Tag Archive: Winter storm


NASAno Rains Ash, Rock on Java: Photos

NASA today released this image of the polar vortex, the weird atmospheric twitch that flooded into the United States last month. The purple wavy line above that wanders down from the Arctic shows the below-average temperatures that set cold records in many states.

From NASA’s Facebook page:

“The Big Chill – Blistering cold air from the Arctic plunged southward this winter, breaking U.S. temperature records. A persistent pattern of winds spins high above the Arctic in winter. The winds, known as the polar vortex, typically blow in a fairly tight circular formation. But in late December 2013 and early January 2014, the winds loosened and frigid Arctic air spilled farther south than usual, deep into the continental United States. On Jan. 6, 2014, alone, approximately 50 daily record low temperatures were set, from Colorado to Alabama to New York, according to the National Weather Service. In some places temperatures were 40 degrees Fahrenheit colder than average.”

 

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….. MLive

Wind chill advisory: Check out how cold it will feel in Grand Rapids

By Andrew Krietz | akrietz@mlive.com

on February 27, 2014 at 3:53 PM, updated February 27, 2014 at 4:23 PM

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Don’t let the Thursday afternoon sun fool you.

A wind chill advisory is in effect until 11 a.m. Friday following the National Weather Service canceling a winter weather advisory. With snow showers mostly out of the picture, there’s now a greater focus on how cold it’ll feel when the sun comes up.

“Feels like” temperatures will be at their lowest after 4 a.m. Friday, with some readings approaching minus 25 degrees, according to the National Weather Service in Grand Rapids.

Forecasters say there likely will be a bit of a lull in wind speeds late tonight through the early morning hours, but an approaching weather system is positioned to kick them back up again to about 5 to 15 mph. It won’t take much for the wind, coupled with an overnight low of minus 7 degrees, to knock down those readings quickly.

 

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Arctic air makes a comeback, sort of

Freeze will cover two-thirds of country, weather service says

UPDATED 8:35 AM PST Feb 25, 2014
Cold New Yorkers, cold weather

Chad Weisser/iReport

(CNN) —Don’t pack away those winter coats and hats yet!

We’re in for another blast of cold Arctic air, which is gearing up to roll across most of the country this week, but it won’t be as bad as the shocking freeze in January.

The National Weather Service says some places from the central U.S. to the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys could be having some frosty high temperatures, as low 20 to 30 degrees below normal.

If you call it Polar Vortex Part II (or III or IV), meteorologists say you’d be wrong — nor was the first big cold spell of 2014, strictly speaking, a strike of the Polar Vortex.

The Polar Vortex stays anchored over Baffin Bay, to the north of Canada, and doesn’t move, says CNN meteorologist Sean Morris. But its shifting pattern allows cold Arctic air to spill southward into the United States.

“When it weakens, this allows the cold Arctic air that is often mislabeled the “Polar Vortex” to spill southward across the U.S. border and bring us bone-chilling temperatures,” Morris explained.

So from a technical perspective, “if you’re looking to get ‘struck’ by the vortex, you’re out of luck,” he added.

Although this cold snap doesn’t have as menacing a name, the Arctic air blast will cause temperatures to plummet 25 to 35 degrees below average east of the Rocky Mountains, Morris said.

Temperatures will drop Tuesday to 10 to 30 degrees below normal for this time of year in places such as Minnesota and the Dakotas. Then the arctic blast will roll east.

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Brutal Winter Continues as Temps Plummet Again

File Photo
Photo: AP/Nati Harnik

Updated: 02/27/2014 4:50 PM

Created: 02/27/2014 6:10 AM KSTP.com
By: Jennie Olson

Now that the high winds of Wednesday are settling down, our temperatures have taken yet another dive.

After a brief warm up, the never-ending winter of 2013-14 has re-established its run at record territory, Morning Chief Meteorologist Ken Barlow says.

 

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File: The climate-controlled skyway system in Minneapolis provides warmth for people moving from building to building as another polar blast brought sub-zero temperatures with wind chills in the minus-40’s, Monday, Jan. 27.
Photo: AP/Jim Mone, File

 

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AOL.com

Weekend Snow to Blanket Northwest

More wintry weather in store for region

Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014

This file photo shows a snowy Casper, Wyoming, field. The state is among those being hit by wintry storms this weekend. (Wyoming_Jackrabbit/Flickr)
It’s shaping up to be a snowy weekend for parts of the Northwest and northern Rockies as waves of snow and cold air move through the region.

Although the highest accumulations will be found in the mountains, snow in the lower elevations can still accumulate enough to cause travel delays in cities such as Spokane, Wash., Billings, Mont., Casper, Wyo. and Vancouver, British Columbia.

The first wave of snow will move in on Saturday, spreading light snow from Washington through Wyoming. A steadier snow looks to move in with the second wave of snow from Sunday afternoon into Sunday night.

Accumulating snowfall will likely stay out of the city of Seattle with much of the precipitation falling as rain. However, some snowflakes may mix in for a time on Saturday night and into early on Sunday morning.

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deep freeze

Image: A woman walks through the snow in the Williamsburg neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York

ERIC THAYER / Reuters

Winter administered a fresh whipping to parts of the Northeast overnight, as a new storm brought more snow and high winds to the region.

The latest blast came as residents were still digging out from a major storm that caused at least 25 deaths, and at its height, left hundreds of thousands without power on the East Coast and in the South.

New England was absorbing the worst of the weekend storm, which was moving in Saturday evening. Up to 12 inches of snow fell in eastern Massachusetts, and parts of Maine and Rhode Island overnight, Weather Channel meteorologist Mark Swaim said.

New York City and Boston, which both saw flurries overnight, were waking up to lower than average temperatures: Upper 20s in Beantown and lower 30s in the Big Apple.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick on Saturday warned drivers to stay off the roads for a 12-hour period beginning at 5 p.m., saying, “It won’t be possible to keep up with the clearing of the roads.”

The newest storm spawned blizzard conditions in several places along the Massachusetts coastline, including Cape Ann, Hingham, Cape Cod and surrounding islands.

Another Winter Storm Batters East Coast

Nightly News

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh announced that the city would deploy more than 600 snow plows, trucks and other equipment by Saturday evening to deal with the storm. He said additional police officers, firefighters and paramedics would be on hand throughout the storm to ensure public safety.

Southeastern New Hampshire is under a winter storm warning through Sunday that could bring 6 to 10 inches of snow. The weather service said 1 to 2 inches of snow were possible on Saturday with as much as 8 inches overnight.

Further south, New York City New York City’s Central Park received 1 1/2 inches of new snow after getting nearly a foot of snow Thursday.

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Boston Weather Forecast: Snow From Winter Storm Hits New England

Good Samaritans help push a stranded motorist stuck in deep snow on Stefko Boulevard Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 in Bethlehem, Pa.  A wide swath of Pennsylvania awoke Thursday to a fresh coating of snow and a forecast for much more to come over the course of the day. (AP Photo/Chris Post)

Good Samaritans help push a stranded motorist stuck in deep snow on Stefko Boulevard Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 in Bethlehem, Pa. A wide swath of Pennsylvania awoke Thursday to a fresh coating of snow and a forecast for much more to come over the course of the day. (AP Photo/Chris Post)

BOSTON (AP) — Another winter storm began hitting southern New England on Saturday afternoon and meteorologists said the region will experience heavy snow, strong winds and blizzard conditions near the Massachusetts coast before the storm clears out on Sunday.

The National Weather Service said Massachusetts and parts of Rhode Island will bear the brunt of the storm, with 10 to 14 inches of snow.

“Connecticut will see heaviest snowfall amounts near the Rhode Island border, with lesser amounts as you head further west,” meteorologist William Babcock said. “So there might be 8 to 10 inches right along the Rhode Island border, maybe 4 to 6 around Willimantic and 2 to 4 around Hartford.”

At its peak, the storm will dump snow at the rate of up to 3 inches per hour, Babcock said.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick urged drivers to stay off the roads from 5 p.m. Saturday to 5 a.m. Sunday, and said “it won’t be possible to keep up with the clearing of the roads” during the storm.

The storm is expected to spawn blizzard conditions in several spots along the eastern Massachusetts coastline, including Cape Ann, Hingham, Cape Cod and surrounding islands.

“These areas could be seeing winds reaching up to 70mph, blowing snow and creating extremely poor visibility,” Babcock said. “People should be preparing for deteriorating conditions … People should be ready to stay off the roads and the good thing is a lot of this will be at night, when people are normally off the roads.”

The Rhode Island coast areas north and northwest of Boston will experience winds of up to 45mph that will blow the snow and create chilly conditions.

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Universe Today

by Ken Kremer on February 13, 2014

This visible image of the winter storm over the U.S. south and East Coast was taken by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 13 at 1455 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST. Snow covered ground can be seen over the Great Lakes region and Ohio Valley. Image Credit:  NASA/NOAA GOES Project

This visible image of the winter storm over the U.S. south and East Coast was taken by NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 13 at 1455 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST. Snow covered ground can be seen over the Great Lakes region and Ohio Valley. Image Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

A deadly monster storm is battering virtually the entire US Eastern seaboard today, Thursday, Feb. 13, as it moves from the Southeast to the Northeast and into the New England states, wreaking havoc and causing miserable weather conditions for over 100 million Americas.

This afternoon, NASA and NOAA published a new image taken by a GOES satellite that showed the extent of the clouds associated with the massive winter storm over the US East Coast – see above and below.

Blizzard, white out and slippery conditions have already caused more than 18 deaths.

The killer storm has brought relentless waves of snow, sleet and ice over the past two days covering a vast swath stretching from inland to coastal areas as it moved up from the southern to northern states.

More than a foot of snow has already fallen in many areas today stretching from the Mid-Atlantic into the entire Northeast region.

Several states have declared states of emergency.

This is the season’s 12th snow storm. In many Northeast localities, the accumulated snowfall totals are three times the normal average. As a result many municipalities are running out of road salt.

And to add insult to injury, much more icy snow is falling overnight into Friday on top of the massive existing mounds and piles of frozen ice and snow that’s accumulated over the past few weeks of subfreezing temperatures.

There are also predictions for patches of “thunder snow” — which is a snow storm mixed with thunder and lightning!

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by Associated Press

Posted on February 11, 2014 at 1:38 PM

Updated today at 1:41 PM

 

ATLANTA (AP) — In a dire warning Tuesday, forecasters said a potentially “catastrophic” winter storm threatened to bring a thick layer of ice to Georgia and other parts of the South, causing widespread power outages that could leave people in the dark for days.

Many people heeded the advice to stay home and off the roads, leaving much of metro Atlanta desolate during what is typically a busy morning commute. While only rain fell in the city, places 40 miles northwest saw 2 to 3 inches of snow. The rain was expected to turn to sleet and freezing rain and the ice coating was forecast for Wednesday.

When asked to elaborate on the “catastrophic” warning, Brian Hoeth, a meteorologist at the service’s southern regional headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, said forecasters were talking about an ice storm that happens only once every 10 to 20 years for the area. Forecasters predicted crippling snow and ice accumulations as much as three-quarters of an inch in area from Atlanta to central South Carolina. Wind gusts up to 30 mph could exacerbate problems.

Aaron Strickland, emergency operations director for Georgia Power, said the utility is bringing in crews from Florida, Texas, Oklahoma and Michigan. Strickland, who has spent 35 years with Georgia Power, said he’s never seen an inch of ice in metro Atlanta.

“I’ve seen people forecast it, but it’s never come,” Strickland said. “And I’m hoping it don’t this time.”

President Barack Obama declared an emergency in Georgia, ordering federal agencies to help with the state and local response.

The quiet streets were a stark contrast to the scene just two weeks earlier when downtown roads were jammed with cars, drivers slept overnight in vehicles or abandoned them on highways. Students camped in school gymnasiums.

 

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With dire storm forecast, many in Ga. stay home

State agencies prepare for the approaching winter weather at the Georgia Emergency Management Agency State Operations Center on Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, in Atlanta.

Another round of rain, sleet and freezing rain is expected to begin walloping Atlanta and other parts of Georgia on Tuesday.

ATLANTA — Forecasters issued an unusually dire winter storm warning Tuesday for much of Georgia, but many residents were already heeding advice to stay home and off the roads, leaving much of metro Atlanta a ghost town during the usually busy morning commute.

New Winter Storm Aims for South

New Winter Storm Aims for South
6 hr ago 1:16 Views: 4k AP Online Video

The storm could be a “catastrophic event” reaching “historical proportions,” the National Weather Service said in its warnings. Forecasters cited potentially crippling snow and ice accumulations, and they expected widespread power outages that could last for days. As much as three-quarters of an inch of ice is forecast for Atlanta, and wind gusts up to 25 mph could exacerbate problems.

Aaron Strickland, emergency operations director for Georgia Power, said the utility is already bringing in crews from Florida, Texas, Oklahoma and Michigan. Strickland, who has spent 35 years with Georgia Power, said he’s never seen an inch of ice in metro Atlanta.

“I’ve seen people forecast it, but it’s never come,” Strickland said. “And I’m hoping it don’t this time.”

Rain was falling Tuesday morning in Atlanta, with snow in north Georgia. Dustin Wilkes, 36, of Atlanta, was one of the few who headed to the office. “It looks like this time it’s not going to be bad until everyone’s home,” he said. He noticed his parking lot was mostly deserted.

It was a stark contrast to the storm that hit Atlanta two weeks earlier. Downtown streets were jammed with unmoving cars, highway motorists slept overnight in vehicles or abandoned them where they sat, and students were forced to camp in school gymnasiums.

Related: How 2 inches of snow created a traffic nightmare in Atlanta

Atlanta has a painful history of being ill-equipped to deal with snowy weather. Despite officials’ promises after a crippling ice storm in 2011, the Jan. 28 storm proved they still had many kinks to work out.

Georgia prepares for snow: Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal

AP Photo: Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Ben Gray

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal indicated Monday that he and other state officials had learned their lesson. Before a drop of freezing rain or snow fell, Deal declared a state of emergency for nearly a third of the state and state employees were told they could stay home. He expanded the declaration Tuesday to more than half the state’s counties.

On Monday, schools canceled classes, and Deal urged people who didn’t need to be anywhere to stay off the roads. Tractor-trailer drivers were handed fliers about the weather and a law requiring chains on tires in certain conditions.

“We are certainly ahead of the game this time, and that’s important,” Deal said. “We are trying to be ready, prepared and react as quickly as possible.”

Some residents thought officials moved too quickly. “I think they probably overreacted,” Wilkes said. “It’s to be expected.”

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MSN News

 

Hundreds of flights canceled at Southern airports

Travelers wait for flights at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the main hub for Delta Air Lines, led the nation in Tuesday flight cancellations with 368.

ATLANTA — As a winter storm with potential to coat the South with ice and snow moves in, nearly 900 flights have been cancelled at three of the region’s major airports.

Check your local forecast, flight delays

Tracking service FlightAware shows that before dawn Tuesday, 894 flights for the day had been canceled into and out of the main airports in Atlanta, Dallas and Charlotte, N.C.

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Business Insider

US Northeast Struggles To Handle Latest Series Of Storms

nyc slush snow february

AP

BOSTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – The latest in a rapid succession of brutal winter storms hit the United States on Wednesday, cutting power to over a million homes and businesses and playing havoc with road and air transport links.The snow and ice storms in the country’s Northeast triggered states of emergency in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and some districts reported stocks of the salt used to keep roads ice-free were running low.

The hardest-hit state was Pennsylvania, where 849,000 customers were without electricity at one point, according to the governor. By 8 p.m. local time (0100 GMT Thursday), the figure was just over 625,000, said Cory Angell, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency.

In all, over a million Northeast homes and businesses were cut off, according to local power companies.

Throughout the United States, 2,893 flights were canceled on Wednesday, according to FlightAware.com, an online flight tracking site.

In the Northeast, roughly half the departing flights were canceled out of Newark Liberty International, LaGuardia inNew York and Boston’s Logan International, FlightAware said.

Snow continued to fall in patches along the East Coast, but by early on Thursday the storm looked to have largely run its course, a forecaster at the National Weather Service said.

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Image:  A plow cleans up North Ave. in Garwood, N.J.

John Makely / NBC News 2 days

Deep Freeze

Pinched: Salt Shortage Leads to Dangerously Slippery Streets

As if traffic snarls, scrubbed flights and power outages weren’t enough misery, the latest bit of winter savagery to hit the Midwest and the East is an extreme shortage of the salt used to clear snow and ice off roadways.

Many cities have been forced to ration salt after weeks of above-average snowfall and bone-chilling temperatures have nearly depleted their stockpiles.

That’s left many streets treacherously slippery, putting motorists, their passengers and pedestrians at risk.

By the end of January, for instance, the Pennsylvania Transportation Department had burned through 686,000 tons of salt — upwards of 200,000 tons more than used during an average year, according to the Associated Press.

In Illinois, Chicago’s supply is holding up, but the suburbs are hurting.

“If we don’t get the salt, at some point people are going to be sliding all over the place like what you saw in Atlanta,” Julius Hansen, the public works director in the Chicago suburb of Glen Ellyn, told the AP, referencing the motorists stranded in the South last week.

Salt producers in Kansas and elsewhere said they were out of rock salt or close to it.

Officials in New York and New Jersey also warned they were running short of the rock salt.

New York City has spread some 346,000 tons of rock salt on its roads so far this year, about the total for all of last winter, Belinda Mager, a spokeswoman for the city Department of Sanitation said.

The rapidly shrinking supply of salt has sent prices skyrocketing as officials stretch resources thin and scramble to find alternatives — like the processed sugar beet molasses being tested in Pennsylvania’s Butler County.

Store owners, too, are getting squeezed.

“I have people calling from all parts of the East Coast looking for it, and we just have nothing.”

“We’re just continuing to get crushed by these storms. With major rock salt shortages, it’s starting to get scary out there,” Anthony Scorzetti, a hardware and paint manager for Braen Supply in Wanaque, New Jersey, told Reuters.

“I have people calling from all parts of the East Coast looking for it, and we just have nothing.”

Some 77 million Americans were under storm warnings and hundreds of thousands were without power Wednesday as the winter blast that wreaked havoc across the nation’s midsection roared into the Northeast.

“The worst will be along the higher terrain, around central New England,” said Benjamin Sipprell, a National Weather Service meteorologist. “Southern parts of Vermont and New Hampshire around the border with Massachusetts could see up to around a foot of snow.”

The onslaught of ice dragged down power lines. More than 849,000 people were without power in eastern and central Pennsylvania at one point, prompting the governor to declare an emergency. Crews managed to cut that down to 625,000 by Wednesday night.

In New Jersey, where Gov. Chris Christie ordered a state of emergency, the state’s largest utility PSE&G reported about 9,000 customers without power Wednesday night, down from about 75,000 outages.

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy called on residents to stay off roads. Parts of the state have reported 10 inches or more of snow.

“With heavy snow falling across the state and a mix of sleet and freezing rain on the way, I am asking residents to avoid unnecessary travel,” Malloy said. “If you can stay home or work from home, please do.”

In Connecticut, more than 300 traffic accidents were reported on major roadways and side streets on Wednesday.

“Everyone was skidding all over the place,” Bruce Small, 58, an aircraft mechanic from Millford told Reuters.

More than 2,500 flights across the country were canceled, with airports and passengers in New York, Boston and Chicago bearing the brunt. Most of the flights not scrubbed were experiencing delays.

Commuters across the region creeped to work. Making matters worse, a “significant” power outage crippled service on at least three major subways lines in New York City during the early morning commute — including at Times Square, the busiest station in the busiest subway system in the country. By the end of the morning rush, the issue had been fixed, city officials said.

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NBC U.S. news

Salt in the Wound: Rugged Winter Drains Road Budgets, Supplies

As storm after ferocious storm wallops the country this winter, many cities have been forced to ration resources amid a shortage of the road salt used to melt snow.

Many communities from the Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic that have already been pounded by above-average snowfall and bone-chilling temperatures have nearly depleted their supply of salt, leaving streets treacherously slippery.

By the end of January, for instance, the Pennsylvania Transportation Department had burned through 686,000 tons of salt — upwards of 200,000 tons more than used during an average year, according to the Associated Press.

In Illinois, Chicago’s supply is holding up, but the suburbs are hurting.

“If we don’t get the salt, at some point people are going to be sliding all over the place like what you saw in Atlanta,” Julius Hansen, the public works director in the Chicago suburb of Glen Ellyn, told the AP, referencing the motorists stranded in the South last week.

The rapidly shrinking supply of salt has sent prices skyrocketing as officials stretch resources thin and scramble to find alternatives — like the processed sugar beet molasses being tested in Pennsylvania’s Butler County.

Store owners, too, are getting squeezed. “We’re just continuing to get crushed by these storms. With major rock salt shortages, it’s starting to get scary out there,” Anthony Scorzetti, a hardware and paint manager for Braen Supply in Wanaque, New Jersey, told Reuters.

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Christie declares state of emergency ahead of storm

Tuesday, February 04, 2014
state of emergency
  Eyewitness News

In anticipation of the severe winter weather expected to arrive in New Jersey late Tuesday and early Wednesday, Governor Chris Christie declared a State of Emergency.

The state of emergency authorizes the State Director of Emergency Management to continue coordinating the preparation, response and recovery efforts for the storm with all county and municipal emergency operations and governmental agencies. Governor Christie also authorized the closing of state offices on Wednesday, February 5th for all non-essential employees.

“Tonight’s winter weather is expected to produce snow and ice, creating hazardous travel conditions and affecting areas throughout the state that are already recovering from yesterday’s storm,” said Governor Christie. “I’ve authorized state officials to continue all necessary actions to assist, and my Administration will continue monitoring conditions throughout the remainder of the storm. I encourage all New Jerseyans to drive carefully and remain off the roads if possible so that our first responders and public safety officials can safely respond to any emergency situations.”

The storm is expected to continue into Wednesday afternoon, bringing additional snow and ice to areas that experienced significant snowfall during Monday’s storm. A potential mixture of hazardous travel conditions, fallen trees, power outages and flooding are anticipated.

New Jersey Transit has adjusted its service schedule for Wednesday and advised riders to build additional time into their travel plans.

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