Tag Archive: West Coast


  • Scientists started noticing the mass deaths in June of 2013
  • Both wild starfish and those in captivity have been affected by the mysterious phenomenon
  • Entire populations have been wiped out in Puget Sound

By Afp and Daily Mail Reporter

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Starfish have been mysteriously dying by the millions in recent months along the US west coast, worrying biologists who say the sea creatures are key to the marine ecosystem.

Scientists first started noticing the mass deaths in June 2013. Different types of starfish, also known as sea stars, were affected, from wild ones along the coast to those in captivity, according to Jonathan Sleeman, director of the US Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center.

‘The two species affected most are Pisaster ochraceus (purple sea star or ochre starfish) and Pycnopodia helianthoides (sunflower sea star),’ he wrote in a statement in December.

Mystery: Millions of starfish on the west coast are dying - and scientists have no idea why

Mystery: Millions of starfish on the west coast are dying – and scientists have no idea why

The sunflower sea star is considered among the largest starfish and can span more than a meter in diameter.

The most commonly observed symptoms are white lesions on the arms of the sea star. The lesions spread rapidly, resulting in the loss of the arm. Within days, the infection consumes the creature’s entire body, and it dies.

Entire populations have been wiped out in Puget Sound off the coast of Washington state, in the Salish Sea off Canada’s British Columbia as well as along the coast of California. The mortality rate is estimated at 95 percent.

Scientists who have spent decades studying the local ecosystem have yet to identify the cause.

‘What we currently think is likely happening is that there is a pathogen, like a parasite or a virus or a bacteria, that is infecting the sea stars and that compromises in some way their immune system,’ Pete Raimondi, chair of the department of ecology and evolutionary biology, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, told AFP.

Wiped out: Entire populations of starfish have been wiped out in Puget Sound off the coast of Washington state

Wiped out: Entire populations of starfish have been wiped out in Puget Sound off the coast of Washington state

Then, the creatures become more susceptible to bacteria which is “causing a secondary infection that causes most of the damages that you see.’

A barometer of sea health

The 2013 phenomenon has not been observed solely along the West Coast; a smaller outbreak also killed East Coast sea stars last year.
Read More Here

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What’s killing all the starfish on the West Coast?

By Jean-Louis Santini, AFP

Posted:   02/01/2014 01:40:39 PM PST | Updated:   a day ago
A starfish clings to a rock near Haystack Rock during low tide Saturday, July 31, 2010, in Cannon Beach, Ore.

A starfish clings to a rock near Haystack Rock during low tide Saturday, July 31, 2010, in Cannon Beach, Ore. (Rick Bowmer/AP Photo)

Starfish have been mysteriously dying by the millions in recent months along the West Coast, worrying biologists who say the sea creatures are key to the marine ecosystem.

Scientists first started noticing the mass deaths in June 2013. Different types of starfish, also known as sea stars, were affected, from wild ones along the coast to those in captivity, according to Jonathan Sleeman, director of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center.

“The two species affected most are Pisaster ochraceus (purple sea star or ochre starfish) and Pycnopodia helianthoides (sunflower sea star),” he wrote in a statement in December.

The sunflower sea star is considered among the largest starfish and can span more than a meter in diameter.

The most commonly observed symptoms are white lesions on the arms of the sea star. The lesions spread rapidly, resulting in the loss of the arm. Within days, the infection consumes the creature’s entire body, and it dies.

Entire populations have been wiped out in Puget Sound off the coast of Washington state, in the Salish Sea off Canada’s British Columbia as well as along the coast of California. The mortality rate is estimated at 95 percent.

Read More Here

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Anthony Gucciardi Anthony Gucciardi

Published on Jan 8, 2014

Anthony Gucciardi joins The Alex Jones Show to break down the reality that a whopping 78% of the Fukushima radioactive waste material was deposited in the Pacific Ocean and how a wave of radiation is indeed on course for the West Coast.

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Raw: Conjoined Whales Discovered, Dead

AssociatedPress AssociatedPress

Published on Jan 8, 2014

Rare conjoined grey whale calves were discovered on Monday in a Mexican Lagoon. This could be the first documented case of its kind. (Jan. 9)

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Fishermen have found two conjoined gray whale calves in a northwestern Mexican lagoon, a discovery that a government marine biologist described as "exceptionally rare."

Two conjoined gray whale calves found by fishermen in the Ojo de Liebre lagoon, in Baja California, Mexico, on January 5.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CONANP, AFP PHOTO

Jane J. Lee

National Geographic

Published January 8, 2014

Scientists made an unexpected discovery on January 5 when they found the bodies of two conjoined gray whale calves (Eschrichtius robustus)floating inLaguna Ojo de Liebre (map) in Baja California.

The conjoined twins—also known as Siamese twins—measured aboutseven toten feet (two to three meters) in length, according to several reports. That’s shorter than the usual 12- to 16-foot (3.6- to 4.8-meter) length of full-term gray whale calves.

Gray whale gestation lasts for 13.5 months, saidJim Dines, collections manager of mammals at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in California. So the conjoined twins were probably between 8.5 and 10.5 months of age when they were born, he noted.

Dines cautions that those ages are only estimates based on the lengths of single fetuses. “In the case of twins, the mother has to provide nourishment for two growing fetuses and that may result in two slightly smaller fetuses rather than one normal-sized one,” he explained.

“These were pretty sizeable,” Dines said. “There’s a fair chance the mother was trying to deliver them and couldn’t.”

Researchers who made the find in Mexico didn’t spot the mother, so it’s unclear whether she survived or not.

Read More Here

 

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STARFISH MELTING ALONG WASHINGTON AND CANADIAN WEST COAST!

MOXNEWSd0tC0M MOXNEWSd0tC0M

Published on Oct 26, 2013

October 26, 2013 KING 5 News

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Sea stars are wasting away in larger numbers on a wider scale in two oceans

Sea stars off the nation’s eastern and western coasts are dying in large numbers and in the most undignified ways. Their colorful limbs are curling up at the tips. Squiggly arms are detaching from dying bodies like tails from lizards and wiggling until they also drop dead. Ulcers are opening holes in tissue, allowing internal organs to ooze out.

Video

This time lapse shows a quarantined sea star over a seven-hour period. Living in the Vancouver Aquarium, this sea star was exhibiting symptoms similar to the early stages of the mysterious wasting outbreak observed in nearby waters.

This time lapse shows a quarantined sea star over a seven-hour period. Living in the Vancouver Aquarium, this sea star was exhibiting symptoms similar to the early stages of the mysterious wasting outbreak observed in nearby waters.

Dying sea stars: Sea star wasting syndrome is devastating populations of the creatures.

Click Here to View Full Graphic Story

Dying sea stars: Sea star wasting syndrome is devastating populations of the creatures.

Marine scientists say the sea stars are under attack by an unknown wasting disease that turns their bodies to goo, and the results are gruesome, nasty and grisly.

All along the Pacific coast, sea stars are experiencing their largest known die-off, which is affecting more species of sea stars than any other attack in recent memory, biologists said. A smaller and isolated Atlantic outbreak, at points off Rhode Island and Maine, has also been noted.

Formerly known as starfish — a term scientists rejected because they’re more like a sea urchin than a fish — sea stars have been killed by disease several times over the past few decades. But each of those events affected only a single species, marine scientists said, not up to seven, as the new plague has. Divers have previously reported mass sea star deaths in warmer waters south of Santa Barbara, Calif., but not in waters as cool as those of Washington’s Puget Sound.

Scientists disagree slightly on the potential ecological impacts of the current die-off. Sea stars control mussel populations by relentlessly eating them. In their absence, mussels may proliferate and ruin portions of undersea kelp forests that hide small fish from predators and help protect coastal areas from sea surge and storm flooding.

That impact “is very unlikely,” said John Pearse, a professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California at Santa Cruz, who believes scientists will figure the problem out before it gets out of control.

But a colleague who is closely studying the disease isn’t so sure. “We are at the onset of the outbreak,” said Pete Raimondi, chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Santa Cruz.

More important, said Drew Harvell, a Cornell University professor of ecology and evolutionary biology who studies marine diseases, “these kinds of events are sentinels of change. When you get an event like this, I think everybody will say it’s an extreme event and it’s pretty important to figure out what’s going on.”

Scientists do know that wasting is happening on both coasts, but they don’t know if the two die-offs are linked. They know that tens of thousands of sunflower stars have perished in British Columbia alone since the summer, but they don’t know exactly how many or every place there’s a disease outbreak.

Read More Here

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Floating dock from Japan carries potential invasive species

Terra Daily.com

by Staff Writers
Newport, OR (SPX)


Workers from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife remove marine organisms in order to prevent invasive species from a derelict Japanese dock that washed up on Agate Beach. Credit: OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

When debris from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan began making its way toward the West Coast of the United States, there were fears of possible radiation and chemical contamination as well as costly cleanup. But a floating dock that unexpectedly washed ashore in Newport this week and has been traced back to the Japanese disaster has brought with it a completely different threat – invasive species.

Scientists at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center said the cement float contains about 13 pounds of organisms per square foot. Already they have gathered samples of 4-6 species of barnacles, starfish, urchins, anemones, amphipods, worms, mussels, limpets, snails, solitary tunicates and algae – and there are dozens of species overall.

“This float is an island unlike any transoceanic debris we have ever seen,” said John Chapman, an OSU marine invasive species specialist. “Drifting boats lack such dense fouling communities, and few of these species are already on this coast. Nearly all of the species we’ve looked at were established on the float before the tsunami; few came after it was at sea.”

Chapman said it was “mind-boggling” how these organisms survived their trek across the Pacific Ocean. The low productivity of open-ocean waters should have starved at least some of the organisms, he said.

“It is as if the float drifted over here by hugging the coasts, but that is of course impossible,” Chapman said. “Life on the open ocean, while drifting, may be more gentle for these organisms than we initially suspected. Invertebrates can survive for months without food and the most abundant algae species may not have had the normal compliment of herbivores. Still, it is surprising.”

Jessica Miller, an Oregon State University marine ecologist, said that a brown algae (Undaria pinnatifida), commonly called wakame, was present across most of the dock – and plainly stood out when she examined it in the fading evening light. She said the algae is native to the western Pacific Ocean in Asia, and has invaded several regions including southern California. The species identification was confirmed by OSU phycologist Gayle Hansen.

“To my knowledge it has not been reported north of Monterey, Calif., so this is something we need to watch out for,” Miller said.

Miller said the plan developed by the state through the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon State Parks is to scrape the dock and to bag all of the biological material to minimize potential spread of non-native species. But there is no way of telling if any of the organisms that hitchhiked aboard the float from Japan have already disembarked in nearshore waters.

“We have no evidence so far that anything from this float has established on our shores,” said Chapman. “That will take time. However, we are vulnerable. One new introduced species is discovered in Yaquina Bay, only two miles away, every year. We hope that none of these species we are finding on this float will be among the new discoveries in years to come.”

The possibilities are many, according to Miller.

“Among the organisms we found are small shore crabs similar to our Hemigrapsus that look like the same genus, but may be a different species,” Miller said. “There were also one or more species of oysters and small clam chitons, as well as limpets, small snails, numerous mussels, a sea star, and an assortment of worms.”

Invasive marine species are a problem on the West Coast, where they usually are introduced via ballast water from ships. OSU’s Chapman is well aware of the issue; for several years he has studied a parasitic isopod called Griffen’s isopod that has infested mud shrimp in estuaries from California to Vancouver Island, decimating their populations.

In 2010, an aggressive invasive tunicate was found in Winchester Bay and Coos Bay along the southern Oregon coast. Known as Didemnum vexillum, the tunicate is on the state’s most dangerous species list and is both an ecological and economic threat because of its ability to spread and choke out native marine communities, according to OSU’s Sam Chan, who chairs the Oregon Invasive Species Council.

It is difficult to assess how much of a threat the organisms on the newly arrived float may present, the researchers say. As future debris arrives, it may carry additional species, they point out. However, this dock may be unique in that it represents debris that has been submerged in Japan and had a well-developed subtidal community. This may be relatively rare, given the amount of debris that entered the ocean, the researchers say.

“Floating objects from near Sendai can drift around that coast for a while before getting into the Kuroshio current and then getting transported to the eastern Pacific,” Chapman said. The researchers hope to secure funding to go to Japan and sample similar floats and compare the biological life on them with that on the transoceanic dock.

The scientists say the arrival of the dock is also a sobering reminder of the tragedy that occurred last year, which cost thousands of lives.

“We have to remember that this dock, and the organisms that arrived on it, are here as a result of a great human tragedy,” Miller said. “We respect that and have profound sympathy for those who have suffered, and are still suffering.”

Related Links
Hatfield Marine Science Center
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Foreboding. Animation of changes in ocean acidification over time in the California Current System. The left side shows the depth of aragonite saturation, and the right side shows thearagonite saturation.
Courtesy of Nicolas Gruber and Claudine Hauri

Humanity’s use of fossil fuels sends 35 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year. That has already begun to change the fundamental chemistry of the world’s oceans, steadily making them more acidic. Now, a new high resolution computer model reveals that over the next 4 decades, rising ocean acidity will likely have profound impacts on waters off the West Coast of the United States, home to one of the world’s most diverse marine ecosystems and most important commercial fisheries. These impacts have the potential to upend the entire marine ecosystem and affect millions of people dependent upon it for food and jobs.

About one-third of the carbon dioxide (CO2) humans pump into the atmosphere eventually diffuses into the surface layer of the ocean. There, it reacts with water to create carbonic acid and release positively charged hydrogen ions that increase the acidity of the ocean. Since preindustrial times, ocean acidity has increased by 30%. By 2100, ocean acidity is expected to rise by as much as another 150%.

Declining pH of seawater reduces the amount of carbonate ions in the water, which many shell-building organisms combine with calcium to create the calcium carbonate that they use to build their shells and skeletons. The lower carbonate availability, in turn, decreases a measure known as the saturation state of aragonite, an easily dissolvable mineral form of calcium carbonate that organisms such as oyster larvae rely on to build their shells. If the aragonite saturation state falls below a value of 1, a condition known as undersaturation, all calcium carbonate shells will dissolve. But trouble starts well before that. If the aragonite saturation state falls below 1.5, some organisms such as oyster larvae are unable to harvest enough aragonite to build shells during the first days of their lives, and they typically succumb quickly.

These changes are particularly worrisome for global ocean regions known as eastern boundary upwelling zones. In these regions, such as those along much of the West Coast of the United States, winds push surface water away from the shore, causing water from the deep ocean to well up. This water typically already has naturally high levels of dissolved CO2, produced by microbes that eat decaying algae and other organic matter and then respire CO2. Along the central Oregon coast, for example, when summer winds blow surface ocean waters offshore, a measure of the amount of CO2 in the water known a partial pressure rises from a few hundred to over 2000, causing ocean acidity to spike.

But oceanographers still didn’t have a good handle on how rising atmospheric CO2 levels would interact with CO2 rich waters that upwell naturally. So for their current study, researchers led by Nicolas Gruber, an ocean biogeochemist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, decided to look closely at what’s likely to happen in an upwelling region known as the California Current System off the West Coast of the United States. They constructed a regional ocean model that ties together what’s going on in the atmosphere and the ocean. Because this model focused on the California Current System, Gruber and colleagues were able to give it a resolution 400 times that of conventional global ocean models. In their model, the Swiss team considered different scenarios of CO2 emissions over the next 4 decades and linked these to CO2 produced in the ocean due to respiration.

The buildup of atmospheric CO2 will rapidly increase the amount of undersaturated waters in the upper 60 meters of ocean, where most organisms live, the team reports online today in Science. Prior to industrialization, undersaturation conditions essentially did not exist at this top layer in the ocean. Today, Gruber says, undersaturation conditions exist approximately 2% to 4% of the time. But by 2050, surface waters of the California Current System will be undersaturated for half of the year.

Perhaps just as bad, however, aragonite saturation will fall below 1.5 for large chunks of each year. This could spell doom for Pacific oysters, a $110 million-per-year industry on the West Coast, as well as for other shell-building organisms that are sensitive to changes in ocean acidity, says Sue Cudd, owner of the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery on Netarts Bay in Oregon. Another species likely to face difficulty are tiny sea snails known as pteropods, which are a vital food source for young salmon.

The new results are “alarming,” says Richard Feely, a chemical oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. “It’s dramatic how fast these changes will take place.”

George Waldbusser, an ocean ecologist and biogeochemist at Oregon State University, Corvallis, says it’s not clear precisely how rising acidity will affect different organisms. However, he adds, the changes will likely be broad-based. “It shows us that the windows of opportunity for organisms to succeed get smaller and smaller. It will probably have important effects on fisheries, food supply, and general ocean ecology.”

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Earthquakes

 

EMSC     Greece
Apr 12 23:46 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 23:25 PM
2.7     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 23:19 PM
2.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southeast Indian Ridge
Apr 12 23:15 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Southeast Indian Ridge
Apr 12 23:15 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 23:04 PM
3.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 23:01 PM
2.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 22:55 PM
2.9     10.0     MAP

USGS     Southern California
Apr 12 22:46 PM
2.8     9.4     MAP

USGS     Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
Apr 12 22:42 PM
2.7     76.2     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 22:37 PM
4.6     96.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 22:37 PM
4.4     27.1     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 22:37 PM
4.6     15.0     MAP

EMSC     Sea Of Okhotsk
Apr 12 22:28 PM
4.0     480.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 12 22:13 PM
3.5     19.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 12 22:10 PM
3.0     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Italy
Apr 12 21:55 PM
2.4     27.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 21:42 PM
4.8     28.7     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 21:42 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 21:42 PM
4.9     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 21:12 PM
3.0     7.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Alaska
Apr 12 20:49 PM
2.7     26.4     MAP

GEOFON     Greenland Sea
Apr 12 20:45 PM
4.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greenland Sea
Apr 12 20:45 PM
4.2     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 20:43 PM
2.4     5.0     MAP

GEOFON     Greenland Sea
Apr 12 20:31 PM
4.4     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greenland Sea
Apr 12 20:31 PM
4.5     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 20:21 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 20:21 PM
4.9     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 20:07 PM
3.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Strait Of Gibraltar
Apr 12 19:41 PM
4.1     82.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Apr 12 19:30 PM
2.4     7.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 19:25 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 19:25 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Southern California
Apr 12 19:11 PM
2.5     7.0     MAP

USGS     Southern California
Apr 12 18:53 PM
3.5     7.7     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico Region
Apr 12 18:31 PM
3.6     87.0     MAP

EMSC     Near The Coast Of Western Turkey
Apr 12 17:52 PM
2.4     21.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 12 17:36 PM
2.8     5.0     MAP

USGS     Offshore Oregon
Apr 12 16:59 PM
2.7     5.0     MAP

USGS     Offshore Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 12 16:58 PM
4.2     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Offshore Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 12 16:58 PM
4.2     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Iran
Apr 12 16:47 PM
3.6     10.0     MAP

USGS     Virgin Islands Region
Apr 12 16:44 PM
3.6     39.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 16:44 PM
2.4     14.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Alaska
Apr 12 16:41 PM
4.2     57.0     MAP

USGS     Central Alaska
Apr 12 16:41 PM
4.0     67.6     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 12 16:27 PM
2.6     16.0     MAP

USGS     Offshore Oregon
Apr 12 16:25 PM
2.7     5.0     MAP

USGS     Near The East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 15:51 PM
4.4     32.0     MAP

EMSC     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 15:51 PM
4.4     32.0     MAP

EMSC     Izu Islands, Japan Region
Apr 12 15:26 PM
4.7     40.0     MAP

USGS     Izu Islands, Japan Region
Apr 12 15:26 PM
4.7     33.1     MAP

GEOFON     Southeast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 15:26 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 15:07 PM
4.8     11.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 15:07 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 15:07 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Northern Iran
Apr 12 15:01 PM
4.0     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Java, Indonesia
Apr 12 15:01 PM
4.8     69.0     MAP

GEOFON     Java, Indonesia
Apr 12 15:01 PM
4.9     65.0     MAP

USGS     Java, Indonesia
Apr 12 15:01 PM
4.8     42.8     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 14:55 PM
2.8     8.0     MAP

USGS     Near The East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 14:50 PM
5.6     23.2     MAP

GEOFON     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 14:50 PM
5.4     24.0     MAP

EMSC     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 14:50 PM
5.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 14:46 PM
5.0     27.8     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 14:46 PM
5.0     5.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 14:46 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 14:31 PM
4.7     30.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 14:31 PM
4.7     29.7     MAP

EMSC     Sicily, Italy
Apr 12 13:20 PM
3.1     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 13:09 PM
5.3     30.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 13:09 PM
5.3     30.4     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 13:09 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Sicily, Italy
Apr 12 12:57 PM
2.9     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 12:19 PM
4.8     26.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 12:19 PM
4.8     29.5     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 12:19 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

USGS     Oklahoma
Apr 12 12:10 PM
3.1     4.9     MAP

USGS     Central California
Apr 12 11:53 AM
2.6     6.1     MAP

EMSC     Southern Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 12 11:38 AM
4.9     33.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 12 11:38 AM
4.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Southern Mid Atlantic Ridge
Apr 12 11:38 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico Region
Apr 12 11:34 AM
3.1     8.6     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 11:29 AM
2.6     15.0     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 12 11:28 AM
2.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 11:20 AM
5.2     18.0     MAP

USGS     Near The East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 11:19 AM
5.3     14.3     MAP

GEOFON     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 12 11:19 AM
5.2     14.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 11:02 AM
3.3     15.0     MAP

GEOFON     Southwest Of Sumatra, Indonesia
Apr 12 11:02 AM
5.1     35.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Sumatra, Indonesia
Apr 12 11:02 AM
4.9     28.1     MAP

EMSC     Southern Sumatra, Indonesia
Apr 12 11:02 AM
4.9     29.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:59 AM
4.9     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:59 AM
4.7     10.1     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:59 AM
4.9     5.0     MAP

GEOFON     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 10:27 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 10:26 AM
4.9     9.9     MAP

EMSC     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 10:26 AM
5.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:18 AM
4.7     30.2     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:18 AM
4.9     27.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 10:18 AM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 10:07 AM
2.6     15.0     MAP

GEONET     West Coast
Apr 12 09:49 AM
3.8     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 09:32 AM
4.0     2.0     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico Region
Apr 12 09:30 AM
2.5     103.8     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 09:24 AM
2.4     12.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 09:15 AM
4.7     27.5     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 09:15 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 09:15 AM
4.8     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Afghanistan-tajikistan Border Region
Apr 12 08:56 AM
4.0     162.0     MAP

EMSC     Tajikistan
Apr 12 08:56 AM
4.1     156.0     MAP

USGS     Tajikistan
Apr 12 08:56 AM
4.1     163.4     MAP

USGS     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 08:54 AM
4.4     10.1     MAP

EMSC     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 08:54 AM
4.4     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Baja California, Mexico
Apr 12 08:54 AM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 08:21 AM
2.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Italy
Apr 12 08:10 AM
2.6     20.0     MAP

EMSC     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 07:57 AM
4.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 07:57 AM
4.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 12 07:54 AM
3.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:43 AM
5.1     30.4     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:43 AM
5.1     30.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:43 AM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Central Alaska
Apr 12 07:43 AM
2.5     7.2     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 07:41 AM
2.4     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 12 07:38 AM
2.5     8.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 07:34 AM
5.0     15.8     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 07:34 AM
5.1     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 12 07:33 AM
3.9     80.0     MAP

GEONET     West Coast
Apr 12 07:18 AM
4.0     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Baja California, Mexico     
Apr 12 07:15 AM     
6.3     60.0     MAP     

GEOFON     Baja California, Mexico     
Apr 12 07:15 AM     
7.0     10.0     MAP     

USGS     Gulf Of California     
Apr 12 07:15 AM     
6.9     10.3     MAP     

USGS     Southern Alaska
Apr 12 07:14 AM
4.0     64.3     MAP

GEOFON     Baja California, Mexico     
Apr 12 07:06 AM     
6.1     10.0     MAP     

USGS     Gulf Of California     
Apr 12 07:06 AM     
6.2     10.1     MAP     

EMSC     Gulf Of California     
Apr 12 07:06 AM     
6.0     10.0     MAP   

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 12 07:01 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:01 AM
5.0     26.9     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:01 AM
5.0     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 12 07:01 AM
5.1     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Baja California, Mexico
Apr 12 06:48 AM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 06:48 AM
4.6     10.0     MAP

USGS     Gulf Of California
Apr 12 06:48 AM
4.7     9.8     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico Region
Apr 12 06:47 AM
2.7     11.7     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 06:47 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 06:47 AM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 12 06:47 AM
4.5     14.7     MAP

EMSC     Northern Algeria
Apr 12 06:17 AM
3.1     10.0     MAP

 

 

 

Earthquakes shake Gulf of California

By the CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) — A pair of strong earthquakes rocked Mexico’s Gulf of California only minutes apart early Thursday, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

The quakes — magnitude 6.9 and 6.2 — were centered about 85 miles northeast of Guerrero Negro in the Mexican state of Baja California, or 325 miles south-southwest of Phoenix in the United States. Both epicenters were shallow, a little more than six miles underground.

No tsunami warnings were issued and there were no immediate reports of damage, but people as far north as Tucson, Arizona, reported feeling them.

The temblors were recorded at 12:16 a.m. and 12:06 a.m. local time (3:16 a.m. and 3;06 a.m. ET).

 

 

7.0 Mexico/ 5.9 Oregon Coast/8.6 Sumatra/6.1 Tokyo

Magnitude 4.5 – NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

Magnitude 4.5
Date-Time
Location 41.998°N, 65.994°W
Depth 15.8 km (9.8 miles)
Region NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN
Distances 203 km (126 miles) S of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
290 km (180 miles) SSW of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Canada
352 km (218 miles) SW of HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, Canada
421 km (261 miles) E of BOSTON, Massachusetts
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 22 km (13.7 miles); depth +/- 6.3 km (3.9 miles)
Parameters NST=125, Nph=138, Dmin=323.9 km, Rmss=0.89 sec, Gp=155°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=8
Source
  • Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
    Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Event ID usc0009131

************************************************************************************************

Volcanic Activity

Mount Etna eruption no danger to local airport

15:44 12 APR 2012

(AGI) Catania – Mount Etna is erupting for the sixth time this year with lava and plumes of smoke and ash from a new crater on the volcano’s southeast side. The new activity was preceded by new phase that began last night and that, according to experts from the INGV in Catania, has the same characteristics as the one before this one. Ash, carried by wind towards the east, has not yet created problems at the Fontanarossa airport, which is fully operational. . .

***********************************************************************************************

Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

URGENT – FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE

New Mexico

Colorado

Florida

Arizona

Texas

Freeze Warning

Virginia

New York

Maryland

Washington, D.C.

Pennsylvania

Michigan

Ohio

South Carolina

New Jersey

***********************************************************************************************

Storms, Flooding

Photos: Spring hailstorm pelts Texas Panhandle

by WFAA

Posted on April 12, 2012 at 8:10 AM

An unusual spring storm in the Texas Panhandle Wednesday afternoon dumped two to four feet of hail near Dumas.

Trucks were reported sliding off the road on Highway 287 as a result of the unexpected weather phenomenon. Snow plows were being used to clear the roads.

Some vehicles were trapped in the drifts of hailstones.

Chief Meteorologist Pete Delkus said a tornado watch was in effect for the Panhandle region through 10 p.m. Wednesday, and the storms were moving very slowly between Pampa and Dumas north of Amarillo and to the east of Dalhart.

Melting hail and heavy rain triggered flash flooding in the Panhandle

http://swfs.bimvid.com/bimvid_player-3_2_7.swf?x-bim-callletters=KVUE

Tornado leaves path of destruction near Stockton

French Camp funnel cloud damage photo
French Camp funnel cloud damage

KTVU.com

STOCKTON, Calif. —

An EF-1 tornado that set down near Stockton Wednesday afternoon destroyed a building near a home and left debris strewn across the surrounding area, according to local meteorologists.

In Stockton, a highway traffic camera captured a funnel cloud southwest of the city, near Lathrop and a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sacramento said it later touched down in French Camp, south of Stockton.

Discovery Bay resident Carlos Espinoza noticed the unusual atmospheric conditions just before the funnel cloud formed.

“I hear what I thought was thunder, said Espinoza. “Curious, I went out to look”

Espinoza grabbed his compact camera and snapped a series of 11 pictures that showed the funnel cloud forming and extending towards the ground.

A retired police officer, Espinoza knew what he’d witnessed.

“We’ve been shown how to look for certain weather conditions, explained Espinoza. To see this come up right in front of you was surprising, and fun!”

By early Wednesday evening, the National Weather Service confirmed that an EF-1 tornado swept through French Camp.

People who live in French Camp said they knew it was a tornado before the weather service did, as they watched it tear apart a building and send pieces of corrugated metal flying into telephone poles.

“[I was] scared to death,” said tornado victim Valentin Guitierrez. “We really thought we were going to die. I thought I was going to die.”

Guitierrez owned the shed that was destroyed when the tornado touched down. He said the sight of the twister and resulting damage was stunning.

“I heard a loud loud noise. I ran out to look out the back window and I see this big ol’ cloud,” said Guitierrez. “I see it flip over the trailers, so I figured it was a tornado. So I ran to the front of the house, told my family to get on the ground.”

One man said he’d never seen anything like it in his 65 years in San Joaquin County.

It is not unheard of to have twisters spawn from the clouds in the San Joaquin Valley, but it’s not common.

Besides the funnel cloud, a mass of unstable air between Spring storms triggered thundershowers and hail in the Central Valley, according tometeorologists.

The thundershowers erupted in a break between two storm fronts that have gotten April off to a wet start.

The National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm warning Wednesday afternoon for Tulare County near Hanford where quarter-inch sized hail fell accompanied by strong winds, lightning and thunder.

National Weather Service forecaster Steve Anderson said some BB-size hail was reported in the San Jose area around noon.

Meanwhile, a strong line of thundershowers roared into the Sierra foothills, dumping half inch in diameter hail and heavy downpours.

Two more low pressure system were lined up off shore ready to bring showers for the morning commutes both on Thursday and Friday.

Forecasters predicted the North Bay and the Santa Cruz Mountains could get 2 inches or more of rain by Saturday while the central Bay Area could expect 0.5 to 2 inches.

After one of the driest winters in a century, Mother Nature has done her best to eliminate potential drought conditions with one of the wettest Marchs in the past 80 years and now the April showers.

The same has held true for the Sierra where for much of the winter the ski resorts were forced to rely on snowmaking machines.

“Back in January, when we didn’t have any snow, we were looking for a tough season,” said Jennie Bartlett, a spokeswoman for Sugar Bowl. “But March was an awesome month for us. We got over 200 inches of snow.”

Flood Warning

Texas

Louisiana

Arkansas

Winter Storm Warning

California

Nevada

Oregon

**********************************************************************************************

Radiation

Published on Apr 6, 2012 by

Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear, joins Thom Hartmann. California beware! A radioactive wave is headed toward the West Coast of the United States courtesy of the Fukushima nuclear disaster? So with nuclear power still wreaking havoc on the environment – why are the Japanese about to flip on more of their nuclear reactors?


**********************************************************************************************

 

Solar Activity

THE SUN TODAY: 12 April 2012 – Activity Building?

Solar X-rays:

Geomagnetic Field:

>

Status
Status

From n3kl.org
*********************************************************************************************

[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 23:56 PM
5.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 23:56 PM
5.5     13.9     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 23:56 PM
5.5     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Pacific Ocean
Apr 11 23:33 PM
5.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Fiji Region
Apr 11 23:28 PM
4.6     536.0     MAP

USGS     Fiji Region
Apr 11 23:28 PM
4.6     535.7     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 23:18 PM
4.6     10.2     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 23:18 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Michoacan, Mexico
Apr 11 22:55 PM
7.0     80.0     MAP
I Felt It

USGS     Michoacan, Mexico     
Apr 11 22:55 PM     
7.0     84.0     MAP     

USGS     Michoacan, Mexico     
Apr 11 22:55 PM     
6.5     20.0     MAP  

GEOFON     Michoacan, Mexico
Apr 11 22:55 PM
6.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 22:51 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 22:51 PM
5.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 22:51 PM
5.4     14.7     MAP

USGS     Offshore Northern California
Apr 11 22:42 PM
3.9     7.3     MAP

GEOFON     Off Coast Of Oregon
Apr 11 22:41 PM
5.8     10.0     MAP     

EMSC     Off Coast Of Oregon     
Apr 11 22:41 PM
6.0     20.0     MAP     

USGS     Off The Coast Of Oregon     
Apr 11 22:41 PM
5.9     14.0     MAP   

USGS     Off The Coast Of Oregon     
Apr 11 22:41 PM     
5.9     10.2     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:35 PM
5.0     20.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:35 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:35 PM
4.9     14.8     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 22:15 PM
2.5     6.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:15 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:15 PM
5.0     13.8     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 22:15 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Andreanof Islands, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

Apr 11 22:02 PM
4.2     35.6     MAP

USGS     Southern Alaska
Apr 11 21:53 PM
3.0     197.9     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 21:38 PM
2.5     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 21:36 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 21:36 PM
5.0     15.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 21:36 PM
4.9     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 11 21:30 PM
2.6     5.0     MAP

USGS     Andreanof Islands, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

Apr 11 21:23 PM
3.2     18.3     MAP

EMSC     Spain
Apr 11 21:17 PM
3.0     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 21:07 PM
2.5     14.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 21:02 PM
4.7     15.2     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 21:02 PM
5.1     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 21:02 PM
5.2     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Spain
Apr 11 20:58 PM
3.2     8.0     MAP

USGS     Mona Passage, Puerto Rico
Apr 11 20:50 PM
2.9     11.6     MAP

GEOFON     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 11 20:29 PM
4.8     63.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Honshu, Japan
Apr 11 20:29 PM
4.8     46.0     MAP

GEOFON     Poland
Apr 11 20:13 PM
3.7     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Poland
Apr 11 20:13 PM
3.8     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 11 20:13 PM
3.8     2.0     MAP

USGS     Dominican Republic Region
Apr 11 20:03 PM
3.6     165.3     MAP

GEONET     Canterbury
Apr 11 19:36 PM
2.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 19:14 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 19:14 PM
4.9     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 11 19:13 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 19:04 PM
5.5     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 19:04 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 19:04 PM
5.5     10.3     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:54 PM
5.4     40.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:54 PM
5.4     14.3     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:54 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Near The Coast Of Western Turkey
Apr 11 18:44 PM
2.4     6.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:32 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:32 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:15 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 18:15 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Near The Coast Of Western Turkey
Apr 11 18:10 PM
3.4     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 17:54 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 17:41 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 17:41 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 17:16 PM
5.1     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 17:16 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:58 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:49 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:49 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Dominican Republic Region
Apr 11 16:32 PM
2.5     104.0     MAP

EMSC     Sicily, Italy
Apr 11 16:30 PM
2.5     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 16:27 PM
3.7     5.0     MAP

EMSC     South Of Java, Indonesia
Apr 11 16:21 PM
5.0     53.0     MAP

GEOFON     South Of Java, Indonesia
Apr 11 16:21 PM
5.0     43.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:13 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:13 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

GEONET     West Coast
Apr 11 16:12 PM
3.7     60.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:04 PM
5.1     12.0     MAP
USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:04 PM
5.1     10.8     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 16:04 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

GEONET     Canterbury
Apr 11 16:03 PM
3.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 11 15:52 PM
2.6     6.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:46 PM
5.1     21.6     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:46 PM
5.0     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:46 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:41 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:41 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:37 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:37 PM
4.7     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 15:35 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:09 PM
4.9     100.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:09 PM
5.0     13.1     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:06 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP
EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 15:06 PM
4.8     5.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:54 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:54 PM
5.3     11.9     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:54 PM
5.2     2.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:49 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:49 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:34 PM
5.2     20.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:34 PM
5.3     14.4     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 14:34 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:26 PM
5.0     9.4     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:26 PM
5.0     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:18 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:18 PM
5.0     10.3     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:18 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:08 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:08 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 14:08 PM
5.2     9.6     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:58 PM
5.5     13.7     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:58 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:58 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:42 PM
5.3     20.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:42 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:42 PM
5.3     11.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:39 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     South Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:39 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     South Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:39 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Albania
Apr 11 13:38 PM
3.2     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:32 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:32 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 13:32 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:19 PM
5.0     30.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:19 PM
5.0     20.4     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:15 PM
5.1     5.3     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:15 PM
5.1     5.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga
Apr 11 13:12 PM
4.8     245.2     MAP

GEOFON     Tonga Islands
Apr 11 13:12 PM
5.2     238.0     MAP

EMSC     Tonga
Apr 11 13:12 PM
4.9     215.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:10 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 13:10 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     Central Alaska
Apr 11 13:06 PM
3.4     174.1     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 12:53 PM
4.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 12:53 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:37 PM
5.1     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:37 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:37 PM
5.2     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Strait Of Gibraltar
Apr 11 12:27 PM
2.7     1.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:21 PM
5.1     9.9     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:21 PM
5.1     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:21 PM
5.1     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:10 PM
5.1     10.4     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:10 PM
5.5     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 11 12:10 PM
5.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 11 12:10 PM
2.7     23.0     MAP

EMSC     North Indian Ocean
Apr 11 11:53 AM
5.7     10.0     MAP

USGS: Earthquake Magnitude 8.6 – Off West Coast of Sumatra

US Geological Survey
2012-04-11 10:54:00

Date-Time:
Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 08:38:37 UTC
Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 02:38:37 PM at epicenter

Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location:
2.311°N, 93.063°E

Depth:
22.9 km (14.2 miles)

Region:
OFF THE WEST COAST OF NORTHERN SUMATRA

Distances:
434 km (269 miles) SW of Banda Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

550 km (341 miles) SW of Lhokseumawe, Sumatra, Indonesia

963 km (598 miles) W of KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia

1797 km (1116 miles) WNW of JAKARTA, Java, Indonesia

The April 11, 2012 Event: cluster of large earthquakes rattle the globe from Indonesia to Mexico

Posted on April 12, 2012
April 12, 2012WORLD – A strong earthquake hit Mexico on Wednesday, shaking buildings and sending people running out of offices onto the streets of the capital Mexico City. The U.S. Geological Survey said the 6.5 -magnitude quake was centered on Mexico’s Pacific coast near Michoacan and struck fairly deep under the earth at 65 km or 40 miles. Prior to the Mexico earthquake, a powerful and shallow 5.9 struck near the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate off the coast of Oregon- indicating tectonic plates worldwide are being rattled by planetary seismic tension. Prior to Oregon earthquake, two massive 8.0+ magnitude earthquakes (8.6 and 8.2) struck the ocean floor off the north coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. As I warned in my book The Extinction Protocol, the power unleashed in these seismic events is growing. This is testament to the dangers and seriousness of the earth-changes facing us and how these events are unleashing more unbridled force with each successive eruption. The Indian Ocean strike-slip fault earthquakes are very unusual. As a matter of fact, I’ve never heard of a strike-slip lateral earthquake of this great a magnitude; especially under water. Preliminary assessment of the Indonesian quakes by U.S. geologists suggests one plate lurched past each other as much as 70 feet. San Andreas is a strike-slip, lateral- can we even imagine two sections of ground moving 70 feet near San Francisco? Had the force of the Sumatra quakes been unleashed upon San Andreas, the city would have been completely destroyed. Ironically, the largest surface displacement ever recorded in a lateral strike-slip fault was 21 feet and that was in the 1906 7.9 San Andreas earthquake. Just so we understand the significance of what transpired today; the Japanese March 11, 2011 earthquake move the ocean floor 79 feet sideways and 10 ft upwards, but today’s earthquakes happened in double 8.0+ magnitude sequence and moved the earth nearly as far. Worst, the seismic tension from the event ricocheted around the world and contributed to other earthquakes. –The Extinction Protocol

Arizona earthquake numbers saw a large increase in 2011

by on Apr. 11, 2012,

According to the Arizona Geological Survey, 131 earthquakes were detected in 2011 compared with 53 in 2010. That was twice as many as in 2009 and about a third more than in 2008. Most of the earthquakes were in the northwestern part of the state. The Yuma area was also shaken by earthquakes associated with the Gulf of California Rift Zone.

Many of these earthquakes (magnitude ca. 1.6) occurred near Lake Mead. These are attributed to mining and quarrying, and also to crustal adjustments to water going into and out of the lake. The strongest earthquakes (magnitude ca. 3.6) occurred near Clarkdale in the central part of the state. The Survey says that these events are consistent with past behavior: “a propensity for deeper seismicity to occur in two pockets, the northwestern Utah-Arizona border and well within the Colorado Plateau in the northeast corner of the state” and “the highest concentration of energy release correlates well with the pattern of established Quaternary faulting, indicating that this portion of the crust continues to be an active area of strain release and of particular interest for hazard studies in Arizona.” The strain is due to on-going crustal extension.

Read more here. The Arizona Geological Survey provides several videos dealing with earthquakes and geothermal energy on its Youtube Channel. Give it a look. Also take a look at the new issue of Arizona Geology Magazine.

See also:

The Great Arizona-Sonora Earthquake of 1887

Arizona earthquakes, 1852-2011, a video time line

Precariously Balanced Rocks and earthquakes

Where the Next Big American Earthquake and Tsunami Might Occur

The Measure of an Earthquake

8.9 Aceh quake triggers Indian Ocean tsunami warning

BBC News
2012-04-11 04:58:00

An earthquake with an initial magnitude of 8.9 has struck under the sea off Indonesia’s northern Aceh province.

The quake triggered a tsunami warning across the Indian Ocean region.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said it was not yet known whether a tsunami had been generated, but advised authorities to “take appropriate action”.

The region is regularly hit by earthquakes. The Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 killed 170,000 people in Aceh.

The US Geological Survey, which documents quakes worldwide, said the Aceh quake was centred 33km (20 miles) under the sea about 495km from Banda Aceh, the provincial capital.

It was initially reported as 8.9 magnitude but was later revised down to 8.7 by the USGS.

The tsunami warning said quakes of such a magnitude “have the potential to generate a widespread destructive tsunami that can affect coastlines across the entire Indian Ocean basin”.

Tsunami watch lifted after two big earthquakes

By the CNN Wire Staff

Jakarta, Indonesia (CNN) — A massive earthquake struck off the coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra on Wednesday afternoon, triggering a tsunami watch for the Indian Ocean, which was later canceled.

The quake struck about 434 kilometers (270 miles) southwest of Banda Aceh, the capital of Indonesia’s Aceh province, and had a magnitude of 8.6, the U.S. Geological Survey said. It took place at a depth of 23 kilometers (14 miles).

A second large quake, with a magnitude of 8.2, occurred off the west coast of Sumatra about two hours later, the USGS said.

Gary Gibson from the Seismology Research Center in Melbourne, Australia, said the location of the second quake reduced the possibility of a tsunami.

There was also a series of smaller quakes off the west coast of northern Sumatra with magnitudes between 5.1 and 5.4.

There were no reports of destruction or deaths.

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said on local television that there were no reports of casualties or damage in Aceh.

Four people were slightly injured on Simeulue Island, off the coast of Aceh, the National Disaster Management Agency said Wednesday.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued a tsunami watch for the entire Indian Ocean. And a few hours later, the center announced the tsunami watch was canceled.

“A significant tsunami was generated by this earthquake. However, sea level readings now indicate that the threat has diminished or is over for most areas,” the center said.

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

Still In Effect

URGENT – FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE FOR

Florida From  Central Florida  to the  Panhandle

El Paso, Texas  to Santa Teresa, New Mexico

Pueblo ,Colorado

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Freeze Watch Still in Effect  For

Buffalo,  New York
Clevelnad, Ohio
Greenville-Spartanburg, South Carolina

Blacksburg, Virginia

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Baltimore, Maryland,Washington, D.C.

***********************************************************************************************

Storms, Flooding

Hailstorm in China on Thursday, 12 April, 2012 at 03:24 (03:24 AM) UTC.

HS-20120412-34868-CHN
Hailstorm
Thursday, 12 April, 2012 at 03:24 (03:24 AM) UTC

Severe Damage level

Asia
China
MultiProvinces
Provinces of Jiangxi and Guizhou

N 28° 40.465, E 115° 54.551

Base data
EDIS Number: Event type: Date/Time: Last update: Cause of event: Damage level: Geographic information Continent: Country: County / State: Area: City: Coordinate:

Giant Wave Impact in New Zealand on Wednesday, 11 April, 2012 at 11:31 (11:31 AM) UTC.

GW-20120411-34852-NZL
Giant Wave Impact
Wednesday, 11 April, 2012 at 11:31 (11:31 AM) UTC

Storm surge
Moderate Damage level

Australia & New-Zealand
New Zealand
Southland
Foveaux Strait

S 46° 35.360, E 168° 3.774

Base data
EDIS Number: Event type: Date/Time: Last update: Cause of event: Damage level: Geographic information Continent: Country: County / State: Area: City: Coordinate:

Winter Storm Watch

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Hanford, California
647 PM PDT WED APR 11 2012

...WINTER-LIKE STORM TO REACH THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA THURSDAY
NIGHT AND CONTINUE THROUGH FRIDAY NIGHT...

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Reno, Nevada
300 PM PDT WED APR 11 2012

...HEAVY SNOW POSSIBLE IN THE SIERRA...

.A STRONG LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL MOVE INTO THE REGION THURSDAY
AFTERNOON INTO FRIDAY BRINGING THE POTENTIAL FOR HEAVY SNOW IN
THE SIERRA.

...WINTER STORM WATCH IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
FRIDAY EVENING...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN HANFORD HAS ISSUED A WINTER STORM
WATCH FOR HEAVY SNOW AND STRONG WINDS...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM
THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH FRIDAY EVENING FOR THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS
OF THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA.

* SNOW ACCUMULATIONS: 1 TO 2 FEET.

* ELEVATION: ABOVE 4000 FEET.

* TIMING: FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH FRIDAY EVENING.

* LOCATIONS INCLUDE: CAMP NELSON...GIANT FOREST...JOHNSONDALE...
  LODGEPOLE...SHAVER LAKE...YOSEMITE VALLEY.

* WINDS: SOUTHWEST WINDS 25 TO 35 MPH WITH GUSTS TO AROUND 60 MPH
  OVER HIGHER ELEVATIONS.

* IMPACTS: SNOW COULD CAUSE TRAVEL DELAYS AND POSSIBLE ROAD
  CLOSURES ABOVE 5000 FEET. GUSTY WINDS WILL CREATE AREAS OF
  BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW WITH REDUCED VISIBILITIES. PEOPLE
  LIVING IN OR PLANNING TRAVEL INTO THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA
  ABOVE 5000 FEET SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR WINTER WEATHER
  CONDITIONS.

Flood Advisory

FLOOD ADVISORY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Amarillo, Texas
1220 AM CDT THU APR 12 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN AMARILLO HAS ISSUED AN

* URBAN AND SMALL STREAM FLOOD ADVISORY FOR...
  SOUTHERN MOORE COUNTY IN THE PANHANDLE OF TEXAS...
  THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF DUMAS...

* UNTIL 415 AM CDT

* HEAVY RAIN WILL CONTINUE TO MOVE EAST ACROSS CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN
  MOORE COUNTY.

* THE HEAVY RAIN HAS CAUSED FLOODED ROADWAYS IN WESTERN MOORE
  COUNTY AND WILL LIKELY CAUSE URBAN FLOODING IN DUMAS AND IN
  CREEKS ACROSS CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN MOORE COUNTY.

Flood Watch

FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Spokane, Washington
1138 AM PDT WED APR 11 2012

...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SPOKANE, WA HAS ISSUED A FLOOD
WATCH FOR THE FOLLOWING RIVERS IN IDAHO...

  COEUR D`ALENE RIVER AT CATALDO AFFECTING KOOTENAI AND SHOSHONE
  COUNTIES

...EXPECTED RAIN FALL TONIGHT AND EARLY THURSDAY OVER THE COEUR D`ALENE
RIVER BASIN WILL LEAD TO POSSIBLE MINOR FLOODING ON THE COEUR D`ALENE
RIVER AT CATALDO.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SPOKANE, WA HAS ISSUED A
* FLOOD WATCH FOR
  THE COEUR D`ALENE RIVER AT CATALDO
* FROM THURSDAY EVENING TO FRIDAY EVENING.
* AT  9:30 AM WEDNESDAY THE STAGE WAS 37.6 FEET.
* MINOR FLOODING IS POSSIBLE.
* FLOOD STAGE IS 43.00 FEET.
* FORECAST...THE RIVER WILL RISE TODAY AND THURSDAY...POSSIBLY
  ACHIEVING FLOOD STAGE LATE THURSDAY EVENING. THE RIVER WILL
  LIKELY CREST SLIGHTLY ABOVE FLOOD STAGE AND BEGIN TO DROP
  DURING THE DAY FRIDAY.
* AT 43.0 FEET...MINOR FLOODING OF FARMLAND FROM CATALDO DOWNSTREAM TO
  HARRISON IS LIKELY. THE CAMPGROUND AT CATALDO WILL ALSO BEGIN TO
  FLOOD. PORTIONS OF DUDLEY ROAD, WEST OF LATOUR CREEK, WILL LIKELY
  BE UNDERWATER AND IMPASSABLE. IF THERE IS SIGNIFICANT WATER ALREADY
  IN THE FLOODPLAIN, THESE IMPACTS MAY OCCUR AT LOWER STAGES.

***********************************************************************************************

Radiation

Fukushima Radiation Plume Has Now Hit Hawaii- In a year it’ll Probably Reach U.S. West Coast

Energy News
2012-04-08 09:38:00

Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear, joins Thom Hartmann. California beware! A radioactive wave is headed toward the West Coast of the United States courtesy of the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

KAMPS: And that plume, as you said, it’s taken a year but it has now hit Hawaii. Another year from now it’ll probably reach the West Coast of the US.

***********************************************************************************************

SOLAR ACTIVITY

2MIN News Apr11: 8.9 Quake Indonesia [8.6 USGS] & a New Gamma Burst!


***********************************************************************************************

Solar System

A Magnetic Surprise from Venus

Artist’s impression showing how the solar wind shapes the magnetospheres of Venus (shown with a brown tail, closer to the Sun) and Earth (shown in blue). Both planets are roughly the same size. Venus is closer to the Sun, at roughly 0.7 AU (Astronomical Unit) while Earth is located at 1 AU. Unlike Venus, Earth has an internal magnetic field which makes its magnetosphere bigger. The lines coming out of the Sun symbolise the propagation direction of the solar wind. Credit: ESA

Venus is a rarity among planets – a world that does not internally generate a magnetic field. Despite the absence of a large protective magnetosphere, the near-Venus environment does exhibit a number of similarities with planets such as Earth. The latest, surprising, example is the evidence for magnetic reconnection in Venus’ induced magnetotail.

Planets which generate magnetic fields in their interiors, such as Earth, Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn, are surrounded by invisible magnetospheres. Their magnetic fields deflect the charged particles of the solar wind (electrons and protons) as they stream away from the Sun. This deflection creates a magnetosphere – a protective “bubble” around the planet – which ends in an elongated magnetotail on the lee side of the magnetosphere.

Since Venus has no intrinsic magnetic field to act as a shield against incoming charged particles, the solar wind sometimes interacts directly with the upper atmosphere. However, Venus is partially protected by an induced magnetic field. ….

Read Full Article Here

*******************************************************************************************

Mysterious Booms / Rumblings

Long rumbling (20 min or more) then mystery ‘boom’ — St. Louis, MO – part 1

 

Published on Apr 12, 2012 by

Boom can be heard at the very first few seconds of PART 2 — uploading that video next (right now its 2am CDT)

I am not drawing ANY conclusions on this yet.. just a strange coincidence as of now… but hoping there are some other people besides my wife and I, who heard these sounds yesterday—- here in South Saint Louis, Missouri USA.

Approx coordinates of the rumbles and boom heard: 38°36’14.85″N , 90°14’7.74″W ..

Confirmed 1st hand reports — heard by myself, my wife, and neighbor. Looking for others in the area who may have heard these multiple rumbles. 3am for 15 or 20 minutes.. 9am for 20-30 minutes.. and 11am for about 10 – 15 seconds.. Two times VERY long.. one time very short…..not a jet, train, or truck.. which you CAN hear in the video clearly as such.

Some kind of rumbling / drilling sound ?!! Carries on for a very long time.

One boom at 3am (not captured on video).. one boom about 945am (captured on video at the very start of part 2)… camera is a Sony DCR SX-63 … records in 30 minute segments.. part 1 30 min long.. part two 17 min long.

every bird in the area is chirping.. its about 40 degrees F outside. No wind 1-5 mph tops.

you can hear the rumble OVER any animals, trucks, planes, helicopters AND EVEN over the police sirens. NO air conditioners fans or construction going on.. especially at 3am the first time we heard it (it woke up my wife .. who woke me up).

Yesterday — 4/11/2012 — my wife and I were awoke about 3am CDT to a long persistent rumble — which shook our house and windows… it lasted for about 15 minutes before I got out of bed and came down to record video of it….

my camera died at 315am (approx) .. as soon as i took it outside… blast confounded! Then the sound stopped abruptly.

Then…. within the hour of this first rumble at 3am — we saw the large earthquakes in Indonesia — don’t know yet if these are related… may not be related at all (im HOPING!).

Then move forward to about 9am CDT — the rumble appeared again.. this time with a series of “booms”. I grabbed my cam and ran outside.. and this is where you begin in the video.

Clearly.. a low audible rumble for many minutes.. towards the end of this Part 1 .. you can hear it pick up in intensity.

Start of video 2 you can hear the last “boom”.. only one boom heard on cam. At 3am.. the first “boom” rattled the windows and woke my wife, who woke me in turn to check out what was going on.

Hoping this is just some kind of anomaly… if we get a repeat… I will deploy the cam again if I hear it.

The part 2 of this video.. the boom in particular.. sounds similar to the Wisconsin booms a few weeks ago… if you have some kind of audio processing gear.. let me know what you think if you have the time to analyze this fully.

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