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Tag Archive: Wellington


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Biological Hazard in New Zealand on December 11 2015 01:43 PM (UTC).

Base data

EDIS Number BH-20151211-51213-NZL
Event type Biological Hazard
Date/Time December 11 2015 01:43 PM (UTC)
Last update December 11 2015 01:46 PM (UTC)
Cause of event
Damage level Is not or not known Damage level

Geographic information

Continent Australia – New-Zealand
Country New Zealand
County / State South Island
Area Wellington, Motueka, Kaikoura and Christchurch
Settlement
Coordinate 41° 7.443,173° 0.059

Number of affected people / Humanities loss

Dead person(s) 0
Injured person(s) 0
Missing person(s) 0
Evacuated person(s) 0
Affected person(s) 0
Foreign people 0

Biohazard information

Biohazard level
Disease, agent name Measles
Infected person(s) 0
Species Human
Status suspected

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A measles warning has been issued in several areas after an infected tourist traveled the country. A 28-year-old European man carrying the virus traveled from Wellington, to Motueka, Kaikoura and Christchurch from December 3 to 11. The Canterbury District Health Board now is asking anyone who may have come in contact with him and is now presenting symptoms to call their doctor. He is believed to have contracted the highly-infectious virus while in Australia and is in private accommodation in Christchurch until the end of his infectious period. Canterbury medical officer Alistair Humphrey said it was a particularly risky time for the tourism industry. “Over the next few years there is a heightened risk of measles as a result of the decision by parents in the 1990s not to get their children immunized,” he said. Where He Stayed: December 3-5: Comfort Hotel, Cuba Street, Wellington,5 December 5: BlueBridge Ferry,December 5-7: Motueka Holiday Top 10,December 8-10: Lazy Shag Backpackers, Kaikoura,December 11: Travels to residence outside Christchurch

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news

Sick tourist prompts measles warning

NZ Newswire
Measles is untreatable but easily preventagle through vaccinations© Getty Images Measles is untreatable but easily preventable through vaccinations A measles warning has been issued in several areas after an infected tourist traveled the country.

 

A 28-year-old European man carrying the virus traveled from Wellington, to Motueka, Kaikoura and Christchurch from December 3 to 11.The Canterbury District Health Board now is asking anyone who may have come in contact with him and is now presenting symptoms to call their doctor.

He is believed to have contracted the highly-infectious virus while in Australia and is in private accommodation in Christchurch until the end of his infectious period.

 

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo NewZealand-65MagEQwith7aftershocksAugust16th20132_zps834294d4.jpg

 photo NewZealand-65MagEQwith7aftershocksAugust16th2013_zpsf63e7f36.jpg

M6.5 – 22km S of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 02:31:08 UTC

Earthquake location 41.715°S, 173.976°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 02:31:08 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 14:31:08 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 21:31:08 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.715°S 173.976°E depth=9.9km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 22km (14mi) S of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 75km (47mi) SE of Nelson, New Zealand
  3. 78km (48mi) ESE of Richmond, New Zealand
  4. 79km (49mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  5. 81km (50mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image


 photo NewZealand-65MagEQAugust16th2013_zps4d5452b3.jpg

M5.7 – 38km SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 02:45:26 UTC

Earthquake location 41.820°S, 174.180°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 02:45:26 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 14:45:26 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 21:45:26 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.820°S 174.180°E depth=5.0km (3.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 38km (24mi) SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 75km (47mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  3. 77km (48mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand
  4. 90km (56mi) SW of Lower Hutt, New Zealand
  5. 94km (58mi) SW of Porirua, New Zealand

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

M5.7 – 38km SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 02:45:26 UTC

Earthquake location 41.820°S, 174.180°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 02:45:26 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 14:45:26 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 21:45:26 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.820°S 174.180°E depth=5.0km (3.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 38km (24mi) SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 75km (47mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  3. 77km (48mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand
  4. 90km (56mi) SW of Lower Hutt, New Zealand
  5. 94km (58mi) SW of Porirua, New Zealand

M5.2 – 63km SSW of Brooklyn, New Zealand

2013-08-16 02:56:25 UTC

Earthquake location 41.870°S, 174.570°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 02:56:25 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 14:56:25 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 21:56:25 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.870°S 174.570°E depth=5.0km (3.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 63km (39mi) SSW of Brooklyn, New Zealand
  2. 64km (40mi) SE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  3. 66km (41mi) SSW of Karori, New Zealand
  4. 67km (42mi) SSW of Wellington, New Zealand
  5. 78km (48mi) SSW of Lower Hutt, New Zealand

M5.4 – 32km S of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 03:09:10 UTC

Earthquake location 41.806°S, 173.926°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 03:09:10 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 15:09:10 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 22:09:10 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.806°S 173.926°E depth=10.1km (6.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 32km (20mi) S of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 79km (49mi) SE of Nelson, New Zealand
  3. 81km (50mi) SE of Richmond, New Zealand
  4. 89km (55mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  5. 91km (57mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand

M5.0 – 30km SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand

 2013-08-16 03:21:31 UTC

Earthquake location 41.780°S, 174.060°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 03:21:31 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 15:21:31 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 22:21:31 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.780°S 174.060°E depth=17.0km (10.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 30km (19mi) SSE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 78km (48mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  3. 81km (50mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand
  4. 85km (53mi) SE of Nelson, New Zealand
  5. 88km (55mi) SE of Richmond, New Zealand

M4.7 – 36km ESE of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 03:26:50 UTC

Earthquake location 41.630°S, 174.360°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 03:26:50 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 15:26:50 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 22:26:50 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.630°S 174.360°E depth=21.0km (13.0mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 36km (22mi) ESE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 49km (30mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  3. 51km (32mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand
  4. 65km (40mi) SW of Lower Hutt, New Zealand
  5. 68km (42mi) SW of Porirua, New Zealand

M5.5 – 30km SE of Blenheim, New Zealand

2013-08-16 03:51:35 UTC

Earthquake location 41.734°S, 174.182°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-08-16 03:51:35 UTC
  2. 2013-08-16 15:51:35 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-08-15 22:51:35 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

41.734°S 174.182°E depth=10.1km (6.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 30km (19mi) SE of Blenheim, New Zealand
  2. 68km (42mi) SW of Karori, New Zealand
  3. 70km (43mi) SW of Wellington, New Zealand
  4. 84km (52mi) SW of Lower Hutt, New Zealand
  5. 86km (53mi) SW of Porirua, New Zealand

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

Tectonic Summary

The M 6.5 August 16, 2013 earthquake south of Blenheim, New Zealand, occurred as the result of strike-slip faulting on or near the plate boundary between the Pacific and Australia plates. At the latitude of this event, the Pacific plate moves towards the WSW with respect to Australia at a rate of approximately 41 mm/yr. Preliminary faulting mechanisms for the earthquake suggest it is related to either NE-SW right-lateral strike-slip motion (consistent with plate boundary oriented deformation), or NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip motion.

This region of New Zealand has hosted a number of small-moderate sized earthquakes in recent weeks, including a M 6.5 earthquake approximately 40 km east of the August 16 event in the Cook Straight, on July 21, 2013. The July 21 event was preceded by several M 5.3-5.8 events and was followed by a dozen or more aftershocks between M 4.5-5.0, delineating shallow upper plate structures aligned NE-SW, and some deeper subduction-related activity, mostly offshore of the north coast of New Zealand’s South Island.

In contrast to the earlier events, the August 16 earthquake is on land, near the eastern end of the complex Marlborough Fault System. The event is located approximately 10 km southeast of the Awatere Fault in the vicinity of Lake Grassmere. The Marlborough Fault system is characterized by a series of NE striking right-lateral strike slip faults that have dismembered the northern South Island into a series of crustal blocks that are being transported to the northeast. Although there is no specific mapped surface fault that can be linked to the August 16 event at this time, the NE trending fault plane is similarly oriented to the Awatere and Clarence faults of the Marlborough system. In 1966 a M 5.8 earthquake (interpreted to have occurred offshore to the NE of the August 16 event) was widely felt in this area, causing surface deformation of the main railroad line in the region. That event is interpreted to have occurred on a blind structure sub-parallel to the Awatere fault to its northeast.

Seismotectonics of the Eastern Margin of the Australia Plate

The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most sesimically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand.

Since 1900 there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults’ strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

North of New Zealand, the Australia-Pacific boundary stretches east of Tonga and Fiji to 250 km south of Samoa. For 2,200 km the trench is approximately linear, and includes two segments where old (>120 Myr) Pacific oceanic lithosphere rapidly subducts westward (Kermadec and Tonga). At the northern end of the Tonga trench, the boundary curves sharply westward and changes along a 700 km-long segment from trench-normal subduction, to oblique subduction, to a left lateral transform-like structure.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 60 mm/yr at the southern Kermadec trench to 90 mm/yr at the northern Tonga trench; however, significant back arc extension (or equivalently, slab rollback) causes the consumption rate of subducting Pacific lithosphere to be much faster. The spreading rate in the Havre trough, west of the Kermadec trench, increases northward from 8 to 20 mm/yr. The southern tip of this spreading center is propagating into the North Island of New Zealand, rifting it apart. In the southern Lau Basin, west of the Tonga trench, the spreading rate increases northward from 60 to 90 mm/yr, and in the northern Lau Basin, multiple spreading centers result in an extension rate as high as 160 mm/yr. The overall subduction velocity of the Pacific plate is the vector sum of Australia-Pacific velocity and back arc spreading velocity: thus it increases northward along the Kermadec trench from 70 to 100 mm/yr, and along the Tonga trench from 150 to 240 mm/yr.

The Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone generates many large earthquakes on the interface between the descending Pacific and overriding Australia plates, within the two plates themselves and, less frequently, near the outer rise of the Pacific plate east of the trench. Since 1900, 40 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded, mostly north of 30°S. However, it is unclear whether any of the few historic M8+ events that have occurred close to the plate boundary were underthrusting events on the plate interface, or were intraplate earthquakes. On September 29, 2009, one of the largest normal fault (outer rise) earthquakes ever recorded (M8.1) occurred south of Samoa, 40 km east of the Tonga trench, generating a tsunami that killed at least 180 people.

Across the North Fiji Basin and to the west of the Vanuatu Islands, the Australia plate again subducts eastwards beneath the Pacific, at the North New Hebrides trench. At the southern end of this trench, east of the Loyalty Islands, the plate boundary curves east into an oceanic transform-like structure analogous to the one north of Tonga.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 80 to 90 mm/yr along the North New Hebrides trench, but the Australia plate consumption rate is increased by extension in the back arc and in the North Fiji Basin. Back arc spreading occurs at a rate of 50 mm/yr along most of the subduction zone, except near ~15°S, where the D’Entrecasteaux ridge intersects the trench and causes localized compression of 50 mm/yr in the back arc. Therefore, the Australia plate subduction velocity ranges from 120 mm/yr at the southern end of the North New Hebrides trench, to 40 mm/yr at the D’Entrecasteaux ridge-trench intersection, to 170 mm/yr at the northern end of the trench.

Large earthquakes are common along the North New Hebrides trench and have mechanisms associated with subduction tectonics, though occasional strike slip earthquakes occur near the subduction of the D’Entrecasteaux ridge. Within the subduction zone 34 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded since 1900. On October 7, 2009, a large interplate thrust fault earthquake (M7.6) in the northern North New Hebrides subduction zone was followed 15 minutes later by an even larger interplate event (M7.8) 60 km to the north. It is likely that the first event triggered the second of the so-called earthquake “doublet”.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

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New Zealand Herald

 

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Dire quake warning for Alpine Fault

By Shelley Robinson

9:40 AM Wednesday Apr 10, 2013

The West Coast would suffer most of those casualties and Christchurch will be relatively unscathed in comparison.

The figures have been revealed by Civil Defence emergency management group leader James Thompson, as Civil Defence, hospitals, police and other emergency services plan for a major exercise to prepare for The Big One.

The Alpine Fault is expected to rupture within 50 years, a one-in-500 year event that will produce a devastating earthquake of a magnitude 8 or more.

Towns and cities throughout the South Island will feel its tremendous power, with those on the West Coast taking most of its brunt.

Settlements and possibly towns are expected to be cut off for long periods because of landslides and wrecked roading and other links.

Read More Here

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IBTimes

By Reissa Su | July 22, 2013 12:17 PM EST

The Wellington earthquake could have brought a lot of damage, but the possibility of bigger aftershocks remains high, according to scientists.

The fault line that caused the earthquakes in Cook Strait has long been known to produce earthquake “swarms” but none have been recorded as devastating, according to historical records.

The Wellington quakes that occurred three times on Friday, July 19, and twice on July 21 and the following aftershocks were due to city’s plates moving between the Pacific and Australian tectonic plates. The highest magnitude of an earthquake in Wellington was recorded last night at 6.5.

Dr. Richard Sharpe, Director of Earthquake Engineering at Beca said he did not expect the yesterday’s quakes at Wellington will cause damage to buildings. However, Mr. Sharpe said the quakes would prompt the city to conduct engineering checks.

New Zealand is resilient to earthquakes in general. According to Mr. Sharpe, other countries that will experience the same type of earthquakes in Wellington will probably cause very brittle buildings to sustain damage.

Professor of Geophysics at Victoria University Euan Smith said that the interface between the underlying Pacific plates and overlying Australian plates was a critical fault. Mr. Smith said the same fault could potentially cause massive earthquakes.

Read More and  Watch Video Here

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An empty shipping container sits in the harbour where the land fell into the sea at the Port Wellington Container terminal caused by yesterdays earthquake on July 22, 2013. (AFP)

The New World supermarket in Blenheim, on New Zealand’s south island, is closed after the earthquake. Photo: Emma Allen/Fairfax NZ

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Earthquake rattles New Zealand capital

  • guardian.co.uk, Sunday 21 July 2013 02.55 EDT

Link to video: Earthquake hits New Zealand Capital The New Zealand capital, Wellington, was rattled by a magnitude 6.9 earthquake on Sunday that broke water mains, smashed windows and downed power lines.

Wellington police Inspector Marty Parker said there had been minor structural damage and parts of the city were left without power but there were no reports of injury and no tsunami.

The US Geological Survey said the quake happened under the Cook Strait 35 miles (57km) south-west of Wellington and six miles (10km) beneath the surface. The strait separates the main North and South Islands of New Zealand.

The quake could be felt hundreds of miles away in the centre of the North Island.

Parker said the quake struck near nightfall. A more complete picture of the damage would emerge in the morning, he said.

The Reuters news agency said the quake knocked items off shelves, shattered some windows and brought trains in Wellington to a halt. It was the largest of a series of tremors that had shaken the region in the past few days.

New Zealand is part of the so-called Pacific “Ring of Fire” that has regular seismic activity. A severe earthquake in the city of Christchurch on the South Island in 2011 killed 185 people and destroyed much of the city’s downtown.

 

Read More and Watch Video Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Forest / Wild Fires

Today Forest / Wild Fire New Zealand Northland, [Martinborough area] Damage level
Details

Forest / Wild Fire in New Zealand on Monday, 01 April, 2013 at 03:48 (03:48 AM) UTC.

Description
Five helicopters and seven fire crews are fighting a 30-hectare pine forest fire east of Martinborough. Two further helicopters are expected to join firefighters shortly. Wairarapa principal rural fire officer Phill Wishnowsky said it could take days to extinguish the large forestry blaze. “We’ve got a large forest fire, very active and quite extreme conditions. The fire is an active fire so of course everywhere it goes it’s obviously destroying the forest. “It’s going to take a long time and a lot of effort [to put it out],” Mr Wishnowsky said. Mr Wishnowsky said there was no risk to surrounding property at the moment. Wellington fire communications shift manager Tim Rees said the forestry block fire was reported at 5.50am this morning. Fire services from Martinborough, Featherston, Upper Hutt, Wellington and rural fire parties are fighting the blaze.

Two helicopters needed to fight forest fire

8:35 AM Monday Apr 1, 2013

New Zealand Herald

 Photo / File photo

Photo / File photo

Ground crews and two helicopters are battling a forestry fire in south Wairarapa.

Emergency services were called to Hinakura just before 6am.

Crews from Wairarapa and Wellington are on the ground fighting the blaze that is well involved and covering a 20ha area, with two helicopters also assisting, said a central fire communications spokesman.

There was no threat to properties, he said.

APNZ

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 

5.4 South of the Kermadec Islands 2013-01-15 19:04:35 34.722°S 178.901°E 170.6

M5.4 – South of the Kermadec Islands 2013-01-15 19:04:35 UTC

Earthquake location 34.722°S, 178.901°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-01-15 19:04:35 UTC
  2. 2013-01-16 07:04:35 UTC+12:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-01-15 13:04:35 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

34.722°S 178.901°E depth=170.6km (106.0mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 372km (231mi) NE of Whitianga, New Zealand
  2. 398km (247mi) NNE of Whakatane, New Zealand
  3. 410km (255mi) NE of Tauranga, New Zealand
  4. 431km (268mi) ENE of Whangarei, New Zealand
  5. 813km (505mi) NNE of Wellington, New Zealand

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

6.1 Pacific-Antarctic Ridge 2013-01-15 16:09:36 62.566°S 161.346°W 10.0

M6.1 – Pacific-Antarctic Ridge 2013-01-15 16:09:36 UTC

Earthquake location 62.566°S, 161.346°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-01-15 16:09:36 UTC
  2. 2013-01-15 05:09:36 UTC-11:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-01-15 10:09:36 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

62.566°S 161.346°W depth=10.0km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 1030km (640mi) ENE of Scott Island Bank, Antarctica
  2. 2572km (1598mi) SSE of Dunedin, New Zealand
  3. 2619km (1627mi) SE of Invercargill, New Zealand
  4. 2619km (1627mi) SE of Gore, New Zealand
  5. 2845km (1768mi) SSE of Wellington, New Zealand

Posted by .

If I were going to describe the perfect contraceptive, it would go something like this: no babies, no latex, no daily pill to remember, no hormones to interfere with mood or sex drive, no negative health effects whatsoever, and 100 percent effectiveness. The funny thing is, something like that currently exists.

The procedure called RISUG in India (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) takes about 15 minutes with a doctor, is effective after about three days, and lasts for 10 or more years. A doctor applies some local anesthetic, makes a small pinhole in the base of the scrotum, reaches in with a pair of very thin forceps, and pulls out the small white vas deferens tube. Then, the doctor injects the polymer gel (called Vasalgel here in the US), pushes the vas deferens back inside, repeats the process for the other vas deferens, puts a Band-Aid over the small hole, and the man is on his way. If this all sounds incredibly simple and inexpensive, that’s because it is. The chemicals themselves cost less than the syringe used to administer them. But the science of what happens next is the really fascinating part.

The two common chemicals — styrene maleic anhydride and dimethyl sulfoxide — form a polymer that thickens over the next 72 hours, much like a pliable epoxy, but the purpose of these chemicals isn’t to harden and block the vas deferens. Instead, the polymer lines the wall of the vas deferens and allows sperm to flow freely down the middle (this prevents any pressure buildup),  and because of the polymer’s pattern of negative/positive polarization, the sperm are torn apart through the polyelectrolytic effect. On a molecular level, it’s what super-villains envision will happen when they stick the good guy between two huge magnets and flip the switch.

 

Read Full Article Here

Earth Watch Report  –  Extreme Weather

'Horrific' noise as 'tiny tornado' hits Kaikoura  (Source: Maeve Ryan)

09.01.2013 Extreme Weather New Zealand Southland, Kaikoura Damage level
Details

Extreme Weather in New Zealand on Wednesday, 09 January, 2013 at 21:20 (09:20 PM) UTC.

Description
A “mini-tornado” has hit Kaikoura, cutting power to a number of homes, as gales and heavy rain continue to lash the country. Police confirmed they were at the scene, on Beach Rd, after the “mini tornado” hit earlier this morning. No one was believed to have been injured but a house was understood to have lost its roof, police south communications shift manager Hemi Waratini said. Power was also out in many areas. Mainpower confirmed a number of power lines were down and linesmen were working to restore electricity to houses. Engineering network manager Peter Hurford said Beach Rd was the worst affected area. Meanwhile, wind continued to howl in Wellington and eastern areas this morning, with gusts in excess of 130kmh hammering the capital, while heavy rain was moving away from Southland toward the headwaters of Otago and the Canterbury lakes. Fire service shift manager Murray Dunbar said between 7.30am and 8am firefighters were called to secure roofs that were lifting in the Wellington suburbs of Karori and Kilbirnie.

 

In this file photo, released by manipula.co.nz, author Ray Waru inspects files at New Zealand's national archives, in Wellington, on December 7, 2012, following the release of his new book about rare historical gems buried in the archives, including a bizarre WWII plan to create a "tsunami bomb" and military X-Files detailing supposed UFO sightings.

In this file photo, released by manipula.co.nz, author Ray Waru inspects files at New Zealand’s national archives, in Wellington, on December 7, 2012, following the release of his new book about rare historical gems buried in the archives, including a bizarre WWII plan to create a “tsunami bomb” and military X-Files detailing supposed UFO sightings.
In this file photo, released by manipula.co.nz, author Ray Waru inspects files at New Zealand's national archives, in Wellington, on December 7, 2012, following the release of his new book about rare historical gems buried in the archives, including a bizarre WWII plan to create a "tsunami bomb" and military X-Files detailing supposed UFO sightings.

In this file photo, released by manipula.co.nz, author Ray Waru inspects files at New Zealand’s national archives, in Wellington, on December 7, 2012, following the release of his new book about rare historical gems buried in the archives, including a bizarre WWII plan to create a “tsunami bomb” and military X-Files detailing supposed UFO sightings.

AFP – A new book has revealed rare historical gems buried in New Zealand’s national archives, including a bizarre WWII plan to create a “tsunami bomb” and military files detailing supposed UFO sightings.

Author Ray Waru said he wrote “Secrets and Treasures” to highlight the material publicly available at Archives New Zealand in Wellington — where almost 100 kilometres (62 miles) of shelf space is crammed with historical artefacts.

“It was totally overwhelming at the beginning,” he told AFP.

“I knew I wanted to get in the important things, the Treaty of Waitangi (New Zealand’s founding document), the Declaration of Independence, the women’s suffrage petition, and a few other things.

“But once you start digging, one story leads onto another and I’d just follow my nose.”

The suffrage petition Waru refers to contains 36,000 signatures and was dramatically unfurled on the floor of the New Zealand parliament in 1893 by supporters of women’s right to vote.

Stretching for almost 300 metres (980 feet), the petition, currently undergoing restoration, proved successful and led New Zealand, then a British colony, to become the first country in the world to grant women the vote later that year.

 

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