Tag Archive: Wyoming


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The gigantic ‘crack in the earth’ in Wyoming: Landslide in the Big Horn Mountains causes canyon-like gash  – and it could get even bigger

  • The opening is thought to be 750 yards long and about 50 yards wide
  • Experts believe it is a slow-moving landslide
  • Believed it could be caused by a spring underneath the area
  • Crack may get larger ‘as long as there’s room for it to move’

A gigantic ‘crack in the earth’ has opened over Wyoming.

The gigantic opening was spotted in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming this month.

Now, a geologist has suggested it is in fact a ‘slow-moving landslide’ – and warned it could get even bigger.

 

Gaping: A gigantic opening was spotted in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming this month. SNS Outfitter & Guides said 'Everyone here is calling it "the gash". It's a really incredible sight'

Gaping: A gigantic opening was spotted in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming this month. SNS Outfitter & Guides said ‘Everyone here is calling it ‘the gash’. It’s a really incredible sight’

The Wyoming Geological Survey’s Seth Wittke told GrindTV: ‘Without getting out there and looking at it, I can’t be positive, but from what I’ve seen on the Internet it looks like a slow-moving landslide.’

Growing pains? Wittke has said the crack may get larger 'as long as there's room for it to move it could keep moving'

Growing pains? Wittke has said the crack may get larger ‘as long as there’s room for it to move it could keep moving’

He told the website: ‘A lot of landslides are caused by subsurface lubrication by ground moisture or water and things like that, or in this case, a spring.’

Wittke told GrindTV the crack may get larger ‘as long as there’s room for it to move it could keep moving.’

He explained to The Powell Tribune that ‘A number of things trigger them, moisture in the subsurface which causes weakness in soil or geology, and any process that would weaken the bedrock or unstabilize it somehow.’

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Biological Hazard USA State of Wyoming, [Laramie County] Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in USA on Thursday, 29 October, 2015 at 04:14 (04:14 AM) UTC.

Description
A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic plague in rural western Laramie County. Over a dozen individuals who came into contact with the cat are currently being assessed by the Wyoming Department of Health to determine if they need to receive antibiotics. Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly if not treated promptly with antibiotics. The pneumonic form of plague can be easily transmitted from a coughing cat or other animal to a human. Humans can then breathe in the bacteria and develop pneumonic plague as well. Although health officials believe this is thought to be an isolated case, plague has been present in the area before with animal cases in 2005 and 2008 and is believed to be endemic in Wyoming wildlife.
Biohazard name: Plague (pneumonic, cat )
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Local News 8

Pneumonic plague found in Laramie County cat

POSTED: 10:24 AM MDT Oct 29, 2015 
cat logo

GNU image/MGN Online

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) – A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic plague in rural western Laramie County.

Over a dozen individuals who came into contact with the cat are currently being assessed by the Wyoming Department of Health to determine if they need to receive antibiotics.

 

Read More Here

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 Cheyenne, Wyoming | News, Weather, Sports | CBS5 NewsChannel

Animal plague found in Laramie County

LARAMIE COUNTY – A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic (the lung form) of plague in rural western Laramie County.

Plague, known as the Black Death during medieval times, is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly if not treated promptly with antibiotics. The pneumonic form of plague can be easily transmitted from a coughing cat or other animal to a human. Humans can then breathe in the bacteria and develop pneumonic plague as well.

On October 26, the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) notified Cheyenne-Laramie County Health Department (CLCHD) of a plague positive housecat submitted to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab on October 21.

 

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Extreme Weather –  Snow Storm

 

Spring and winter collide as a heavy wet snowstorm hit Colorado on Mother’s Day, covering blooms and blossoms and prompting birds to look for cover.

Spring and winter collide as a heavy wet snowstorm hit Colorado on Mother’s Day, covering blooms and blossoms and prompting birds to look for cover. (Steve Nehf, The Denver Post)

 

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Snow Storm USA State of Colorado, Denver Damage level Details

 

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RSOE EDIS

Snow Storm in USA on Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 03:31 (03:31 AM) UTC.

Description
Denver received five inches of snow, which mostly stuck on grass and trees instead of roadways. It continued to snow into Monday morning, which slowed down the morning commute in the metro area. Driving conditions were the worst in the mountains, with certain areas receiving over a foot of snow.

 

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Winter storm pounding Colorado mountains; 10 inches possible in Denver

By Joey Bunch and Tom McGhee
The Denver Post

Posted:   05/11/2014 09:47:13 AM MDT

While Denver dealt with slushy streets and snow on tender buds, the Colorado high country and foothills fought a winterlike battle with road closures, fender benders and heavy tree damage Sunday.Two law enforcement officers were injured in separate accidents as they helped motorists Sunday night, according to the State Patrol.

A Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy was injured along with three others when an SUV struck his cruiser that was parked on the side of U.S. 285 near the community of Doubleheader just after 7 p.m. None of the injuries were thought to be life-threatening, according to the sheriff’s department.

The cause of the crash was under investigation, but weather is likely a factor, said sheriff’s spokeswoman Jacki Kelley.
Four people, including a Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy, were injured when seven cars slid into one another on U.S. 285 near the community of
Four people, including a Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy, were injured when seven cars slid into one another on U.S. 285 near the community of Doubleheader on Sunday. (Courtesy Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District)

At 7:38 p.m. a state trooper was injured when his vehicle was hit as he was parked along U.S. 285 near Fairplay. A car slid across the road and hit the trooper’s vehicle head-on.

The trooper sustained minor injuries, but no one else was hurt, according to the State Patrol.

 

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Yellowstone: M 4.7 Earthquake , 37km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana – 13 EQ ranging in Magnitude from 2.5 to 4.7 in the last 5 days 3/31/2014

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13 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 3.1 – 35km NNE of Old Faithful Geyser, Wyoming

     2014-03-31 23:32:45 UTC-05:00 3.6 km

  2. M 2.7 – 33km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 12:37:31 UTC-05:00 5.1 km

  3. M 3.3 – 32km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 10:12:24 UTC-05:00 6.0 km

  4. M 3.1 – 32km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 10:07:49 UTC-05:00 6.6 km

  5. M 2.9 – 33km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 08:56:41 UTC-05:00 3.9 km

  6. M 3.6 – 34km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 08:30:52 UTC-05:00 4.4 km

  7. M 4.7 – 37km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 07:34:39 UTC-05:00 5.6 km

  8. M 2.5 – 35km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 07:18:58 UTC-05:00 3.6 km

  9. M 3.4 – 35km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 05:36:25 UTC-05:00 3.9 km

  10. M 2.8 – 36km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-30 01:23:48 UTC-05:00 1.5 km

  11. M 2.5 – 30km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-26 20:24:06 UTC-05:00 6.2 km

  12. M 3.5 – 30km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-26 18:59:00 UTC-05:00 4.5 km

  13. M 3.0 – 30km ENE of West Yellowstone, Montana

     2014-03-26 14:14:36 UTC-05:00 6.4 km

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 Huffington Post Green

Yellowstone National Park Hit By Magnitude 4.8 Earthquake

Posted: 03/31/2014 8:51 am EDT Updated: 03/31/2014 8:59 am EDT
YELLOWSTONE


By Laura Zuckerman

March 30 (Reuters) – Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world’s largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported.

The tremor, a relatively light event by seismic standards, struck the northwest corner of the park and capped a flurry of smaller quakes at Yellowstone since Thursday, geologists at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations said in a statement.

The latest earthquake struck at 6:34 a.m. near the Norris Geyser Basin and was felt about 23 miles (37 km) away in two small Montana towns adjacent to year-around entrances to the park – Gardiner and West Yellowstone.

The national park spans 3,472 square miles (8,992 square km) of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, and draws about 3 million visitors each year to its iconic geysers and wildlife attractions, including bison.

A U.S. Geological Survey team planned to tour the Norris Geyser Basin on Sunday to determine if the quake altered any of Yellowstone’s geothermal features, such as geysers, mud pots and hot springs.

 

Read More Here

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

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Recent Earthquakes in the Intermountain West

Yellowstone National Park Special Map

Special Map

get updated list here

 

Update time = Sun Mar 30 18:00:04 MDT 2014
Here are the earthquakes appearing on this map, most recent at top …

 MAG    DATE    LOCAL-TIME  LAT     LON    DEPTH    LOCATION
        y/m/d     h:m:s     deg     deg     km
 3.3  2014/03/30 09:12:24 44.777N 110.723W  6.0   29 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 3.1  2014/03/30 09:07:49 44.770N 110.720W  6.6   30 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 2.5  2014/03/30 07:56:40 44.770N 110.714W  7.7   30 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 3.1  2014/03/30 07:30:52 44.772N 110.698W  4.5   29 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 4.8  2014/03/30 06:34:39 44.778N 110.683W  6.8   29 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 3.0  2014/03/30 04:36:25 44.786N 110.690W  1.6   28 km (17 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 2.8  2014/03/30 00:23:48 44.785N 110.681W  1.5   28 km (17 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 0.5  2014/03/28 09:41:43 44.825N 110.781W  3.1   24 km (15 mi) SSW of  Gardiner, MT
 2.0  2014/03/28 05:37:16 44.839N 110.513W  7.1   27 km (17 mi) SE  of  Gardiner, MT
 1.9  2014/03/26 18:58:40 44.808N 110.773W  4.3   26 km (16 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 2.2  2014/03/26 18:20:59 44.800N 110.772W  4.1   27 km (17 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 1.5  2014/03/26 18:11:57 44.821N 110.774W  2.0   24 km (15 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 2.0  2014/03/26 18:00:10 44.799N 110.774W  3.9   27 km (17 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 3.5  2014/03/26 17:59:00 44.801N 110.778W  4.5   27 km (17 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 3.0  2014/03/26 13:14:36 44.804N 110.772W  6.4   26 km (16 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 1.4  2014/03/24 12:06:51 44.246N 110.444W  3.6   70 km (43 mi) SE  of  West Yellowstone, MT
 1.7  2014/03/24 05:21:37 44.778N 110.774W  7.5   29 km (18 mi) S   of  Gardiner, MT
 1.1  2014/03/23 22:55:22 44.574N 110.410W  2.7   56 km (35 mi) E   of  West Yellowstone, MT

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UPI

Ancient helium rising to the surface in Yellowstone National Park

Feb. 20, 2014 at 4:46 PM

Steam plumes rise above thermal features at Yellowstone National Park. The U.S. Geological Survey determined the famed national park was releasing hundreds — if not thousands — of times more helium than anticipated. Credit: Ken McGee/U.S. Geological Survey

MENLO PARK, Calif., Feb. 20 (UPI) — Helium, trapped underground for 2 billion years, is bubbling to the surface from steam vents and hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, U.S. researchers say.Researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey say the park, located mostly in Wyoming, was releasing hundreds, even possible thousands, of times more of the ancient helium than previously thought, the Los Angeles Times reported Thursday.

About 60 tons are being release each year, enough helium to fill one Goodyear blimp every week, researchers said in a report published in the journal Nature.

Volcanic activity beginning about 2 million years ago initiated the release, they said.

That counts as a “sudden” release compared with how long the helium has been trapped within the Earth’s surface, study coauthor Bill Evans, a research chemist at the USGS office in Menlo Park, Calif., said.

 

 

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Mankind  in their journey to  control and  develop as far as  the eye can see have played a  significant  role  in the changes  that  have  taken place in our  environment.  The construction and restructuring  of  forests  and  natural habitats.  The  eradication  of  native wildlife species  in the never  ending  expansion of  commercial food  production and land development.

  These  pursuits have endangered  many  species having been labeled  as  pests in their  eyes.  Some  have  been  eradicated  to the  brink of  extinction.  Others  have  required protection as  endangered.   Others still have had t heir  populations  explode for lack of  natural  predators.  Forcing culls  to  be organized to  keep  their  numbers in  check.

Mankind knew  what they  wanted  to  achieve  However, they  had  no understanding  of  what changes  and  perils  they were manifesting  on the natural balance  of  our world.  One  such  member  of  the  animal  kingdom are  wolves.  Hunted  and  repudiated  as  a dangerous  nuisance.  They  have helped  mankind understand  that they are so much  more  than  that.

                           Joel Sartore/National Geographic     A portrait of the Yellowstone gray wolf.

After  70 years  these  beautiful creatures  were re-introduced  to the  Yellowstone National Park area and the  changes  that  have  taken  place since   then  have been  amazing.  The  wolves have shown their  true  worth as  well as  the  complicated web  of  life  that we  had  not been able to  see in  our  quest to  tame a natural habitat .  They  have  taught  us  that the intricacies of the  natural web of  life  requires a  balance  that  man  should not  tamper with.  We as  human  beings consider  ourselves  superior to the  other  members  of  the  animal  kingdom.  However, we  must  understand  that  we  are  simply a  link in the  chain  of  the  intricate  web  of  life that exists on our  planet.

Providing  balance  where  none  had  been.  Creating  diversity to provide  a balanced habitat  for all  wildlife.  The  wolves  have  proven themselves  to  be the  “Ultimate Eco-Engineers”.

(C)   ~Desert Rose~

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World News How wolves can alter the course of rivers

worldnews422 worldnews422

Published on Feb 20, 2014

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers. How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers
When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers. How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers
When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers. How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of rivers How wolves can alter the course of riversWhen wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix titled, How Wolves Change Rivers.When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable trophic cascade occurred

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The New York Times

Hunting Habits of Wolves Change Ecological Balance in Yellowstone

Anne Sherwood for The New York Times

CHANGES IN THE WILD Douglas W. Smith using radio tracking equipment, above, to try to find the Leopold Wolf Pack along Blacktail Deer Creek in Yellowstone in September.

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. – Hiking along the small, purling Blacktail Deer Creek, Douglas W. Smith, a wolf biologist, makes his way through a lush curtain of willows.

Forum: Wildlife

Joel Sartore/National Geographic

A portrait of the Yellowstone gray wolf.

Nearly absent for decades, willows have roared back to life in Yellowstone, and the reason, Mr. Smith believes, is that 10 years after wolves were introduced to Yellowstone, the park is full of them, dispersed across 13 packs.

He says the wolves have changed the park’s ecology in many ways; for one, they have scared the elk to high ground and away from browsing on every willow shoot by rivers and streams.

“Wolves have caused a trophic cascade,” he said.

“Wolves are at the top of it all here. They change the conditions for everyone else, including willows.”

The last 10 years in Yellowstone have re-written the book on wolf biology. Wildlife biologists and ecologists are stunned by the changes they have seen.

It is a rare chance to understand in detail how the effects of an “apex predator” ripple through an ecosystem. Much of what has taken place is recounted in the recently released book “Decade of the Wolf: Returning the Wild to Yellowstone,” by Mr. Smith and Gary Ferguson. (Mr. Smith will discuss the effects at 7 tonight in the Linder Theater at the American Museum of Natural History. Admission is $15.)

In 1995, 14 wolves from Canada were brought into the park by truck and sleigh in the dead of winter, held in a cage for 10 weeks and released. Seventeen were added in 1996. Now, about 130 wolves in 13 packs roam the park.

Yellowstone, says Mr. Smith, is full.

Over the next 10 years, elk numbers dropped considerably. One of the world’s largest elk herds, which feeds on rich grasses on the northern range of the park, dropped from 19,000 in 1994 to about 11,000. Wolf reintroduction has been cited as the culprit by hunters, but Mr. Smith says the cause is more complex.

Data recently released after three years of study by the Park Service, the United States Geological Survey and the University of Minnesota found that 53 percent of elk deaths were caused by grizzly bears that eat calves. Just 13 percent were linked to wolves and 11 percent to coyotes. Drought also playing a role. The study is continuing.

Scientists do say that wolf predation has been significant enough to redistribute the elk. That has in turn affected vegetation and a variety of wildlife.

The elk had not seen wolves since the 1920’s when they disappeared from the park. Over the last 10 years, as they have been hunted by wolf packs, they have grown more vigilant.

They move more than they used to, and spend most of their time in places that afford a 360-degree view, said Mr. Smith. They do not spend time in places where they do not feel secure – near a rise or a bluff, places that could conceal wolves.

In those places willow thickets, and cottonwoods have bounced back. Aspen stands are also being rejuvenated. Until recently the only cottonwood trees in the park were 70 to 100 years old. Now large numbers of saplings are sprouting.

William Ripple, a professor of botany at Oregon State University, calls the process the “ecology of fear,” which has allowed the vegetation to thrive as a result of behavioral changes in the newly skittish and peripatetic elk.

Though the changes now are on a fairly small scale, the effects of the wolves will spread, and in 30 years, according to Mr. Smith, Yellowstone will look very different.

Not everyone is convinced. “Wolves have a role to play,” said Robert Crabtree, a canid biologist who has researched wolves and coyotes in the park since the late 1980’s. “But the research has ignored climate change and flooding, which have also had an effect on vegetation. Their work isn’t wrong, but it’s incomplete.”

Read More Here

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Minnesota’s wolves needed for ecological balance

  • Article by: MAUREEN HACKETT
  • Updated: September 8, 2013 – 9:27 PM

A recreational hunt doesn’t follow the DNR’s stated management plans.

The recent article, “Despite wins, Minnesota’s endangered species list up by 180” (Aug. 20, 2013) quotes the Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR) endangered species coordinator as stating, “We’ve got to learn how to manage species on a larger scale.”

The state’s list of species that have gone extinct and of those that are endangered and threatening to go extinct has grown tremendously.

One of the first steps in the large-scale management referred to by the DNR is to keep in place the vital assets already provided by nature. This is particularly relevant to the Minnesota wolf population.

A Romanian proverb says, “Where wolves roam, forests grow.” Having wolves on our landscapes and ecologically active is vital to maintaining the natural balance for all wildlife.

There is ample science and thinking that supports this management strategy, and innovative new ways to reduce wolf conflicts with livestock, including nonlethal methods (only 2 percent of the Minnesota farms in wolf country have experienced wolf problems with livestock).

As far back as the 1920s and ’30s, University of Wisconsin scientist, ecologist, forester and environmentalist Aldo Leopold established visionary wildlife management theories that rightfully viewed wildlife issues within the greater ecological system of nature.

In 1949, he proposed that a natural predator such as the wolf has a major residual impact on plants; river and stream bank erosion; fish and fowl; water quality; and on other animals. In other words, the wolf is a keystone species.

Leopold’s trophic cascade concept articulated emphatically that killing a predator wolf carries serious implications for the rest of the ecosystem. Later, that concept was endorsed by former Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt.

The natural benefits of wolves to our complex landscapes is still not fully understood. What is known is that:

• The presence of wolves helps plants and tree growth by affecting the browsing behavior of deer, especially along stream and river banks.

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Bloomberg

Murder of Yellowstone Wolves Threatens Area Renaissance

Photographer: Marc Cooke/Wolves of the Rockies via Bloomberg

Two wolves passing through Lamar Valley at Yellowstone National Park. According to Marc Cooke, president of Wolves in… Read More

By Mike Di Paola Sep 2, 2013 11:01 PM CT

The air in Yellowstone National Park is chilly at the crack of dawn, even in August. If you want to see a wolf, you get up early and shiver.

“It’s more difficult right now to spot a wolf,” says Marc Cooke, president of Wolves of the Rockies. He means both the time of year — wolves are less active in summer — and the recent decline in wolf numbers, which he attributes to “the devastating impact from the needless trapping and hunting season.”

At last count there were 95 wolves in the park, traveling in 11 packs. A few years ago there were almost twice as many. Part of the decline is due to the natural ebb and flow of ecological systems, but hunters can legally shoot wolves when they stray outside the park into Wyoming, Montana or Idaho, even if they’re wearing radio collars.

Just last week, a collar-wearing female wolf that had killed a chicken was shot by a resident of Jardine, Montana.

As tenuous as the population is, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to delist the species, which is currently designated as “endangered” or “threatened” in most of the lower 48 states. The wolf would still be protected in Yellowstone, but would be at the mercy of bloodthirsty types just outside the park when the hunting season opens in September.

After a couple days, I finally catch the briefest glimpse of a pair of black wolves, loping over a rise and out of sight in the park’s stunning Lamar Valley. Though I’m looking through a spotting scope and the wolves are more than a mile off, the scene takes my breath away.

Wolf Renaissance

As an apex predator, wolves are essential to an ecosystem’s health. Soon after reintroduction to Yellowstone in 1995, wolves helped cull the overpopulated elk herds. This led to a rejuvenation of verdant ground cover that the elk had been mowing down, which in turn attracted animals that rely on low foliage for cover and food.

Yellowstone wolves are undoubtedly responsible for a renaissance of songbird and beaver populations and a lot more.

“You could argue that they’ve affected everything through the system,” says wolf biologist Doug Smith, Yellowstone’s longtime wolf project leader. “Wolves have been good for fish, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates.”

Wolves are even good for another top predator, the grizzly bear, which feeds on berries that bounced back with the reappearance of wolves.

“We’ve got the most predators, or carnivores, in Yellowstone in the park’s entire history,” says Smith. “Arguably, Yellowstone is as pristine as it’s been in its entire history.”

Read More Here

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NPR

Wolves At The Door

Can two top predators coexist in the American West?

This is a story about wolves and people

This is a story about wolves and people

It’s a story about what we have in common — we’re social, adaptable and fiercely territorial. It’s also a story about whether we can get along.

It's also a story about whether we can get along

People have been fascinated with wolves for millennia. They show up in our folklore and in our fairy tales. Today, in much of the American West, gray wolves also show up in our politics. I know this because I grew up in Montana, where wolves can be as important and divisive a topic as gun control or health care.

A few decades ago, wolves had been hunted, trapped and poisoned — down to a population of about 50 in the contiguous United States. Then, in the mid-1990s, the federal government decided to bring them back, introducing 66 Canadian gray wolves into Idaho and Yellowstone National Park. They became “the environmental movement poster animal,” says Doug Smith, head of the Yellowstone Wolf Project, a group that monitors and studies wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

File:Yellowstone Nationalpark3.jpg

Image Source  :  Wikimedia . Org

Yellowstone National park

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:Yellowstone_Nationalpark.jpg by Huebi

Earthquake USA State of Wyoming, [Yellowstone National Park, near the Old Faithful geyser] Damage level Details

Earthquake in USA on Monday, 16 September, 2013 at 18:13 (06:13 PM) UTC.

Description
A small earthquake struck in Yellowstone National Park near the Old Faithful geyser on Sunday, but even the seismic shaking could not stop the trusty waterspout. The U.S. Geological Survey said that a 3.6 magnitude earthquake struck at Yellowstone, centered close to six miles away from the geyser Old Faithful. The quake was part of a series of more than 100 tremors in the park since last Tuesday. While Sunday’s was the strongest, a number of other earthquakes have been felt by Yellowstone visitors. “A total of 130 earthquakes of magnitude 0.6 to 3.6 have occurred in these three areas, however, most have occurred near the Lower Geyser Basin,” park officials noted. “Notably, much of the seismicity in Yellowstone occurs as swarms. The University of Utah Seismograph Stations continues to monitor Yellowstone earthquakes and will provide additional information if the earthquake swarm activity increases.” The park has been in the news a bit this summer. In June a norovirus outbreak infected at least 100 visitors, leading to allegations that visitors were not being properly warned of the outbreak. “Hundreds of signs in Yellowstone warn motorists to not harm wild animals, but not a single sign warning human beings of a huge outbreak of the norovirus is present,” park visitor Louis Greenwald told The Inquisitr. The Yellowstone earthquake did not seem too much an inconvenience to the park’s visitors. A live video feed the National Park Service has set up to show Old Faithful showed several hundred of onlookers watching it erupt later in the day.

Earthquake in USA on Monday, 16 September, 2013 at 18:13 (06:13 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Monday, 23 September, 2013 at 03:34 UTC
Description
It was recently reported that a very rare triple swarm of earthquakes rocked Yellowstone National Park. In fact, Bob Smith, a geophysics professor out of the University of Utah, says he has never seen even two swarms occur together before in all the 53 years that he has been monitoring seismic activity. Now, he he’s seen three. An earthquake swarm, seismologists say, is an event where a sequence of earthquakes occurs in a limited geographic area over a short period of time. Speaking about the event, Smith called it “remarkable,” asking, “How does one swarm relate to another? Can one swarm trigger another and vice versa?” No answers are available to Smith’s questions, however, because simultaneous swarms haven’t been detected before. Smith says he believes that at least two of the swarms are probably related to each other though. The three swarms hit in the following areas: Lewis Lake, the Lower Geyser Basin and the northwest part of Norris Geyser Basin.Earlier this month, on September 15, the largest earthquake to rock Yellowstone in over a year occurred about six miles north of the Old Faithful Geyser. Its magnitude was about 3.6 at its epicenter. It takes a magnitude of about 3.0 for people to feel it, a Yellowstone representative named Al Nash told the Jackson Hole News and Guide. The recent swarms of earthquakes began on September 10 and finished up on September 16. The University of Utah put out a statement saying that altogether 130 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 3.6 occurred in the area, with most of them being located in the Lower Geyser Basin. But, including many smaller events which were not detected, there were many more quakes than this. The recent swarms produced four earthquakes which, although they were not large, were significant enough in size to be felt. The first, which had a magnitude of 3.5, happened on September 13, about 17 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, Montana. The next two tremblors to be felt occurred early on the morning of September 15 with magnitudes of 3.2 and 3.4 respectively. These two occurred in rapid succession, with one being detected at 5:10 AM and the other at 5:11 AM. The quakes happened about 15 miles southeast of West Yellowstone. The largest earthquake recording during the swarm, a 3.6, was measured nearby about 4 1/2 hours later.According to Nash, a strong enough earthquake, like the 7.3-7.5 quake that shook the Hebgen Lake area in 1959, has the potential to change the activity of the geysers in the area. And, in fact the 1959 quake did. It caused nearly 300 features to erupt, included 160 where there were no previous records of geysers. None of the current earthquakes were powerful enough to create these types of changes, however. Smith says he believes that the current swarms of earthquakes may, in fact, be related to the 1959 earthquake. “We think that much of the seismicity is still aftershocks from that event in 1959. It can go on for hundreds of years.” Usually only about half a dozen earthquakes occur each year in Yellowstone, Smith noted, so it is quite unusual for this level of swarm activity to rock the park.

The Billings Gazette

Swarm of earthquakes shake Yellowstone

September 22, 2013 9:22 am  • 

JACKSON, Wyo. — Until recently, Bob Smith had never witnessed two simultaneous earthquake swarms in his 53 years of monitoring seismic activity in and around the Yellowstone Caldera.

Now, Smith, a University of Utah geophysics professor, has seen three swarms at once.

“It’s very remarkable,” Smith said. “How does one swarm relate to another? Can one swarm trigger another and vice versa?”

Because concurrent swarms have never been detected in the past, the answers aren’t in yet, Smith said. The geophysicist said he “wouldn’t doubt” if at least two of the events were related.

Temblors from the three quake swarms mostly hit in three areas: Lewis Lake, the Lower Geyser Basin and the northwest part of Norris Geyser Basin.

The largest earthquake shook the ground near Old Faithful Geyser on Sept. 15.

The epicenter of the magnitude 3.6 quake, the largest in Yellowstone in about a year, was just 6 miles to the north of Old Faithful.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Extreme Weather

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062313d

It’s that time of the year again, where a hot desert meets the Summer.  Temperatures in the 100s across Phoenix will turn to 115+, with 120+ along the Colorado River Valley as a ridge of high pressure builds in the area.

This ridge will be very large, bringing temperatures 15-20 degrees higher than normal for Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, New Mexico, and Utah.  Other areas like Montana, and Wyoming may also be in the outer fridges of the heatwave ridge.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological  Hazards

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24.06.2013 Biological Hazard USA State of Wyoming, [Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park] Damage level Details

Biological Hazard in USA on Friday, 21 June, 2013 at 02:57 (02:57 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Monday, 24 June, 2013 at 05:29 UTC
Description
An outbreak of the potent norovirus – one that causes violent stomach flu symptoms – has been reported at Yellowstone National Park this week, CBS reported this Saturday, June 22. It is believed that the norovirus is on the rise in the area, as nearly 200 people have been reported to have contracted the highly contagious virus. The norovirus Yellowstone story came about after roughly 50 visitors began to report symptoms of the stomach flu to park officials. The norovirus is considered highly contagious due to its ability to be spread extremely easily through a single touch from an infected individual or even on surfaces that have been contamined. In addition to the visitors, it is believed that around 150 employees may also have caught the norovirus. A local physician announced that this most recent stomach flu outbreak is the most widespread he’s ever seen in the area, spurring the National Park Service to issue an official warning announcement this June 19 to wash their hands frequently to avoid “a greater-than-normal gastrointestinal illness.” According to RedOrbit, the very first reports of the norovirus Yellowstone case occurred this June 7, 2013, when national park visitors began to complain of having serious stomach aches. Park Service officials again remind people to wash their hands frequently.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

 

(Photo : Wikimedia Commons) Recent outbreaks of norovirus and hantavirus in US national parks have officials warning visitors to take precautions against disease.

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21.06.2013 Biological Hazard USA State of Wyoming, [Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park] Damage level
Details

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Biological Hazard in USA on Friday, 21 June, 2013 at 02:57 (02:57 AM) UTC.

Description
After 200 park employees and visitors reported bouts of gastrointestinal illness at Yellowstone National Park and nearby Grand Teton National Park this month, national park officials have warned visitors to be vigilant about hygiene. The outbreak started on June 7, when a group touring the Mammoth Hot Springs complained of stomach flu and other gastrointestinal problems. After the tour group members reported their illnesses, about other 50 visitors and 150 park employees reported similar symptoms. Preliminary reports found that they had norovirus, or “stomach flu,” which affects up to 21 million people, every year according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Al Mash, spokesman for Yellowstone National Park, said campers who were worried about the outbreak should take care to properly store their food and wash their hands with soap and water before eating. “Don’t rely on hand sanitizer. It’s good for a while if you don’t have access to water,” said Mash. “But sanitizer is a poor second to washing your hands.”

According to the CDC, the norovirus can be very contagious and is usually passed from contaminated surfaces or food. Mash said that while it might be more difficult to wash hands before and after meals on camping trips, sporting goods stores sell soap slivers or biodegradable soap that can be used on camping trips. “My manta is be aware but not afraid,” said Mash. Employees at Yellowstone and nearby Grand Teton park have been cleaning and disinfecting the areas where the illnesses were first reported. Yellowstone National Park regularly has 20,000 visitors a day. The norovirus outbreak is just the latest one to hit the national parks. Last year, Yosemite National Park experienced an outbreak of the deadly hantavirus. Infection with hantavirus, often contracted through contact with contaminated mouse feces or urine, can lead to hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, which can be fatal, according to the CDC. Kathy Kupper, a spokeswoman for the National Park Service, said if campers were worried about becoming sick they should be sure to check in with the park’s website or information line before they arrive. Any potential hazards from disease outbreaks from high concentrations of ticks, for example, will be listed in each national park’s newsletter or on its website.

Biohazard name: Norovirus Outbreak
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: suspected

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Norovirus outbreaks reported in Yellowstone, Grand Teton parks

In the northern section of the mountain valley known as Jackson Hole, Wyo., Grand Teton National Park is seen in this image.

In the northern section of the mountain valley known as Jackson Hole, Wyo., Grand Teton National Park is seen in this image. / Jon Cook

JACKSON, Wyo.A norovirus outbreak that may have originated at Yellowstone National Park in Wyo. may have affected around 200 people at both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park.

About 50 visitors have reported symptoms associated with norovirus, a highly contagious stomach flu that is easily spread by touching an infected person or contaminated surfaces. Up to 150 park employees may have been infected, though not all those cases have been confirmed.

The outbreak is believed to have started with a group of tourists who visited the Mammoth Hot Springs area in Yellowstone on June 7. They complained of stomach flu symptoms and, within 48 hours, employees who work with visitors also reported being sick.

Physician’s assistant Michael Takagi told the Jackson Hole Daily that the outbreak is one of the most significant ones he’s seen.

The National Park Service issued a June 19 statement urging visitors to northwestern Wyoming to be vigilant about washing their hands, due to “greater-than-normal reports of gastrointestinal illness” after visitors and employees visited medical clinics with symptoms of norovirus.

 

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 photo UnitedStates-SeismicActivity112registeredEarthquakesMay15th-May25th2013_zps8449e87a.jpg

Seismic Activity Last  30  days

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Arkansas

  1. 3.4 16km N of Morrilton, Arkansas 2013-05-24 00:44:24-05:00 5.7 km deep

  2. 2.5 15km NNE of Morrilton, Arkansas 2013-05-23 07:22:16-05:00 5.5 km deep

  3. 2.5 15km NNE of Morrilton, Arkansas 2013-05-22 17:02:44-05:00 5.1 km deep

  4. 3.4 16km N of Morrilton, Arkansas 2013-05-22 12:19:39-05:00 5.5 km deep

  5. 2.9 22km E of Cave City, Arkansas 2013-05-21 04:28:06-05:00 15.5 km deep

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California

  1. 3.3 18km SW of Fort Irwin, California 2013-05-25 20:58:31-05:00 3.0 km deep

  2. 2.7 1km NNW of The Geysers, California 2013-05-25 19:29:01-05:00 2.2 km deep

  3. 3.5 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-25 17:27:39-05:00 0.0 km deep

  4. 3.5 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-25 13:43:02-05:00 0.0 km deep

  5. 2.9 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-25 12:35:12-05:00 0.0 km deep

  6. 2.6 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-25 10:04:09-05:00 0.1 km deep

  7. 2.6 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-25 09:48:10-05:00 0.0 km deep

  8. 2.7 10km SSE of San Juan Bautista, California 2013-05-25 05:12:59-05:00 10.4 km deep

  9. 3.3 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 21:27:04-05:00 0.1 km deep

  10. 3.0 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 21:23:44-05:00 0.0 km deep

  11. 2.5 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 21:18:05-05:00 1.3 km deep

  12. 2.7 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 18:29:07-05:00 0.0 km deep

  13. 2.6 11km SW of Westwood, California 2013-05-24 18:27:35-05:00 1.3 km deep

  14. 2.7 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 16:32:58-05:00 0.1 km deep

  15. 3.0 19km NE of Shawville, Canada 2013-05-24 14:48:08-05:00 18.0 km deep

  16. 3.2 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 13:58:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  17. 3.2 13km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 13:48:31-05:00 0.1 km deep

  18. 2.8 7km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 13:43:19-05:00 0.0 km deep

  19. 2.9 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 13:22:06-05:00 0.0 km deep

  20. 2.6 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 13:16:58-05:00 0.0 km deep

  21. 2.8 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 12:36:46-05:00 0.0 km deep

  22. 2.5 7km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 11:29:53-05:00 0.0 km deep

  23. 2.6 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 11:29:10-05:00 0.0 km deep

  24. 3.9 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 10:26:21-05:00 9.8 km deep

  25. 2.9 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 08:18:54-05:00 6.3 km deep

  26. 2.5 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 07:36:14-05:00 1.0 km deep

  27. 2.8 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 06:59:08-05:00 0.0 km deep

  28. 3.8 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 06:40:15-05:00 0.0 km deep

  29. 2.9 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 06:21:38-05:00 0.0 km deep

  30. 2.8 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 06:12:41-05:00 0.1 km deep

  31. 3.6 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 04:52:18-05:00 0.0 km deep

  32. 4.0 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 04:42:52-05:00 5.9 km deep

  33. 3.1 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 03:23:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  34. 2.7 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 03:15:17-05:00 6.5 km deep

  35. 4.9 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 03:02:19-05:00 5.2 km deep

  36. 3.7 14km SW of Westwood, California 2013-05-24 02:46:08-05:00 0.0 km deep

  37. 2.6 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:38:43-05:00 7.6 km deep

  38. 2.5 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:22:19-05:00 2.8 km deep

  39. 2.7 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:20:21-05:00 6.2 km deep

  40. 2.5 13km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:19:20-05:00 7.3 km deep

  41. 3.0 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:10:03-05:00 0.0 km deep

  42. 2.6 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 02:04:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  43. 2.7 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 01:58:51-05:00 0.1 km deep

  44. 3.4 13km SSW of Westwood, California 2013-05-24 01:44:58-05:00 0.0 km deep

  45. 2.8 12km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 01:37:28-05:00 0.0 km deep

  46. 3.0 10km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 01:31:06-05:00 0.0 km deep

  47. 2.7 8km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 01:12:52-05:00 3.4 km deep

  48. 3.0 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:46:56-05:00 0.0 km deep

  49. 2.9 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:39:43-05:00 0.0 km deep

  50. 3.1 13km SSW of Westwood, California 2013-05-24 00:24:42-05:00 0.0 km deep

  51. 2.9 9km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:18:23-05:00 0.0 km deep

  52. 2.7 7km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:13:46-05:00 2.5 km deep

  53. 2.9 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:09:13-05:00 0.1 km deep

  54. 2.7 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:06:15-05:00 0.2 km deep

  55. 3.6 8km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-24 00:01:55-05:00 0.0 km deep

  56. 3.5 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:58:57-05:00 0.1 km deep

  57. 3.4 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:58:08-05:00 0.0 km deep

  58. 2.8 10km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:44:42-05:00 0.1 km deep

  59. 2.7 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:40:30-05:00 0.0 km deep

  60. 2.7 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:29:42-05:00 0.0 km deep

  61. 2.5 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:28:31-05:00 1.3 km deep

  62. 2.5 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:25:19-05:00 0.1 km deep

  63. 2.6 10km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:23:40-05:00 5.1 km deep

  64. 2.8 10km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:09:15-05:00 1.3 km deep

  65. 3.4 15km SE of Chester, California 2013-05-23 23:08:21-05:00 0.0 km deep

  66. 2.6 12km SSW of Westwood, California 2013-05-23 23:07:44-05:00 1.6 km deep

  67. 2.6 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 23:04:09-05:00 1.6 km deep

  68. 3.4 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:55:56-05:00 10.3 km deep

  69. 3.4 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:55:31-05:00 6.1 km deep

  70. 3.3 11km NW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:51:20-05:00 11.2 km deep

  71. 4.2 9km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:50:28-05:00 11.4 km deep

  72. 4.6 10km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:48:57-05:00 14.0 km deep

  73. 5.7 11km WNW of Greenville, California 2013-05-23 22:47:08-05:00 11.0 km deep

  74. 2.7 33km SW of Rio Dell, California 2013-05-22 16:26:44-05:00 22.6 km deep

  75. 4.2 238km W of Crescent City, California 2013-05-20 08:56:30-05:00 10.0 km deep

  76. 4.3 250km W of Crescent City, California 2013-05-20 08:23:44-05:00 10.0 km deep

  77. 4.3 273km W of Crescent City, California 2013-05-20 08:20:53-05:00 10.0 km deep

  78. 4.1 248km W of Crescent City, California 2013-05-20 08:19:30-05:00 10.0 km deep

  79. 2.8 4km SW of Niland, California 2013-05-19 10:44:43-05:00 2.1 km deep

  80. 4.0 10km S of Rancho Palos Verdes, California 2013-05-15 15:00:06-05:00 1.2 km deep

  81. 4.0 10km S of Rancho Palos Verdes, California 2013-05-15 15:00:06-05:00 0.1 km deep

  82. 3.1 7km NNE of Cabazon, California 2013-05-15 11:20:05-05:00 17.9 km deep

  83. 3.0 6km NW of The Geysers, California 2013-05-15 01:11:55-05:00 4.0 km deep

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Idaho

  1. 2.7 53km NE of Idaho City, Idaho 2013-05-21 01:23:52-05:00 9.0 km deep

  2. 2.7 53km NE of Idaho City, Idaho 2013-05-21 01:23:52-05:00 9.0 km deep

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Montana

  1. 2.9 12km SW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-22 04:32:24-05:00 11.6 km deep

  2. 2.8 57km NNW of Hysham, Montana 2013-05-21 09:54:34-05:00 7.2 km deep

  3. 2.6 13km SW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-21 08:13:55-05:00 10.5 km deep

  4. 3.2 12km SW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-21 06:20:36-05:00 11.1 km deep

  5. 2.7 13km WSW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-21 05:01:00-05:00 10.5 km deep

  6. 3.3 13km SW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-21 03:34:18-05:00 9.7 km deep

  7. 2.6 13km WSW of Lima, Montana 2013-05-23 12:30:14-05:00 3.7 km deep

  8. 2.8 29km SSE of Seeley Lake, Montana 2013-05-17 06:44:15-05:00 11.6 km deep

  9. 2.7 34km SSW of Three Forks, Montana

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Nevada

  1. 3.3 55km E of McDermitt, Nevada 2013-05-23 15:56:31-05:00 0.0 km deep

  2. 2.7 35km NNW of West Wendover, Nevada 2013-05-20 17:50:25-05:00 0.0 km deep

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Oklahoma

  1. 2.7 18km SSE of Medford, Oklahoma 2013-05-19 08:33:06-05:00 6.8 km dee

  2. 2.9 11km ENE of Luther, Oklahoma 2013-05-19 20:46:35-05:00 4.5 km deep

  3. 2.6 6km N of Harrah, Oklahoma 2013-05-15 05:54:06-05:00 4.3 km deep

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Oregon

  1. 3.9 Off the coast of Oregon 2013-05-21 15:28:31-05:00 12.3 km deep

  2. 4.3 252km WSW of Brookings, Oregon 2013-05-20 08:12:44-05:00 10.0 km deep

  3. 4.4 234km WSW of Brookings, Oregon 2013-05-20 09:07:59-05:00 10.0 km deep

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Washington State

  1. 2.5 3km ENE of Lewisville, Washington 2013-05-25 11:40:51-05:00 1.8 km deep

  2. 2.9 8km NE of Sedro-Woolley, Washington 2013-05-25 10:22:59-05:00 8.2 km deep

  3. 2.5 11km N of Anacortes, Washington 2013-05-22 08:48:06-05:00 15.5 km deep

  4. 2.5 32km NE of Amboy, Washington 2013-05-21 03:03:05-05:00 6.0 km deep

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Wyoming

  1. 3.6 23km WNW of Afton, Wyoming 2013-05-16 00:23:52-05:00 4.8 km deep

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