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Tag Archive: Africa


President calls Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti ‘critical’

– Lauren McCauley, staff writer

In a deal penned Monday, President Obama cemented the U.S. military’s foothold in the drone war by signing a new long-term lease for Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti. (Photo: U.S. Dept. of Defense/ Creative Commons /Flickr))

The United States has agreed to sign a long-term lease agreement with the government of Djibouti, President Obama announced Monday, cementing the U.S. military’s presence at Camp Lemonnier, home to U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) and key foothold for the killer drone program.

In a statement announcing the agreement with Djibouti President Ismaïl Omar Guelleh, Obama hailed Camp Lemonnier’s “critical role as an operational headquarters for regional security,” emphasizing “the importance the base plays in protecting Americans and Djiboutians alike from violent extremist individuals and organizations.”

The only “official” U.S. base in Africa, Camp Lemonnier is known as the “busiest Predator drone base outside the Afghan war zone,” according to The Washington Post, and is central to drone operations in Somalia and Yemen. The base primarily serves the Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) and currently houses more than 2,000 U.S. personnel.

Human rights groups have accused Djibouti of being a “knowing participant” in the CIA’s rendition program and of housing CIA “black sites,” where prisoners of the U.S. military have been held and tortured.

According to an administration official, the $63 million per year lease permits to U.S. to keep personnel and equipment at the camp for an additional 10 years with options to renew, the Associated Press reports.

According to recent reporting by Nick Turse, investigative journalist with TomDispatch, the U.S. military has been working towards establishing a “permanent footprint” in Djibouti, awarding over $320 million in construction projects in 2013, including a $220 million Special Operations compound at the base.

During the meeting, Guelleh thanked Obama for U.S.’s development assistance to the poverty-stricken nation and said the base agreement would “reinforce our partnership and our relationship.”

Though largely undisclosed, the U.S. military’s presence in Africa extends far beyond the “official” base Lemonnier. As TomDispatch investigations have revealed, U.S. forces “average far more than a mission a day on the continent, conducting operations with almost every African military force, in almost every African country, while building or building up camps, compounds, and ‘contingency security locations.'”

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FILE - A Cheetah cub is examined by veterinary staff during a health check in its enclosure at Chester Zoo in northern England, July 31, 2013.

FILE – A Cheetah cub is examined by veterinary staff during a health check in its enclosure at Chester Zoo in northern England, July 31, 2013.

Lisa Bryant

The two-day old kitten Dr. Jean-Yves Routier is examining has a big bandage wrapped around its middle. It was injured at birth, but it will survive.

The fate is less certain for some of the bigger cats the French veterinarian treats. When he is not at his clinic in the Paris suburb of Noisy le Grand, Routier is in Africa. He uses groundbreaking reproductive techniques to boost the numbers of cheetahs, lions and other game animals – and to diversify their gene pool.

The challenge, Routier said, is how to manage what he calls micro-populations – small populations of wild animals that are threatened, some to the verge of extinction. Zoos use artificial insemination and other techniques to induce pregnancy in captive animals. But that, he says, it does not save threatened species in the wild.

In 2002, Routier founded a nongovernmental organization called CRESAM. That stands for Conservation and Reproduction of Endangered Wild Species. He and his international team of highly specialized vets work with about 20 different species of carnivores in France and overseas. Many are big cats like cheetahs, living in private game parks. CRESAM is one of the rare organizations using artificial reproduction techniques outside of zoos.

A video on CRESAM’s website shows Routier shooting a cheetah with a tranquillizer gun. Once down, the vets take blood samples of the animal. They have to work quickly. Within a few minutes, it will be back on its feet.

Cheetahs once roamed large chunks of Africa and Asia. But their numbers have plummeted from about 100,000 a century ago, to only about 7,000 to 15,000 today. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature lists cheetahs in general as a vulnerable species. Some subspecies are considered critically endangered.  Luke Hunter, president of the global wildcat conservation organization Panthera, said big cats face a basic threat: competing with humans for space.

“The issue becomes the whole suite of threats that humans bring into landscapes in which large cats exist, which includes direct hunting of large cats for their furs or their bones or other things that are considered valuable for certain cultures. [Also] hunting and persecution of cats because they’re considered dangerous, and just wiping out habitats and prey that big cats need,” Hunter stated.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:Symptoms of bubonic plague.svg

Image Source : Wikimedia.Org

Author Mikael Häggström

 

File:Xenopsylla chepsis (oriental rat flea).jpg

 

Male Xenopsylla cheopis (oriental rat flea) engorged with blood. This flea is the primary vector of plague in most large plague epidemics in Asia, Africa, and South America. Both male and female fleas can transmit the infection.

Image Source  :  Wikimedia.Org

Author   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

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Biological Hazard Madagascar Sofia Region, Mandritsara Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in Madagascar on Wednesday, 11 December, 2013 at 04:22 (04:22 AM) UTC.

Description
A deadly outbreak of the bubonic plague is running rampant on the island of Madagascar, medical experts have confirmed. Tests established the disease was responsible for the deaths of at least 20 villagers in the northwestern town of Mandritsara. The island nation last year recorded the world’s highest number of plague-related casualties, with 60 lives claimed by the flea-borne disease. Bubonic plague – also known as the Black Death – wiped out an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages but there have been few instances reported in recent years. Health officials are investigating the cause of the outbreak, thought to have originated in prisons with a prevalence of rats that carry the disease. The Pasteur Institute said towns and cities faced increased risk of infection as ongoing political crises took its toll on living conditions. It is hoped a second round of presidential elections on December 20 will end the political deadlock.
Biohazard name: Plague (bubonic, human)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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The Irish Times

Bubonic plague kills 20 in Madagascar

Confirmation of rodent-born disease follows Red Cross warning that island country is at risk of plague epidemic

Last year about 60 people died of plague in Madagascar, the highest number globally.Last year about 60 people died of plague in Madagascar, the highest number globally.

Thu, Dec 12, 2013, 01:01

Once feared as the Black Death, the rodent-borne disease that wiped out one-third of the world’s population in the Middle Ages, bubonic plague has killed 20 villagers in Madagascar in one of the worst outbreaks globally in recent years, health experts have confirmed.

The confirmation that bubonic plague was responsible for the deaths last week near the northwestern town of Mandritsara follows a warning in October from the International Committee of the Red Cross that the island nation was at risk of a plague epidemic.

The Pasteur Institute of Madagascar revealed on Tuesday that tests taken from bodies in the village last week showed they had died of the bubonic plague. The institute said it was concerned the disease could spread to towns and cities where living standards have declined since a coup in 2009.

The deaths are doubly concerning, because the outbreak occurred both outside the island’s normal plague season, which runs from July to October, and apparently at a far lower elevation than usual – suggesting it might be spreading.

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Bubonic plague killed 20 villagers in Madagascar, health experts confirm

Announcement of one of worst outbreaks in years raises fears that disease could spread to towns and cities
Bubonic plague bacteria

Bacteria that cause bubonic plague. The disease is spread by Xenopsylla cheopis fleas, whose main host is the black rat. Photograph: Rocky Mountain Laboratories/AP

Once feared as the Black Death – the rodent-borne disease that wiped out a third of the world’s population in the Middle Ages – bubonic plague has killed 20 villagers in Madagascar in one of the worst outbreaks globally in recent years, health experts have confirmed.

The confirmation that bubonic plague was responsible for the deaths last week near the north-western town of Mandritsara follows a warning in October from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) that the island nation was at risk of a plague epidemic.

The Pasteur Institute of Madagascar revealed on Tuesday that tests taken from bodies in the village last week showed that they had died of bubonic plague. The institute added it was concerned the disease could spread to towns and cities where living standards have declined since a coup in 2009.

The deaths are doubly concerning because the outbreak occurred both outside the island’s normal plague season, which runs from July to October, and apparently at a far lower elevation than usual – suggesting it might be spreading.

Bubonic plague, which has disappeared from Europe and large parts of the globe, is spread by bites from plague-carrying rat fleas – Xenopsylla cheopis – whose main host is the black rat. In Europe the threat of the Black Death pandemic, which appeared with black rats brought by merchant ships from Asia, eventually died out as black rats were displaced by brown rats and health and hygiene improved.

 

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RT

 

Published on Dec 4, 2013

Amid the power struggle in Libya, tribal groups are largely being left to fend for themselves. Some are being targeted by militias, for allegedly supporting the slain Colonel Gaddafi. Paula Slier reports on the plight of one embattled minority.

RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air

 

 

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AFRICA NEWS

Tanzania halts anti-poaching drive after abuse claims

 

 

 

by Staff Writers
Dar Es Salaam (AFP) Nov 02, 2013


Tanzania has suspended a controversial anti-poaching operation following reports of rampant human rights abuses including the seizure of property, torture and killing of suspects, the speaker of parliament said Saturday.

Police and wildlife officers have cracked down on suspected poachers amid a surge of killings of elephant and rhino in the east African nation, operating under what was reported to be a shoot-to-kill policy and making sweeping arrests.

The campaign, launched two months ago, was dubbed “Operation Tokomeza”, or “Operation Terminate”.

“It is has been necessary for government to suspend the operation indefinitely,” Speaker of Parliament Anne Makinda told AFP Saturday, adding that a probe into the conduct of the campaign would be launched next week.

Natural Resources and Tourism Minister Khamis Kagasheki told parliament Friday the operation would be called off, adding that any member of the security forces found to be involved in acts of torture, theft of property would be punished.

Shortly after the campaign’s launch Kagasheki was widely quoted in Tanzanian media as saying that “rangers are allowed to shoot to kill poachers.”

On Friday, MP John Shibuda said while poachers have badly hit Tanzania’s elephant population, killing the hunters was unacceptable.

“Human life is more valuable than jumbos,” he told parliament.

 

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Execute elephant poachers on the spot, Tanzanian minister urges

Khamis Kagasheki says radical shoot-to-kill policy would curb the slaughter of elephants for illicit ivory trade

Elephant walking in Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Tanzania, with 70,000-80,000 elephants in 2009, is thought to have nearly one-quarter of all African elephants. Photograph: Joe McDonald/Corbis

A government minister in Tanzania has called for a “shoot-to-kill” policy against poachers in a radical measure to curb the mass slaughter of elephants.

Khamis Kagasheki’s proposal for perpetrators of the illicit ivory trade to be executed “on the spot” divided opinion, with some conservationists backing it as a necessary deterrent but others warning that it would lead to an escalation of violence.

There are already signs of an increasing militarisation of Africa’s wildlife parks with more than 1,000 rangers having been killed while protecting animals over the past decade, according to the Thin Green Line Foundation. Tanzania is said to have lost half its elephants in the past three years.

“Poachers must be harshly punished because they are merciless people who wantonly kill our wildlife and sometimes wardens,” said Kagasheki at the end of an International March for Elephants, which took place in 15 countries to raise awareness of the poaching scourge. “The only way to solve this problem is to execute the killers on the spot.”

 

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OZONE NEWS


by Staff Writers
Bindura, Zimbabwe (UPI) Oct 14, 2013

 


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

 

A decades-long warming trend in southern Africa is likely the result of the ozone hole over the Antarctic and its effect on wind circulation, researchers say.

In early summer southern Africa is affected by what is known as the Angola Low, a low-pressure system that pulls in warm air from the lower latitudes, increasing temperatures.

But during the past 20 years, the researchers said, the annual rise in temperatures has been nearly two degrees Fahrenheit hotter than normal.

Desmond Manatsa, a climate scientist at Bindura University of Science in Zimbabwe, working with international colleagues, analyzed climate data from 1979 to 2010, and found as the size of the ozone hole — caused by human use of fluorocarbons — grew, temperatures in southern Africa rose as well.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Hazmat  –  Animal Advocacy – Poaching

elephants watering hole photo

CC BY 2.0 ilovetrees

Tree Hugger.com

HAZMAT Zimbabwe Matabeleland North, [Hwange National Park] Damage level Details

HAZMAT in Zimbabwe on Monday, 23 September, 2013 at 14:24 (02:24 PM) UTC.

Description
Zimbabwe’s government said Monday that a “poaching syndicate” has killed at least 81 elephants, unknown numbers of buffalos and kudus by poisoning in the country’s largest national park. Six suspects were arrested two weeks ago but the scale of the cyanide-poisoning has only gradually unfolded as more elephant carcasses were discovered in the sprawling Hwange National Park. Authorities on Monday warned “huge spiral effects” as primary predators like lions, vultures, and others that feed on the contaminated elephants carcasses would be poisoned as well. Police revealed that the syndicate, led by a South African businessman, mixed up a combination of cyanide, salt and water and poured the cocktail in about 35 salt licks at watering holes known to be frequented by elephants. At other watering holes the poachers would dig holes and place containers containing the deadly mixture into the holes. Zimbabwe’s newly appointed Minister of Environment, Water and Climate Savior Kasukuwere declared a “war” against poaching. “We declare zero tolerance to poaching. We must put a stop to this. We cannot continue with this non-sense,” state media quoted Kasukuwere as saying after he went to inspect the ecological impact of the poisoning — his second trip in a week. Tourism and Hospitality Minister Walter Mzembi, who accompanied Kasukuwere to Hwange, described the poisoning as case as “murder” of Zimbabwe’s our wildlife and pledged to take the fight to those international source markets. Hwange, spanning 14,651 square kilometers, is home to about 50, 000 African elephants. Over the years, elephant population in Africa has been rapidly declining due to rampant poaching. Zimbabwe is among a few countries, mostly in southern Africa, that still have a significant number of elephants. The Zimbabwean government allows ivory trade in the domestic market, but puts strong restrictions on exporting the ivory products. The country’s law provides maximum 11 years in prison for people convicted of poaching.

The Zimbabwean News

Zim elephant death tolls climbs to 81 after cyanide poisoning

More than 80 elephants have died as a result of cyanide poisoning at the Hwange National Park, in what is being described as serious crisis for the park.

Nine suspected members of a poaching syndicate have been arrested since the first of the elephant carcasses were discovered late last month. The carcasses were discovered after national parks authorities teamed up with police to track suspected poachers, after hearing gunfire in the park.

Investigations by the police resulted in the grisly discovery of the elephants, with their tusks removed. Further investigations led the police to nearby Mafu homestead, where six suspected members of the poaching gang were arrested and 17 elephant tusks were recovered.

According to authorities, the poaching syndicate laced salt licks with cyanide and placed the salt at main water sources where the Hwange elephants drink.

Since then, a large scale operation has been launched resulting in three more arrests and the discovery of even more elephants remains.

Johnny Rodrigues, the chairman of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force (ZCTF) said the situation is “very serious.” He told SW Radio Africa that greed and corruption was to blame for allowing poaching to reach such serious levels.

“The repercussions are just so big. All the carnivores in the park like your lions, your leopards, the birds, they will all have perished too from eating the elephant meat,” Rodrigues said.

He added: “The situation is just going to get worse and something needs to be done to stop the carnage.”

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Business Insider

REPORT: Embassy Scare Came From A ‘Legion Of Doom’ Conference Call Of Al Qaeda Affiliates

The U.S. government announced a terror alert and closed embassies in 22 countries last week after intercepting a conference call between al Qaeda senior leadership in Pakistan and representatives more than 20 al Qaeda operatives throughout the region, three U.S. officials familiar with the intelligence told Eli Lake and Josh Rogin of The Daily Beast.

“This was like a meeting of the Legion of Doom,” one U.S. intelligence officer told the Beast, in reference referring to the coalition of villains featured in the cartoon Super Friends. “All you need to do is look at that list of places we shut down to get a sense of who was on the phone call.”

Officials said that al Qaeda’s leader Ayman al-Zawahiri and various al Qaeda leaders — including representatives from al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), Nigeria’s Boko Haram, the Pakistani Taliban, al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), AQ in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, and AQ in Uzbekistan — vaguely discussed plans for a pending attack and “mentioned that a team or teams were already in place for such an attack,” according to the Beast.

On Tuesday Richard Engel of NBC News, citing sources, reported that the plot could have been in the “aspirational stages.”

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18 of 19 closed U.S. embassies, consulates to reopen

Updated 10:04 PM ET

WASHINGTON The State Department says that 18 of the 19 U.S. embassies and consulates in the Middle East and Africa that have been closed due to a terrorist threat will reopen on Sunday.

Officials say the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, will remain closed.

Pakistani security personnel are pictured outside the US consulate in Lahore on August 5, 2013. The United States said that 19 of its embassies and consulates in the Mideast and Africa would be closed through August 10 over terror fears.

Pakistani security personnel are pictured outside the US consulate in Lahore on August 5, 2013. The United States said that 19 of its embassies and consulates in the Mideast and Africa would be closed through August 10 over terror fears.

/ Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

A statement issued Friday didn’t cite a reason for resuming regular business operations at the 18 diplomatic missions.

Play Video

U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan evacuated due to terror threat

Nineteen outposts had been closed to the public since last Sunday. Most American employees at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen were ordered to leave the country on Tuesday because of threat information.

An intercepted message between al Qaeda officials about plans for a major terror attack triggered the closures.

A separate threat led to the closure Thursday of the U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan. It remains closed.

Play Video

Terror alert shows evolution of al Qaeda

Late Friday, the State Dept. issued this statement:

“On Sunday, August 11, the Department of State will re-open 18 of the 19 embassies and consulates that were closed recently. Our embassy in Sanaa, Yemen will remain closed because of ongoing concerns about a threat stream indicating the potential for terrorist attacks emanating from Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Our consulate in Lahore, Pakistan, which closed yesterday due to a separate credible threat to that facility, will also remain closed.”

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

Image Source

25.07.2013 Biological Hazard Namibia Caprivi Region, [Masikili-Nakabolelelwa area] Damage level Details

Biological Hazard in Namibia on Thursday, 25 July, 2013 at 18:24 (06:24 PM) UTC.

Description
The Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry has issued an anthrax alert to members of the public and farming communities in the Caprivi Region. This comes after tests confirmed that an elephant died from the the viral disease in the Masikili-Nakabolelelwa area recently. In a press statement, the ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Joseph Iita warned members of the public at large not to touch, open or eat meat from any animal carcass that dies on its own or of unknown causes. According to the statement, by the time veterinary officials arrived at the scene of the dead elephant, the local villagers in the area had already opened the carcass and helped themselves to the meat. Urging people in the vicinity of Masikili and Nakabolelelwa who had contact with the elephant in question to visit the nearest clinic for appropriate advice, Iita warned: “Handling such meat or eating meat from such animals puts the people at serious risks of contracting anthrax”. Iita said anthrax is a vaccine-preventable disease in livestock, and urged livestock owners to vaccinate their animals against the disease once a year.
Biohazard name: Anthrax (elephant)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

The Namibian (Windhoek)

Namibia: Anthrax Alert in Caprivi

THE Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry has issued an anthrax alert to members of the public and farming communities in the Caprivi Region.

This comes after tests confirmed that an elephant died from the the viral disease in the Masikili-Nakabolelelwa area recently.

In a press statement, the ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Joseph Iita warned members of the public at large not to touch, open or eat meat from any animal carcass that dies on its own or of unknown causes.

According to the statement, by the time veterinary officials arrived at the scene of the dead elephant, the local villagers in the area had already opened the carcass and helped themselves to the meat.

Urging people in the vicinity of Masikili and Nakabolelelwa who had contact with the elephant in question to visit the nearest clinic for appropriate advice, Iita warned: “Handling such meat or eating meat from such animals puts the people at serious risks of contracting anthrax”.

Iita said anthrax is a vaccine-preventable disease in livestock, and urged livestock owners to vaccinate their animals against the disease once a year.

“Anthrax carcasses should be disposed of by deep burial or burning without opening them. This limits contamination of the environment by the causal bacteria,” Iita added.

Anthrax is a serious illness caused by a spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus anthracis. Although anthrax affects mainly livestock and wild game, humans can become infected through direct or indirect contact with sick animals. Normally, anthrax isn’t transmitted from person to person, but in rare cases, anthrax skin lesions may be contagious.

Most often, anthrax bacteria enter the human body through a wound in the skin. People can also become infected by eating contaminated meat or inhaling the spores.

The signs and symptoms, which depend on the infection, can range from skin sores to nausea and vomiting or shock.

Iita said prompt treatment with antibiotics can cure most anthrax infections contracted through the skin or contaminated meat. He said inhaled anthrax is more difficult to treat and can be fatal.

luqman@namibian.com.na

luqman@namibian.com.na
Anthrax alert in Caprivi
Luqman Cloete

THE Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry has issued an anthrax alert to members of the public and farming communities in the Caprivi Region.

This comes after tests confirmed that an elephant died from the the viral disease in the Masikili-Nakabolelelwa area recently.

In a press statement, the ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Joseph Iita warned members of the public at large not to touch, open or eat meat from any animal carcass that dies on its own or of unknown causes.

According to the statement, by the time veterinary officials arrived at the scene of the dead elephant, the local villagers in the area had already opened the carcass and helped themselves to the meat.

Urging people in the vicinity of Masikili and Nakabolelelwa who had contact with the elephant in question to visit the nearest clinic for appropriate advice, Iita warned: “Handling such meat or eating meat from such animals puts the people at serious risks of contracting anthrax”.

Iita said anthrax is a vaccine-preventable disease in livestock, and urged livestock owners to vaccinate their animals against the disease once a year.

“Anthrax carcasses should be disposed of by deep burial or burning without opening them. This limits contamination of the environment by the causal bacteria,” Iita added.

Anthrax is a serious illness caused by a spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus anthracis. Although anthrax affects mainly livestock and wild game, humans can become infected through direct or indirect contact with sick animals. Normally, anthrax isn’t transmitted from person to person, but in rare cases, anthrax skin lesions may be contagious.

Most often, anthrax bacteria enter the human body through a wound in the skin. People can also become infected by eating contaminated meat or inhaling the spores.

The signs and symptoms, which depend on the infection, can range from skin sores to nausea and vomiting or shock.

Iita said prompt treatment with antibiotics can cure most anthrax infections contracted through the skin or contaminated meat. He said inhaled anthrax is more difficult to treat and can be fatal.

– See more at: http://www.namibian.com.na/indexx.php?id=1758&page_type=story_detail&category_id=1#sthash.Y2uy6ITp.dpuf

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NBCNEWS.com

Sunday Aghaeze / AP

President of Nigeria Goodluck Jonathan, left, and Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir right, shake hands before an African Union summit on health focusing on HIV and AIDS.

The president of Sudan has been allowed to leave a conference in Nigeria, despite the International Criminal Court calling for his “immediate arrest” on charges of genocide and war crimes, officials said Tuesday.

Omar al-Bashir is accused of five counts of crimes against humanity, two counts of war crimes and three counts of genocide against the Fur, Masalit and Zagawa tribes in Darfur, where the U.N. estimates 200,000 people have been killed.

Two arrest warrants have been issued for the former army brigadier, who came to power in 1989 after leading a bloodless military coup.

But while many African countries – including South Africa, Kenya and Malawi – have threatened to act on the warrant, Nigeria allowed him to attend Monday’s one-day African Union HIV/Aids summit.

 

This was in keeping with 2009 vote by African Union states not to cooperate with ICC indictments, a Nigerian official told Reuters.

African enthusiasm for the court has waned over the years, partly owing to a perception that prosecutors disproportionately target African leaders – an accusation the ICC denies.

 

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