Tag Archive: Volcano Eruption in Indonesia


Earthquakes

USGS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  2.9 2012/10/07 23:48:20   19.083   -64.763 37.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/07 23:34:07   19.085   -64.797 19.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/07 23:31:10   18.962   -64.695 52.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/07 23:14:56   59.767  -151.986 54.5  KENAI PENINSULA, ALASKA
MAP  2.7 2012/10/07 21:10:23   49.483  -120.490 0.0  BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA
MAP  2.7 2012/10/07 21:04:00   18.420   -64.879 83.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.4 2012/10/07 16:53:10   19.600   -64.442 47.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.5 2012/10/07 13:25:09   33.986  -117.189 14.2  GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA, CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.1 2012/10/07 12:59:21   19.155   -64.604 82.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/07 12:44:53   18.145   -64.599 3.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/07 12:12:06   19.093   -65.859 13.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  2.9 2012/10/07 12:01:34   18.978   -64.108 39.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.3   2012/10/07 11:42:51   40.737   48.470 40.9  AZERBAIJAN
MAP  4.5   2012/10/07 11:34:14   -7.423   124.922 376.0  BANDA SEA
MAP  3.2 2012/10/07 11:19:37   19.658   -64.352 47.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.3 2012/10/07 11:08:55   -3.211   135.196 32.8  PAPUA, INDONESIA
MAP  3.3 2012/10/07 11:06:20   19.926   -64.301 49.0  NORTH OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
MAP  3.2 2012/10/07 10:17:13   59.028  -154.559 135.7  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.5   2012/10/07 09:16:49   12.368   -89.199 35.0  OFF THE COAST OF EL SALVADOR
MAP  5.3   2012/10/07 08:36:32   -5.533   151.810 35.3  NEW BRITAIN REGION, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
MAP  2.9 2012/10/07 08:34:03   18.899   -64.974 19.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.6 2012/10/07 07:49:31   18.015   -68.561 97.0  DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REGION
MAP  3.1 2012/10/07 07:44:51   19.786   -64.281 30.0  NORTH OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
MAP  2.7 2012/10/07 07:41:26   18.562   -64.104 24.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.1 2012/10/07 07:39:36   17.543   -68.570 37.0  DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REGION
MAP  4.7   2012/10/07 07:38:46  -15.420  -172.065 10.0  SAMOA ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/10/07 07:00:55   9.685   -85.056 23.7  OFF THE COAST OF COSTA RICA
MAP  3.2 2012/10/07 06:10:09   18.890   -65.249 13.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/07 06:09:00   19.027   -64.584 18.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.9 2012/10/07 05:45:23   19.094   -64.508 35.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.6   2012/10/07 03:14:23   18.550   120.959 33.1  LUZON, PHILIPPINES
MAP  3.4 2012/10/07 03:07:43   19.631   -64.387 50.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.7 2012/10/07 02:48:34   19.457   -64.256 81.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/10/07 02:32:07   54.567   167.322 25.4  KOMANDORSKIYE OSTROVA, RUSSIA REGION
MAP  4.7   2012/10/07 01:56:51  -20.659  -174.094 21.8  TONGA

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  2.7 2012/10/06 23:42:18   41.274  -123.381 40.4  NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.6 2012/10/06 22:57:02   61.735  -150.726 55.1  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.1 2012/10/06 22:49:37  -32.097   -72.290 15.2  OFFSHORE COQUIMBO, CHILE
MAP  2.7 2012/10/06 22:11:34   55.639  -161.901 166.7  ALASKA PENINSULA
MAP  2.5 2012/10/06 21:58:29   33.456  -116.388 5.5  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.7 2012/10/06 20:15:36   60.232  -141.851 36.3  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  2.6 2012/10/06 16:59:06   19.259  -155.287 32.7  ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
MAP  2.9 2012/10/06 15:01:11   57.067  -157.532 6.1  ALASKA PENINSULA
MAP  2.7 2012/10/06 10:25:44   59.825  -141.784 5.0  SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA
MAP  4.7   2012/10/06 09:27:41   41.113   88.308 36.1  SOUTHERN XINJIANG, CHINA
MAP  4.1 2012/10/06 08:49:17   23.769  -108.551 10.1  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.3 2012/10/06 08:40:51   62.423  -153.554 37.8  CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP  4.1 2012/10/06 08:35:37   19.436  -109.056 10.0  REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/10/06 07:56:29  -25.457  -177.582 150.0  SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS
MAP  3.4 2012/10/06 06:15:15   19.693   -64.379 28.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.2 2012/10/06 05:32:16   18.969   -64.278 64.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.6   2012/10/06 05:27:44   31.424   140.165 153.2  IZU ISLANDS, JAPAN REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/06 04:43:03   19.525   -64.421 55.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.9   2012/10/06 03:40:04   23.833   -45.674 9.9  NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
MAP  4.6   2012/10/06 03:18:16  -32.172   -72.138 12.3  OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP  2.6 2012/10/06 03:01:36   61.519  -146.737 49.0  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.8   2012/10/06 01:19:35   76.129   7.725 10.0  SVALBARD REGION
MAP  3.2 2012/10/06 00:31:54   60.497  -152.071 16.9  SOUTHERN ALASKA

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 23:07:26   41.349  -117.348 0.0  NEVADA
MAP  3.4 2012/10/05 22:37:55   58.209  -137.906 0.0  SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA
MAP  3.2 2012/10/05 20:51:27   43.771  -127.756 10.0  OFF THE COAST OF OREGON
MAP  2.8 2012/10/05 20:32:11   47.709  -122.613 26.2  SEATTLE-TACOMA URBAN AREA, WASHINGTON
MAP  5.0   2012/10/05 20:02:09   23.502  -108.680 1.0  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.6 2012/10/05 19:54:29   32.205  -115.280 35.0  BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO
MAP  3.2 2012/10/05 19:45:33   18.518   -66.071 119.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  3.2 2012/10/05 19:42:54   58.162  -153.726 99.0  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  5.4   2012/10/05 18:22:58   13.032   -91.557 50.9  OFF THE COAST OF GUATEMALA
MAP  5.0   2012/10/05 18:08:20   -6.673   129.509 157.2  BANDA SEA
MAP  4.5   2012/10/05 17:56:02  -15.542   -70.700 185.2  SOUTHERN PERU
MAP  3.0 2012/10/05 17:12:44   19.047   -64.315 63.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.9 2012/10/05 17:11:53   19.233   -64.451 24.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.5 2012/10/05 17:05:21   19.380  -155.238 3.8  ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 13:58:11   19.129   -64.295 58.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.9 2012/10/05 13:57:01   18.777   -64.128 69.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 13:32:58   19.649   -64.397 8.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.7 2012/10/05 13:14:47   19.108   -64.405 44.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/05 13:11:09   19.182   -64.559 7.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/10/05 12:39:03   18.809   -64.120 70.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/05 12:35:36   19.177   -64.409 45.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.2 2012/10/05 12:28:00   19.033   -64.353 60.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 11:59:32   19.629   -64.393 13.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.2 2012/10/05 11:23:01   19.471   -64.115 86.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/10/05 11:19:23  -23.038  -175.509 35.0  TONGA REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/10/05 10:25:28   39.369   33.833 4.8  CENTRAL TURKEY
MAP  5.0   2012/10/05 08:13:19   26.233   125.176 154.7  NORTHEAST OF TAIWAN
MAP  4.0 2012/10/05 06:37:31   19.961   -65.465 36.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/10/05 04:55:52   11.931   -86.656 100.0  NEAR THE COAST OF NICARAGUA
MAP  3.1 2012/10/05 04:38:39   19.642   -64.378 40.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 04:03:31   19.078   -64.707 78.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/05 03:25:18   19.132   -64.382 52.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/10/05 02:36:23   18.940   -64.274 66.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.1 2012/10/05 02:23:54   18.963   -64.271 68.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.7 2012/10/05 02:17:31   19.108   -64.314 53.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/10/05 02:08:30   18.969   -64.384 59.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.5 2012/10/05 01:17:22   35.928  -117.680 2.7  CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.4 2012/10/05 01:10:44   19.236   -64.360 46.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.7   2012/10/05 00:19:57   17.496   -46.461 10.0  NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
MAP  5.5   2012/10/05 00:15:42   17.509   -46.465 10.0  NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE

……………………………

‘Silent Earthquakes’ Ripple Under Cascadia

Credit Pacific Northwest Seismic Network
The past five weeks saw two swarms of “slow slip and tremor” in the Northwest.

Parts of Washington and Oregon are in the midst of silent earthquakes this week. You can’t feel this so-called “slow slip” quake and it doesn’t cause damage. Still, scientists want to learn more about the recently discovered phenomenon.

Little is certain so far, but there’s a possibility these deep tremors could trigger a damaging earthquake or serve as a warning bell for the Big One.

A bank of computer monitors covers one wall of the University of Washington seismology lab. Some display seismograph readouts that look like jagged mountain ranges stacked one over the other. A big screen shows a current map of tremors under the Pacific Northwest. It is lit up with activity.

“Each dot represents the location of a five minute burst of tremor,” says earth scientist Ken Creager.

He scrutinizes a dense slash of blue, yellow, green and red dots. The arc stretches south from mid-Vancouver Island, goes under the Olympic Peninsula, Puget Sound and peters out south of Olympia. A separate patch of color radiates out from near Roseburg, Ore.

Washington State Seismologist John Vidale is also keeping an eye on the busy map.

“This kind of earthquake is distinctly different than the earthquakes we have been watching for a hundred years, because this patch of fault that we’re watching takes three weeks to break. Whereas ordinarily something a hundred miles long would take a minute or less to break.”

“About half of our instruments can see it,” Vidale adds. “It’s a very slight level of rattling. I don’t think I have ever heard of somebody who we believed could feel it.”

Local seismologists woke up to the phenomenon about a decade ago and have since discovered a big non-volcanic tremor swarm happens fairly routinely around here — every 14 months or so in western Washington, a little less often in Oregon and more often in northern California.

Scientists have coined a variety of names including “slow slip quake” or “episodic tremor and slip” to describe what they’re seeing.

Vidale says the mechanisms at work deep underground remain fairly mysterious. This current slow slip quake under the Salish Sea has lasted five weeks. Creager says scientists have calculated that a significant event like this releases the equivalent energy of a magnitude 6.5 regular quake.

“It’s a lot of energy being released,” Creager says. “It just happens so slowly that you’re not going to feel it. This is the way we like to see energy released.”

But there’s a flip side. The grinding and slippage at depth increases the strain closer to the surface where the North American plate and the oceanic plate are stuck together or “locked.” When that offshore fault zone eventually gives way, we get the damaging Big One.

University of Oregon Professor David Schmidt makes an analogy to a car teetering partway over a cliff.

“And these small slow slip events are somebody standing behind that car giving it a little nudge every several months. So even though the nudge is small, at some point that nudge might be enough to kind of tip us over the edge and cause the car to fall off the cliff.”

Or set off the Cascadia megaquake in this analogy.

Schmidt points to a study published in the journal Science that describes how last year’s great earthquake and tsunami in Japan was preceded by slow slip and tremor near the epicenter.

John Vidale mentions another killer earthquake, in Turkey in 1999, where instruments picked up a slow slip precursor.

“One of the goals of our research is to say, how often does that slow slip trigger a great earthquake? How often are great earthquakes triggered by slow slip? That’s almost completely unknown at this point.”

Vidale and his colleague Creager are more certain that we don’t need to quake with worry. They note that great earthquakes strike very infrequently in the Northwest.

So even if a megaquake becomes more likely during a slow slip event, the chances of one happening are still quite slim.

Copyright 2012 Northwest News Network

On the Web:

Interactive tremor map (Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)

“Slow Slip, ETS and Cascadia” (Central Washington University)

LISS – Live Internet Seismic Server

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: October 8, 2012 05:18:48 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

 ANWB 24hr plot

CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

 BBGH 24hr plot

CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

 BCIP 24hr plot

CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

 GRGR 24hr plot

CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

 GRTK 24hr plot

CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

 GTBY 24hr plot

CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

 MTDJ 24hr plot

CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

 SDDR 24hr plot

CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

 TGUH 24hr plot

IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

 BJT 24hr plot

IC/ENH, Enshi, China

 ENH 24hr plot

IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Province, China

 HIA 24hr plot

IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

 LSA 24hr plot

IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

 MDJ 24hr plot

IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Guangduong Province, China

 QIZ 24hr plot

IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

 ADK 24hr plot

IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

 AFI 24hr plot

IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

 ANMO 24hr plot

IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

 ANTO 24hr plot

IU/BBSR, Bermuda

 BBSR 24hr plot

IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

 BILL 24hr plot

IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

 CASY 24hr plot

IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

 CCM 24hr plot

IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

 CHTO 24hr plot

IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

 COLA 24hr plot

IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

 COR 24hr plot

IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

 CTAO 24hr plot

IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

 DAV 24hr plot

IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

 DWPF 24hr plot

IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

 FUNA 24hr plot

IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

 FURI 24hr plot

IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

 GNI 24hr plot

IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

 GRFO 24hr plot

IU/GUMO, Guam, Mariana Islands

 GUMO 24hr plot

IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

 HKT 24hr plot

IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

 HNR 24hr plot

IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

 HRV 24hr plot

IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

 INCN 24hr plot

IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

 JOHN 24hr plot

IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

 KBS 24hr plot

IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

 KEV 24hr plot

IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

 KIEV 24hr plot

IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

 KIP 24hr plot

IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

 KMBO 24hr plot

IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

 KNTN 24hr plot

IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

 KONO 24hr plot

IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

 KOWA 24hr plot

IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

 LCO 24hr plot

IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

 LSZ 24hr plot

IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

 LVC 24hr plot

IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

 MA2 24hr plot

IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

 MAJO 24hr plot

IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

 MAKZ 24hr plot

IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

 MBWA 24hr plot

IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

 MIDW 24hr plot

IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

 MSKU 24hr plot

IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

 NWAO 24hr plot

IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Equador

 OTAV 24hr plot

IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

 PAB 24hr plot

IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

 PAYG 24hr plot

IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

 PET 24hr plot

IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

 PMG 24hr plot

IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

 PMSA 24hr plot

IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

 POHA 24hr plot

IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

 PTCN 24hr plot

IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

 PTGA 24hr plot

IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

 QSPA 24hr plot

IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermandec Islands

 RAO 24hr plot

IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

 RAR 24hr plot

IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

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IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

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IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

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IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

 SBA 24hr plot

IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

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IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

 SFJD 24hr plot

IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

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IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

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IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

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IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

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IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

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IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

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IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

 TEIG 24hr plot

IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

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IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

 TRIS 24hr plot

IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

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IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

 TSUM 24hr plot

IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

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IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

 ULN 24hr plot

IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

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IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

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IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

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IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

 XMAS 24hr plot

IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

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IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

 YSS 24hr plot

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Volcanic Activity

Maar Volcanoes: Odd Explosions Beneath Earth Explained

By Megan Gannon, News Editor | LiveScience.com

The eruption of a so-called maar-diatreme volcano is short-lived but violent. Magma creeps up through a crack in the Earth’s crust and mixes with water, setting off a series of explosions — as many as a few each hour for several weeks. When the action stops, a crater-topped, rock-filled fracture called a diatreme is left behind. Now researchers are proposing a new way to think about how these structures are formed, which could help geologists predict eruptions and find new sources of diamonds. “Previously it was thought that those explosions started at very shallow levels and got progressively deeper,” geologist Greg Valentine, a professor at the University at Buffalo in New York, told LiveScience. This old model seemed to explain the shape of a diatreme, which sits like an inverted cone beneath a shallow maar, or crater. But that model didn’t match with what geologists were finding at volcanic sites, Valentine said. If the explosions started at shallow levels and moved deeper, shallow rocks would be spewed from the mouth of the volcano first and the deeper rock deposits would pile up on top. At maar sites, however, scientists were finding deep rock fragments mixed mostly with shallow fragments, indicating that explosions occur at essentially every depth throughout the episode. Valentine and James White, an associate professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand, created a new model to account for the apparently more jumbled order of explosions. Their model, published online Sept. 18 by the journal Geology, also shows that individual explosions are relatively small, and shallow explosions are more likely than deep explosions to cause eruptions. The last known maar-diatreme eruption occurred in 1977 in Alaska’s remote Aleutian Range, forming two vents known as the Ukinrek Maars. The threats associated with these volcanoes tend to be localized, but they can still be significant, Valentine said. “These volcanoes can send ash deposits into populated areas. They could easily produce the same effects that the one in Iceland did when it disrupted air travel, so what we’re trying to do is understand the way they behave,” he explained in a statement.

08.10.2012 Volcano Eruption Indonesia North Sulawesi, [Mount Lokon _Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on Sunday, 07 October, 2012 at 15:46 (03:46 PM) UTC.

Description
A volatile volcano in northern Indonesia erupted Sunday, spewing smoke and ash that caused muddy rain to fall in nearby villages, an official said. Mount Lokon in North Sulawesi province rumbled as heavy rain fell around its cloud-covered crater, local monitoring official Farid Ruskanda Bina said. He said the sound was heard 5 kilometers (3 miles) away but the height of the eruption was not visible. The ash made the rain thick and muddy in six villages, Bina said. “Soldiers are distributing masks to the villagers,” he said. There was no plan for evacuations because the nearest villages are beyond the danger area, he said. More than 33,000 people live along the fertile slopes of the 5,741-foot (1,750-meter) mountain. Mount Lokon is one of about 129 active volcanoes in Indonesia. Its last major eruption in 1991 killed a Swiss hiker and forced thousands of people to flee their homes.
05.10.2012 Volcano Activity Italy Sicily, [ Etna Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Activity in Italy on Friday, 05 October, 2012 at 17:01 (05:01 PM) UTC.

Description
A slight increase in shaking was reported at Etna volcano on the island of Sicily but it does not appear in danger of eruption, volcano experts said Friday. Activity on a recently opened crater has been registered since Wednesday, Italian news agency ANSA reported. The activity has been accompanied by “a slight increase in volcanic shaking,” volcano experts said. Etna has experienced nine “eruptive events” this year. The volcano belched a plume of smoke in a full-blown explosion in January that led to the temporary closure of Catania airport.

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

07.10.2012 Forest / Wild Fire Tanzania Multiple areas, [Namtumbo and Tunduru districts] Damage level Details

Forest / Wild Fire in Tanzania on Sunday, 07 October, 2012 at 07:05 (07:05 AM) UTC.

Description
Recently, fire occurrence surveys were conducted in Namtumbo and Tunduru districts, covering all villages in Selous-Niassa Wildlife Protection Corridor (SNWPC) Project Area. The surveys were conducted by teams composed of staff belonging to natural resources sectors.Similar situations where wild fires are seen include Coast Region, Morogoro, Singida, Kigoma and Mara. The selected area served as a study case to general situation in rural areas where this dry season phenomenon is common to the detriment of the environment.It has been found that the major cause for fires is shifting cultivation but other factors also come into play, such as poachers, lumberers, honey gatherers and charcoal burners. Also cases of accidental fires cannot be ruled out. However, fires that occur often get out of hand due to lack of action from villagers as well as lack of laws to control fire occurrences and where laws exist there is a lot of laxity in enforcing them. The report compiled by staff from Natural Resources Sector revealed that incidents of wildfire have increased along with effects of climatic changes. Fires are rare in the wet season because the grass usually has high water content to burn properly. The above situation is also applicable to other areas in Coast Region, Morogoro and Tanga, since wildfires are a commonplace in many parts during the dry season.The majority of interviewed residents and villagers agreed that wildfires tend to occur during the dry season, from July to November. This is the time when the grass is tinder dry and, unfortunately, wild fires can often get out of hand. Again, this is the period most peasants are preparing their plots for the next farming season.The fires are used as short-cut measures in removing long grasses and thick bushes.

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Storms /  Flooding / Landslides

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Olivia (EP15) Pacific Ocean – East 06.10.2012 08.10.2012 Tropical Depression 355 ° 93 km/h 111 km/h 4.88 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

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Storm name: Olivia (EP15)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 14° 0.000, W 118° 42.000
Start up: 06th October 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 211.23 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
07th Oct 2012 08:08:10 N 14° 0.000, W 120° 30.000 17 83 102 Tropical Storm 280 19 1000 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
08th Oct 2012 05:01:14 N 16° 12.000, W 120° 54.000 11 93 111 Tropical Depression 355 ° 16 998 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
09th Oct 2012 12:00:00 N 17° 24.000, W 121° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
09th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 17° 18.000, W 121° 0.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
10th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 17° 12.000, W 122° 12.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC
11th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 16° 54.000, W 123° 48.000 Tropical Depression 46 65 NOAA NHC
12th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 16° 0.000, W 125° 42.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
Prapiroon (22W) Pacific Ocean 08.10.2012 08.10.2012 Tropical Depression 270 ° 83 km/h 102 km/h 4.57 m JTWC Details

Tropical Storm data

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Storm name: Prapiroon (22W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 17° 54.000, E 135° 42.000
Start up: 08th October 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 0.00 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
08th Oct 2012 05:04:27 N 17° 54.000, E 135° 42.000 9 83 102 Tropical Depression 270 ° 15 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
09th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 17° 54.000, E 133° 36.000 Typhoon II 130 157 JTWC
09th Oct 2012 12:00:00 N 17° 54.000, E 133° 0.000 Typhoon III 148 185 JTWC
10th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 17° 54.000, E 132° 30.000 Typhoon III 157 194 JTWC
11th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 18° 12.000, E 131° 48.000 Typhoon IV 176 213 JTWC
12th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 19° 0.000, E 131° 0.000 Typhoon IV 185 232 JTWC
13th Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 20° 12.000, E 130° 30.000 Typhoon IV 194 241 JTWC

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All 18 children confirmed dead in China landslide

by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP)

Rescuers have found the bodies of all 18 children buried when a landslide engulfed their primary school in China as they made up classes lost due to recent deadly earthquakes, state media said Friday.

The landslide, triggered by sustained rains, buried the school and three farmhouses on Thursday in the village of Zhenhe in Yunnan province where a pair of earthquakes last month killed 81 people and injured hundreds.

Any last hope for survivors evaporated early Friday when rescuers pulled the body of the last missing child from the landslide debris, China National Radio said in a report on its website.

The disaster in the village of Zhenhe is likely to raise questions over why the children had been brought back into the school, located in a deep mountain valley, when the rest of China was on a week-long national holiday.

But local officials have said the children needed to make up class time lost due to disruptions stemming from the September 7 earthquakes.

China has a highly competitive education system built around cramming for high-stress testing that determines entry into good schools later.

A local villager also was buried under the rubble and has yet to be found by rescuers, China National Radio said.

State media reports initially identified the school as the Youfang Primary School, but subsequent reports have said its official name is the Tiantou Primary School.

School safety is a sensitive issue in China after thousands of students died when an 8.0-magnitude tremor centred in Sichuan province rocked the southwest of the country in 2008.

Many schools collapsed in that quake, which killed more than 80,000 people.

This led to accusations that corner-cutting in construction projects and possibly corruption led to shoddy buildings, especially as many buildings near such schools held firm.

There have so far been no such allegations in the Yunnan landslide.

However, like many schools, homes, and other structures in the rugged region, the disaster-hit primary school was located at the base of steep slopes.

Mountainous southwestern China is prone to deadly landslides, a threat worsened by frequent seismic activity.

The 2008 earthquake triggered giant landslides that left whole mountainsides scarred.

The students killed in Thursday’s landslide were from another school who were brought in to study because their own school had been too heavily damaged in last month’s quakes, state-run Xinhua news agency said.

The two 5.6-magnitude quakes left more than 820 people injured and 201,000 displaced in the poor region.

Thursday’s landslide also blocked a nearby river, creating a lake and forcing the evacuation of more than 800 residents living downstream, the agency said.

Almost 2,000 people had been mobilised to unblock the waterway and help in the rescue, it said.

At least 30 students had been scheduled to resume classes at the school in Zhenhe. Those who were unharmed by the landslide will resume classes at a nearby school, Xinhua said.

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes

07.10.2012 Landslide Italy Provincia di La Spezia, [Cinque Terre] Damage level Details

Landslide in Italy on Sunday, 07 October, 2012 at 17:41 (05:41 PM) UTC.

Description
Rescuers say a rockslide slammed into Italy’s popular Way of Love hiking trail in the coastal Cinque Terre resort area, injuring four Australian women. One was crushed by rocks and another was knocked off the steep path. Dr. Davide Battistella said those two hikers were in grave condition and two others were less seriously injured by the landslide Monday morning on the trail, which cuts into a steep hillside overlooking the Ligurian Sea south of Genoa. Battistella told The Associated Press that one woman was dug out from under the rocks and flown by helicopter to a hospital. The woman who landed on a precarious perch on the hillside was carried out by a human chain of rescuers. The Cinque Terre area is breathtakingly beautiful but geologically fragile.

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Epidemic Hazards  / Diseases

Meningitis Outbreak: 5 Dead

ublished on Oct 5, 2012 by

Some steroid shots contaminated with a fungus incite health scare. For more: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/meningitis-outbreak-highlights-hazards-…

Medication tied to rare meningitis outbreak reached 23 states

By Tim Ghianni

NASHVILLE, Tennessee

(Reuters) – A steroid medication linked to the death of at least five people from rare fungal meningitis may have been administered to patients in 23 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said on Thursday, raising fears the rare outbreak could spread.

In a briefing for reporters, the CDC said five people had died so far and 35 had taken ill from fungal meningitis in six states. The outbreak was first reported in Tennessee, where three people have died and 25 of the cases have been reported.

The other confirmed deaths were in Virginia and Maryland.

The CDC said it had not yet determined the rate of infection among those patients who received the potentially tainted steroid. The rate of infection is an important barometer of the potential for the outbreak to spread.

The steroid is administered to patients, usually by injection, primarily to control back pain.

All the cases have so far been traced to three lots of Methylprednisolene Acetate from a pharmaceutical compounding plant in Massachusetts, according to the briefing.

The company, New England Compounding Center Inc, or NECC, in Framingham, Massachusetts, prepared the medication, which has been voluntarily recalled. The company has also voluntarily surrendered its license. NECC could not immediately be reached for comment.

“We are encouraging all health facilities to immediately cease use of any product produced by NECC,” Dr. Madeleine Biondolillo, Massachusetts public health director of safety, told reporters in a conference call from Boston.

NECC could not immediately be reached for comment.

A fungus linked to the steroid medication has been identified in specimens from five patients, according to the CDC’s Dr. Benjamin Park.

The Massachusetts Health Department said there were 17,676 vials of medication in each of the three lots under investigation. They were sent out July through September and have a shelf life of 180 days.

The CDC said the fungal contamination was detected in the examination of one of the sealed vials taken at that company.

Fungal meningitis is rare and life-threatening, but is not contagious from person to person. Meningitis can be passed to humans from steroid medications that weaken the immune system. Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, and vomiting, according to the CDC web site.

In addition to the 25 cases in Tennessee, one has been reported in North Carolina, two in Florida, four in Virginia, two in Maryland and one in Indiana, according to CDC’s Park.

SOME TENNESSEE PATIENTS ‘REALLY CRITICALLY ILL’

About 75 facilities could have received the steroid in the 23 states. They include California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Texas and West Virginia, according to Park.

In one example of how widespread the steroid was distributed, one facility in Indiana, St. Mary’s Health, said on Thursday that 560 patients had received the recalled medication. They received the steroid at the Surgicare Cross Pointe clinic in Evansville, said St. Mary’s spokeswoman Laura Forbes. It was not immediately known if any patients were infected there.

In Tennessee, the worst-hit state, Dr. John Dreyzehner, the state health commissioner, said expectations were that the number of cases would rise. “We are awaiting results of tests from other cases,” he told a news conference in Nashville.

Some Tennessee patients are “really critically ill” and in intensive care units, said Dr. Marion Kainer of the state health department. She declined to say how many were critical.

The Massachusetts Health Department said there had been several complaints against the company linked to the steroid. Complaints in 2002 and 2003 about the processing of medication resulted in an agreement with government agencies in 2006 to correct deficiencies

In 2011, there was another inspection of the facility and no deficiencies were found. In March 2012, another complaint was made about the potency of a product used in eye surgery procedures. That investigation is continuing, the state health department said.

(Additional reporting by Mary Wisniewski and Susan Guyett; Writing by Greg McCune; Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Peter Cooney)

The Next Pandemic: Why
It Will Come from Wildlife

Experts believe the next deadly human pandemic will almost certainly be a virus that spills over from wildlife to humans. The reasons why have a lot to do with the frenetic pace with which we are destroying wild places and disrupting ecosystems.

by david quammen

Emerging diseases are in the news again. Scary viruses are making themselves noticed and felt. There’s been a lot of that during the past several months — West Nile fever kills 17 people in the Dallas area, three tourists succumb to hantavirus after visiting Yosemite National Park, an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo claims 33 lives. A separate Ebola outbreak, across the border in Uganda, registers a death toll of 17. A peculiar new coronavirus, related to SARS, proves fatal for a Saudi man and puts a Qatari into critical condition, while disease scientists all over the world wonder: Is this one — or is that one — going to turn into the Next Big One?

By the Next Big One, I mean a murderous pandemic that sweeps around the planet, killing millions of people, as the so-called “Spanish” influenza did in 1918-19, as AIDS has been doing in slower motion, and as SARS might have done in 2003 if it hadn’t been stopped by fast science, rigorous

Avian bird flu test

Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images
An official from the Scottish Agricultural College holds a dead swan to be tested for avian flu.

measures of public health, and luck. Experts I’ve interviewed over the past six years generally agree that such a Next Big One is not only possible but probable. They agree that it will almost certainly be a zoonotic disease — one that emerges from wildlife — and that the causal agent will most likely be a virus. They agree that sheer human abundance, density, and interconnectedness make us highly vulnerable. Our population now stands above seven billion, after all, a vast multitude of potential victims, many of us living at close quarters in big cities, traveling quickly and often from place to place, sharing infections with one another; and there are dangerous new viruses lately emerging against which we haven’t been immunized. Another major pandemic seems as logically inevitable as the prospect that a very dry, very thick forest will eventually burn.

That raises serious issues in the realm of health policy, preparedness, and medical response. It also suggests a few urgent questions on the scientific side — we might even say, the conservation side — of the discussion. Those questions, in simplest form, are: Where? How? and Why? Addressing them is crucial to understanding the dynamics of emerging diseases, and understanding is crucial to preparedness and response.

First question: From where will the Next Big One emerge? Answer, as I’ve noted: Most likely from wildlife. It will be a zoonosis — an animal infection that spills over into humans.

Everything comes from somewhere. New human diseases don’t arrive from Mars. Notwithstanding the vivid anxieties of The Andromeda Strain (1969) and other such fictions, lethal microbes don’t arrive on contaminated satellites returning from deep space. (Or anyway, knock wood, they haven’t so far.) They emerge from nonhuman animals, earthly ones, and spill over into human populations, catching hold, replicating, sometimes adapting and prospering, then passing onward from human to human.

According to one study, 58 percent of all pathogen species infecting humans are zoonotic. Another study found that 72 percent of all recently emerged zoonotic pathogens have come from wildlife. That list includes

According to one study, 72 percent of all recently emerged zoonotic pathogens have come from wildlife.

everything from Ebola and Marburg and the HIVs and the influenzas to West Nile virus, monkeypox, and the SARS bug.

In Malaysia, a virus called Nipah spilled over from fruit bats in 1998. Its route into humans was indirect but efficient: The bats fed in fruit trees overshadowing factory-scale pigsties; the bat droppings carried virus, which infected many pigs; the virus replicated abundantly in the pigs, and from them infected piggery workers and employees at abattoirs. That outbreak killed 109 people and ended with the culling of 1.1 million pigs.

Second question: How do such pathogens get into humans? The particulars are various but the general answer is: contact. Contact equals opportunity, and the successful pathogens are those that seize opportunities to proliferate and to spread, not just from one host to another but from one kind of host to another.

Wild aquatic birds defecate in a village duck pond, passing a new strain of influenza to domestic ducks; the ducks pass it to a Chinese boy charged with their care, after which the boy passes it to his brother and sister. A man in Cameroon butchers a chimpanzee and, elbow deep in its blood, acquires a simian virus that becomes HIV-1. A miner in Uganda enters a shaft filled with bats carrying Marburg virus and, somehow, by ingesting or breathing bat wastes, gets infected. Contact between people and wildlife, sometime direct, sometimes with livestock as intermediaries, presents opportunities for their infections to become ours.

Third question: Whydo such spillovers seem to be happening now more than ever? There’s been a steady drumbeat of new zoonotic viruses

We are interacting with wild animals and disrupting the ecosystems they inhabit to an unprecedented degree.

emerging into the human population within recent decades: Machupo (1961), Marburg (1967), Lassa (1969), Ebola (1976), HIV-1 (inferred in 1981, first isolated in 1983), HIV-2 (1986), Sin Nombre (the first-recognized American hantavirus, 1993), Hendra (1994), the strain of influenza called “avian flu” (1997), Nipah (1998), West Nile (1999), SARS (2003), and others. These are not independent events. They are parts of a pattern. They reflect things that we’re doing, not just things that are happening to us.

What we’re doing is interacting with wild animals and disrupting the ecosystems that they inhabit — all to an unprecedented degree. Of course, humans have always killed wildlife and disrupted ecosystems, clearing and fragmenting forests, converting habitat into cropland and settlement, adding livestock to the landscape, driving native species toward extinction, introducing exotics. But now that there are seven billion of us on the planet, with greater tools, greater hungers, greater mobility, we’re pressing into the wild places like never before, and one of the things that we’re finding there is… new infections. And once we’ve acquired a new infection, the chance of spreading it globally is also greater than ever.

We cut our way through the Congo. We cut our way through the Amazon. We cut our way through Borneo and Madagascar and northeastern Australia. We shake the trees, figuratively and literally, and things fall out. We kill and butcher and eat many of the wild animals found there. We settle in those places, creating villages, work camps, towns, extractive

Evolution seizes opportunity, explores possibilities, and helps convert spillovers to pandemics.

industries, new cities. We bring in our domesticated animals, replacing the wild herbivores with livestock. We multiply our livestock as we’ve multiplied ourselves, operating huge factory-scale operations such as the piggeries in Malaysia, into which Nipah virus fell from the bats feeding in fruit trees planted nearby, after the bats’ native forest habitats had been destroyed. We export and import livestock across great distances and at high speeds. We export and import other live animals, especially primates, for medical research. We export and import animal skins, exotic pets, contraband bushmeat, and plants, some of which carry secret microbial passengers.

We travel, moving between cities and continents even more quickly than our transported livestock. We eat in restaurants where the cook may have butchered a porcupine before working on our scallops. We visit monkey temples in Asia, live markets in India, picturesque villages in South America, dusty archeological sites in New Mexico, dairy towns in the Netherlands, bat caves in East Africa, racetracks in Australia — breathing the air, feeding the animals, touching things, shaking hands with the friendly locals — and then we jump on our planes and fly home. We get bit by mosquitoes and ticks. We alter the global climate with our carbon emissions, which may in turn alter the latitudinal ranges within which those mosquitoes and ticks live. We provide an irresistible opportunity for enterprising microbes by the ubiquity and abundance of our human bodies.

 

Climate’s Strong Fingerprint
In Global Cholera Outbreaks

  YALE e360

Climate’s Strong Fingerprint in Global Cholera Outbreaks

For decades, deadly outbreaks of cholera were attributed to the spread of disease through poor sanitation. But recent research demonstrates how closely cholera is tied to environmental and hydrological factors and to weather patterns — all of which may lead to more frequent cholera outbreaks as the world warms.

Everything I’ve just mentioned is encompassed within this rubric: the ecology and evolutionary biology of zoonotic diseases. Ecological circumstance provides opportunity for spillover. Evolution seizes opportunity, explores possibilities, and helps convert spillovers to pandemics. But the majesty of the sheer biological phenomena involved is no consolation for the human miseries, the deaths, and the current level of risk.

There are things that can be done — research, vigilance, anticipation, fast and effective response — to stave off or at least mitigate the Next Big One. My point here is different. My point is about human ecology, not human medicine. It behooves us to remember that we too are animals, interconnected with the rest of earthly biota by shared diseases, among other ways. We should recall that salubriuous biblical warning from the Book of Proverbs: “He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind.” The planet is our home, but not ours only, and we’d be wise to tread a little more lightly within this wonderful, germy world.

7 dead as meningitis outbreak grows

By the CNN Wire Staff
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: The pharmacy that manufactured the steroid recalls all its other products
  • The number of cases grows to 64 people in 9 states
  • It is linked to contaminated steroid injections
  • The steroid is used to treat pain and inflammation

Atlanta (CNN) — The death toll from an outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated steroid injections has risen to seven, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday.

The total number of cases has also grown to 64 people in nine states, the CDC said. That is 17 more cases and two more states than the day before.

Patients contracted the deadly meningitis after being injected in their spine with a preservative-free steroid called methylprednisolone acetate that was contaminated by a fungus. The steroid is used to treat pain and inflammation.

What is meningitis?

The New England Compounding Center, the Massachusetts-based pharmacy that made the contaminated injections, voluntarily recalled three lots of the injected steroid last week.

On Saturday, the same pharmacy announced a voluntary nationwide recall of all its other products as well. NECC said the new recall was being announced out of an abundance of caution and that there is no indication any of its other products are contaminated.

The Food and Drug Administration has already asked doctors, clinics, and consumers to stop using any of the pharmacy’s products. The pharmacy on Wednesday voluntarily surrendered its license to operate until the FDA investigation into the contamination is complete.

Health officials say 76 medical facilities in 23 states received the contaminated steroid injections from NECC. A list of the 76 affected medical facilities is on the CDC’s website at http://www.cdc.gov/hai/outbreaks/meningitis-facilities-map.html.

The CDC raised the death toll Saturday after two people died in Michigan. Other deaths have been reported in Maryland, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Tennessee is reporting the most number of overall cases — 29 — which includes three deaths, according to the CDC.

There are also confirmed cases in Florida, Indiana, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio.

The other states that received the contaminated products from NECC are California, Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas and West Virginia.

Federal health inspectors began inspecting the NECC plant last Monday. Inspectors found foreign particles in unopened vials, and after testing one of the unopened vials, they determined the substance was a fungus.

The investigation is still under way.

Nearly 10% of drugs administered in the United States come from compound pharmacies, according to a 2003 Government Accountability Office report.

Drugs manufactured by compound pharmacies do not have to go through FDA-mandated pre-market approval. Instead, oversight and licensing of these pharmacies comes from state health pharmacy boards.

Compound pharmacists create customized medication solutions for patients for whom manufactured pharmaceuticals won’t work, according to the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists.

Meningitis is an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. It is usually caused by an infection, frequently with bacteria or a virus, but it can also be caused by less common pathogens like fungi, according to the CDC.

Fungal meningitis is very rare and, unlike viral and bacterial meningitis, it is not contagious.

Symptoms of fungal meningitis are similar to symptoms from other forms of meningitis, but they often appear more gradually and can be very mild at first, the CDC says.

Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told CNN that fungal infections are not usually mild. He said when a fungus invades small blood vessels, it can cause them to clot or bleed, which can lead to symptoms of small strokes.

In addition to typical meningitis symptoms like headache, fever, nausea and stiffness of the neck, people with fungal meningitis may also experience confusion, dizziness and discomfort from bright lights. Patients might just have one or two of these symptoms, the CDC says.

Health officials say any patients who received an injection at one of the facilities beginning July 1 and who began showing symptoms between one and three weeks after being injected should see their doctor right away.

The earlier a patient gets treatment, the more likely he or she will survive.

Patients are treated with anti-fungal medication, which is given intravenously so patients have to be admitted to the hospital, the CDC said. Patients may need to be treated for months.

The FDA is urging anyone who has experienced problems following an injection with the NECC product to report it to MedWatch, the FDA’s voluntary reporting program, by phone at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/report.htm.

CNN’s Miriam Falco contributed to this report.

Today Epidemic Hazard India State of Orissa, Kandhamal Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in India on Monday, 08 October, 2012 at 02:58 (02:58 AM) UTC.

Description
The vector-borne disease of chicken pox has been spreading among the inmates of a government-run residential school in Kandhamal district. At least 19 inmates, aged 6 to 12 years, in the residential school at Daberi in Daringibadi block, have been infected with the disease. There are 131 inmates in the hostel at present. “The situation is under control and there is no cause to panic,” a senior medical officer said, however. District malaria officer (DMO) J N Patnaik visited the hostel along with a team of doctors on Sunday. “The infected children were segregated in a room to prevent the spread of the disease. They are being administered the required medication,” the DMO said. He said the condition of the other students, who have already left the hostel after being infected, was not known. “We are trying to bring them to the hostel for treatment. If their parents do not agree, the medical staff will go to their respective places to provide treatment,” Patnaik said. The outbreak of chicken pox was first reported in the hostel on September 29, sources said. The disease spread gradually. “It’s a viral disease which spreads through the air and after contact with the affected persons. We have advised the school authorities not to allow the affected students to venture outside the hostel,” the DFO said.
Biohazard name: Chicken pox
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Climate Change

Arctic Sea Ice Shatters Previous Low Records; Antarctic Sea Ice Edges to Record High

ScienceDaily

This September, sea ice covering the Arctic Ocean fell to the lowest extent in the satellite record, which began in 1979. Satellite data analyzed by NSIDC scientists showed that the sea ice cover reached its lowest extent on September 16. Sea ice extent averaged for the month of September was also the lowest in the satellite record.

The near-record ice melt occurred without the unusual weather conditions that contributed to the extreme melt of 2007. In 2007, winds and weather patterns helped melt large expanses of ice. “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were not as conducive to ice loss this year, but the melt still reached a new record low,” said NSIDC scientist Walt Meier. “This probably reflects loss of multi-year ice in the Arctic, as well as other factors that are making the ice more vulnerable.” Multi-year ice is ice that has survived more than one melt season and is thicker than first-year ice.

NSIDC Director Mark Serreze said, “It looks like the spring ice cover is so thin now that large areas melt out in summer, even without persistent extreme weather patterns.” A storm that tracked through the Arctic in August helped break up the weakened ice pack.

Arctic sea ice extent reached its lowest point this year on September 16, 2012 when sea ice extent dropped to 3.41 million square kilometers (1.32 million square miles). Averaged over the month of September, ice extent was 3.61 million square kilometers (1.39 million square miles). This places 2012 as the lowest ice extent both for the daily minimum extent and the monthly average. Ice extent was 3.29 million square kilometers (1.27 million square miles) below the 1979 to 2000 average.

The Arctic ice cap grows each winter as the sun sets for several months and shrinks each summer as the sun rises higher in the northern sky. Each year the Arctic sea ice reaches its annual minimum extent in September. It hit its previous record low in 2007. This summer’s low ice extent continued the downward trend seen over the last 33 years. Scientists attribute this trend in large part to warming temperatures caused by climate change. Since 1979, September Arctic sea ice extent has declined by 13 percent per decade. Summer sea ice extent is important because, among other things, it reflects sunlight, keeping the Arctic region cool and moderating global climate.

In addition to the decline in sea ice extent, a two-dimensional measure of the ice cover, the ice cover has grown thinner and less resistant to summer melt. Recent data on the age of sea ice, which scientists use to estimate the thickness of the ice cover, shows that the youngest, thinnest ice, which has survived only one or two melt seasons, now makes up the large majority of the ice cover.

Climate models have suggested that the Arctic could lose almost all of its summer ice cover by 2100, but in recent years, ice extent has declined faster than the models predicted. Serreze said, “The big summer ice loss in 2011 set us up for another big melt year in 2012. We may be looking at an Arctic Ocean essentially free of summer ice only a few decades from now.” NSIDC scientist Julienne Stroeve recently spent three weeks in the Arctic Ocean on an icebreaker ship, and was surprised by how thin the ice was and how much open water existed between the individual ice floes. “According to the satellite data, I expected to be in nearly 90% ice cover, but instead the ice concentrations were typically below 50%,” she said.

As the Arctic was experiencing a record low minimum extent, the Antarctic sea ice was reaching record high levels, culminating in a Southern Hemisphere winter maximum extent of 19.44 million square kilometers (7.51 million square miles) on September 26. The September 2012 monthly average was also a record high, at 19.39 million square kilometers (7.49 million square miles) slightly higher than the previous record in 2006. Temperatures over Antarctica were near average this austral winter. Scientists largely attribute the increase in Antarctic sea ice extent to stronger circumpolar winds, which blow the sea ice outward, increasing extent.

NSIDC scientist Ted Scambos said, “Antarctica’s changes — in winter, in the sea ice — are due more to wind than to warmth, because the warming does not take much of the sea ice area above the freezing point during winter. Instead, the winds that blow around the continent, the “westerlies,” have gotten stronger in response to a stubbornly cold continent, and the warming ocean and land to the north.”

Weather-Making High-Pressure Systems Predicted
To Intensify In Coming Years!
 


MessageToEagle.com – The intensity of two such high-pressure systems, present over the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans during the summer, has changed in recent years.

Scientists do not know whether these changes are related to climate warming.

Conducted simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report suggest that these summertime highs are likely to intensify in the twenty-first century as a result of an increase in atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations, according to a Duke University-led study published online this week in Nature Geoscience.


Click on image to enlargeSouth Indian Ocean, Oval-shaped Hole in a Blanket of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds photographed off Australia on June 5, 2012. High-pressure weather systems often bring fair weather and relatively clear skies. In early June 2012, a high off the coast of Tasmania did just that…and in spectacular fashion. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this view of a hole in a cloud formation at 3:00 p.m. local time (05:00 Universal Time) on June 5, 2012.
The weather system over the Great Australian Bight cut out the oval-shaped hole from a blanket of marine stratocumulus clouds. The cloud hole, with a diameter that stretched as far as 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) across, was caused by sinking air associated with an area of high pressure near the surface. Credits: NASA

High-pressure systems over oceans that largely determine the tracks of tropical cyclones and hydrological extremes will posssibly play an increasingly important role regarding drought and extreme summer rainfall.

The black lines of all the historical tropical storm and hurricane paths curving around that subtropical ridge. If that ridge extends far to the west, tropical storms or hurricanes south of it can in turn be forced far to the west. Credits: http://www.weather.com

Changes in the dominant heating component between the twenty-first- and twentieth-century run. p>Blue, red and green colours denote long-wave radiative cooling, sensible heating and condensational heating, respectively, obtained from the CMIP3 multi-model ensemble mean. Credits: Duke University


A team of scientists led by Wenhong Li, assistant professor of earth and ocean sciences at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, conducted a series of simulations predicting future changes in the strength of the annually occurring North Atlantic Subtropical High “subtropical ridge” (also known as the Bermuda High), and the North Pacific Subtropical High.

Based on their results, these changes will intensify over the 21st century as a result of increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations and – the difference between ocean and land heating, as Earth’s climate warms – will fuel the systems’ intensification.

Research paper

© MessageToEagle.com

See also:
Escalating Problem: Satellites See Collapse of the Greenland Glaciers!

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Solar Activity

3MIN News October 5. 2012: Tsunamis on the Sun

Published on Oct 5, 2012 by

Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU

TODAY’S LINKS
China Landslide: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2012-10/05/c_131889256.htm
F*cking Monsanto: http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2012/10/european-food-safety-author…
Head of NOAA: http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2012/10/despite-tumult-noaas-lubche…

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

CERES JPL: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=ceres;orb=1;cov=0;log=0;cad=0#orb

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

2MIN News October 6. 2012

Published on Oct 6, 2012 by

Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU
STARWATER: http://youtu.be/LiC-92YgZvQ

TODAY’S LINKS
Snow: http://www.weather.com/news/weather-winter/snow-seasons-first-average-20121004

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

CERES JPL: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=ceres;orb=1;cov=0;log=0;cad=0#orb

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

3MIN News October 7. 2012

Published on Oct 7, 2012 by

Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU
STARWATER: http://youtu.be/LiC-92YgZvQ

TODAY’S LINKS
Colombia Landslide: http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/15055199/13-missing-in-colombia-muds…
Australia cold: http://www.weatherzone.com.au/news/record-cold-october-day-across-nsw-and-vic…
Canary Quake List: http://www.01.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/volcaListadoTerremotos.do?zona=2&cantid…
Draconid Meteors: http://earthsky.org/tonight/legendary-draconids-boom-or-bust

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

CERES JPL: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=ceres;orb=1;cov=0;log=0;cad=0#orb

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

The Past 99 Days

Published on Oct 7, 2012 by

July 1st to October 7th

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Space

 Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2012 QE50) 09th October 2012 1 day(s) 0.0809 31.5 450 m – 1.0 km 11.47 km/s 41292 km/h
(1994 EK) 14th October 2012 6 day(s) 0.1356 52.8 230 m – 520 m 12.22 km/s 43992 km/h
(2012 PA20) 15th October 2012 7 day(s) 0.1502 58.5 100 m – 230 m 10.36 km/s 37296 km/h
(2012 RV16) 18th October 2012 10 day(s) 0.1270 49.4 310 m – 700 m 16.14 km/s 58104 km/h
214869 (2007 PA8) 05th November 2012 28 day(s) 0.0433 16.8 1.5 km – 3.3 km 10.79 km/s 38844 km/h
(2011 UG21) 06th November 2012 29 day(s) 0.1784 69.4 340 m – 760 m 19.73 km/s 71028 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

NIWAKA Japanese Minisatellite Is Sending A Morse Code Beacon Signal 

MessageToEagle.com – Scientists from Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Japan developed a small artificial satellite named FITSAT-1. It also has the nickname “NIWAKA”.

The shape is a 10cm cube, and the weight is 1.33kg.

The main mission of this satellite is to demonstrate the high speed transmitter developed. It can send a jpeg VGA-picture(480×640) within 6 sec.

NIWAKA, which is now in a regular orbit, was launched from the International Space Station 390 kilometres (242 miles) above Earth at 15:44 on 4th October 2012 (UTC).

NIWAKA will write messages in the night sky with Morse code as:


Click on image to enlargeA Morse code in the night sky – transmitted by a palm sized satellite, NIWAKA designed by scientists from Fukuoka Institute of Technology. Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Japan

NIWAKA will test the possibility of optical communication by satellite. It will actually twinkle as an artificial star.

The minisatellite’s high power LEDs, which is driven with more than 200W pulses to produce extremely bright flashes, will be observable by the unaided eye or with small binoculars.


Click on image to enlargeThe beacon signal is a standard Morse code CW signal. The signal starts with “HI DE NIWAKA …” and telemetry data follows. Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

The LEDs will also be driven in detecting faint light mode. The light will received by a photo-multiplier equipped telescope linked to the 5.8 GHz parabolic antenna.


Duty 30%, 10Hz signal is modulated with also duty 30%, 5kHz signal. So the average input power will be 220W x 0.3 x 0.3 = 20W. In order to detect the faint light, a high gain amplifier with 5kHz filter may be useful.

While, the Morse code is modulated with duty 15%, 1kHz signal. So, the signal can directly drive a speaker with AF-amplifier to hear Morse sound.


Click on image to enlargeFlight Model – Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

The NIWAKA body is made by cutting a section of 10cm square aluminum pipe. Both ends of the cut pipe are covered with aluminum plates. The surface of the body is finished with black anodic coating.


Click on image to enlargeBottom View of The Model – Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

The CubeSat slide rails and side plates are not separate; they are made as a single unit. The thickness of the square pipe is 3mm, but the surfaces attached by solar cells are thinned to 1.5mm because of weight limit.

In order to make the 8.5mm square CubeSat rails, 5.5mm square aluminum sticks are attached to the four corners of the square pipe.


Click on image to enlargeCredits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

The trajectory of the ISS is inclined 51.6 deg from the equator, so NIWAKA will travel between 51.6 degrees south latitude and 51.6 degrees north latitude.

NIWAKA minisatellite will carry a mounted neodymium magnet to force it to always point to magnetic north like a compass. When NIWAKA rises above the horizon, it will be to the south of the Fukuoka ground station, and both the 5.8 GHz antenna and the LEDs will be aimed accurately enough by the magnet aligning itself and the satellite with the earth’s magnetic field that the Fukuoka ground station will be within the main beams.


Click on image to enlargeScientists perform both 5.8 GHz high-speed and optical communication experiments for about 3 minutes as the satellite travels along the orbit shown as the red line in the figure. Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

After Deployment from NASA pictures:


Click on image to enlargeCredits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology


Click on image to enlargeCredits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology


Click on image to enlargeProfessor Takushi Tanaka holding a palm sized satellite at his laboratory in Fukuoka. Credits: Fukuoka Institute of Technology

Scientists will perform both 5.8 GHz high-speed and optical communication experiments for about 3 minutes as the satellite travels along the orbit shown as the red line in the figure.

MessageToEagle.com

See also:
Dawn Spacecraft Is Heading Towards Dwarf Planet Ceres To Investigate The Formation Of Our Solar System

X-Ray Nova Reveals A New Black Hole 

MessageToEagle.com – A new stellar-mass black hole has been discovered in our Milky Way galaxy by NASA’s Swift satellite.

The presence of a previously unknown black hole, was revealed by high-energy X-rays emanating from a source towards the center of our galaxy.

“Bright X-ray novae are so rare that they’re essentially once-a- mission events and this is the first one Swift has seen,” according to Neil Gehrels, the mission’s principal investigator at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.


Click on image to enlargeCredit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

“This is really something we’ve been waiting for.”

An X-ray nova is a short-lived X-ray source that appears suddenly, reaches its emission peak in a few days and then fades out over a period of months. The outburst arises when a torrent of stored gas suddenly rushes toward one of the most compact objects known.


The nova – dubbed Swift J1745-26 – is located a few degrees from the center of our galaxy toward the constellation Sagittarius. While astronomers do not know its precise distance, they think the object resides about 20,000 to 30,000 light-years away in the galaxy’s inner region.

The nova peaked in X-rays — energies above 10,000 electron volts, or several thousand times that of visible light — on September 18, when it reached an intensity equivalent to that of the famous Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant that serves as a calibration target for high-energy observatories and is considered one of the brightest sources beyond the solar system at these energies.


Click on image to enlargeCredit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

As it dimmed at higher energies, the nova brightened in the lower-energy emissions detected by Swift’s X-ray Telescope.

“The pattern we’re seeing is observed in X-ray novae where the central object is a black hole,” said Boris Sbarufatti, an astrophysicist at Brera Observatory in Milan, who currently is working with other Swift team members at Pennsylvania State

“Once the X-rays fade away, we hope to measure its mass and confirm its black hole status.”

MessageToEagle.com

See also:
Halo Of Hot Gas Surrounds The Milky Way

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Biological Hazards / Wildlife /Hazmat

Officials baffled as Nearly 8,500 Deer found Dead in Michigan in recent weeks due to mystery Virus

Published on Oct 4, 2012 by

(Oct 4, 2012) Almost 8,500 deer across Michigan have died from EHD according to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. EHD is a disease that causes deer to suffer a high fever and internal bleeding. The DNR says a small fly known as a midge bites the deer transferring the disease. Officials say nearly half of the deer that have died from EHD have been found in Ionia County. Just two days into bow hunting season and many are talking about the problem. Steve Hayes, a manager at Bob’s Gun and Tackle Shop in Barry County, says people are not putting away their bows just yet.”Our customers are concerned, they are also concerned sportsman too. They’re deciding if they are going to back off on the number of deer they are going to shoot this year, but what we are seeing so far is most people are still interested in going out and doing some deer hunting,” said Hayes. James Waller says the outbreak will cause him to cutback because he has a concern of wiping out too many prize game. Waller says he usually gets out around 15-20 times per season.”A lot of the big bucks, the DNA that is there, we are losing that gene of that deer. We’re trying to create a really good herd to raise some nice deer,” said Waller. “Something like this comes along and it wipes out a lot of work, time and effort.””We’re going to be carefully watching the situation to and watching how it affects business, so we can react to that going forward,” says Hayes. A frost is expected to hit as early as this weekend, leaving many hopeful it will put an end to the disease and see hunting season can return to normal. http://www.wlns.com/story/19724898/dnr-over-8000-deer-dead-in-michigan

(Zephaniah 1:2-3) “I will utterly consume all things from off the land, saith the Lord.I will consume man and beast; I will consume the fowls of the heaven, and the fishes of the sea, and the stumbling blocks with the wicked: and I will cut off man from off the land, saith the Lord.”

(Hosea 4:3) “Therefore shall the land mourn, and every one that dwelleth therein shall languish, with the beasts of the field, and with the fowls of heaven; yea, the fishes of the sea also shall be taken away.”

06.10.2012 HAZMAT USA State of Texas, Halliburton Damage level Details

 

HAZMAT in USA on Friday, 14 September, 2012 at 03:03 (03:03 AM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Saturday, 06 October, 2012 at 03:42 UTC
Description
A small radioactive cylinder that went missing from a Halliburton (HAL) truck last month was found on a Texas road late Thursday, the company said, ending a weeks-long hunt for the device that involved local, state and federal authorities. The seven-inch stainless steel tube, which contained a small amount of radioactive material, was lost by an oil-and-gas crew somewhere along the 130-mile journey from the vicinity of Pecos to Odessa, in West Texas. A Halliburton spokesman said Friday that the device was found late Thursday on a road in Reeves County, Texas. The company first reported it missing to the state health department on Sept. 11, according to another report to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. State officials, company inspectors and members of a Texas National Guard unit had combed the area for the device, which is used in the process of measuring and evaluating conditions within oil and gas wells. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission report stated that the tube was a “category 3” radioactive device, a class that includes some pacemakers.
07.10.2012 HAZMAT India State of Maharashtra, Jalgaon Damage level Details

HAZMAT in India on Sunday, 07 October, 2012 at 14:18 (02:18 PM) UTC.

Description
Over 50 labourers fell ill on Sunday in an industrial area of Jalgaon city in Maharashtra owing to a chlorine gas leak from a factory, police said. “The workers belonged to a factory called Tulsi Pipes. They suffered from breathing problems and acute vomiting as one of the 25 chlorine cylinders stacked in the adjoining Kalpataru Agro-Chem Industries leaked,” an official from Jalgaon police station said. The manager of Kalpataru Agro-Chem told police that the cylinders were kept on the factory premises for being taken to another plant. He said that he did not know how the chlorine leaked from one of the cylinders, police said. “All victims have been sent to hospital. While 10 labourers are still under medical care, others have been discharged,” the official added. A complaint has been registered by one of the labourers, Mohammed Aslam Mehboob Ilahi, against owners of Kalpataru Agro-Chem under Indian Penal Code Sections 284 (negligent conduct with respect to poisonous substance), 336 (act endangering life or personal safety of other), 337 (causing hurt by act endangering life or personal safety of other) and 338 (causing grievous hurt by act endangering life or personal safety of other), the official said.

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[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

USGS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  3.2 2012/09/27 23:59:40   18.546   -68.963 101.0  DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
MAP  6.0   2012/09/27 23:53:49   -8.825   157.557 10.0  SOLOMON ISLANDS
MAP  4.8   2012/09/27 22:18:21  -22.905   -68.620 86.1  ANTOFAGASTA, CHILE
MAP  3.3 2012/09/27 21:06:05   19.631   -64.225 62.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.0   2012/09/27 16:54:44  -24.893  -179.256 515.1  SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS
MAP  4.8   2012/09/27 16:39:00  -20.066   -69.068 94.3  TARAPACA, CHILE
MAP  4.2 2012/09/27 15:36:08   24.693  -110.239 14.8  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/27 13:14:30   15.442   -91.632 228.7  GUATEMALA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/27 12:38:43   37.629   95.888 32.9  NORTHERN QINGHAI, CHINA
MAP  4.0 2012/09/27 11:24:11   24.419  -110.135 10.2  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.5 2012/09/27 10:41:15   61.984  -154.418 36.4  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.8   2012/09/27 10:28:41   -9.422   123.543 98.1  TIMOR REGION, INDONESIA
MAP  2.6 2012/09/27 09:44:48   19.410  -155.304 4.0  ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
MAP  3.2 2012/09/27 08:36:34   36.890  -117.414 7.6  CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.5 2012/09/27 08:04:29   63.355  -151.197 10.6  CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/27 07:16:10   51.653  -177.636 35.7  ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS., ALASKA
MAP  2.7 2012/09/27 05:58:59   38.827  -122.851 2.7  NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.6 2012/09/27 05:39:23   39.417  -123.535 3.2  NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.5 2012/09/27 05:21:53   39.467  -123.110 3.9  NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/27 05:02:20   59.693  -152.430 67.9  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  3.2 2012/09/27 04:23:58   19.694   -64.231 50.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.7 2012/09/27 04:12:45   62.877  -150.522 92.1  CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP  3.1 2012/09/27 04:03:04   19.676   -64.369 36.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.7 2012/09/27 03:50:39   18.045   -66.858 22.0  PUERTO RICO
MAP  2.6 2012/09/27 03:45:04   61.149  -150.911 50.8  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/27 03:28:52   51.728  -177.860 44.5  ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS., ALASKA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/27 01:36:29  -23.208   -66.655 190.3  JUJUY, ARGENTINA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/27 01:08:24   41.218   15.026 5.0  SOUTHERN ITALY
MAP  4.5   2012/09/27 00:56:04   38.412   46.709 10.0  NORTHWESTERN IRAN

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6.0 magnitude quake hits off Solomon Islands: USGS

Agencies : Sydney,

A quake measuring magnitude 6.0 hit off the Solomon Islands today, but Australian seismologists said there was little risk of a tsunami.

The US Geological Survey put the quake at 6.0-magnitude some 272 kilometres west-northwest of the capital Honiara. With a depth of about 9 kilometres, it was about 112 kilometres southeast of the western city of Gizo.

Geoscience Australia measured the quake at about 6.2-magnitude but said it was unlikely to create a tsunami or cause serious damage in the capital.

“It’s just off the plate boundary so it’s a normal-sized earthquake and positioning for the area,” seismologist Hugh Glanville told AFP.

“It’s not too close to Honiara. There’s a local city with a population of about 6,000 or so that might get a bit of damage,” he said in reference to Gizo.

“But the majority of the population is a bit too far away to suffer more than a bit of shaking. And the population in the area is pretty sparse really.”

Glanville also said the quake was too small to generate a tsunami.

“Generally a local tsunami starts at about 6.5 (magnitude). It’s always possible, but it’s just extremely rare that it would generate a tsunami,” he said.

“It’s just one of the plate boundary earthquakes along the Ring of Fire that normally happens in this area.”

The Solomon Islands form part of the Ring of Fire, a zone of tectonic activity around the Pacific Ocean that is subject to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

In 2007 a tsunami following an 8.1-magnitude earthquake killed at least 52 people in the Solomons and left thousands homeless.

Matt Burrows Reporting
    The San Andreas, Calaveras, and Hayward fault lines -which run underneath Silicon Valley – could set off tremors and aftershocks globally, according to a new study.
Researchers at UC Berkeley and the U.S. Geological Survey found that fault lines of the “strike-slip” type, where plates of land slide past each other, were more likely to set off the worldwide aftershocks.
As an example, the researchers found the 8.6 earthquake in Indonesia this April set off 16 earthquakes with a magnitude of 5.5 or greater within days.
Not only could these “strike slip” faults like the San Andreas, Calaveras, and Hayward faults set off worldwide aftershocks, but the researchers indicate the faults could also be set off if another earthquake’s tremors struck when the fault was ready to rupture.
However, the study indicates a quake powerful enough to do that only happens once every 50 years or so.

Sumatran quakes in April were part of tectonic plate breakup

Scientists document an episode in the breakup of the Indo-Australian plate into two pieces, an epic process that began roughly 50 million years ago and isn’t done yet.

 Sumatran earthquakeA woman and her baby evacuate to higher ground after a strong earthquake in Sumatra in April. (Heri Juanda / Associated Press / April 11, 2012)

By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times

Planet Earth may be 4.5 billion years old, but that doesn’t mean it can’t serve up a shattering surprise now and again.

Such was the case on April 11 when two massive earthquakes erupted beneath the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, far from the usual danger zones. Now scientists say the seafloor ruptures are part of a long suspected, yet never before observed, event: the slow-motion splitting of a vast tectonic plate.

The first of the quakes, a magnitude 8.7, was 20 times more powerful than California’s long anticipated “big one” and tore a complex network of faults deep in the ocean floor. The violence also triggered unusually large aftershocks thousands of miles away, including four off North America’s western coast.

“It was jaw-dropping,” said Thorne Lay, a professor of Earth and planetary sciences at UC Santa Cruz. “It was like nothing we’d ever seen.”

At first, Lay wondered whether the computer code he used to analyze earthquakes was wrong. Eventually, he and other scientists realized that they had documented the breakup of the Indo-Australian plate into two pieces, an epic process that began roughly 50 million years ago and will continue for tens of millions more. Lay and other scientists reported their findings online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Most great earthquakes occur along plate borders, where one plate dives beneath the adjoining plate and sinks deep into Earth’s mantle, a process called subduction. The April 11 quakes, however, occurred in the middle of the plate and involved a number of strike-slip faults, meaning the ground on one side of the fault moves horizontally past ground on the other side.

Scientists say the 8.7 main shock broke four faults. The quake lasted 2 minutes and 40 seconds — most last just seconds — and was followed by a second main shock, of magnitude 8.2, two hours later.

Unlike the magnitude 9.1 temblor that struck in the same region on Dec. 26, 2004, and created a deadly tsunami, the April 11 quakes did not cause similar destruction. That’s because horizontally moving strike-slip faults do not induce the massive, vertical displacement of water that thrust faults do on the borders of plates.

The type of interplate faults involved in the Sumatran quakes are the result of monumental forces, some of which drove the land mass of India into Asia millions of years ago and lifted the Himalayan Mountains. As the Indo-Australian plate continues to slide northwest, the western portion of the plate, where India is, has been grinding against and underneath Asia. But the eastern portion of the plate, which contains Australia, keeps on moving without the same obstruction. That difference creates squeezing pressure in the area where the quakes occurred.

The study authors say that over time, as more quakes occur and new ruptures appear, the cracks will eventually coalesce into a single fissure.

“This is part of the messy business of breaking up a plate,” said University of Utah seismologist Keith Koper, senior author of one of the studies. “Most likely it will take thousands of similar large quakes for that to happen.”

The quakes were also notable for triggering powerful aftershocks thousands of miles away. Though major quakes have been known to trigger aftershocks at great distance, they are usually less than 5.5 in magnitude. The April earthquakes triggered 11 aftershocks that measured 5.5 or greater in the six days that followed, including a magnitude 7. Remote shocks were felt 6,000 to 12,000 miles from the main quakes.

Fred Pollitz, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif., and lead author of one of the studies, said the quakes were extremely effective in transmitting seismic wave radiation around the world. Though Pollitz said the magnitude of the larger Sumatran quake is No. 10 on the list of quakes since 1900, no other temblor has triggered so many strong aftershocks so far away.

“It’s the most powerful earthquake ever in terms of capability of putting stress on other fault zones around the world,” he said.

Pollitz said the quakes were likely to teach seismologists about the physics of earthquakes, particularly those along strike-slip faults. That knowledge, he said, would certainly apply to California’s San Andreas fault, which is also a strike-slip fault.

Lay said that the Sumatran quakes were most surprising in that they were completely unanticipated by seismologists and that he did not expect the event to repeat any time soon.

monte.morin@latimes.com

Big quake was part of crustal plate breakup

by Staff Writers
Salt Lake City UT (SPX)


This map of the Indian Ocean region shows boundaries of Earth’s tectonic plates in the area, and the epicenters (red stars) of two great earthquakes that happened April 11, 2012. A new study from the University of Utah and University of California, Santa Cruz, says the main shock measured 8.7 in magnitude, about 40 times larger than the previous estimate of 8.6. An 8.2-magnitude quake followed two hours later.The scientists explain how at least four faults ruptured during the 8.7 main shock, and how both great quakes are likely part of the breakup of the Indo-Australian Plate into separate subplates. The northeastward-moving plate is breaking up over scores of millions of years because the western part of the plate is bumping into Asia and slowing down, while the eastern part is sliding more easily beneath Sumatra and the Sunda plate. Credit: Keith Koper, University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

Seismologists have known for years that the Indo-Australian plate of Earth’s crust is slowly breaking apart, but they saw it in action last April when at least four faults broke in a magnitude-8.7 earthquake that may be the largest of its type ever recorded.

The great Indian Ocean quake of April 11, 2012 previously was reported as 8.6 magnitude, and the new estimate means the quake was 40 percent larger than had been believed, scientists from the University of Utah and University of California, Santa Cruz, report in the Sept. 27 issue of the journal Nature.

The quake was caused by at least four undersea fault ruptures southwest of Sumatra, Indonesia, within a 2-minute, 40-second period. It killed at least two people, and eight others died from heart attacks. The quake was felt from India to Australia, including throughout South Asia and Southeast Asia.

If the four ruptures were considered separate quakes, their magnitudes would have been 8.5, 7.9, 8.3 and 7.8 on the “moment magnitude” scale used to measure the largest quakes, the scientists report.

The 8.7 main shock broke three faults that were parallel but offset from each other – known as en echelon faults – and a fourth fault that was perpendicular to and crossed the first fault.

The new study concludes that the magnitude-8.7 quake and an 8.2 quake two hours later were part of the breakup of the Indian and Australian subplates along a yet-unclear boundary beneath the Indian Ocean west of Sumatra and southeast of India – a process that started roughly 50 million years ago and that will continue for millions more.

“We’ve never seen an earthquake like this,” says study co-author Keith Koper, an associate professor geophysics and director of the University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

“This is part of the messy business of breaking up a plate. … This is a geologic process. It will take millions of years to form a new plate boundary and, most likely, it will take thousands of similar large quakes for that to happen.”

All four faults that broke in the 8.7 quake and the fifth fault that ruptured in the 8.2 quake were strike-slip faults, meaning ground on one side of the fault moves horizontally past ground on the other side.

The great quake of last April 11 “is possibly the largest strike-slip earthquake ever seismically recorded,” although a similar size quake in Tibet in 1950 was of an unknown type, according to the new study, which was led by two University of California, Santa Cruz, seismologists: graduate student Han Yue and Thorne Lay, a professor of Earth and planetary sciences. The National Science Foundation funded the study.

The 8.7 jolt also “is probably the largest intraplate [within a single tectonic plate of Earth’s crust] ever seismically recorded,” Lay, Yue and Koper add. Most of Earth’s earthquakes occur at existing plate boundaries.

The researchers cannot be certain the April great quake was the largest intraplate quake or the largest strike-slip quake because “we are comparing it against historic earthquakes long before we had modern seismometers,” says Koper.

Why the Great Quake Didn’t Unleash Major Tsunamis
Koper says the 2012 quakes likely were triggered, at least in part, by changes in crustal stresses caused by the magnitude-9.1 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of Dec. 26, 2004 – a jolt that generated massive tsunamis that killed most of the 228,000 victims in the Indian Ocean region.

The fact the 8.7 and 8.2 quakes were generated by horizontal movements along seafloor strike-slip faults – not by vertical motion along thrust faults – explains why they didn’t generate major tsunamis. The 8.7 quake caused small tsunamis, the largest of which measured about 12 inches in height at Meulaboh, Indonesia, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Without major tsunamis, the great earthquake caused “very little damage and death, especially for this size of an earthquake, because it happened in the ocean and away from coastlines,” and on strike-slip faults, says Koper.

The researchers studied the quake using a variety of methods to analyze the seismic waves it generated. Because the same data can be interpreted in various ways, Koper says it is conceivable that more than four fault segments broke during the 8.7 quake – conceivably five or even six – although four fault ruptures is most likely.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do
The Indo-Australian plate is breaking into two or perhaps three pieces (some believe a Capricorn subplate is separating from the west side of the Indian subplate). The magnitude-8.7 and 8.2 great quakes on April 11 occurred over a broad area where the India and Australian subplates are being sheared apart.

“What we’re seeing here is the Indo-Australian plate fragmenting into two separate plates,” says Lay.

The breakup of the northeast-moving Indo-Australian plate is happening because it is colliding with Asia in the northwest, which slows down the western part of the plate, while the eastern part of the plate continues moving more easily by diving or “subducting” under the island of Sumatra to the northeast. The subduction zone off Sumatra caused the catastrophic 2004 magnitude-9.1 quake and tsunami.

Seismic analysis shows the April 11 quakes “involve rupture of a very complex network of faults, for which we have no documented precedent in recorded seismic history,” the researchers write.

The analysis revealed this sequence for the faults ruptures that generated the 8.7 quake, and the estimated fault rupture lengths and slippage amounts:

+ The quake began with the 50-second rupture of a fault extending west-northwest to east-southeast, with an epicenter a few hundred miles southwest of Sumatra. The fault ruptured along a roughly 90-mile length, breaking “bilaterally” both west-northwestward and east-southeastward, and also at least 30 miles deep, “almost ripping through the whole plate,” Koper says. The seafloor on one side of the fault slipped about 100 feet past the seafloor on the fault’s other side.

+ The second fault, which slipped about 25 feet, began to rupture 40 seconds after the quake began. This rupture extended an estimated 60 miles to 120 miles north-northeast to south-southwest – perpendicular to the first fault and crossing it.

+ The third fault was parallel to the first fault and about 90 to the miles southwest of it. It started breaking 70 seconds after the quake began and ruptured along a length of about 90 miles. This fault slipped about 70 feet.

+ The fourth fault paralleled the first and third faults, but was to the northwest of both of them. It began to rupture 145 seconds after the quake began and continued to do so for 15 seconds until the quake ended after a total time of 2 minutes and 40 seconds. The fault rupture was roughly 30 miles to 60 miles long. The ground on one side of this fault slipped about 20 feet past ground on the other side.

Related Links
University of Utah
Tectonic Science and News

LISS – Live Internet Seismic Server

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: September 28, 2012 10:49:03 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

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CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

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CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

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CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

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CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

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CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

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CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

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CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

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CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

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IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

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IC/ENH, Enshi, China

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IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Province, China

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IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

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IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

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IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Guangduong Province, China

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IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

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IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

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IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

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IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

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IU/BBSR, Bermuda

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IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

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IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

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IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

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IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

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IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

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IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

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IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

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IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

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IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

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IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

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IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

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IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

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IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

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IU/GUMO, Guam, Mariana Islands

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IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

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IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

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IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

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IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

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IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

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IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

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IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

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IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

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IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

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IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

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IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

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IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

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IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

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IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

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IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

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IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

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IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

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IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

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IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

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IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

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IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

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IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

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IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

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IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Equador

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IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

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IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

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IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

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IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

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IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

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IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

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IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

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IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

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IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

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IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermandec Islands

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IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

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IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

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IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

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IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

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IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

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IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

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IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

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IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

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IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

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IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

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IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

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IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

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IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

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IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

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IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

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IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

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IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

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IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

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IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

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IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

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IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

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IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

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IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

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IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

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IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

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IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

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Volcanic Activity

Volcano erupts with smoke on Sumatra

A volcano has erupted on Indonesia’s Sumatra island, spewing thick grey smoke up to 1.5 kilometres into the sky.

Monitoring official Suparno says Mount Marapi’s eruption on Wednesday is its strongest since August last year, when its status was raised to level three out of four.

Suparno, who uses one name, says there is no plan for an evacuation because the nearest villages are far beyond the danger zone of three kilometres from the crater.

Marapi is among about 129 active volcanos in Indonesia, which is located on the Pacific Ring of Fire, an arc of volcanos and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.

Its last major eruption in 1992 killed a climber and injured several others, including two American tourists.

Today Volcano Activity China Baekdu Mountain, [Changbaishan Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Activity in China on Friday, 28 September, 2012 at 02:31 (02:31 AM) UTC.

Description
A volcano on the border of China and North Korea is showing signs of increasing activity and could erupt in the next few decades, Chinese researchers say. A massive eruption of Changbaishan around 1,100 years ago spread ash and volcanic gases for 30 miles and left a 3-mile-wide crater atop the volcano, scientists said. Three smaller eruptions have occurred since then, the most recent in 1903, they said. Seismic activity, ground deformation and gas emissions recorded in a period of heightened activity from 2002 to 2006 suggests the magma chamber beneath the volcano is growing. This activity suggests an explosion could occur in the next couple of decades, researchers said. “We need to upgrade our current monitoring system in order to be able to meet the need for the early warning system for Changbaishan,” Jiandong Xu, a vulcanologist at the China Earthquake Administration in Beijing. Of the dozen or so volcanoes located in mainland China Changbaishan is the most likely to experience an eruption with potential catastrophic effects, Xu said.
27.09.2012 Volcano Eruption Indonesia West Sumatra, [Mount Marapi Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 18:03 (06:03 PM) UTC.

Description
A volcano has erupted on Indonesia’s Sumatra island, spewing thick grey smoke up to 1.5 kilometres into the sky. Monitoring official Suparno says Mount Marapi’s eruption on Wednesday is its strongest since August last year, when its status was raised to level three out of four. Suparno, who uses one name, says there is no plan for an evacuation because the nearest villages are far beyond the danger zone of three kilometres from the crater.
27.09.2012 Volcano Eruption Mexico States of Puebla and Mexico, [Popocatepetl Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Mexico on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 03:15 (03:15 AM) UTC.

Description
At least 26 eruptions accompanied by steam and gas, as well as a volcano tectonic quake were registered as a consequence of the Mexican volcano Popocatépetl activity during the last hours, it was reported Tuesday. The National Center of Disaster Prevention (Cenapred) said eruptions were of low and medium intensity with no ash expulsion in any of them. According to the institution, the volcano tectonic quake was registered at 11.54 local time (16:54 GMT). At this moment, the alert light of volcano activity remains yellow phase 2 and the surrounding population to keep informed as to alerts on the activity of the volcano also known as Don Goyo. Traffic between Santiago Xalitzintla and San Pedro Nexapa, via the Cortes passage, is under control. The Popo is located at the center of the country, in the territorial limits of the Morelos, Puebla and Mexico states. Located 55 kilometers Southeast of the Federal District, the Popocatépetl is the second highest volcano in Mexico, with a maximum height of five thousand 458 meters above sea level, only second to the Pico de Orizaba (Veracruz) with five thousand 610 meters.

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Storms / Flooding / Tornadoes

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Nadine (AL14) Atlantic Ocean 11.09.2012 27.09.2012 Tropical Depression 240 ° 93 km/h 111 km/h 4.88 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Nadine (AL14)
Area: Atlantic Ocean
Start up location: N 16° 18.000, W 43° 6.000
Start up: 11th September 2012
Status: 22nd September 2012
Track long: 1,092.58 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
12th Sep 2012 05:01:17 N 17° 48.000, W 45° 12.000 24 65 83 Tropical Storm 300 13 1004 MB NOAA NHC
12th Sep 2012 10:46:22 N 18° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 74 93 Tropical Storm 300 15 1001 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 05:34:52 N 20° 42.000, W 50° 6.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 11:12:43 N 21° 30.000, W 51° 18.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
14th Sep 2012 05:11:31 N 25° 0.000, W 53° 42.000 24 111 139 Tropical Storm 330 17 989 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 06:55:17 N 30° 0.000, W 52° 48.000 22 120 148 Hurricane I. 25 17 985 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 10:59:20 N 30° 42.000, W 51° 24.000 24 120 148 Hurricane I. 50 13 985 MB NOAA NHC
16th Sep 2012 05:13:53 N 30° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 130 157 Hurricane I. 95 15 983 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 05:22:55 N 31° 24.000, W 38° 6.000 30 111 139 Tropical Storm 75 16 987 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 10:47:47 N 32° 0.000, W 36° 24.000 28 111 139 Tropical Storm 65 15 985 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 05:15:16 N 33° 54.000, W 34° 12.000 15 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 18 989 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 10:46:51 N 34° 18.000, W 33° 36.000 13 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 14 990 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 05:31:59 N 35° 48.000, W 32° 12.000 11 83 102 Tropical Storm 25 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 11:00:20 N 36° 24.000, W 32° 6.000 7 83 102 Tropical Storm 360 9 993 MB NOAA NHC
20th Sep 2012 05:12:41 N 37° 6.000, W 31° 24.000 6 83 102 Tropical Storm 60 9 990 MB NOAA NHC
20th Sep 2012 11:02:24 N 36° 48.000, W 30° 36.000 15 83 102 Tropical Storm 120 18 983 MB NOAA NHC
21st Sep 2012 10:40:35 N 35° 6.000, W 27° 12.000 13 102 120 Tropical Storm 140 14 981 MB NOAA NHC
22nd Sep 2012 06:38:52 N 31° 54.000, W 26° 36.000 20 93 111 Tropical Storm 165 15 984 MB NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 04:58:41 N 29° 30.000, W 31° 24.000 9 83 102 Tropical Storm 220 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 12:03:57 N 28° 54.000, W 31° 30.000 9 93 111 Tropical Storm 220 10 992 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 16:47:10 N 28° 42.000, W 32° 24.000 11 93 111 Tropical Depression 240 ° 16 993 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 30° 0.000, W 35° 48.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC
30th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 33° 0.000, W 36° 48.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
01st Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 35° 30.000, W 37° 30.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
02nd Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 36° 0.000, W 37° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
Jelewat (18W) Pacific Ocean 20.09.2012 28.09.2012 SuperTyphoon 15 ° 232 km/h 278 km/h 4.27 m JTWC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Jelewat (18W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, E 132° 18.000
Start up: 20th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 805.87 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:41:44 N 11° 42.000, E 129° 54.000 6 93 120 Tropical Storm 200 9 JTWC
23rd Sep 2012 06:04:26 N 11° 48.000, E 128° 54.000 7 139 167 Typhoon I. 270 11 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 08:06:11 N 13° 36.000, E 128° 30.000 9 241 296 Typhoon IV. 350 10 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 10:43:47 N 14° 12.000, E 128° 12.000 13 232 278 Typhoon IV. 335 14 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 05:16:53 N 15° 42.000, E 127° 48.000 7 259 315 Super Typhoon 360 9 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 10:29:06 N 16° 24.000, E 127° 30.000 15 259 278 Super Typhoon 340 18 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 05:26:43 N 17° 18.000, E 126° 36.000 6 250 306 Typhoon IV. 305 17 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 10:56:11 N 18° 0.000, E 126° 6.000 15 250 306 Typhoon IV. 325 18 JTWC
27th Sep 2012 05:36:14 N 19° 42.000, E 124° 42.000 17 241 296 Typhoon IV. 310 19 JTWC
27th Sep 2012 10:57:01 N 20° 12.000, E 124° 24.000 15 250 306 Typhoon IV. 330 16 JTWC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
28th Sep 2012 04:38:56 N 22° 24.000, E 124° 6.000 13 232 278 SuperTyphoon 15 ° 14 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 27° 36.000, E 129° 0.000 Typhoon IV 176 213 JTWC
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 25° 42.000, E 126° 48.000 Typhoon IV 204 250 JTWC
30th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 32° 54.000, E 135° 18.000 Typhoon I 111 139 JTWC
01st Oct 2012 12:00:00 N 39° 6.000, E 144° 12.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 JTWC
Miriam (EP 13) Pacific Ocean – East 22.09.2012 27.09.2012 Tropical Depression 315 ° 65 km/h 83 km/h 4.57 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Miriam (EP 13)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000
Start up: 22nd September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 822.92 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:35:22 N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000 19 56 74 Tropical Depression 275 10 1005 MB NOAA NHC
23rd Sep 2012 06:07:18 N 14° 54.000, W 108° 30.000 13 74 93 Tropical Storm 300 15 1002 MB NOAA NHC
24th Sep 2012 08:09:13 N 16° 48.000, W 111° 18.000 19 148 185 Hurricane I. 305 15 979 MB NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 05:19:32 N 18° 30.000, W 113° 54.000 13 167 204 Hurricane II. 305 14 968 MB NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 10:37:14 N 18° 42.000, W 114° 18.000 9 167 204 Hurricane II. 310 10 968 MB NOAA NHC
26th Sep 2012 05:24:31 N 19° 6.000, W 115° 12.000 7 130 157 Hurricane I. 310 9 983 MB NOAA NHC
26th Sep 2012 10:58:11 N 19° 30.000, W 115° 30.000 9 111 139 Tropical Storm 320 15 990 MB NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 05:38:27 N 21° 30.000, W 115° 42.000 11 74 93 Tropical Storm 345 12 999 MB NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 12:04:18 N 21° 48.000, W 116° 0.000 9 74 93 Tropical Storm 330 15 999 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 16:46:34 N 22° 12.000, W 116° 18.000 9 65 83 Tropical Depression 315 ° 15 1000 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 54.000, W 117° 18.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
30th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 54.000, W 117° 36.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
01st Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 30.000, W 118° 0.000 Tropical Depression 28 37 NOAA NHC
Ewiniar (19W) Pacific Ocean 24.09.2012 28.09.2012 Tropical Depression 55 ° 83 km/h 102 km/h 4.57 m JTWC Details

  Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Ewiniar (19W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 18° 30.000, E 139° 0.000
Start up: 24th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 927.85 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
24th Sep 2012 08:04:10 N 18° 30.000, E 139° 0.000 26 46 65 Tropical Depression 335 17 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 10:42:45 N 19° 36.000, E 138° 54.000 20 56 74 Tropical Depression 350 17 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 05:14:15 N 21° 48.000, E 138° 18.000 15 74 93 Tropical Storm 355 15 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 10:28:32 N 22° 48.000, E 138° 30.000 19 74 93 Tropical Storm 10 10 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 05:25:41 N 25° 24.000, E 141° 18.000 15 93 120 Tropical Storm 60 16 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 10:53:51 N 26° 24.000, E 142° 12.000 24 93 120 Tropical Storm 40 19 JTWC
27th Sep 2012 05:35:33 N 30° 18.000, E 142° 18.000 22 81 130 Tropical Storm 350 17 JTWC
27th Sep 2012 10:56:30 N 31° 18.000, E 142° 12.000 19 102 130 Tropical Storm 355 15 JTWC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
28th Sep 2012 04:37:59 N 31° 36.000, E 142° 18.000 9 83 102 Tropical Depression 55 ° 15 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 38° 48.000, E 150° 18.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 JTWC
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 36° 0.000, E 146° 18.000 Typhoon I 93 120 JTWC
30th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 43° 6.000, E 161° 36.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 JTWC

Taiwan issues warning against Typhoon Jelawat

by Staff Writers
Taipei (AFP)

Taiwan on Thursday issued a warning over a strong typhoon approaching the island which could bring torrential rains and trigger landslides, a month after another heavy storm left six dead.

Residents in the north and east of the island were asked to take precautions against Typhoon Jelawat which is gaining momentum and approaching the island, the Central Weather Bureau said in a statement.

As of 0900 GMT, Jelawat was 380 kilometres (236 miles) southeast of the island’s southern-most tip.

With a radius of 250 kilometres and packing winds of up to 191 kilometres an hour, the typhoon was moving north-northwest at 14 kilometres per hour.

Typhoon Saola pounded Taiwan with fierce winds and torrential rain in August that left six people dead and forced nearly the entire island to shut down.

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest

Storms deluge historic British city

by Staff Writers
London (AFP)

Britain’s most severe September storms for 30 years flooded homes and businesses in the historic city of York on Thursday and threatened chaos for much of northern England.

Residents took to boats to navigate the picturesque streets of the city dating from Roman times but officials said flood defences would cope as the River Ouse reached near record levels, three metres (10 feet) higher than normal.

City of York Council insisted the centre was “very much open for business” despite 80 properties being flooded while defences in the nearby village of Cawood were bolstered overnight by 4,000 sandbags.

“Loads of staff have been working through the night to protect the city,” said Sally Burns from the council, who said experts believed the river levels had peaked.

“We need to be careful and make sure we are giving (sandbags) to the people who are a priority, we can see on the monitors where the problems are.”

The Met Office issued more than 50 flood warnings — indicating flooding is expected — and 80 flood alerts – meaning flooding is possible — in England and Wales.

Further rain was forecast for Thursday, putting thousands of home in northern England at risk.

In Newburn, northeast England, a four-storey block of flats teetered on the brink of collapse after floodwaters destroyed its foundations.

Police arrested a man and a woman in connection with the looting of �20,000 ($32,300, 25,000 euros) worth of bicycles from a nearby shop.

Elsewhere, police were investigating the discovery of two bodies on the banks of the swollen River Clywedog in north Wales.

The body of a 27-year-old woman was found on Wednesday and the second body, believed to be male, was discovered on Thursday. Police believe they are linked.

An 11-year-old boy was fighting for his life after being struck by lightning in storms in Swindon, southwest England.

The storms have been caused by an unusually deep area of low pressure but conditions are expected to improve over the next 24 hours.

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest

……………………………….

Today Tornado Tonga [Island of Nuiatoputapu] Damage level Details

Tornado in Tonga on Friday, 28 September, 2012 at 10:05 (10:05 AM) UTC.

Description
A family that fled to Tonga’s main island Tongatapu after the devastating tsunami hit the northern island of Nuiatoputapu three years ago had its house destroyed by a tornado on Wednesday. The house in the village of Makaunga was wrecked but no one was hurt. Radio Tonga says the family is now living in tents provided by the Red Cross. The town officer, Siosifa Lamipeti, says the tornado also damaged five power poles affecting supply for about 24 hours. He says there was minor damage to four other houses.

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Epidemic Hazards / Diseases

Today Epidemic Hazard Democratic Republic of the Congo Eastern Province, Mangala Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in Democratic Republic of the Congo on Friday, 28 September, 2012 at 02:25 (02:25 AM) UTC.

Description
Bas-Congo virus after the province where it was found just west of Kinshasa, the teeming capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The discovery was announced today in the journal PLoS Pathogens. So far only three people in the remote village of Mangala are known to have contracted Bas-Congo hemorrhagic fever, two of whom died. One was a health care worker who cared for the other two villagers, which means it can apparently be transmitted from person to person, although no one knows how easily. But the small number of known cases is actually one of the important things about this finding. It signifies that scientists may have found an emerging disease very soon after it made its jump from whatever species it came from into humans. We’ll come back to its most likely origins a little later. The reason for thinking Bas-Congo only recently began infecting humans is that researchers have run blood tests on people throughout the DRC and found no evidence of antibodies that would indicate any of them has been exposed to the new virus. “It doesn’t appear to be widespread throughout the Congo,” study co-author Charles Chiu of the University of California San Francisco told Shots. He says the team is planning to do more blood tests on people in the DRC and neighboring countries, such as Congo-Brazzaville right next to Bas-Congo province. “I would say we caught it fairly quickly,” said another study author, Joseph Fair, in a telephone interview from the other side of the DRC, where he’s helping to track down the origin of an ongoing outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever that has so far afflicted 51 people and killed 20.

“This wasn’t HIV, where we’re 15 years into a pandemic before we actually find that we have a pandemic,” says Fair, who’s with a group called Metabiota that contracts with governments and health agencies to track disease outbreaks. The three known cases of Bas-Congo fever actually occurred three years ago. But tissue samples from the victims languished in a laboratory freezer in Kinshasa until an astute doctor called the cases to Fair’s attention. That time lag, along with the inability to keep some tissue samples from thawing out, has hampered the researchers’ ability to track the virus through other possible cases in Mangala village. There are some other striking things about the new virus. It doesn’t belong to any of the four families of previously known hemorrhagic viruses – Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae and Flaviviridae. These families harbor such notorious bugs as Ebola, Marburg, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, dengue fever and Rift Valley Fever. Instead, Bas-Congo belongs to the Rhabdovirus family, which has never been known to include human hemorrhagic fever viruses, although it does contain one that affects fish. “That in itself is astonishing,” Chiu says, “but even within the rhabdovirus family, it’s very divergent.” That is, it doesn’t resemble any other rhabdovirus.

Biohazard name: Bas-Congo hemorrhagic fever
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Climate Change

Global Grain Production at Record High Despite Extreme Climatic Events

by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX)


File image.

Global grain production is expected to reach a record high of 2.4 billion tons in 2012, an increase of 1 percent from 2011 levels, according to new research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute’s Nourishing the Planet project (www.worldwatch.org) for the Institute’s Vital Signs Online service.

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the production of grain for animal feed is growing the fastest – a 2.1 percent increase from 2011. Grain for direct human consumption grew 1.1 percent from 2011, write report authors Danielle Nierenberg and Katie Spoden.

In 2011, the amount of grain used for food totaled 571 million tons, with India consuming 89 million tons, China 87 million tons, and the United States 28 million tons, according to the International Grains Council.

The world relies heavily on wheat, maize (corn), and rice for daily sustenance: of the 50,000 edible plants in the world, these three grains account for two-thirds of global food energy intake. Grains provide the majority of calories in diets worldwide, ranging from a 23 percent share in the United States to 60 percent in Asia and 62 percent in North Africa.

Maize production in the United States – the largest producer – was expected to reach a record 345 million tons in 2012; however, drought in the Great Plains has altered this estimate severely. Maize yields for the 2012-13 growing season are now expected to decrease 13 percent from 2011 production, for a total production of 274.3 million tons.

The reliance on grain crops for food security is threatened by more-extreme climatic events, especially droughts and floods. According to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction, the World Food Programme, and Oxfam International, some 375 million people will be affected by climate change-related disasters by 2015.

By 2050, the FAO notes, 10-20 percent more people will be subject to hunger based on the changing climate’s effects on agriculture, and 24 million more children are expected to be malnourished – 21 percent more than if there were no climate change.

“The relationship between food security, grain production, and climate change is especially important in 2012,” said Nierenberg, a Worldwatch senior researcher and Nourishing the Planet project director.

“The recent drought affecting the United States and the rest of the world show the need to reduce price volatility, move away from fossil fuel-based agriculture, and recognize the importance of women farmers to increase resilience to climate change.”

The drought taking place in the Midwest and Great Plains of the United States is considered the country’s worst in 50 years, coming close to matching the late-1930s Dust Bowl.

The drought is expected to cost many billions of dollars and could top the list as one of the most expensive weather-related disasters in U.S. history. The global market will be most affected by this drought, as so much of the developing world relies on U.S. corn and soybean production.

Food prices have already begun to increase due to lower yields, and price fluctuations will inevitably affect food security around the globe.

Further highlights from the report:

+ The FAO expects global maize production to increase 4.1 percent from 2011, reaching an estimated 916 million tons in 2012.

+ Global rice production achieved an all-time high of 480 million tons in 2011, a 2.6 percent increase from 2010.

+ World wheat production is projected to drop to 675.1 million tons in 2012, down 3.6 percent from 2011, with the largest declines in feed and biofuel utilization.

+ Since 1961, grain production has increased 269 percent and grain yield has increased 157 percent, while the grain harvest area has increased only 25 percent.

+ This is due largely to the Green Revolution and the introduction of high-yielding grain varieties.

Related Links
Worldwatch Institute
Farming Today – Suppliers and Technology

Loss of species makes nature more sensitive to climate change

by Staff Writers
Gothenburg, Sweden (SPX)


File image.

High biodiversity acts as an insurance policy for nature and society alike as it increases the likelihood that at least some species will be sufficiently resilient to sustain important functions such as water purification and crop pollination in a changing environment.

“It’s the same principle as an investment portfolio – you’d be mad to put all your eggs in one basket,” says researcher Johan Eklof.

Experiments with eelgrass meadows in shallow inlets on the west coast of Sweden are now showing that climate change can exacerbate the negative effects of losing sensitive species, and that the insurance effect of biodiversity may be weaker than what we typically assume.

Eelgrass meadows in shallow inlets are important nursery habitats for cod, for example. Since the early 1980s the prevalence of eelgrass has fallen dramatically along the Bohuslan coast.

This is thought to be due partly to eutrophication, which favours mats of filamentous “nuisance” algae which shade and suffocate the eelgrass, and partly to the loss of cod, which has resulted in a huge increase in numbers of smaller predatory fish.

These predatory fish, in turn, reduce numbers of Grammarus locusta, herbivorous crustaceans which are effective grazers that normally control the filamentous algae.

This type of cascade effect has become increasingly common both onshore and off as many types of predator have been wiped out by hunting or fishing. Worryingly, theory and observations would indicate that these effects could magnify the effects of global warming, which favours heat-tolerant but grazing-sensitive plants such as filamentous algae.

At the Sven Loven Centre for Marine Sciences’ Kristineberg research station on Gullmarsfjorden, researchers from the University of Gothenburg’s Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences have developed miniature ecosystems in outdoor aquariums and have been investigating how future ocean warming and ocean acidification could affect the balance between eelgrass and filamentous algae.

The effects were unexpectedly clear and unambiguous: it was the diversity of algal herbivores that determined the extent to which the ecosystem was affected by warming and acidification.

“High diversity meant that neither warming nor acidification had any real effect as the algae were eaten before they managed to grow and shade the eelgrass,” says researcher and biologist Johan Eklof, who headed up the study.

“But when we simultaneously simulated the effects of fishing and removed the effective but vulnerable herbivor Grammarus locusta, the algae took over the ecosystem – especially in the warmer conditions.”

The researchers believe that we should be concerned about the results.

“Most management is based on the assumption that we afford to lose the most sensitive species because other, more resilient species will take their place,” says Johan Eklof. “But this may not be the case with future climate changes, as it can reduce the net efficiency of the resilient species – without directly affecting them.”

However, the researchers are also careful to point out that there is still hope if society does decide to take action.

“If we protect the local biodiversity we still have, and restore the diversity we’ve lost, by for example protecting predatory fish stocks in coastal areas and reducing nutrient loading, then we’ll probably be able to increase the ecosystems’ resilience to climate change.”

Related Links
University of Gothenburg
Climate Science News – Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation

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Solar Activity

.

3MIN News Sept 27. 2012

Published on Sep 27, 2012 by

TODAY’S LINKS
Global Aftershocks: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-sumatra-earthquake-triggered-temblors-worldwide….
The Ripping Fault Lines: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-sumatra-quake-crustal-plate-breakup.html
[Old Article] Croatian Scientist says Earth Ripping Apart: http://www.croatiantimes.com/news/Around_the_World/2012-04-15/26423/Quake_Exp…
ISS Debris Threat: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-space-debris-threatens-iss.html
Russia Suspends Monsanto: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-russia-monsanto-corn-imports.html
100M Dead in 18 Years: http://www.weather.com/news/100-million-could-die-due-to-climate-20120926

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

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Space

  Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2012 SY49) 28th September 2012 0 day(s) 0.0067 2.6 19 m – 42 m 15.84 km/s 57024 km/h
(2012 SJ32) 28th September 2012 0 day(s) 0.0297 11.6 26 m – 59 m 8.11 km/s 29196 km/h
(2012 SM50) 30th September 2012 2 day(s) 0.1074 41.8 36 m – 81 m 8.68 km/s 31248 km/h
(2012 RH10) 03rd October 2012 5 day(s) 0.1260 49.0 98 m – 220 m 12.90 km/s 46440 km/h
(2012 QE50) 09th October 2012 11 day(s) 0.0809 31.5 450 m – 1.0 km 11.47 km/s 41292 km/h
(1994 EK) 14th October 2012 16 day(s) 0.1356 52.8 230 m – 520 m 12.22 km/s 43992 km/h
(2012 PA20) 15th October 2012 17 day(s) 0.1502 58.5 100 m – 230 m 10.36 km/s 37296 km/h
(2012 RV16) 18th October 2012 20 day(s) 0.1270 49.4 310 m – 700 m 16.14 km/s 58104 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

 

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Biological Hazards / Wildlife / Hazmat

HAZMAT in USA on Thursday, 27 September, 2012 at 18:30 (06:30 PM) UTC.

Description
Nine people were taken to the hospital following a chemical spill at West Knox Co. Veteran’s Home. All of the victims were suffering from respiratory problems, one of them was being treated as an emergency. Authorities called it a concentrated chlorine spill. They said it happened shortly after 9:30 a.m. at Ben Atchley State Veterans’ Home in Karns. The home was evacuated and the scene is being treated as a hazmat situation.

 

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[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

RSOE EDIS  World Event Map  September 26th, 2012

USGS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  6.4   2012/09/26 23:39:55   51.634  -178.293 9.9  ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS., ALASKA
MAP  3.1 2012/09/26 23:06:34   19.519   -64.322 55.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/26 22:53:59   36.007  -118.403 4.6  CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.1 2012/09/26 21:48:35   31.832  -115.013 0.0  BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO
MAP  2.6 2012/09/26 18:47:24   18.936   -64.157 18.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/09/26 18:21:11   19.501   -64.268 72.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.3   2012/09/26 17:45:00  -22.259   -68.502 108.0  ANTOFAGASTA, CHILE
MAP  2.8 2012/09/26 17:21:03   32.867  -116.026 1.3  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  5.0   2012/09/26 17:15:54  -26.045  -177.407 110.2  SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS
MAP  2.6 2012/09/26 15:34:19   19.613   -64.337 7.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/09/26 15:27:39   5.750   127.653 51.6  PHILIPPINE ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/09/26 13:14:21   -5.770   35.885 10.0  TANZANIA
MAP  4.2 2012/09/26 11:52:54   27.329   52.904 39.6  SOUTHERN IRAN
MAP  4.2 2012/09/26 11:37:26   10.018   -85.303 52.3  COSTA RICA
MAP  2.7 2012/09/26 10:22:56   40.464  -124.751 23.7  OFFSHORE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/26 09:46:49   19.161   -64.751 49.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/26 09:09:47   18.144   -67.081 83.0  PUERTO RICO
MAP  3.1 2012/09/26 08:54:15   19.151   -64.718 55.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.4 2012/09/26 07:42:42   43.167  -126.388 9.9  OFF THE COAST OF OREGON
MAP  3.0 2012/09/26 07:38:58   32.147  -115.211 15.1  BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO
MAP  2.7 2012/09/26 06:55:36   18.036   -66.222 64.0  PUERTO RICO
MAP  5.2   2012/09/26 06:45:18  -18.851  -175.444 162.1  TONGA
MAP  3.2 2012/09/26 06:38:30   19.349   -65.679 80.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.0 2012/09/26 06:02:18   24.667  -110.126 10.0  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.8 2012/09/26 05:53:34   41.078  -125.282 25.7  OFFSHORE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  4.8   2012/09/26 05:24:44  -32.388  -178.076 35.0  SOUTH OF THE KERMADEC ISLANDS
MAP  3.2 2012/09/26 03:52:21   19.546   -64.351 62.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.8 2012/09/26 03:26:48   54.503  -162.843 50.3  ALASKA PENINSULA
MAP  3.1 2012/09/26 03:13:29   19.325   -66.538 15.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.3 2012/09/26 02:22:24   6.752   -73.032 152.4  NORTHERN COLOMBIA
MAP  5.1   2012/09/26 01:41:44  -21.214  -174.271 42.7  TONGA
MAP  4.6   2012/09/26 01:28:33   34.796   29.982 29.1  EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
MAP  4.3 2012/09/26 01:21:16   24.878  -110.197 10.0  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  4.0 2012/09/26 00:59:47   24.591  -110.179 10.0  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.4 2012/09/26 00:45:25   19.587   -64.345 61.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.8   2012/09/26 00:17:55   24.637  -110.346 9.8  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
MAP  4.6   2012/09/26 00:05:30   24.510  -110.270 10.0  GULF OF CALIFORNIA
…………………………………..

Globe with Earthquake Location

6.4 Mwc – ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS.

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 6.4 Mwc
Date-Time
  • 26 Sep 2012 23:39:54 UTC
  • 26 Sep 2012 14:39:54 near epicenter
  • 26 Sep 2012 17:39:54 standard time in your timezone
Location 51.634N 178.293W
Depth 9 km
Distances
  • 117 km (72 miles) WSW (257 degrees) of Adak, AK
  • 287 km (178 miles) W (259 degrees) of Atka, AK
  • 2027 km (1260 miles) WSW (251 degrees) of Anchorage, AK
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 13.9 km; Vertical 2.6 km
Parameters Nph = 853; Dmin = 114.9 km; Rmss = 1.17 seconds; Gp = 20°
M-type = Mwc; Version = E
Event ID us c000cwni ***This event has been revised.

For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://neic.usgs.gov/

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Aleutian Arc

The Aleutian arc extends approximately 3,000 km from the Gulf of Alaska in the east to the Kamchatka Peninsula in the west. It marks the region where the Pacific plate subducts into the mantle beneath the North America plate. This subduction is responsible for the generation of the Aleutian Islands and the deep offshore Aleutian Trench.

The curvature of the arc results in a westward transition of relative plate motion from trench-normal (i.e., compressional) in the east to trench-parallel (i.e., translational) in the west, accompanied by westward variations in seismic activity, volcanism, and overriding plate composition. The Aleutian arc is generally divided into three regions: the western, central, and eastern Aleutians. Relative to a fixed North America plate, the Pacific plate is moving northwest at a rate that increases from roughly 60 mm/yr at the arc’s eastern edge to 76 mm/yr near its western terminus. The eastern Aleutian arc extends from the Alaskan Peninsula in the east to the Fox Islands in the west. Motion along this section of the arc is characterized by arc-perpendicular convergence and Pacific plate subduction beneath thick continental lithosphere. This region exhibits intense volcanic activity and has a history of megathrust earthquakes.

The central Aleutian arc extends from the Andreanof Islands in the east to the Rat Islands in the west. Here, motion is characterized by westward-increasing oblique convergence and Pacific plate subduction beneath thin oceanic lithosphere. Along this portion of the arc, the Wadati-Benioff zone is well defined to depths of approximately 200 km. Despite the obliquity of convergence, active volcanism and megathrust earthquakes are also present along this margin.

The western Aleutians, stretching from the western end of the Rat Islands in the east to the Commander Islands, Russia, in the west, is tectonically different from the central and eastern portions of the arc. The increasing component of transform motion between the Pacific and North America plates is evidenced by diminishing active volcanism; the last active volcano is located on Buldir Island, in the far western portion of the Rat Island chain. Additionally, this portion of the subduction zone has not hosted large earthquakes or megathrust events in recorded history. Instead, the largest earthquakes in this region are generally shallow, predominantly strike-slip events with magnitudes between M5-6. Deeper earthquakes do occur, albeit rather scarcely and with small magnitudes (M<4), down to approximately 50 km.

Most of the seismicity along the Aleutian arc results from thrust faulting that occurs along the interface between the Pacific and North America plates, extending from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. Slip along this interface is responsible for generating devastating earthquakes. Deformation also occurs within the subducting slab in the form of intermediate-depth earthquakes that can reach depths of 250 km. Normal faulting events occur in the outer rise region of the Aleutian arc resulting from the bending of the oceanic Pacific plate as it enters the Aleutian trench. Additionally, deformation of the overriding North America plate generates shallow crustal earthquakes.

The Aleutian arc is a seismically active region, evidenced by the many moderate to large earthquakes occurring each year. Since 1900, this region has hosted twelve large earthquakes (M>7.5) including the May 7, 1986 M8.0 Andreanof Islands, the June 10, 1996 M7.9 Andreanof Islands, and the November 17, 2003 M7.8 Rat Islands earthquakes. Six of these great earthquakes (M8.3 or larger) have occurred along the Aleutian arc that together have ruptured almost the entire shallow megathrust contact. The first of these major earthquakes occurred on August 17, 1906 near the island of Amchitka (M8.3) in the western Aleutian arc. However, unlike the other megathrust earthquakes along the arc, this event is thought to have been an intraplate event occurring in the shallow slab beneath the subduction zone interface.


Globe with Earthquake Location

6.9 Mwp – ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS.

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 6.9 Mwp
Date-Time
  • 26 Sep 2012 23:39:58 UTC
  • 26 Sep 2012 14:39:58 near epicenter
  • 26 Sep 2012 17:39:58 standard time in your timezone
Location 51.583N 178.200W
Depth 40 km
Distances
  • 112 km (70 miles) WSW (253 degrees) of Adak, AK
  • 282 km (175 miles) WSW (258 degrees) of Atka, AK
  • 2026 km (1259 miles) WSW (251 degrees) of Anchorage, AK
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 14.4 km; Vertical 7.5 km
Parameters Nph = 715; Dmin = 110.4 km; Rmss = 1.16 seconds; Gp = 51°
M-type = Mwp; Version = 7
Event ID us c000cwni

For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://neic.usgs.gov/

***********************************************************************************************************

RSOE EDIS

27.09.2012 02:00:43 6.9 North America United States Alaska Adak There are volcano(s) nearby the epicenter. VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 USGS-RSOE Details
27.09.2012 01:50:32 6.9 North America United States Alaska Adak There are volcano(s) nearby the epicenter. VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 USGS-RSOE Details
27.09.2012 02:10:22 6.9 North-America United States Alaska Adak There are volcano(s) nearby the epicenter. VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 EMSC Details

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…………………………..

 Tsunami Information
Pacific Ocean Region
Date/Time (UTC) Message Location Magnitude Depth Status Details
26.09.2012 23:47 PM Tsunami Information Bulletin Andreanof Islands Aleutian Is. 6.9 35 km Details

Tsunami Information Bulletin in Andreanof Islands Aleutian Is., Pacific Ocean

GuID: pacific.TIBPAC.2012.09.26.2347
Date/Time: 2012-09-26 23:47:21
Source: PTWC
Area: Pacific Ocean
Location: Andreanof Islands Aleutian Is.
Magnitude: M 6.9
Depth: 35 km
Tsunami observed: Not observed.
Original Bulletin

Tsunami Information Bulletin in Andreanof Islands Aleutian Is., Pacific Ocean

000
WEPA42 PHEB 262347
TIBPAC

TSUNAMI BULLETIN NUMBER 001
PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER/NOAA/NWS
ISSUED AT 2347Z 26 SEP 2012

THIS BULLETIN APPLIES TO AREAS WITHIN AND BORDERING THE PACIFIC
OCEAN AND ADJACENT SEAS...EXCEPT ALASKA...BRITISH COLUMBIA...
WASHINGTON...OREGON AND CALIFORNIA.

... TSUNAMI INFORMATION BULLETIN ...

THIS BULLETIN IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

THIS BULLETIN IS ISSUED AS ADVICE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES.  ONLY
NATIONAL AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO MAKE
DECISIONS REGARDING THE OFFICIAL STATE OF ALERT IN THEIR AREA AND
ANY ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN RESPONSE.

AN EARTHQUAKE HAS OCCURRED WITH THESE PRELIMINARY PARAMETERS

 ORIGIN TIME -  2340Z 26 SEP 2012
 COORDINATES -  51.2 NORTH  178.2 WEST
 DEPTH       -   35 KM
 LOCATION    -  ANDREANOF ISLANDS  ALEUTIAN IS.
 MAGNITUDE   -  6.9

EVALUATION

 A WIDESPREAD DESTRUCTIVE TSUNAMI THREAT DOES NOT EXIST BASED ON
 HISTORICAL EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI DATA.

 THE WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WILL ISSUE
 INFORMATION REGARDING ANY LOCAL TSUNAMI THREAT TO COASTS NEAR
 THE EARTHQUAKE EPICENTER.

THIS WILL BE THE ONLY BULLETIN ISSUED FOR THIS EVENT UNLESS
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BECOMES AVAILABLE.

THE WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WILL ISSUE PRODUCTS
FOR ALASKA...BRITISH COLUMBIA...WASHINGTON...OREGON...CALIFORNIA.

……………………………

LISS – Live Internet Seismic Server

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: September 27, 2012 04:49:07 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

 ANWB 24hr plot

CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

 BBGH 24hr plot

CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

 BCIP 24hr plot

CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

 GRGR 24hr plot

CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

 GRTK 24hr plot

CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

 GTBY 24hr plot

CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

 MTDJ 24hr plot

CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

 SDDR 24hr plot

CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

 TGUH 24hr plot

IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

 BJT 24hr plot

IC/ENH, Enshi, China

 ENH 24hr plot

IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Province, China

 HIA 24hr plot

IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

 LSA 24hr plot

IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

 MDJ 24hr plot

IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Guangduong Province, China

 QIZ 24hr plot

IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

 ADK 24hr plot

IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

 AFI 24hr plot

IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

 ANMO 24hr plot

IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

 ANTO 24hr plot

IU/BBSR, Bermuda

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IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

 BILL 24hr plot

IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

 CASY 24hr plot

IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

 CCM 24hr plot

IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

 CHTO 24hr plot

IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

 COLA 24hr plot

IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

 COR 24hr plot

IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

 CTAO 24hr plot

IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

 DAV 24hr plot

IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

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IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

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IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

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IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

 GNI 24hr plot

IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

 GRFO 24hr plot

IU/GUMO, Guam, Mariana Islands

 GUMO 24hr plot

IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

 HKT 24hr plot

IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

 HNR 24hr plot

IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

 HRV 24hr plot

IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

 INCN 24hr plot

IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

 JOHN 24hr plot

IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

 KBS 24hr plot

IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

 KEV 24hr plot

IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

 KIEV 24hr plot

IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

 KIP 24hr plot

IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

 KMBO 24hr plot

IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

 KNTN 24hr plot

IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

 KONO 24hr plot

IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

 KOWA 24hr plot

IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

 LCO 24hr plot

IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

 LSZ 24hr plot

IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

 LVC 24hr plot

IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

 MA2 24hr plot

IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

 MAJO 24hr plot

IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

 MAKZ 24hr plot

IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

 MBWA 24hr plot

IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

 MIDW 24hr plot

IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

 MSKU 24hr plot

IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

 NWAO 24hr plot

IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Equador

 OTAV 24hr plot

IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

 PAB 24hr plot

IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

 PAYG 24hr plot

IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

 PET 24hr plot

IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

 PMG 24hr plot

IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

 PMSA 24hr plot

IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

 POHA 24hr plot

IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

 PTCN 24hr plot

IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

 PTGA 24hr plot

IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

 QSPA 24hr plot

IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermandec Islands

 RAO 24hr plot

IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

 RAR 24hr plot

IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

 RCBR 24hr plot

IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

 RSSD 24hr plot

IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

 SAML 24hr plot

IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

 SBA 24hr plot

IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

 SDV 24hr plot

IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

 SFJD 24hr plot

IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

 SJG 24hr plot

IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

 SLBS 24hr plot

IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

 SNZO 24hr plot

IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

 SSPA 24hr plot

IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

 TARA 24hr plot

IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

 TATO 24hr plot

IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

 TEIG 24hr plot

IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

 TIXI 24hr plot

IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

 TRIS 24hr plot

IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

 TRQA 24hr plot

IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

 TSUM 24hr plot

IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

 TUC 24hr plot

IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

 ULN 24hr plot

IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

 WAKE 24hr plot

IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

 WCI 24hr plot

IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

 WVT 24hr plot

IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

 XMAS 24hr plot

IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

 YAK 24hr plot

IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

 YSS 24hr plot

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Volcanic Activity

26.09.2012 Volcano Eruption Indonesia West Sumatra, [Mount Marapi Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 18:03 (06:03 PM) UTC.

Description
A volcano has erupted on Indonesia’s Sumatra island, spewing thick grey smoke up to 1.5 kilometres into the sky. Monitoring official Suparno says Mount Marapi’s eruption on Wednesday is its strongest since August last year, when its status was raised to level three out of four. Suparno, who uses one name, says there is no plan for an evacuation because the nearest villages are far beyond the danger zone of three kilometres from the crater.
26.09.2012 03:15 AM States of Puebla and Mexico, Mexico Popocatepetl Volcano Volcano Eruption 1401-09= Stratovolcanoes 2008 No. 0 Details

Volcano Eruption in Mexico on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 03:15 (03:15 AM) UTC.

Description
At least 26 eruptions accompanied by steam and gas, as well as a volcano tectonic quake were registered as a consequence of the Mexican volcano Popocatépetl activity during the last hours, it was reported Tuesday. The National Center of Disaster Prevention (Cenapred) said eruptions were of low and medium intensity with no ash expulsion in any of them. According to the institution, the volcano tectonic quake was registered at 11.54 local time (16:54 GMT). At this moment, the alert light of volcano activity remains yellow phase 2 and the surrounding population to keep informed as to alerts on the activity of the volcano also known as Don Goyo. Traffic between Santiago Xalitzintla and San Pedro Nexapa, via the Cortes passage, is under control. The Popo is located at the center of the country, in the territorial limits of the Morelos, Puebla and Mexico states. Located 55 kilometers Southeast of the Federal District, the Popocatépetl is the second highest volcano in Mexico, with a maximum height of five thousand 458 meters above sea level, only second to the Pico de Orizaba (Veracruz) with five thousand 610 meters.

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

26.09.2012 Extreme Weather United Kingdom Multiple region, [South west, northern England and Scotland] Damage level Details

Extreme Weather in United Kingdom on Monday, 24 September, 2012 at 13:34 (01:34 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 03:10 UTC
Description
A woman died after being hit by a falling tree branch at the Royal Botanical Gardens in London. She was a victim of the storm that has swept across the UK, causing power black-outs and flood evacuations. Heavy rain and winds of up to 70mph disrupted rail services in the South West, the Midlands, northern England and Wales. East Coast trains said there was no service on the East Coast Main Line between York and Darlington because of flooding, preventing the running of East Coast services between London and Scotland. About 70 areas in England and Wales were being warned to expect flooding, with northern England the worst affected. In Tyne and Wear, Northumberland and County Durham 200 homes were evacuated. In Scotland, there were eight flood warnings, mostly for the Borders. The Scottish Government’s Resilience Room (SGoRR) and Transport Scotland’s Multi Agency Response Team (MART) were both activated in light of Met Office Amber Alerts. Transport Minister Keith Brown, who chaired a meeting earlier today, said: “Yet again, we have seen a wide range of agencies and organisations react quickly to weather alerts and to put in place their response plans for the potential impact of heavy rain and high winds. “This activity, including a significant level of multi-agency co-operation, has played its part in keeping disruption to a minimum in difficult conditions. “The travelling public also deserve praise for the way they have reacted to the various travel updates.” And around 2,000 households across a number of areas were without power.

Extreme Weather in United Kingdom on Monday, 24 September, 2012 at 13:34 (01:34 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 03:29 UTC
Description
More than 300 homes have been flooded in the north of England in two days, as almost twice the average rainfall for September drenched the Pennine and Cheviot catchments and streamed off both sides. Boats ferried residents to safety from St Helen’s in Lancashire and Morpeth in Northumberland, where defences installed after disastrous flooding in 2008 failed to contain the river Wansbeck. Transport was devastated as parts of the M6 and the East Coast main line became temporary rivers, and swirling underground water left a block of town houses in Newburn, Newcastle, seemingly on stilts as earth round the foundations was swept away. Police cordoned off the building amid fears it could collapse and last night the area around it was said to be like a “ghost town” after a power failure. An old fishing village in the Footdee or “Fittie” area of Aberdeen was covered in a white foam as wind and rain drove a thick froth of plankton and sea-spume inland. The city council said the coating was “unusual but harmless” and it would be swept up by environmental teams if any was left after the rain. An easing of the downpour in the central Pennines, turning to a fine mist by mid-afternoon on Tuesday, saved the centre of Leeds and the much-flooded Calder valley town of Hebden Bridge from serious damage. Sandbags were everywhere in Hebden Bridge and pumps on standby, while emergency teams from the Environment Agency in Leeds ran a round-the-clock clearing of drains and watercourses. The agency warned, however, that further flooding was likely in Yorkshire, the north-west and north Wales overnight before the obstinate centre of low pressure finally crept off the fells and turned its attention to the Midlands and south. The Meteorological Office warned that their turn would be on Wednesday as the weather backtracked down the course it took over the weekend. There are 219 flood warnings in place.

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Storms /  Flooding

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Nadine (AL14) Atlantic Ocean 11.09.2012 27.09.2012 Tropical Depression 220 ° 83 km/h 102 km/h 4.57 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Nadine (AL14)
Area: Atlantic Ocean
Start up location: N 16° 18.000, W 43° 6.000
Start up: 11th September 2012
Status: 22nd September 2012
Track long: 1,173.54 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
12th Sep 2012 05:01:17 N 17° 48.000, W 45° 12.000 24 65 83 Tropical Storm 300 13 1004 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 05:34:52 N 20° 42.000, W 50° 6.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
14th Sep 2012 05:11:31 N 25° 0.000, W 53° 42.000 24 111 139 Tropical Storm 330 17 989 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 06:55:17 N 30° 0.000, W 52° 48.000 22 120 148 Hurricane I. 25 17 985 MB NOAA NHC
16th Sep 2012 05:13:53 N 30° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 130 157 Hurricane I. 95 15 983 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 05:22:55 N 31° 24.000, W 38° 6.000 30 111 139 Tropical Storm 75 16 987 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 05:15:16 N 33° 54.000, W 34° 12.000 15 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 18 989 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 05:31:59 N 35° 48.000, W 32° 12.000 11 83 102 Tropical Storm 25 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
20th Sep 2012 05:12:41 N 37° 6.000, W 31° 24.000 6 83 102 Tropical Storm 60 9 990 MB NOAA NHC
22nd Sep 2012 06:38:52 N 31° 54.000, W 26° 36.000 20 93 111 Tropical Storm 165 15 984 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 04:58:41 N 29° 30.000, W 31° 24.000 9 83 102 Tropical Depression 220 ° 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
28th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 29° 6.000, W 34° 48.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
28th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 28° 36.000, W 33° 36.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 30° 0.000, W 35° 48.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC
30th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 33° 0.000, W 36° 48.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
01st Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 35° 30.000, W 37° 30.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
02nd Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 36° 0.000, W 37° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
Jelewat (18W) Pacific Ocean 20.09.2012 27.09.2012 SuperTyphoon 310 ° 241 km/h 296 km/h 5.79 m JTWC Details

Tropical Storm data

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Storm name: Jelewat (18W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, E 132° 18.000
Start up: 20th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 651.09 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:41:44 N 11° 42.000, E 129° 54.000 6 93 120 Tropical Storm 200 9 JTWC
23rd Sep 2012 06:04:26 N 11° 48.000, E 128° 54.000 7 139 167 Typhoon I. 270 11 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 08:06:11 N 13° 36.000, E 128° 30.000 9 241 296 Typhoon IV. 350 10 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 05:16:53 N 15° 42.000, E 127° 48.000 7 259 315 Super Typhoon 360 9 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 05:26:43 N 17° 18.000, E 126° 36.000 6 250 306 Typhoon IV. 305 17 JTWC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 05:36:14 N 19° 42.000, E 124° 42.000 17 241 296 SuperTyphoon 310 ° 19 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
28th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 23° 6.000, E 124° 6.000 Typhoon IV 194 241 JTWC
29th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 25° 24.000, E 126° 36.000 Typhoon III 167 204 JTWC
30th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 29° 18.000, E 132° 6.000 Typhoon I 120 148 JTWC
01st Oct 2012 06:00:00 N 34° 48.000, E 137° 54.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 JTWC
Miriam (EP 13) Pacific Ocean – East 22.09.2012 27.09.2012 Tropical Depression 345 ° 74 km/h 93 km/h 3.66 m NOAA NHC Details

 Tropical Storm data

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Storm name: Miriam (EP 13)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000
Start up: 22nd September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 761.83 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:35:22 N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000 19 56 74 Tropical Depression 275 10 1005 MB NOAA NHC
23rd Sep 2012 06:07:18 N 14° 54.000, W 108° 30.000 13 74 93 Tropical Storm 300 15 1002 MB NOAA NHC
24th Sep 2012 08:09:13 N 16° 48.000, W 111° 18.000 19 148 185 Hurricane I. 305 15 979 MB NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 05:19:32 N 18° 30.000, W 113° 54.000 13 167 204 Hurricane II. 305 14 968 MB NOAA NHC
26th Sep 2012 05:24:31 N 19° 6.000, W 115° 12.000 7 130 157 Hurricane I. 310 9 983 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 05:38:27 N 21° 30.000, W 115° 42.000 11 74 93 Tropical Depression 345 ° 12 999 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
28th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 22° 48.000, W 117° 0.000 Tropical Depression 46 65 NOAA NHC
28th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 42.000, W 116° 36.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 NOAA NHC
29th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 54.000, W 117° 18.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
30th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 54.000, W 117° 36.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
01st Oct 2012 00:00:00 N 22° 30.000, W 118° 0.000 Tropical Depression 28 37 NOAA NHC
Ewiniar (19W) Pacific Ocean 24.09.2012 27.09.2012 Typhoon I 350 ° 81 km/h 130 km/h 5.18 m JTWC Details

  Tropical Storm data

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Storm name: Ewiniar (19W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 18° 30.000, E 139° 0.000
Start up: 24th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 840.84 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
24th Sep 2012 08:04:10 N 18° 30.000, E 139° 0.000 26 46 65 Tropical Depression 335 17 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 05:14:15 N 21° 48.000, E 138° 18.000 15 74 93 Tropical Storm 355 15 JTWC
26th Sep 2012 05:25:41 N 25° 24.000, E 141° 18.000 15 93 120 Tropical Storm 60 16 JTWC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Sep 2012 05:35:33 N 30° 18.000, E 142° 18.000 22 81 130 Typhoon I 350 ° 17 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
28th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 32° 42.000, E 143° 48.000 Typhoon I 102 130 JTWC
29th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 37° 24.000, E 148° 54.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 JTWC

UK Weather: Dramatic Pictures Of Flooding Across Britain

PA/Huffington Post UK

The wet and windy start to week has persisted into Wednesday with more than a month’s worth of rain falling in some places across the UK.

Britain has been hit with the most extreme September weather for decades, with hundreds evacuated from their homes and fire and rescue teams battling against the floods to help residents of some of the worst-hit areas.

donkey rescue

The RSPCA had to step in to rescue donkeys (one of whom was called none other than Noah!) from their field in Cattal near YorkCars sailed down streets after being abandoned by motorists, and a block of flats in Newburn, Newcastle were left with their foundations exposed as the town struggled with another day of heavy rain.

autumn

There were fears that the modern housing blocks could crumple as torrents of water washed away their foundationsMick Murphy, technical director of Newcastle City Council, told the BBC that the Spencer Court flats were “extremely unstable”, adding that he had “never seen anything like this in 33 years of civil engineering experience”

no foundations

The floods washed away material around the foundations as a waterfall surged through the backgardenIt was evacuated close to a bicycle shop which had thousands of pounds worth of cycles stolen while the roads were blocked by water and silt.

“We have increased patrols in Newburn” said Acting Chief Superintendent Dave Byrne, of Newcastle Area Command.

He added: “It is despicable if people are thinking of taking advantage of the bad weather and using it as an opportunity to break in to properties.”

tweed

The river Tweed bursts its banks in the centre of Peebles, Scottish Borders as rain causes misery for many across the UK.There are 57 flood warnings and 100 flood alerts currently in force across the UK, with the North of England worst affected.

Although the worst of the rain has now passed, river levels in some places were still rising as the water comes down through the systems.

The Environment Agency said rivers such as the Ouse, which flows through York, and the Dane, which flows through Crewe, Nantwich and Northwich, had yet to peak this afternoon and posed a real risk of flooding.

york

Elevated walkways carry pedestrians to walk above floodwater in York as the River Ouse continues to rise today following the torrential rainfalls of the past few days.Some towns have been “cut in half” by the floods, as bridges were swamped by the swollen river conditions. Tadcaster was split in two by the closure of the bridge which carries the A659 over the River Wharfe as a precaution after firefighters noticed water seeping through the structure.

tewskebsyuer

Beautiful but dangerous: flood waters in the fields around Tewkesbury AbbeyShut roads and flooded railways have caused travel chaos, with diversions in place across the affected counties. The A1 near Catterick will remain closed all day, police have said.

aerial
An aerial view showing flood water from the River Ouse in York, North Yorkshire as communities are being warned of the possibility of more flooding.

evacuated from york city centre
Workers evacuated from their offices in York city centre on Wednesday

However for some, coping with the flooding is just the first obstacle to overcome.

After the floods subside residents and business owners will have to cope with the huge amounts of mud and debris left by the floods. Some of these deposits have already rendered areas unrecognisable.

floods silt etc

A car is submerged in mud after the waters subsided in an area of Newcastle on WednesdayResident have had to use ladders to bridge their way across the islands of mud that have been left by the floods.

Councils have called on the government to set up an emergency fund to help pay for millions of pounds of repairs to roads damaged by the persistent rain and flooding in the past few months.

morpeth back garden

A flooded back garden in Morpeth, where hundreds have been evacuated after stormsIt said funds might have to be diverted from elsewhere to plug the gap, causing cuts to services or planned infrastructure projects that aim to boost growth being put on the back-burner.

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Radiation / Nuclear

NEW YORK, Sept. 27 (UPI) — Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda told the United Nations Japan will share the lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster to promote nuclear safety.

Addressing the General Assembly, the Japanese leader urged U.N. members to act in the interest of future generations about nuclear safety.

He said the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant disaster, caused by a massive earthquake and tsunami, led his government to take steps that would allow Japan to end its dependence on nuclear power by 2030s.

In this regard, Noda said, his government, along with the International Atomic Energy Agency, will co-sponsor the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety at the end of this year and the U.N. World Conference on Disaster Reduction in 2015.

Noda also urged his counterparts to do more to combat threats such as environmental degradation, terrorism and the proliferation of nuclear weapons, and to build a sustainable future for future generations.

“Political leaders must take charge of their responsibilities now for tomorrow,” he said.

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Epidemic Hazards / Diseases

27.09.2012 Epidemic Hazard Denmark South Denmark, Dánia [Odense University Hospital] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in Denmark on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 03:07 (03:07 AM) UTC.

Description
Five persons showing symptoms of infection from a SARS-like virus have been admitted to Odense University Hospital (OUH), central Denmark, the hospital said in a press statement Tuesday. The five patients are currently being examined for symptoms of infection from a new corona virus, which can lead to severe respiratory disease. Corona viruses are a large family of viruses including those which cause the common cold, as well as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), an outbreak of which killed some 800 people in 2003. The new corona virus is thought to have an incubation period lasting seven to 10 days, and has previously been found among patients who had traveled from Qatar and Saudi Arabia. OUH Director Jens Peter Steensen said to Danish media late Tuesday that the five patients, who are all Danish residents, will be tested for the new corona virus and for a range of more common triggers of respiratory infection. The results of these tests will be released Wednesday afternoon, Steensen said, adding the patients will be kept in isolation until then. On Monday, the Danish Health and Medicines Authority advised persons who had traveled to Qatar or Saudi Arabia to seek medical advice if they experienced fever, cough or difficulty breathing within ten days of their return from these countries. It followed a warning from British health officials who alerted the World Health Organization on Saturday of the new virus found in a man transferred from Qatar to the UK on Sept. 11.
Biohazard name: SARS (susp, human)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: suspected

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Solar Activity

2MIN News Sept 26. 2012

Published on Sep 26, 2012 by

2012 Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU

TODAY’S LINKS
UK Rain: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19716219
Greek Austerity: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/09/26/us-greece-strike-idUSBRE88P0BZ20120926
Spain Protests: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/09/26/us-spain-budget-idUSBRE88O0PU20120926

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

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Space

  Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2012 SL50) 27th September 2012 0 day(s) 0.0073 2.8 14 m – 31 m 12.04 km/s 43344 km/h
(2012 QF42) 27th September 2012 0 day(s) 0.1095 42.6 130 m – 280 m 8.67 km/s 31212 km/h
(2012 SY49) 28th September 2012 1 day(s) 0.0067 2.6 19 m – 42 m 15.84 km/s 57024 km/h
(2012 SJ32) 28th September 2012 1 day(s) 0.0297 11.6 26 m – 59 m 8.11 km/s 29196 km/h
(2012 SM50) 30th September 2012 3 day(s) 0.1074 41.8 36 m – 81 m 8.68 km/s 31248 km/h
(2012 RH10) 03rd October 2012 6 day(s) 0.1260 49.0 98 m – 220 m 12.90 km/s 46440 km/h
(2012 QE50) 09th October 2012 12 day(s) 0.0809 31.5 450 m – 1.0 km 11.47 km/s 41292 km/h
(1994 EK) 14th October 2012 17 day(s) 0.1356 52.8 230 m – 520 m 12.22 km/s 43992 km/h
(2012 PA20) 15th October 2012 18 day(s) 0.1502 58.5 100 m – 230 m 10.36 km/s 37296 km/h
(2012 RV16) 18th October 2012 21 day(s) 0.1270 49.4 310 m – 700 m 16.14 km/s 58104 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

Mystery Of Asteroid Oljato’s Magnetism –
Strange Object That Was Once Lost Then Recovered
 

MessageToEagle.com – This strange object was discovered by an American astronomer, H.L. Giclas in 1947.

It was lost and later recovered again in 1979.
Its name is 2201 Oljato. It is in a highly elliptical Earth-crossing orbit and has a unique spectrum that does not resemble that of any other known asteroid or comet.

Its nature is unknown. For some time, it was believed it could be the “dead” nucleus of a comet that has ceased to be active, but this possibility was later ruled out.


Click on image to enlargeHubble Space Telescope observation of an asteroid trailing debris following a suspected collision. Photo Credits: NASA, ESA, & D. Jewitt/UCLA

In recent years, there has been much focus on the possible relation between comets and asteroids. It has been observed that many asteroids have orbits, which are reminiscent of cometary orbits.

Earth-crossing asteroid 2201 Oljato, for example, seems to have more links to comets than just its orbital parameters.

The orbit of Oljato appears to be coincident with perturbations in the magnetic field of Venus as it was detected by the Pioneer Venus spacecraft.

Are these perturbations caused by particles trailing behind Oljato or a “tail”?


The study of the near-Earth object 2201 Oljato has resulted in many surprises. The asteroid 2201 Oljato appears to be exhibiting some strange behavior.
Its orbital properties have been associated with meteor showers, and its modeled orbital evolution is chaotic, a property which might indicate a history related to comets.

All available observational data gathered during the object’s two apparitions – in 1979 and 1983, shows that this asteroid has a high radiometric albedo, a property not associated with comet nuclei. In certain wavelength regimes it is classified as an S-type asteroid, in others, an E-type, but its overall spectral reflectance is not typical of either taxonomic type, and neither type is thought of as cometlike.


Click on image to enlargeArtist’s conception of Pioneer Venus orbiter entering Venus’ atmosphere.

Surprisingly, high ultraviolet reflectance at the 1979 apparition was suggested to be the result of residual outgassing as in a comet. The UV photometric data are modeled as fluorescent emission from neutral species found in comets.

Oljato orbits the Sun once every 3.2 years. During its lifetime, NASA’s Pioneer Venus Orbiter and its magnetometers observed three passages of Oljato between Venus and the Sun.
Each time, there was a marked increase in the region of unusual magnetic peaks known as Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs), both ahead and behind the asteroid.

The European Space Agency’s craft Venus Express follows an orbit around Venus that brings it to within 250 km (155 miles) at its closest and 66,000 km (41,000 miles) when furthest away. Its seven instruments are mounted on the central body, which is about 1.5m (5 ft) across. Credit: ESA

Now, new data from Venus Express spacecraft suggest the asteroid has lost its magnetism. Dr. Christopher Russell presented an explanation for Oljato’s strange behavior at the European Planetary Science Congress in Madrid on Tuesday 25th September.

“This is not typical asteroidal behavior! These magnetic increases are rare, occurring in Venus orbit about 10 times per year. Pioneer observed that when Oljato was just in front or just behind Venus, the rate of IFEs approximately trebled. And yet, in more recent observations with Venus Express, the occurrence of IFEs is now lower than the average we find outside this region,” Russell said.

Russell and his team believe that the answer to this discrepancy lies with collisions between Oljato and debris in its orbit. When objects collide in interplanetary space, they become electrically charged and dust particles are accelerated by the solar wind.

“At one point in time Oljato shed boulders – mostly a few tens of meters in diameter – into its orbit and they formed a debris trail in front and behind Oljato. These impactors then hit other targets as they passed between Venus and the Sun. The large amount of fine dust released by these collisions was picked up by the solar wind, producing the IFEs observed by Pioneer, and was accelerated out of the solar system,” Russell explained.

The reduced rate of IFEs observed during the Venus Express epoch suggests that the collisions with Oljato’s co-orbiting material have reduced the general debris in the region as well as the co-orbiting material shed by Oljato.

“The IFEs observed by Pioneer suggest that more than 3 tons of dust was being lost from the region each day. Effects associated with solar heating and gravitational perturbations have gradually nudged larger chunks of debris away from Oljato’s orbit. From once being unusually crowded, the region has become unusually clear and free of IFEs,” said Russell.

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Biological Hazards / Wildlife / Hazmat

26.09.2012 HAZMAT Slovakia Capital City, Bratislava [Auto-Klima company, Petrzalka district] Damage level Details

HAZMAT in Slovakia on Wednesday, 26 September, 2012 at 14:39 (02:39 PM) UTC.

Description
A chemical leak on the premises of the Auto-Klima company on Kopcianska Street in Bratislava’s Petrzalka district has injured sixteen people, one seriously. The fire brigade in Bratislava reported that the leak was of styrene, an organic chemical, and sulphur dioxide. The site was evacuated, a de-contamination process begun and the building’s power supply disconnected. Police spokesperson Petra Hrášková said that officers were investigating the cause of the accident.

Sixteen hospitalized in chemicals leak in Slovakia

by Staff Writers
Bratislava (AFP)

Sixteen people were hospitalised for exposure to poisonous gasses in a leak Wednesday at a former chemical plant in Slovakia’s capital Bratislava, the police said.

“Fifteen people suffered light injuries and one was injured more seriously. All of them were taken to hospital,” Boris Chmel, spokesman for the emergency services, told AFP.

The styrene and sulphur dioxide leak occurred at a firm making car air-conditioning systems, which operated on the premises of the former chemicals plant, local media reported.

Sulphur dioxide is a toxic gas, a key contributor to so-called acid rain.

Both chemicals in question may cause breathing problems and possibly, cancer.

Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
A world of storm and tempest
When the Earth Quakes

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[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

USGS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  3.1 2012/09/21 23:07:02   19.037   -64.288 42.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.2 2012/09/21 22:59:26   36.262   70.287 113.1  HINDU KUSH REGION, AFGHANISTAN
MAP  3.2 2012/09/21 20:44:55   18.706   -68.224 27.0  DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REGION
MAP  4.6   2012/09/21 19:36:51   36.785   142.333 24.7  OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP  3.1 2012/09/21 17:24:05   19.457   -64.165 72.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.6   2012/09/21 17:19:04   36.526   71.273 90.2  HINDU KUSH REGION, AFGHANISTAN
MAP  2.6 2012/09/21 15:56:48   56.983  -154.121 19.3  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  4.6   2012/09/21 15:39:16   35.520   22.734 46.1  CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN SEA
MAP  3.2 2012/09/21 12:22:29   19.739   -64.121 30.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.4   2012/09/21 12:17:26  -19.654   -69.149 98.8  TARAPACA, CHILE
MAP  4.9   2012/09/21 11:59:38   -8.979   157.978 35.1  SOLOMON ISLANDS
MAP  4.3 2012/09/21 11:12:05   12.167   -88.743 35.2  OFF THE COAST OF EL SALVADOR
MAP  2.8 2012/09/21 10:39:00   17.974   -67.086 6.0  PUERTO RICO
MAP  4.5   2012/09/21 10:09:26   40.459   77.421 29.6  SOUTHERN XINJIANG, CHINA
MAP  4.4 2012/09/21 09:22:26  -32.965   -69.678 100.9  MENDOZA, ARGENTINA
MAP  5.0   2012/09/21 08:47:40   35.300   22.679 15.1  CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN SEA
MAP  3.3 2012/09/21 08:28:29   19.648   -64.203 60.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.4 2012/09/21 08:11:28   19.499   -64.109 75.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.1 2012/09/21 06:37:01   10.225   -85.594 25.7  COSTA RICA
MAP  3.0 2012/09/21 05:08:30   57.197  -157.848 2.7  ALASKA PENINSULA
MAP  4.8   2012/09/21 05:01:57   9.939   126.099 35.3  MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES
MAP  3.1 2012/09/21 04:53:33   54.716  -154.315 12.4  SOUTH OF ALASKA
MAP  2.7 2012/09/21 04:36:16   63.037  -148.469 76.5  CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP  4.6   2012/09/21 03:28:36   32.099   58.499 25.9  EASTERN IRAN
MAP  4.7   2012/09/21 03:25:50  -25.646   178.468 572.0  SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS
MAP  2.8 2012/09/21 03:16:45   61.735  -149.718 37.0  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  3.2 2012/09/21 02:18:45   19.292   -66.159 73.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/09/21 02:14:50  -10.836   113.985 8.8  SOUTH OF JAVA, INDONESIA
MAP  4.3 2012/09/21 00:30:44   -8.364   121.227 31.5  FLORES REGION, INDONESIA
MAP  4.3 2012/09/21 00:03:54   35.248   135.388 370.4  WESTERN HONSHU, JAPAN

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  2.6 2012/09/20 22:42:33   51.949  -177.631 9.8  ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS., ALASKA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/20 22:17:41   51.121   179.245 23.6  RAT ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN ISLANDS, ALASKA
MAP  5.4   2012/09/20 21:21:06   5.978   126.383 111.2  MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES
MAP  5.7   2012/09/20 21:03:40  -20.753  -178.373 544.2  FIJI REGION
MAP  3.8 2012/09/20 20:47:36   62.692  -149.807 10.1  CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP  3.4 2012/09/20 20:01:18   52.472  -170.057 127.2  FOX ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN ISLANDS, ALASKA
MAP  4.9   2012/09/20 17:44:51   -5.735   149.821 120.5  NEW BRITAIN REGION, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
MAP  2.9 2012/09/20 17:21:58   19.006   -64.557 65.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.4 2012/09/20 17:15:06   19.633   -64.434 17.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.3 2012/09/20 16:58:43   17.569   -94.854 114.1  VERACRUZ, MEXICO
MAP  4.9   2012/09/20 16:32:43   10.657   126.978 35.0  PHILIPPINE ISLANDS REGION
MAP  5.0   2012/09/20 15:52:34   2.178   126.830 83.3  MOLUCCA SEA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/20 12:42:40   10.332   126.205 46.6  PHILIPPINE ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.5 2012/09/20 12:13:12   33.452  -116.441 2.3  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.5 2012/09/20 11:42:15   18.557   -64.535 1.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.7   2012/09/20 10:07:06  -34.271   -72.226 17.5  OFFSHORE LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP  4.1 2012/09/20 09:29:52   13.981   -91.017 71.3  GUATEMALA
MAP  3.3 2012/09/20 08:44:31   19.271   -64.047 94.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/20 08:40:16   40.378  -125.146 0.0  OFFSHORE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.5 2012/09/20 07:57:51   56.912  -154.004 46.1  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  3.4 2012/09/20 07:31:29   56.909  -154.095 43.4  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  3.4 2012/09/20 07:15:03   19.427   -64.198 87.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.8   2012/09/20 06:23:43   52.586   -32.043 9.8  REYKJANES RIDGE
MAP  4.9   2012/09/20 06:08:05  -13.927   -72.699 66.5  CENTRAL PERU
MAP  5.2   2012/09/20 05:40:20  -20.537  -176.155 209.6  FIJI REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/09/20 05:39:35   19.701   -64.203 25.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.7 2012/09/20 05:37:39   17.854   -65.536 16.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.7   2012/09/20 03:32:41  -20.259   167.190 31.9  LOYALTY ISLANDS
MAP  2.5 2012/09/20 01:52:20   35.301  -117.094 20.1  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  4.3 2012/09/20 01:51:15   13.296   -89.807 77.4  OFFSHORE EL SALVADOR
MAP  4.5   2012/09/20 00:20:33   0.069   92.070 10.2  OFF THE WEST COAST OF NORTHERN SUMATRA

LISS – Live Internet Seismic Server

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: September 22, 2012 08:18:43 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

 ANWB 24hr plot

CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

 BBGH 24hr plot

CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

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CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

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CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

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CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

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CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

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CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

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CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

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IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

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IC/ENH, Enshi, China

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IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Province, China

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IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

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IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

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IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Guangduong Province, China

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IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

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IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

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IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

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IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

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IU/BBSR, Bermuda

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IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

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IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

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IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

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IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

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IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

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IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

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IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

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IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

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IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

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IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

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IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

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IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

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IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

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IU/GUMO, Guam, Mariana Islands

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IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

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IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

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IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

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IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

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IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

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IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

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IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

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IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

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IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

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IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

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IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

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IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

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IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

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IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

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IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

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IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

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IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

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IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

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IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

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IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

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IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

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IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

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IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

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IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Equador

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IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

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IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

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IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

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IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

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IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

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IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

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IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

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IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

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IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

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IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermandec Islands

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IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

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IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

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IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

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IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

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IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

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IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

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IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

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IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

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IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

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IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

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IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

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IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

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IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

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IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

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IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

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IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

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IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

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IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

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IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

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IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

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IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

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IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

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IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

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IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

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IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

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IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

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Volcanic Activity

China’s Changbaishan volcano showing signs of increased activity

Roughly 1,100 years ago, the Changbaishan volcano that lies along the border between northeastern China and North Korea erupted, sending pyroclastic flows dozens of kilometers and blasting a 5-kilometer (3-mile) wide chunk off of the tip of the stratovolcano.

The eruption, known as the Millennium eruption because of its proximity to the turn of the first millennium, was one of the largest volcanic events in the Common Era. In the subsequent period, there have been three smaller eruptions, the most recent of which took place in 1903. Starting in 1999, spurred by signs of resumed activity, scientists established the Changbaishan Volcano Observatory, a network to track changing gas compositions, seismic activity, and ground deformation. Reporting on the data collected over the past 12 years, Xu et al. find that these volcanic indices each leapt during a period of heightened activity from 2002 to 2006. The authors find that during this brief active period, earthquake occurrences increased dramatically. From 1999 to 2002, and from 2006 to 2011, they registered 7 earthquakes per month using 11 seismometers. From 2002 to 2006, this rate increased to 72 earthquakes per month, peaking in November 2003 with 243 events. Further, tracking the source of the earthquakes, the authors tie the bulk of the events to a region located 5 kilometers (3 miles) beneath the volcanic caldera, a source that slowly crept upward throughout the study period, suggestive of an ongoing magmatic intrusion. Gas composition measurements collected from hot springs near the volcano showed spikes in carbon dioxide, hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen gases, which the authors suggest could be related to magmatic outgassing. Ground deformation studies, too, show a brief period of rapid expansion. The authors suggest that though Changbaishan is likely not gearing up for an imminent eruption, one could be expected in the next couple of decades. More information: Recent unrest of Changbaishan volcano, northeast China: A precursor of a future eruption? Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2012GL052600 , 2012

21.09.2012 Volcano Eruption Indonesia Sulawesi, [Mount Lokon] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 18:56 (06:56 PM) UTC.

Description
A volcano in northern Indonesia has spewed hot smoke and ash thousands of metres into the air in two new eruptions. Mount Lokon on Sulawesi island had been dormant before rumbling back to life last year. Government volcanologist Hendrasto says it unleashed two strong eruptions on Friday. Residents have been put on alert, but no evacuations are planned since the nearest villages are beyond the danger area about 2.5 kilometres from the crater. Mount Lokon’s last major eruption in 1991 killed a Swiss hiker and forced thousands to flee. The volcano is one of five on high alert in Indonesia. The archipelago straddles the “Pacific Ring of Fire” and has more active volcanoes than any other nation.

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

21.09.2012 Extreme Weather USA State of New York, [New York City region] Damage level Details

Extreme Weather in USA on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 18:51 (06:51 PM) UTC.

Description
Heavy rains and wind gusts knocked down trees and flooded roads in Long Island and Westchester County, leaving thousands without power. The band of storms on Tuesday prompted the National Weather Service to issue a tornado warning for southwestern Suffolk County. The warning was in effect until 10 p.m. A tornado watch expired at 11 p.m. for Suffolk and Nassau counties.

 

Global Sea Surface Temperature – Wunderground.com

 

 

 

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Storms /  Flooding

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Nadine (AL14) Atlantic Ocean 11.09.2012 22.09.2012 Tropical Depression 165 ° 93 km/h 111 km/h 4.57 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Nadine (AL14)
Area: Atlantic Ocean
Start up location: N 16° 18.000, W 43° 6.000
Start up: 11th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 1,489.96 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
12th Sep 2012 05:01:17 N 17° 48.000, W 45° 12.000 24 65 83 Tropical Storm 300 13 1004 MB NOAA NHC
12th Sep 2012 10:46:22 N 18° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 74 93 Tropical Storm 300 15 1001 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 05:34:52 N 20° 42.000, W 50° 6.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 11:12:43 N 21° 30.000, W 51° 18.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
14th Sep 2012 05:11:31 N 25° 0.000, W 53° 42.000 24 111 139 Tropical Storm 330 17 989 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 06:55:17 N 30° 0.000, W 52° 48.000 22 120 148 Hurricane I. 25 17 985 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 10:59:20 N 30° 42.000, W 51° 24.000 24 120 148 Hurricane I. 50 13 985 MB NOAA NHC
16th Sep 2012 05:13:53 N 30° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 130 157 Hurricane I. 95 15 983 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 05:22:55 N 31° 24.000, W 38° 6.000 30 111 139 Tropical Storm 75 16 987 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 10:47:47 N 32° 0.000, W 36° 24.000 28 111 139 Tropical Storm 65 15 985 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 05:15:16 N 33° 54.000, W 34° 12.000 15 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 18 989 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 10:46:51 N 34° 18.000, W 33° 36.000 13 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 14 990 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 05:31:59 N 35° 48.000, W 32° 12.000 11 83 102 Tropical Storm 25 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 11:00:20 N 36° 24.000, W 32° 6.000 7 83 102 Tropical Storm 360 9 993 MB NOAA NHC
20th Sep 2012 05:12:41 N 37° 6.000, W 31° 24.000 6 83 102 Tropical Storm 60 9 990 MB NOAA NHC
20th Sep 2012 11:02:24 N 36° 48.000, W 30° 36.000 15 83 102 Tropical Storm 120 18 983 MB NOAA NHC
21st Sep 2012 10:40:35 N 35° 6.000, W 27° 12.000 13 102 120 Tropical Storm 140 14 981 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:38:52 N 31° 54.000, W 26° 36.000 20 93 111 Tropical Depression 165 ° 15 984 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
23rd Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 30° 42.000, W 24° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
23rd Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 30° 30.000, W 25° 12.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
24th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 31° 24.000, W 24° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 32° 30.000, W 24° 30.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
26th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 32° 30.000, W 23° 0.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 33° 0.000, W 20° 0.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
Jelewat (18W) Pacific Ocean 20.09.2012 22.09.2012 Typhoon I 200 ° 93 km/h 120 km/h 2.74 m JTWC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Jelewat (18W)
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, E 132° 18.000
Start up: 20th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 212.69 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:41:44 N 11° 42.000, E 129° 54.000 6 93 120 Typhoon I 200 ° 9 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
23rd Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 6.000, E 128° 48.000 Typhoon II 130 157 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 30.000, E 128° 18.000 Typhoon III 148 185 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 13° 18.000, E 127° 54.000 Typhoon IV 176 213 JTWC
EP 13 Pacific Ocean – East 22.09.2012 22.09.2012 Tropical Depression 275 ° 56 km/h 74 km/h 3.05 m NOAA NHC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: EP 13
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000
Start up: 22nd September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 0.00 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
22nd Sep 2012 06:35:22 N 13° 42.000, W 107° 30.000 19 56 74 Tropical Depression 275 ° 10 1005 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
23rd Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 14° 18.000, W 110° 24.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
23rd Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 14° 54.000, W 111° 48.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC
24th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 15° 42.000, W 113° 6.000 Hurricane I 111 139 NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 17° 30.000, W 116° 0.000 Hurricane II 139 167 NOAA NHC
26th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 18° 30.000, W 118° 0.000 Hurricane II 130 157 NOAA NHC
27th Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 19° 30.000, W 120° 0.000 Hurricane I 120 148 NOAA NHC

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Today Flash Flood India State of Assam, [13 districts] Damage level Details

Flash Flood in India on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 05:11 (05:11 AM) UTC.

Description
Army and the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) rescue teams were deployed in upper Assam’s Tinsukia and Dhemaji districts on Friday to rescue thousands of people marooned by flood waters as the overall flood situation turned critical in the State following incessant rain for past more than a week. A swollen Brahmaputra has submerged vast areas of Majuli following a breach in an embankment at Sonowal Kachari village of the island on Thursday. The administration cautioned the residents of the river-island to stay alert. Principal Secretary, Revenue and Disaster Management, V.K. Pipersenia, told The Hindu that six columns of the Army have been deployed for rescuing marooned people at Sadiya in Tinsukia district and in Jonai sub-division. Four NDRF teams were deployed for rescue operations. Army and NDRF boats tried to negotiate the strong current of flood waters in Sadiya. As strong current prevented them from reaching out to the marooned people in Sadiya from Tinsukia side, the rescue teams approached the flood-hit areas from Arunachal Pradesh side and rescued some people. Mr. Pipersenia said the services of Indian Air Force (IAF) were requisitioned but the IAF choppers could not carry out any operation during the day because of bad weather. Over five lakh people in 13 districts have been affected in the current and fourth wave of floods in the State. In addition to the breach in the embankment in Majuli, the Brahmaputra has breached an embankment at Dolopa in Sivasagar district and a ring bund at Chawalkhowa near Bogibeel in Dibrugarh district, while river Nona breached an embankment in Kamrup district. Flood situation was also critical in lower Assam’s Kamrup, Baksa and Barpeta districts.
22.09.2012 Flood USA State of Alaska, [Southcentral Alaska] Damage level Details

Flood in USA on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 03:14 (03:14 AM) UTC.

Description
Flooding continues to cause problems throughout Southcentral Alaska. Jeremy Zidek, spokesman for the state Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, says in a release that there have been reports of flooding, landslides and road closures throughout the area. But there has been no report of major injuries. Residents in East Talkeetna are being told to evacuate because of flooding. The Red Cross has established three shelters in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough and helped with another in Seward. Weather problems are not confined to Southcentral Alaska. Zidek says a landslide has blocked access from the village of Chenega to its airport, and state transportation officials are working to restore access. And an assessment team is in Tanacross to evaluate damage from Sunday’s wind storm.

Flood in USA on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 03:14 (03:14 AM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 04:46 UTC
Description
Residents of Talkeetna are being asked to evacuate the town after its dike system against heavy flooding failed Friday, according to local firefighters. The evacuation is now voluntary, although an initial order was mandatory. Talkeetna Fire Department Battalion Chief Johnny Murdoch, the incident commander for flooding in the area, says the Susitna River started backing up to the Talkeetna River, causing the dike to fail. According to local officials the decision to evacuate Talkeetna was made by Alaska State Troopers, with authorities expecting water to continue rising Friday afternoon. The Associated Press reports that overnight rains in Talkeetna ranged from half an inch to 1 1/2 inches over a 6- to 8-hour period. The Talkeetna River was within a foot of its record stage of 17.4 feet, with officials telling the AP about 35 percent of Talkeetna has some form of water coverage. Students from Talkeetna’s elementary school were being bused to the local high school Friday. Traffic was blocked from entering Talkeetna until the evacuation was no longer mandatory, a change made shortly before 2 p.m. In a flood warning effective through 10 p.m. Friday, the National Weather Service says a levee protecting the town was breached as of 1 p.m. The Talkeetna River is 4 feet above flood stage, and expected to crest Friday evening. “All persons in the vicinity of Talkeetna should take precautions now to protect life and property,” meteorologists wrote. The NWS advises people to avoid crossing flowing streams — even small ones – on foot, or driving across flooded roadways in cars, under the slogan “Turn around, don’t drown.”

 

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Epidemic Hazards / Diseases

Today Epidemic Hazard USA State of California, San Francisco [San Francisco State University] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in USA on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 05:15 (05:15 AM) UTC.

Description
Students at San Francisco State University are being warned to look for symptoms of the chicken pox after a third person came down with the disease this week. School officials say it involves a student who lives on campus and uses the dining facilities. To prevent an outbreak, SFSU held a mass vaccination Friday. Chicken pox is highly contagious. Symptoms can pop up two to three weeks after contact and include fever and a rash that develops into blisters.
Biohazard name: Chickenpox
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed
Today Epidemic Hazard USA State of New York, New Paltz [Mountain Laurel Waldorf School] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in USA on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 05:13 (05:13 AM) UTC.

Description
A case of measles has been confirmed in a student who attends the Mountain Laurel Waldorf School in New Paltz, according to the Dutchess County Department of Health. The measles case was reported by Dutchess County Health Commissioner Dr. Michael Caldwell in a press release emailed to local media outlets late Friday. It was not immediately clear why the release came from a Dutchess County official rather than one in Ulster County, where the private school is located, and the name and hometown of the infected person were not provided. Caldwell said his office has “been in close communication” with the Ulster County Department of Health and the state Department of Health. Caldwell said anyone who has visited the school since Sept. 10 or has had contact with anyone from the school since that date should make sure their measles vaccinations are up to date. Those who lack proper vaccinations should consult with a doctor. Caldwell said his department has learned that a number of students at the New Paltz school have not been vaccinated for measles, meaning they could become ill and put others at risk. Caldwell said all medical practices and laboratories in the area should be on high alert that there may be a number of children and family members who have been exposed and could spread the disease further. Incidents of measles, which is highly contagious, have increased in the United States recently due to a growing number of unvaccinated individuals who travel to countries where measles is prevalent, Caldwell said.
Biohazard name: Measles
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed
Today Epidemic Hazard USA State of Montana, [Florence Carlton School Distric] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in USA on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 04:48 (04:48 AM) UTC.

Description
Administrators at the Florence Carlton School District report that between 20 and 30 students are sick with an undiagnosed illness. Most of the reports come from younger students between kindergarten and 6th grades. They’re reporting symptoms like nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. It’s not unlike what the district dealt with in March. Back then, the schools closed for several days to deal with a strain of the stomach flu. Right now, Superintendent John McGee says the district is watching and waiting to see what develops. Ravalli County Health Officials are investigating the causes for the illness. Judy Griffin Ravalli County Health Director says if your child is showing any symptoms of any sickness please take them to your primary physician.
Biohazard name: Unidentified illness
Biohazard level: 0/4 —
Biohazard desc.: This does not included biological hazard category.
Symptoms: nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
Status:
21.09.2012 Epidemic Hazard United Kingdom England, [Cumbria Region] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in United Kingdom on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 03:01 (03:01 AM) UTC.

Description
Around 6,000 children in Cumbria are at risk of getting measles because they have not had the MMR vaccination, health chiefs have said. NHS Cumbria said 95% of babies in the county had been immunised but that thousands aged between five and 16 had not had the jab. Teenagers moving to Cumbria are also being urged to get protected. In recent months 20 cases of measles – which can leave victims deaf – have been reported in the county. The MMR vaccine is given in two doses, the first after the age of one, the second before the child starts school. Dr Rebecca Wagstaff, the county’s deputy director of public health, said: “Measles is highly infectious and anyone who has not previously been vaccinated is at risk when it gets into a community, as it has done here.”
Biohazard name: Measles
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed
20.09.2012 Epidemic Hazard Somalia State of Lower Juba, Hoosingo [District of Badade] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in Somalia on Tuesday, 18 September, 2012 at 18:35 (06:35 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Thursday, 20 September, 2012 at 04:50 UTC
Description
A suspected cholera outbreak has killed at least 19 people since the beginning of September, with 12 still sick in the southern Somali village of Hoosingo in Lower Juba, the United Nations IRIN news service reported Tuesday (September 18th). “One of the biggest problems we have is that we do not know what this disease is,” said Hoosingo village commissioner Aden Ibrahim Dhaqane. Schools, religious centres and restaurants have been closed to prevent the outbreak from spreading, he said. “We call [on] the aid agencies to help us in the following areas: provision of a steady supply of medicine, [the] identification of the disease and the setting up of health centres,” he said, adding that the village does not have a health facility. An emergency weekly update on Somalia from the World Health Organisation reported 107 cases of the disease across the country September 5th-13th. “With the ongoing conflict and subsequent population displacement and disruption of the existing health service access points in the region, the risk of sporadic cholera outbreaks in the southern zone cannot be excluded,” the WHO report said.

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Climate Change

Antarctic Ice Area Sets Record High

Press Release: New Zealand Climate Science Coalition

 

ANTARCTIC ICE AREA SETS RECORD HIGH

“Day 258 of 2012 is the highest for this date since satellite scanning of Antarctic ice areas commenced 33 years ago” the New Zealand Climate Science Coalition announced today. “It is also the fifth highest daily value on record.”

Coalition chairman, Hon Barry Brill, says the most remarkable aspect is the extent to which the 2012 area exceeds normal Antarctica averages. “The sea ice cover yesterday was 311,000 square kilometres above the 1979-2012 average. The surplus ice is more than twice the area of New Zealand”.

“The Antarctic dimensions come partly at the expense of Arctic sea ice” said Mr Brill. “Over the 33-year period aggregate global sea ice volumes have remained steady, but there are fluctuations between the two polar areas from year to year. The fluctuations are the result of ocean currents and wind patterns, rather than temperatures”.

“Antarctic ice is much more important than that of the Arctic. The area of its sea ice is a million square kilometres larger than the highest value ever recorded in the Arctic. Then, of course, the Antarctic is an entire continent, with more than 90% of the earth’s glacial ice” said Mr Brill.

“It is appropriate that this record should occur in a week that The Listener carries a cover story featuring the winter low point of Arctic ice, along with multiple pictures of calving glaciers and forlorn polar bears,” said Mr Brill. “The magazine has little to say about the Antarctic apart from complaining that it is “poorly understood”. The author also avoids mentioning the glaring facts that no significant global warming has been recorded in the past 16 years, and that sea level rise is apparently decelerating.

“It is unfortunate that under-informed writers, albeit unwittingly, mislead their readers who should be helped to understand the difference between sea ice extent and ice cap ice, both thickness and extent as regards the latter. The ice cap in the Arctic is small compared to the Antarctic. The cap of the Antarctic is increasing in thickness in most places, except around the Antarctic Peninsula.
Sea ice extent is largely a consequence of sea surface temperature, ocean currents and wind,” said Mr Brill, who advised those interested in graphic confirmation of Antarctic sea ice readings to refer to:
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/seaice.anomaly.antarctic.png
and:
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/seaice.anomaly.antarctic.png

The Arctic’s Record Breaking Ice Melt

Published on Sep 17, 2012 by

The sea ice in the Arctic Ocean dropped below the previous all-time record set in 2007. This year also marks the first time that there has been less than 4 million square kilometers (1.54 million square miles) of sea ice since satellite observations began in 1979. This animation shows the 2012 time-series of ice extent using sea ice concentration data from the DMSP SSMI/S satellite sensor. The black area represents the daily average (median) sea ice extent over the 1979-2000 time period. Layered over top of that are the daily satellite measurements from January 1 — September 14, 2012. A rapid melt begins in July, whereby the 2012 ice extents fall far below the historical average. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (www.nsidc.org) will confirm the final minimum ice extent data and area once the melt stabilizes, usually in mid-September.

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Solar Activity

2MIN News Sept 21. 2012

Published on Sep 21, 2012 by

2012 Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU

TODAY’S LINKS
Planetary Emergency: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-planetary-emergency-due-arctic-experts.html
China Volcano: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-china-changbaishan-volcano.html
Coronal Caities: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-solar-fleet-peers-coronal-cavities.html
France vs Monsanto: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-france-gm-cancer-threat.html
UK vs Oil: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-uk-lawmakers-moratorium-arctic-drilling.html
Paraguay Storm: http://www.weather.com/news/south-american-storm-causes-death-damage-20120920
IRI Forecasts: http://portal.iri.columbia.edu/portal/server.pt?open=512&objID=944&Pa…
NOAA forecasts: http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/90day/
China Weather-Modification: http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/49672 — Historical Ref: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2009/oct/01/china-cloud-seeding-pa…
Tropical TRacker: http://www.wunderground.com/tropical/
Drought Update: http://www.weather.com/news/drought-update-20120920

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

3MIN News Sept 20. 2012

Published on Sep 20, 2012 by

2012 Pole Shift Video: http://youtu.be/uI10tKuLtFU

TODAY’S LINKS
Okeechobee Overflowing: http://www.weather.com/news/lake-okeechobee-drained-20120919
Quantum Physics Changes: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120919135312.htm
Climate Change Australia: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120919103616.htm
Dust Storm: http://www.weather.com/weather/videos/news-41/top-stories-169/watch-incredibl…
Warm Australia: http://www.weatherzone.com.au/news/early-season-heat-scorches-outback/22446

REPEAT LINKS
Spaceweather: http://spaceweather.com/ [Look on the left at the X-ray Flux and Solar Wind Speed/Density]

HAARP: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/data.html [Click online data, and have a little fun]

SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ [Place to find Solar Images and Videos – as seen from earth]

SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater [SOHO; Lasco and EIT – as seen from earth]

Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images [Stereo; Cor, EUVI, HI – as seen from the side]

SunAEON:http://www.sunaeon.com/#/solarsystem/ [Just click it… trust me]

SOLARIMG: http://solarimg.org/artis/ [All purpose data viewing site]

iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html [Free Application; for advanced sun watchers]

NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=…
NOAA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wsa-enlil/

US Wind Map: http://hint.fm/wind/

NOAA Bouys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php

RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use]

GOES Xray: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/sxi/goes15/index.html

JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/

LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ [Really? You can’t figure out what this one is for?]

BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html [Top left box, look for BIG blue circles]

TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day]

GOES Weather: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ [Clouds over America]

RAIN RECORDS: http://www.cocorahs.org/ViewData/ListIntensePrecipReports.aspx

EL DORADO WORLD WEATHER MAP: http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/satellite/ssec/world/world-composite-ir-…

PRESSURE MAP: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-bin/expertcharts?LANG=us&MENU=0000000000&…

HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker

INTELLICAST: http://www.intellicast.com/ [Weather site used by many youtubers]

NASA News: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/

PHYSORG: http://phys.org/ [GREAT News Site!]

QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php

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Space

Today Event into space United Kingdom Scotland, [Between Airdrie and Arbroath] Damage level Details

Event into space in United Kingdom on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 04:54 (04:54 AM) UTC.

Description
A suspected meteorite shower over Scotland has prompted a flurry of 999 calls from worried members of the public. Concerned callers from Airdrie to Arbroath likened the lights they saw in the sky to flares, fireworks and even a plane crash. Coastguard and police forces up and down the country were inundated with reports from around 11pm on Friday night. A spokesman for Forth Coastguard said: “From talking to other stations and to the RAF it’s almost certainly meteorite activity. “Calls came in from all over the place, thick and fast. We’ve had people report possible plane crashes, and others the weirdest fireworks they’ve ever seen. “Folk just haven’t known how to describe what they’ve seen. It’s quite extraordinary.” The spokesman said reports had come from Crail, Johnshaven and Arbroath. Clyde Coastguard said it had received a “flurry” of calls reporting flares seen in Drummore, Airdrie and Brodick on Arran. A spokeswoman said: “When we get it all over and at the same time then we attribute them to meteorites. There was meteorite activity forecast from September 15 to 21.” Shetland Coastguard said a report of a flare at 11.10pm at Duncansby Head near John O’Groats was thought to be part of the meteorite shower.

 Earth approaching objects (objects that are known in the next 30 days)

Object Name Apporach Date Left AU Distance LD Distance Estimated Diameter* Relative Velocity
(2009 SH2) 24th September 2012 2 day(s) 0.1462 56.9 28 m – 62 m 7.52 km/s 27072 km/h
333578 (2006 KM103) 25th September 2012 3 day(s) 0.0626 24.4 250 m – 560 m 8.54 km/s 30744 km/h
(2002 EZ2) 26th September 2012 4 day(s) 0.1922 74.8 270 m – 610 m 6.76 km/s 24336 km/h
(2009 SB170) 29th September 2012 7 day(s) 0.1789 69.6 200 m – 440 m 32.39 km/s 116604 km/h
(2011 OJ45) 29th September 2012 7 day(s) 0.1339 52.1 18 m – 39 m 4.24 km/s 15264 km/h
(2012 JS11) 30th September 2012 8 day(s) 0.0712 27.7 270 m – 600 m 12.60 km/s 45360 km/h
137032 (1998 UO1) 04th October 2012 12 day(s) 0.1545 60.1 1.3 km – 2.9 km 32.90 km/s 118440 km/h
(2012 GV11) 05th October 2012 13 day(s) 0.1830 71.2 100 m – 230 m 6.96 km/s 25056 km/h
(2009 XZ1) 05th October 2012 13 day(s) 0.1382 53.8 120 m – 280 m 16.87 km/s 60732 km/h
(2006 TD) 06th October 2012 14 day(s) 0.1746 68.0 88 m – 200 m 13.03 km/s 46908 km/h
(2009 TK) 06th October 2012 14 day(s) 0.0450 17.5 100 m – 230 m 11.10 km/s 39960 km/h
(2004 UB) 08th October 2012 16 day(s) 0.1995 77.6 240 m – 530 m 14.65 km/s 52740 km/h
277830 (2006 HR29) 11th October 2012 19 day(s) 0.1917 74.6 190 m – 440 m 7.88 km/s 28368 km/h
(2008 BW2) 11th October 2012 19 day(s) 0.1678 65.3 3.1 m – 6.8 m 11.10 km/s 39960 km/h
(2005 GQ21) 12th October 2012 20 day(s) 0.1980 77.0 620 m – 1.4 km 23.86 km/s 85896 km/h
(2012 GV17) 12th October 2012 20 day(s) 0.1500 58.4 160 m – 370 m 16.11 km/s 57996 km/h
256004 (2006 UP) 14th October 2012 22 day(s) 0.1374 53.5 65 m – 140 m 3.06 km/s 11016 km/h
(2005 ST1) 14th October 2012 22 day(s) 0.1319 51.3 230 m – 510 m 12.88 km/s 46368 km/h
(2011 OB57) 14th October 2012 22 day(s) 0.1553 60.4 17 m – 37 m 4.95 km/s 17820 km/h
(2012 KB4) 14th October 2012 22 day(s) 0.1271 49.4 22 m – 49 m 4.98 km/s 17928 km/h
(2004 RX10) 15th October 2012 23 day(s) 0.0819 31.9 150 m – 340 m 11.86 km/s 42696 km/h
(2006 WV1) 15th October 2012 23 day(s) 0.0910 35.4 17 m – 39 m 6.15 km/s 22140 km/h
(2012 LA) 16th October 2012 24 day(s) 0.0449 17.5 8.3 m – 19 m 1.86 km/s 6696 km/h
329275 (1999 VP6) 17th October 2012 25 day(s) 0.1766 68.7 300 m – 670 m 7.15 km/s 25740 km/h
136993 (1998 ST49) 18th October 2012 26 day(s) 0.0737 28.7 790 m – 1.8 km 16.63 km/s 59868 km/h
(2002 TR190) 19th October 2012 27 day(s) 0.1712 66.6 430 m – 960 m 13.58 km/s 48888 km/h
(1998 XX2) 20th October 2012 28 day(s) 0.1356 52.8 290 m – 650 m 10.62 km/s 38232 km/h
(2003 UC5) 21st October 2012 29 day(s) 0.1750 68.1 260 m – 580 m 35.80 km/s 128880 km/h
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers,1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers Source: NASA-NEO

 

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Biological Hazards / Wildlife / Environmental Pollution

Biological Hazard in USA on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 05:21 (05:21 AM) UTC.

Description
A mysterious coral die-off on Kauai’s north shore is prompting a team of scientists to take a closer look at what may be killing large areas of coral reef. Marine biologist Terry Lilley has been monitoring and documenting Kauai’s marine environment for the last decade or more. This summer he was struck at how fast he was seeing something kill off what he estimates are millions of coral colonies. Lilley contacted scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey who’ve determined the diseased coral is different from what killed coral heads in Kaneohe Bay last year. The Kauai outbreak is believed to be due to a type of cyano bacteria and fungus which has compromised the health of the reef, according to researcher Thierry Work. Work said he took samples from the reef earlier this month and will be back to collect more coral and fish to conduct toxicology tests. Lilley has sounded the alarm which he hopes will trigger action to get the disease in check, and prevent its spread. “We have a billion dollar industry tourist industry in Hawaii with snorkels who want to see the reefs. If we let them die on the north shore of Kauai, that’s going to be a huge impact financially on the resources, and the money coming in,” said Lilley. The Kauai resident is also concerned about what he saw on a recent dive where he documented evidence of diseased turtles and fish.
Biohazard name: Mass. Die-off (corals)
Biohazard level: 0/4 —
Biohazard desc.: This does not included biological hazard category.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed
21.09.2012 Biological Hazard Pakistan State of Sindh, [Malir District] Damage level Details

Biological Hazard in Pakistan on Friday, 21 September, 2012 at 03:10 (03:10 AM) UTC.

Description
The Department of Livestock Sindh has said that evidence has been gathered that points to the dead Australian sheep’s being affected by the deadly Anthrax infection. The day-to-day developments in connection with the Australian sheep’s import to Pakistan continue to give a new twist to the story. Only yesterday, the discovery of thousands of these sheep from a private compound in Malir District had raised new questions. Out of these, six were found dead with bleeding mouths. This is not it. More dead sheep were also discovered buried under ground and these had mouths infested with parasites. Now a fresh disclosure hints at the dead sheep’s being infected by the deadly Anthrax virus. Originally, it was believed that the sheep suffered from scabby mouth disease. Due to the possible presence of Anthrax, the Department of Livestock has refused to get the post-mortem done on the dead sheep. The reason is clear. The deadly Anthrax virus can even kill the staff carrying out the post-mortem of the sheep. Director Department of Livestock, Nazir Kalhoro has said that after the evidence hinting at presence of Anthrax, arrangements are now geing made to burry these sheep with the help of machines. Only those dead sheep will be put through post-mortem which had not contracted Anthrax, he added. Meanwhile, as many as 1800 samples from the sheep have been sent for tests to the Livestock laboratories in Tando Jam, Karachi and Islamabad. According to sources, the company that had imported the sheep has been served a letter in which it has been directed to prove the Anthrax claims of the investigation team wrong or get ready for a legal action.
Biohazard name: Anthrax (sheep)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

………………………..

Today Environment Pollution USA State of Hawaii, [Coastal of Waimanalo] Damage level Details

Environment Pollution in USA on Saturday, 22 September, 2012 at 05:03 (05:03 AM) UTC.

Description
A large plastic bin is the first confirmed piece of marine debris from last year’s Japan tsunamis to arrive in Hawaii, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday. Japanese consular officials confirmed that the blue bin found earlier this week floating in the ocean is from Fukushima, said Ben Sherman, a NOAA spokesman in Washington, D.C. It’s the 12th confirmed piece to hit U.S. or Canada waters, he said. The bin was spotted off Waimanalo, on the southeast coast of Oahu, by Makai Ocean Engineering staff and was retrieved by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. Used for transporting seafood, the 4-by-4-foot cube bears the name Y.K. Suisan Co. Ltd., the state Department of Land and Natural Resources said. Nikolai Maximenko, a University of Hawaii researcher and ocean currents expert who is studying the trajectory of the tsunami debris, said the bin’s arrival is consistent with his predictions for when the first pieces would get to Hawaii. “It came at the right time, according to our model,” he said. “But in some sense, it could just be a coincidence.” One million to 2 million tons of debris remain in the ocean, but only 1 to 5 percent of that could reach American and Canadian shorelines, Maximenko has said. Crabs and barnacles were found on the bin, the state said, along with five local seabirds. Two flew away and three were found dead inside the bin. There were no foreign plant or animal species in or on the bin, which state officials put in quarantine. Meanwhile, Hawaii fishermen spotted a large dock drifting toward Oahu that may also be tsunami debris. A Maui fisherman climbed on the dock and saw Japanese writing. The 30-feet by 50-feet dock was spotted Wednesday off Molokai, heading toward Oahu. The Coast Guard was notifying mariners of the debris.

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Articles of Interest

Swollen Lake Okeechobee Drained

EDT Associated Press1

Getty Images

Water levels in the Lake Okeechobee top 15 feet and are still rising from rains dumped by Tropical Storm Isaac.

MIAMI — Federal engineers are draining storm-swollen Lake Okeechobee.

Water levels in the South Florida lake top 15 feet and are still rising from rains dumped by Tropical Storm Isaac. Draining the lake will ease pressure on its aging dike.

It also means sending polluted waters down the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers. Draining the lake in the past has triggered fish-killing algae blooms in both rivers.

Lt. Col. Thomas Greco of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers tells the Miami Herald that, starting Wednesday, engineers will release small amounts of water to minimize environmental impacts.

According to the Corps plan, the lake’s water levels are supposed to stay between 12.5 feet and 15.5 feet.

Lake Okeechobee functions as a flood control basin, a regional water reservoir and a fishing destination.

Experiment Corrects Prediction in Quantum Theory

ScienceDaily

An international team of scientists is rewriting a page from the quantum physics rulebook using a University of Florida laboratory once dubbed the coldest spot in the universe.

Scientists are rewriting a page from the quantum physics rulebook using a laboratory once dubbed the coldest spot in the universe. (Credit: iStockphoto/Nick Schlax)

Much of what we know about quantum mechanics is theoretical and tested via computer modeling because quantum systems, like electrons whizzing around the nucleus of an atom, are difficult to pin down for observation. One can, however, slow particles down and catch them in the quantum act by subjecting them to extremely cold temperatures. New research, published in the Sept. 20 edition of the journal Nature, describes how this freeze-frame approach was recently used to overturn an accepted rule of thumb in quantum theory.

“We are in the age of quantum mechanics,” said Neil Sullivan, a UF physics professor and director of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory High B/T Facility on the UF campus — home of the Microkelvin lab where experiments can be conducted in near-absolute zero temperatures. “If you’ve had an MRI, you have made use of a quantum technology.”

The magnet that powers an MRI scanner is a superconducting coil transformed into a quantum state by very cold liquid helium. Inside the coil, electric current flows friction free.

Quantum magnets and other strange, almost otherworldly occurrences in quantum mechanics could inspire the next big breakthroughs in computing, alternative energy and transportation technologies such as magnetic levitating trains, Sullivan said. But innovation cannot proceed without a proper set of guidelines to help engineers navigate the quantum road.

That’s where the Microkelvin lab comes in. It is one of the few facilities in the world equipped to deliver the extremely cold temperatures needed to slow what Sullivan calls the “higgledy-piggledy” world of quantum systems at normal temperatures to a manageable pace where it can be observed and manipulated.

“Room temperature is approximately 300 kelvin,” Sullivan said. “Liquid hydrogen pumped into a rocket at the Kennedy Space Center is at 20 kelvin.”

Physicists need to cool things down to 1 millikelvin, one thousandth of a kelvin above absolute zero, or -459.67 degrees Fahrenheit, to bring matter into a different realm where quantum properties can be explored.

One fundamental state of quantum mechanics that scientists are keen to understand more fully is a fragile, ephemeral phase of matter called a Bose-Einstein Condensate. In this state, individual particles that make up a material begin to act as a single coherent unit. It’s a tricky condition to induce in a laboratory setting, but one that researchers need to explore if technology is ever to fully exploit the properties of the quantum world.

Two theorists, Tommaso Roscilde at the University of Lyon, France, and Rong Yu from Rice University in Houston, developed the underlying ideas for the study and asked a colleague, Armando Paduan-Filho from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil, to engineer the crystalline sample used in the experiment.

“Our measurements definitively tested an important prediction about a particular behavior in a Bose-Einstein Condensate,” said Vivien Zapf, a staff scientist at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos and a driving force behind the international collaboration.

The experiment monitored the atomic spin of subatomic particles called bosons in the crystal to see when the transition to Bose-Einstein Condensate was achieved, and then further cooled the sample to document the exact point where the condensate properties decayed. They observed the anticipated phenomenon when they took the sample down to 1 millikelvin.

The crystal used in the experiment had been doped with impurities in an effort to create more of a real world scenario, Zapf said. “It’s nice to know what happens in pure samples, but the real world, is messy and we need to know what the quantum rules are in those situations.”

Having performed a series of simulations in advance, they knew that the experiment would require them to generate temperatures down to 1 millikelvin.

“You have to go to the Microkelvin Laboratory at UF for that,” she said. The lab is housed within the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory High B/T Facility at UF, funded by the National Science Foundation. Other laboratories can get to the extreme temperature required, but none of them can sustain it long enough to collect all of the data needed for the experiment.

“It took six months to get the readings,” said Liang Yin, an assistant scientist in the UF physics department who operated the equipment in the Microkelvin lab. “Because the magnetic field we used to control the wave intensity in the sample also heats it up. You have to adjust it very slowly.”

Their findings literally rewrote the rule for predicting the conditions under which the transition would occur between the two quantum states.

“All the world should be watching what happens as we uncover properties of systems at these extremely low temperatures,” Sullivan said. “A superconducting wire is superconducting because of this Bose-Einstein Condensation concept. If we are ever to capitalize on it for quantum computing or magnetic levitation for trains, we have to thoroughly understand it.”

*************************************************************************************************************

[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

USGS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  2.7 2012/09/19 23:51:51   18.740   -67.386 12.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/09/19 21:30:11   3.345   128.302 121.3  NORTH OF HALMAHERA, INDONESIA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/19 21:18:34   4.621   126.632 97.9  KEPULAUAN TALAUD, INDONESIA
MAP  2.7 2012/09/19 20:16:56   52.499  -168.047 26.3  FOX ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN ISLANDS, ALASKA
MAP  2.6 2012/09/19 18:34:48   61.998  -151.125 89.5  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/19 17:07:25   59.659  -152.972 96.7  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  3.2 2012/09/19 15:02:47   65.653  -144.998 10.9  NORTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.4 2012/09/19 10:45:40   -9.810   124.570 35.3  TIMOR REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/19 10:00:00   60.568  -153.189 137.1  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.9   2012/09/19 09:17:48   37.235   37.098 10.0  CENTRAL TURKEY
MAP  2.7 2012/09/19 08:33:41   60.306  -143.104 0.4  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/19 07:57:24   66.247   -18.785 10.3  ICELAND REGION
MAP  3.3 2012/09/19 07:39:25   18.792   -64.222 41.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.5   2012/09/19 07:31:47  -10.864   113.891 37.8  SOUTH OF JAVA, INDONESIA
MAP  4.6   2012/09/19 06:44:24  -29.381  -177.017 59.5  KERMADEC ISLANDS, NEW ZEALAND
MAP  2.8 2012/09/19 06:26:58   19.029   -67.299 9.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  3.6 2012/09/19 05:44:25   19.561   -63.512 37.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.5 2012/09/19 04:57:03   35.398  -117.823 7.3  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  2.9 2012/09/19 04:35:56   19.319  -155.213 8.8  ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
MAP  3.2 2012/09/19 04:34:35   19.599   -64.419 43.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.1 2012/09/19 04:27:02   13.008   -88.660 70.7  OFFSHORE EL SALVADOR
MAP  3.5 2012/09/19 02:07:14   59.447  -151.916 58.0  KENAI PENINSULA, ALASKA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/19 01:57:33   -5.657   146.707 36.1  EASTERN NEW GUINEA REG, PAPUA NEW GUINEA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/19 00:32:09   1.501   127.329 116.5  HALMAHERA, INDONESIA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/19 00:15:11  -20.180   168.912 48.5  LOYALTY ISLANDS

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
 Region
MAP  2.8 2012/09/18 21:15:17   18.975   -66.837 11.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 21:09:40   33.694  -116.737 20.3  SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 19:57:10   43.085  -126.533 10.5  OFF THE COAST OF OREGON
MAP  2.5 2012/09/18 19:34:28   32.642  -115.703 8.4  BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 19:22:25   59.271  -153.328 93.1  SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/18 19:10:38   9.792   -85.561 44.2  OFF THE COAST OF COSTA RICA
MAP  2.9 2012/09/18 18:54:00   57.200  -154.806 40.6  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/18 17:52:24   18.990   -64.516 8.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.8 2012/09/18 17:40:38   19.659   -64.236 7.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  4.7   2012/09/18 16:35:03   -7.280   105.886 44.6  JAVA, INDONESIA
MAP  2.6 2012/09/18 16:06:02   54.094  -163.611 147.0  UNIMAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/18 15:59:37   3.776   92.650 10.4  OFF THE WEST COAST OF NORTHERN SUMATRA
MAP  3.1 2012/09/18 15:31:50   67.326  -166.875 23.6  BERING STRAIT
MAP  2.9 2012/09/18 14:59:17   19.091   -66.582 54.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  2.7 2012/09/18 14:46:50   51.898  -179.987 159.1  ANDREANOF ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN IS., ALASKA
MAP  2.8 2012/09/18 14:34:25   18.976   -65.149 42.0  VIRGIN ISLANDS REGION
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 14:32:54   18.993   -65.221 17.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/18 12:32:38   56.992  -154.127 9.1  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  3.3 2012/09/18 11:51:52   67.268  -166.824 24.4  BERING STRAIT
MAP  2.9 2012/09/18 10:48:51   19.008  -155.421 44.4  ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
MAP  3.2 2012/09/18 10:25:36   19.095   -66.900 55.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.9   2012/09/18 10:15:36  -20.740   167.405 35.0  LOYALTY ISLANDS
MAP  2.7 2012/09/18 09:42:21   17.899   -65.740 13.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  4.3 2012/09/18 09:10:24   9.801   -85.635 17.2  OFF THE COAST OF COSTA RICA
MAP  4.2 2012/09/18 09:03:29   9.726   -85.622 14.4  OFF THE COAST OF COSTA RICA
MAP  4.5   2012/09/18 08:20:40   12.268   -89.250 35.4  OFF THE COAST OF EL SALVADOR
MAP  5.1   2012/09/18 08:05:38   4.481   126.380 28.1  KEPULAUAN TALAUD, INDONESIA
MAP  2.5 2012/09/18 07:08:25   42.234  -124.719 35.9  OFFSHORE OREGON
MAP  4.8   2012/09/18 06:42:30  -10.771   114.033 39.3  SOUTH OF BALI, INDONESIA
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 06:33:40   19.076   -66.146 50.0  PUERTO RICO REGION
MAP  3.4 2012/09/18 05:20:02   18.358   -68.089 109.0  MONA PASSAGE, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
MAP  3.0 2012/09/18 04:30:33   19.783   -64.234 38.0  NORTH OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
MAP  2.6 2012/09/18 04:14:26   56.955  -154.135 30.1  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  4.7   2012/09/18 03:53:32  -31.896   -69.203 64.6  SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA
MAP  4.8   2012/09/18 03:51:36  -29.215  -176.820 58.1  KERMADEC ISLANDS REGION
MAP  2.6 2012/09/18 03:26:01   56.966  -154.118 27.4  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  5.2   2012/09/18 03:23:42   -6.173   103.788 10.0  SOUTHWEST OF SUMATRA, INDONESIA
MAP  3.4 2012/09/18 01:52:37   56.953  -154.101 38.5  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  5.1   2012/09/18 01:46:42   1.405   126.003 22.3  MOLUCCA SEA
MAP  5.1   2012/09/18 01:44:50   56.937  -154.142 38.6  KODIAK ISLAND REGION, ALASKA
MAP  4.4 2012/09/18 00:52:24   49.062   154.770 80.1  KURIL ISLANDS
MAP  2.5 2012/09/18 00:20:51   18.078   -67.223 33.0  MONA PASSAGE, PUERTO RICO

……………

List Of Earthquakes  on the Canary Islands

Listado Terremotos

¿Ha sentido algún terremoto?
Earthquakes of the  last  2  days on the  Canary Islands Mgnitude 1.5 or greater
Terremotos de los últimos 2 días en las Islas Canarias de magnitud igual o superior a 1.5 o sentidos:
The earthquake  information for lesser magnitudes  can be found at this link   Catálogo y boletines sísmicos.
La información de terremotos de magnitud inferior se puede obtener en Catálogo y boletines sísmicos.This data  is  subject  to change as a  consequence of continuous  revisions of seismic  analysis

Esta información está sujeta a modificaciones como consecuencia de la continua revisión del análisis sísmico.

Translation  by Desert Rose

95 Tremors in the Canary Islands Region between 9/17/2012 and 9/18/2012

Event     Date              Time            Lat.        Long.      Depth               Mag.   Type                  Location

Evento Fecha Hora(GMT)* Latitud Longitud Prof.
(km)
Int. Máx. Mag. Tipo Mag. (**) Localización Info
1166716 20/09/2012 17:36:11 27.7012 -18.0111 21 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166709 20/09/2012 15:24:23 27.6983 -17.9930 28 2.4 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166640 20/09/2012 08:51:54 27.7227 -18.0269 21 2.2 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166601 20/09/2012 05:38:00 27.7024 -18.0260 21 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166569 19/09/2012 21:29:26 27.7239 -18.0672 21 1.8 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166486 19/09/2012 05:08:31 27.7030 -18.0327 21 1.8 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166475 19/09/2012 00:50:00 27.7188 -18.0141 22 1.8 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166474 18/09/2012 22:32:54 27.6298 -18.0865 14 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166466 18/09/2012 21:05:06 27.7194 -18.0215 23 2.0 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166428 18/09/2012 15:13:36 27.6615 -17.9935 19 1.6 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166429 18/09/2012 14:21:31 27.7023 -18.0231 20 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166422 18/09/2012 13:44:05 27.7263 -18.0070 21 2.4 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166423 18/09/2012 13:43:13 27.7074 -18.1414 19 2.0 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166348 18/09/2012 06:03:03 27.7480 -18.0772 11 2.1 mbLg W FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166347 18/09/2012 05:43:33 27.7016 -17.9932 26 2.4 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166350 18/09/2012 05:30:50 27.7069 -18.0159 21 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166335 18/09/2012 02:00:06 27.7172 -18.0061 22 1.9 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166334 18/09/2012 01:44:59 27.7116 -18.0057 23 1.8 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166333 18/09/2012 01:20:05 27.7154 -18.0037 21 1.8 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166313 17/09/2012 23:58:02 27.6961 -18.0187 22 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166312 17/09/2012 23:26:31 27.7065 -17.9957 22 2.0 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166311 17/09/2012 21:42:46 27.7030 -18.0078 24 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166308 17/09/2012 21:10:53 27.6954 -18.0087 22 1.8 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166306 17/09/2012 21:01:03 27.7032 -18.0052 20 2.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166301 17/09/2012 20:55:02 27.7141 -18.0022 20 2.3 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166283 17/09/2012 20:50:45 27.7009 -18.0074 22 2.1 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166282 17/09/2012 20:20:41 27.7107 -18.0105 22 2.5 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166280 17/09/2012 20:14:15 27.7036 -17.9998 21 2.0 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166279 17/09/2012 19:53:08 27.7042 -17.9886 20 1.9 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166278 17/09/2012 19:47:08 27.7155 -18.0153 23 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166273 17/09/2012 18:29:37 27.7204 -18.0029 19 1.6 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166266 17/09/2012 17:49:38 27.6889 -17.9883 22 2.2 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166265 17/09/2012 17:34:22 27.6855 -18.0191 22 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166260 17/09/2012 16:54:36 27.6945 -18.0669 27 2.1 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166247 17/09/2012 16:11:02 27.7200 -17.9911 22 2.5 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166243 17/09/2012 16:06:47 27.7324 -17.9921 21 2.1 mbLg S FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166240 17/09/2012 16:04:37 27.7184 -17.9992 20 2.8 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166245 17/09/2012 15:52:56 27.7575 -18.0872 10 1.8 mbLg W FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166231 17/09/2012 15:39:07 27.7118 -18.0222 22 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166226 17/09/2012 15:34:51 27.7601 -18.0891 10 1.8 mbLg W FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166221 17/09/2012 15:32:59 27.7876 -18.1054 11 1.7 mbLg NW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166224 17/09/2012 15:32:23 27.7054 -18.0069 25 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166225 17/09/2012 15:26:48 27.7398 -18.0069 19 1.5 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166220 17/09/2012 15:15:08 27.7021 -18.0191 22 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166204 17/09/2012 14:04:42 27.6965 -18.0061 21 2.0 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166205 17/09/2012 14:02:27 27.6968 -18.0169 20 1.8 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166217 17/09/2012 13:49:28 27.6801 -18.0791 16 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166214 17/09/2012 13:40:08 27.7179 -17.9985 22 2.0 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166213 17/09/2012 13:20:35 27.7305 -18.0298 23 1.5 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166202 17/09/2012 13:05:19 27.6834 -18.0092 20 2.2 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166197 17/09/2012 12:50:25 27.7269 -17.9985 22 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166198 17/09/2012 12:47:52 27.6832 -18.0099 15 1.6 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166199 17/09/2012 12:43:14 27.7365 -18.0161 23 1.7 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166171 17/09/2012 11:52:38 27.6973 -18.0285 21 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166148 17/09/2012 11:16:04 27.6981 -18.0131 22 1.8 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166146 17/09/2012 11:06:18 27.6948 -18.0032 22 2.2 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166144 17/09/2012 11:04:19 27.7143 -17.9947 20 2.4 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166141 17/09/2012 10:54:41 27.7256 -18.0145 21 1.6 mbLg SW FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166142 17/09/2012 10:48:49 27.7211 -18.0185 22 1.6 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166143 17/09/2012 10:47:50 27.6981 -18.0208 22 2.0 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166103 17/09/2012 10:00:35 27.7061 -17.9905 24 1.5 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166085 17/09/2012 09:43:12 27.7059 -18.0168 23 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166072 17/09/2012 09:20:44 27.7104 -18.0355 23 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166075 17/09/2012 09:16:04 27.6991 -18.0086 22 2.2 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166069 17/09/2012 09:11:26 27.7119 -18.0034 21 2.4 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166068 17/09/2012 09:04:48 27.7181 -18.0060 22 1.9 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166060 17/09/2012 08:33:14 27.6835 -18.0236 22 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166064 17/09/2012 08:21:17 27.7925 -18.0067 21 1.5 mbLg N FRONTERA.IHI [+]
1166057 17/09/2012 08:19:27 27.7142 -18.0143 21 1.8 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166054 17/09/2012 08:04:36 27.6896 -18.0120 22 1.7 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166055 17/09/2012 07:50:51 27.7225 -17.9935 24 2.0 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166056 17/09/2012 07:45:42 27.7203 -18.0018 23 1.5 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166038 17/09/2012 07:33:30 27.7105 -18.0003 23 2.5 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166033 17/09/2012 06:58:53 27.7155 -18.0042 20 2.6 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166030 17/09/2012 06:17:57 27.6933 -18.0103 22 2.1 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166027 17/09/2012 05:58:53 27.7211 -18.0139 21 2.0 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166028 17/09/2012 05:57:22 27.7019 -18.0153 22 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166025 17/09/2012 05:35:02 27.7107 -18.0187 22 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166026 17/09/2012 05:30:04 27.7022 -17.9972 21 2.2 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166023 17/09/2012 05:27:21 27.7165 -18.0316 22 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166024 17/09/2012 05:06:16 27.7155 -18.0297 23 2.8 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166016 17/09/2012 04:22:17 27.7244 -17.9950 21 1.9 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166017 17/09/2012 04:16:07 27.6996 -18.0234 23 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166019 17/09/2012 04:06:08 27.6913 -18.0453 22 1.8 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166014 17/09/2012 03:53:17 27.6975 -18.0212 23 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166012 17/09/2012 03:37:23 27.7079 -17.9951 22 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166011 17/09/2012 03:06:03 27.6989 -18.0075 22 2.0 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166010 17/09/2012 02:38:58 27.7092 -18.0085 21 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166009 17/09/2012 02:38:07 27.6933 -18.0160 22 2.1 mbLg SW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166008 17/09/2012 02:21:35 27.7018 -18.0065 23 1.9 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1166007 17/09/2012 01:54:23 27.7107 -18.0084 22 1.7 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1165994 17/09/2012 01:28:49 27.7114 -18.0118 21 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1165993 17/09/2012 01:24:55 27.7166 -18.0028 20 II 3.0 mbLg NW EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1165992 17/09/2012 00:59:44 27.7033 -18.0202 20 1.5 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]
1165990 17/09/2012 00:30:25 27.7068 -17.9991 22 1.6 mbLg W EL PINAR.IHI [+]

……………………………..

More quakes raise panic near Vietnamese dam

A man in Quang Nam Province swings his arms to describe earthquakes that rattled his house early on Monday. The tremors have left his wife and son in a panic, he said.

The central province of Quang Nam, which has been disturbed by tremors caused by the Song Tranh 2 dam, was hit by more earthquakes Monday and Tuesday.

Two earthquakes, the bigger of which registered 2.7 on the Richter scale, occurred early Monday, and three others early on Tuesday.

Nguyen Quoc Viet, who lives near the dam, said he was sleeping when a tremor woke him Monday. 

“The bed shook. I knew it was another earthquake, and I just ran out of the house.”

Ho Van Tien, who felt a quake while exercising at 5 p.m., said the tremors lasted around seven seconds. He said it was the biggest of the recent quakes he’d experienced.

Many local residents agreed the late quake Monday was the worst, while scientists later said it occurred as close as five kilometers from the earth’s surface.

The quakes added to a series of at least 17 since September 3, including one of a magnitude 4.2, which have panicked local residents.

Scientists said the quakes were “normal” reservoir-induced ones, caused by the increased pressure of the dam’s water on the earth’s surface as water from the reservoir is absorbed into fault lines in the area, triggering seismic activity.

Geologists sent to the province said the quakes were not dangerous, but local authorities did not believe them.

Many local residents have packed their clothes and blankets and are ready to leave at a moment’s notice. Others have built wooden houses, leaving their cracked concrete houses abandoned.

Many parents have also pulled their children out of schools downstream from the dam. 

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Local officials have demanded that the dam’s investor, the state-owned monopoly Electricity of Vietnam, not to store any more water at the dam, and compensate affected families, at least with rice.

The Song Tranh 2 hydropower dam, the biggest in the central region, was built at a cost of more than VND4.15 trillion (US$197.53 million). It caused first quakes in November 2010 soon after it was completed, and more in April this year after it developed cracks. The cracks were fixed by the end of August.

LISS – Live Internet Seismic Server

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: September 20, 2012 19:18:44 UTC

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Volcanic Activity

Mount Soputan Volcano Erupts In Central Indonesia, Spewing Ash

JAKARTA, Indonesia — One of Indonesia’s most active volcanos has erupted, shooting ash and smoke nearly 1 1/2 kilometers (one mile) into the sky.

State volcanology official Kristianto says Mount Soputan on central Indonesia’s Sulawesi island erupted Tuesday afternoon.

Kristianto, who uses one name, says there is no plan for an immediate evacuation since the nearest villages are outside the danger area of about 6.5 kilometers (4 miles) from the crater.

Mount Soputan is about 1,350 miles (2,160 kilometers) northeast of Jakarta. It last erupted in July last year, causing no casualties.

Indonesia straddles the “Pacific Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanos and fault lines around the Pacific Basin. It has more active volcanoes than any other nation. Another mountain, Gamalama, erupted last week on the Molucca Islands.

Volcanic Activity Up in Several Locations

Steam and ash billow out of Mount Gamalama on Ternate Island on Sunday. (AP Photo)

Steam and ash billow out of Mount Gamalama on Ternate Island on Sunday. (AP Photo)

Solo, Central Java. As two volcanos in the eastern part of Indonesia continued to erupt on Monday, Mount Merapi in Central Java has been displaying increasing activity, with rumblings in the past week.

“In the evenings, there are rumblings that are accompanied by the ground shaking,” Sapto, from Samiran village in the district of Boyolali on the slope of Merapi, said on Monday.

He said that the 2,968-meter volcano was also active during the day, as evidenced by the thick column of ash billowing out from its crater.

Sapto said that as of Monday, local authorities had not issued any information to the public regarding the volcano.

Subiso, head of Selo subdistrict in Boyolali, confirmed that no official advisories or warnings had been issued yet about the increased activity on Merapi.

However, he said that the rumbling sounds from the volcano were almost routine in the area, and added that the situation there “is still safe.”

Ngatini, another resident said that the rumblings did not disturb local residents too much.

“If an eruption is imminent, the rumbling will be heard continuously and there will be some ash rain,” she said.

Merapi last erupted in October 2010, spewing enormous amounts of ash. Pyroclastic flows, fast-moving currents of superheated gas and rock, killed more than 300 people along the heavily populated slopes and forced 350,000 to evacuate.

Meanwhile, with a small eruption still taking place on Mount Lokon in Tomohon, North Sulawesi, authorities there are maintaining the alert status for the volcano and have banned all human activities within a 2.5-kilometer radius of the crater.

Farid Sukendar, head of the Lokon volcano observation post, said that  the mountain erupted after dusk on Saturday, spewing superheated volcanic material up to 600 meters and ash up to 1,500 meters into the atmosphere.

“This volcano is active and therefore we should remain vigilant because it could erupt any time,” he said.

Arnold Poli, secretary of the town of Tomohon, located at the base of the mountain, said that the authorities were continuously monitoring the volcano. He said that the series of eruptions had not affected the activities of the local population but added the authorities were calling on everyone to remain alert.

He also said that despite the volcanic activity, the government had yet to evacuate anyone from the villages of Kinilow and Kakaskasen III, the two villages closest to the smoldering crater.

“No one has yet been ordered to evacuate,” he said.

Mount Soputan, in North Sulawesi’s South Minahasa district, and Mount Karangetang in the Sitaro Islands district across from the northernmost tip of Sulawesi remained on a government-ordered standby alert status, or just one rung below the most severe alert.

“There are now three volcanoes in North Sulawesi under the standby alert status,” said Hooke Makarawung, head of the North Sulawesi Disaster Mitigation Office (BPBD).

“People should remain vigilant.”

He said that about 110 people had been evacuated from the slopes of Karangetang and that the North Sulawesi administration had sent relief supplies to them.

Djauhari Kansil, the deputy governor of North Sulawesi, said that those evacuated were from East Siau subdistrict, but he added that in the daytime, the people were allowed to return to their village to work their fields.

They have been asked to return to the shelters in the evening.

The volcanology office also announced on Monday that it had raised the alert level for Mount Gamalama, on Ternate Island in North Maluku province, to standby.

The office, on its website, said that the alert status was raised on Sunday.

The site offered no further details.

The 1,715-meter Gamalama, a conical volcano that dominates Ternate Island, last erupted in December, destroying more than 100 houses and leaving farmers devastated after a thick layer of ash smothered fruit trees and crops.

Four villagers were confirmed dead in that eruption.

Metro TV reported on Monday that the mountain spewed a white column of ash about 500 meters into the atmosphere.

There was also some volcanic debris thrown up by the mountain but on a smaller scale.

It also said the local volcanology authorities had declared a 2.5-kilometer exclusion radius around the crater of the erupting volcano.

On Sunday evening, the smoke and volcanic debris thrown up by Gamalama reached about 1,000 meters into the atmosphere, according to the report.

Anak Krakatau in the Sunda Strait between Java and Sumatra also showed some signs of activity earlier this month. The volcano is the remnant of Krakatau, the site of an earth-shattering eruption in 1883.

SP, JG

Related articles

Life Goes On in Manado as Mount Lokon Erupts 12:15pm Sep 20, 2012

Alert Levels Rising Along With Smoke and Ash From Marapi 8:02pm Sep 19, 2012

Two Indonesian Volcanoes Awaken, Rattling Nerves 11:34am Sep 17, 2012

Indonesian Vulcanology Office Issues Warning for Tangkuban Perahu 9:15pm Sep 6, 2012

Taking the Water, With a Side of Eggs, at Bandung’s Tangkuban Perahu 8:03pm Jul 25, 2012

Cumbal volcano (Colombia) activity update: seismic swarms

BY: T

Seismic unrest has been increasing. 2 earthquake swarms occurred on 23 and 26 August, with 115 and 94 quakes, respectively. White gas emissions from the El Verde fumarole could be observed on 24 August. INGEOMINAS mintains yellow alert for the volcano.

18.09.2012 Volcano Eruption Indonesia Sulawesi, [Soputan Volcano] Damage level Details

Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on Tuesday, 18 September, 2012 at 15:40 (03:40 PM) UTC.

Description
One of Indonesia’s most active volcanos has erupted, shooting ash and smoke nearly 1 1/2 kilometers (one mile) into the sky. State volcanology official Kristianto says Mount Soputan on central Indonesia’s Sulawesi island erupted Tuesday afternoon. Kristianto, who uses one name, says there is no plan for an immediate evacuation since the nearest villages are outside the danger area of about 6.5 kilometers (4 miles) from the crater. Mount Soputan is about 1,350 miles (2,160 kilometers) northeast of Jakarta. It last erupted in July last year, causing no casualties. Indonesia straddles the “Pacific Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanos and fault lines around the Pacific Basin. It has more active volcanoes than any other nation. Another mountain, Gamalama, erupted last week on the Molucca Islands.

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

2nd Major Wind Storm Hits Anchorage

Rachel D’Oro

Overlay

Alaska Vacation Forecast

ANCHORAGE, Alaska  — A second major wind storm in less than two weeks swept through Alaska’s largest city on Sunday, but unlike the earlier storm, its greatest intensity was mostly on higher elevations where gusts as high as 120 mph were reported, weather forecasters said.

Chugach Electric said as many as 6,000 customers between Anchorage and the northern Kenai Peninsula were without power at the height of the storm. Fewer than two dozen customers remained in the dark, utility spokesman Phil Steyer said.

The outages are known or suspected to be caused by fallen trees, although not as many as the stronger storm earlier this month that downed hundreds of trees across the city. That storm blew a lot of leaves off branches, making “less surface area now for the wind to catch on,” Steyer said.

iWitness/cindymbrice

The storm two weeks ago brought down trees and caused thousands of power outages. Only 6,000 outages were reported Sunday.

Era Aviation commuter planes were grounded Saturday evening, though only partially because of the weather. Spokesman Steve Smith said the statewide airline also learned recently that electronic components for cockpit voice recorders on its 12-plane fleet must be replaced to conform to federal regulatory specifications.

Smith said the equipment could be replaced within a few hours and a few days, depending on the aircraft. In the meantime, some passengers have been rerouted to other carriers, he said. With moderate rains in the area, the National Weather service issued a flood warning for Anchorage’s Chester Creek.

The storm turned out to be less dramatic than expected in the lower elevation Anchorage bowl, with the fiercest winds concentrated in higher elevations, such as the Hillside area and Turnagain Arm south of town.

“It looks like we’re dodging a bullet in the bowl,” weather service meteorologist John Papineau said.

For Anchorage police, the storm brought far fewer calls than the last one, with just a few reports of downed trees and of two flooded intersections, dispatcher Eric Anderson said.

(MORE: Anchorage Recovers from First Storm)

“It’s pretty uneventful so far,” he said. “We’re pretty happy about that.”

The weather service said wind gusts of 35-40 mph were hitting parts of anchorage Sunday night.

With weather service instruments in some of the windiest spots knocked out by the earlier storm, the agency was relying on wind measurements taken by weather enthusiasts, meteorologist Emily Niebuhr said.

The storm, whose long front has stretched over much of south-central Alaska, was expected to shift to the east and diminish later Sunday, Papineau said.

More rain was expected early in the week, he said.

Record loss of Arctic ice may trigger extreme weather

Arctic sea ice is shrinking at a rate much faster than scientists ever predicted and its collapse, due to global warming, may well cause extreme weather this winter in North America and Europe, according to climate scientists.

Last month, researchers announced that Arctic sea ice had dwindled to the smallest size ever observed by man, covering almost half the area it did 30 years ago, when satellites and submarines first began measuring it. While the loss of summer sea ice is likely to open up new shipping lanes and may connect the West Coast of the United States to the Far East via a trans-polar route, researchers say it will also affect weather patterns and Arctic wildlife. “It’s probably going to be a very interesting winter,” climate scientist Jennifer Francis said Wednesday in a teleconference with reporters. Francis, a researcher at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University, has argued that shrinking Arctic ice can be tied to such recent weather events as prolonged cold spells in Europe, heavy snows in the Northeastern U.S. and Alaska, and heat waves in Russia. Decades ago, Arctic ice covered about 6 million square miles of sea in the winter, and would shrink to about 3 million square miles in the summer. The rate of summer melt increased enormously around 2005, however, and today scientists say Arctic ice covers about 1 million square miles. “This is a very small amount of ice indeed,” said Peter Wadhams, an ocean physics professor at the University of Cambridge. Wadhams said that while Arctic ice used to build up over many years, new ice formations are now breaking up and melting each summer. “I think that what we can expect in the next few years is further collapse leading to an ice-free Arctic in summer,” Wadhams said. “It really is a dramatic change.” Previously, scientists had predicted that it would take 30 or 40 more years before the Arctic was ice-free in the summer.

The loss of Arctic ice has several effects. Ice reflects heat and solar energy back into space. With less ice cover, that heat energy is instead absorbed by the ocean, which warms and melts more ice. Currently, the Arctic region is the fastest-warming region on the planet, and the change in temperature will probably influence weather patterns here and in Europe, according to Francis. The heating and cooling of Arctic seawater has been affecting the jet stream – the river of air that flows from west to east high above the Earth’s surface – and has slowed it down, Francis said. The jet stream controls the formation and movement of storm systems, so when its movement slows, weather conditions persist for longer periods of time over the same area. They get “stuck.” “If you’re in a nice dry pattern with sunny skies, it’s great if it lasts for a few days. But If it lasts for a few weeks, well then you’re starting to talk about a drought,” Francis said. “If you have a rainy pattern and it hangs around for a long time, then that becomes a situation that could lead to flooding.” Arctic warming will influence weather to the south during the late fall and winter. While Francis said it would probably result in severe weather this winter, it was impossible to predict when and where those events would occur. Record ice melts this year and in 2007 have alarmed many scientists, mostly because they thought it would take many more years to reach this state. James Overland, an oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said forecasts failed to account for the physics of lost solar energy reflection and warming ocean water. “These are really surprises to most scientists,” Overland said. “In looking at climate models that are used to look forward, they’ve tended to say the Arctic may be ice-free by 2040 or 2050. It looks like things are happening a lot faster, and it’s because not all of the physics that we’re seeing today were well-handled in these climate models.” Overland, who is also an associate professor at the University of Washington’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences, said these effects are known as “Arctic amplification” and would carry heavy consequences for wildlife like polar bears and walruses by reducing their habitat. Wednesday’s telephone news conference was hosted by Climate Nexus, a New York-based nonprofit that seeks to publicize the effects of climate change. (c)2012 Los Angeles Times Distributed by MCT Information Services

During the first six months of 2012, sea surface temperatures in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem were the highest ever recorded, according to the latest Ecosystem Advisory issued by NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC). Above-average temperatures were found in all parts of the ecosystem, from the ocean bottom to the sea surface and across the region, and the above average temperatures extended beyond the shelf break front to the Gulf Stream.
The annual 2012 spring plankton bloom was intense, started earlier and lasted longer than average. This has implications for marine life from the smallest creatures to the largest marine mammals like whales. Atlantic cod continued to shift northeastward from its historic distribution center. The Northeast US Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (LME) extends from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The NEFSC has monitored this ecosystem with comprehensive sampling programs from 1977 onward; prior to 1977, this ecosystem was also monitored by the NEFSC through a series of separate but coordinated programs dating back decades. “A pronounced warming event occurred on the Northeast Shelf this spring, and this will have a profound impact throughout the ecosystem,” said Kevin Friedland, a scientist in the NEFSC’s Ecosystem Assessment Program. “Changes in ocean temperatures and the timing of the spring plankton bloom could affect the biological clocks of many marine species, which spawn at specific times of the year based on environmental cues like water temperature.” Friedland said the average sea surface temperature (SST) exceeded 10.5 degrees C (51°F) during the first half of 2012, exceeding the previous record high in 1951. Average SST has typically been lower than 9 degrees C (48°F) over the past three decades. Sea surface temperature in the region is based on both contemporary satellite remote-sensing data and long-term ship-board measurements, with historical SST conditions based on ship-board measurements dating back to 1854. In some nearshore locations like Delaware and Chesapeake Bays in the Middle Atlantic Bight region, temperatures were more than 6 degrees C (11°F) above historical average at the surface and more than 5 degrees C (9°F) above average at the bottom. In deeper offshore waters to the north, bottom waters were 1 degree C (2°F) warmer in the eastern Gulf of Maine and greater than 2 degrees C (3.6°F) warmer in the western Gulf of Maine.
Ocean bottom temperature data cited in the advisory posted today came from a variety of sources, including eMOLT, a cooperative research program between the Northeast Fisheries Science Center and lobstermen who deploy temperature probes attached to lobster traps. While some of the temperature probes from the eMOLT program are still in the water and have not yet been returned, those that have been returned indicate that bottom water temperatures in 2012 were the warmest since the eMOLT program began in 2001. Atlantic cod distribution in the Gulf of Maine continues a northeasterly shift, with the spring 2012 data consistent with a response to ecosystem warming. Warming ocean temperatures and the resulting impact on the distribution of 36 fish stocks was reported by the Center in a 2009 study published in Marine Ecology Progress Series. That study analyzed annual NEFSC spring survey data from 1968 to 2007 and other information and found that about half of the 36 fish stocks studied in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean, many of them commercially valuable species, have been shifting northward over the past four decades, with some disappearing from US waters as they move farther offshore. Friedland notes that although cod didn’t shift as much as other species like hake in the 2009 study, the effects of warming water on ocean currents and other ocean circulation patterns could change that. “Cod distribution continues to be dynamic, with northerly shifts detected in the spring 2012 data, consistent with a response to ecosystem warming,” Friedland said. “The big question is whether or not these changes will continue, or are they a short-term anomaly?” Mike Fogarty, who heads the Ecosystem Assessment Program, says the abundance of cod and other finfish is controlled by a complex set of factors, and that increasing temperatures in the ecosystem make it essential to monitor the distribution of many species, some of them migratory and others not. “A complex combination of factors influence ocean conditions, and it isn’t always easy to understand the big picture when you are looking at one specific part of it at one specific point in time, “Fogarty said, a comparison similar to not seeing the forest when looking at a single tree in it. “We now have information from a variety of sources collected over a long period of time on the ecosystem, and are continually adding more data to clarify specific details. The data clearly show a relationship between all of these factors.” The 2012 spring plankton bloom, one of the longest duration and most intense in recent history, started at the earliest date recorded since the ocean color remote sensing data series began in 1998. In some locations, the spring bloom began in February, and was fully developed by March in all areas except Georges Bank, which had an average although variable spring bloom. The 2012 spring bloom in the Gulf of Maine began in early March, the earliest recorded bloom in that area. “What this early start means for the Northeast Shelf ecosystem and its marine life is unknown,” Fogarty said. “What is known is that things are changing, and we need to continue monitoring and adapting to these changes.” Intensive surveys of environmental conditions on the Northeast Shelf from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Nova Scotia were conducted from 1977 to 1987 as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment & Prediction (MARMAP) program. The efforts continued at reduced levels through the 1990s and are ongoing today as part of the Center’s Ecosystems Monitoring (EcoMon) program. Plankton samples are collected six times a year in each of the four subareas of the Northeast Shelf: the Middle Atlantic Bight, Southern New England, Georges Bank, and the Gulf of Maine. EcoMon scientists also collect water samples and other oceanographic data about conditions during each season in each of the four areas to provide a long-term view of changing conditions on the Shelf. Ecosystem advisories have been issued twice a year by the NEFSC’s Ecosystems Assessment Program since 2006 as a way to routinely summarize overall conditions in the region. The reports show the effects of changing coastal and ocean temperatures on fisheries from Cape Hatteras to the Canadian border. The advisories provide a snapshot of the ecosystem for the fishery management councils and also a broad range of stakeholders from fishermen to researchers. The Spring 2012 Ecosystem Advisory with supporting information is available online.

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Storms /  Flooding / Landslides

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Nadine (AL14) Atlantic Ocean 11.09.2012 20.09.2012 Tropical Depression 120 ° 83 km/h 102 km/h 5.79 m JTWC Details

Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Nadine (AL14)
Area: Atlantic Ocean
Start up location: N 16° 18.000, W 43° 6.000
Start up: 11th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 1,607.33 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
11th Sep 2012 16:46:42 N 16° 18.000, W 43° 6.000 17 56 74 Tropical Depression 275 12 1006 MB NOAA NHC
12th Sep 2012 05:01:17 N 17° 48.000, W 45° 12.000 24 65 83 Tropical Storm 300 13 1004 MB NOAA NHC
12th Sep 2012 10:46:22 N 18° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 74 93 Tropical Storm 300 15 1001 MB NOAA NHC
12th Sep 2012 16:51:03 N 19° 6.000, W 47° 36.000 24 93 111 Tropical Storm 300 13 997 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 05:34:52 N 20° 42.000, W 50° 6.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 11:12:43 N 21° 30.000, W 51° 18.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 305 17 990 MB NOAA NHC
13th Sep 2012 18:13:35 N 22° 36.000, W 52° 12.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 315 15 990 MB NOAA NHC
14th Sep 2012 05:11:31 N 25° 0.000, W 53° 42.000 24 111 139 Tropical Storm 330 17 989 MB NOAA NHC
14th Sep 2012 17:08:52 N 28° 0.000, W 53° 30.000 26 111 139 Tropical Storm 360 17 988 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 06:55:17 N 30° 0.000, W 52° 48.000 22 120 148 Hurricane I. 25 17 985 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 10:59:20 N 30° 42.000, W 51° 24.000 24 120 148 Hurricane I. 50 13 985 MB NOAA NHC
15th Sep 2012 17:35:38 N 30° 54.000, W 49° 54.000 24 130 157 Hurricane I. 70 17 983 MB NOAA NHC
16th Sep 2012 05:13:53 N 30° 36.000, W 46° 36.000 28 130 157 Hurricane I. 95 15 983 MB NOAA NHC
16th Sep 2012 18:00:15 N 30° 30.000, W 41° 42.000 37 130 157 Hurricane I. 90 20 983 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 05:22:55 N 31° 24.000, W 38° 6.000 30 111 139 Tropical Storm 75 16 987 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 10:47:47 N 32° 0.000, W 36° 24.000 28 111 139 Tropical Storm 65 15 985 MB NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2012 16:41:39 N 32° 54.000, W 35° 18.000 24 111 139 Tropical Storm 50 16 987 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 05:15:16 N 33° 54.000, W 34° 12.000 15 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 18 989 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 10:46:51 N 34° 18.000, W 33° 36.000 13 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 14 990 MB NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2012 18:19:45 N 34° 24.000, W 32° 54.000 13 93 111 Tropical Storm 45 11 990 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 05:31:59 N 35° 48.000, W 32° 12.000 11 83 102 Tropical Storm 25 15 993 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 11:00:20 N 36° 24.000, W 32° 6.000 7 83 102 Tropical Storm 360 9 993 MB NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2012 17:37:42 N 37° 12.000, W 31° 48.000 7 83 102 Tropical Storm 20 9 993 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
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Category Course Wave
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Pressure Source
20th Sep 2012 17:59:47 N 36° 12.000, W 29° 24.000 17 83 102 Tropical Depression 120 ° 19 981 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
21st Sep 2012 18:00:00 N 33° 30.000, W 26° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
21st Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 35° 0.000, W 27° 30.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
22nd Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 32° 30.000, W 26° 0.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
23rd Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 32° 0.000, W 26° 0.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
24th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 32° 0.000, W 25° 54.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
25th Sep 2012 06:00:00 N 32° 0.000, W 26° 0.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 NOAA NHC
18W Pacific Ocean 20.09.2012 20.09.2012 Tropical Depression 265 ° 46 km/h 65 km/h 5.18 m JTWC Details

  Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: 18W
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 13° 42.000, E 132° 18.000
Start up: 20th September 2012
Status: Active
Track long: 0.00 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
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Pressure Source
20th Sep 2012 15:58:27 N 13° 42.000, E 132° 18.000 26 46 65 Tropical Depression 265 ° 17 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
21st Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 36.000, E 130° 0.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 JTWC
21st Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 13° 6.000, E 130° 48.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC
22nd Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 6.000, E 129° 18.000 Typhoon I 102 130 JTWC
22nd Sep 2012 00:00:00 N 12° 18.000, E 129° 36.000 Tropical Depression 83 102 JTWC
23rd Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 6.000, E 128° 48.000 Typhoon II 130 157 JTWC
24th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 12° 30.000, E 128° 18.000 Typhoon III 148 185 JTWC
25th Sep 2012 12:00:00 N 13° 18.000, E 127° 54.000 Typhoon IV 176 213 JTWC

………………………………

Five dead as storm rips across South America

by Staff Writers
Asuncion (AFP)

A fierce storm packing 140-kilometer (87-mile) an hour winds tore across the heart of South America on Wednesday, killing five people in Paraguay and wreaking havoc in Argentina and Uruguay.

The Roque Alonso suburb of the Paraguayan capital Asuncion was devastated by the storm and widespread looting was reported in its aftermath.

Four police cadets died and 15 were injured when the roof of their dormitory collapsed, and a 16-year-old boy died at a shopping center when a water tank collapsed on him outside a pharmacy.

“Roque Alonso has to be built all over again,” police commander Heriberto Marmol said.

Dozens of injured people flooded Asuncion hospitals and traffic was gridlocked in parts of the city.

A crowd of thousands braved torrential rain for a concert by the rock band Scorpions only to see the show cancelled.

Nationwide, at least 5,000 homes were destroyed and more than 80 people injured in storm-related incidents, Aldo Saldivar of the national emergency response center said.

The storm also blew the roof off homes and barns in Neembucu, south of the capital and knocked out power in the town of Encarnacion for many hours.

The wind was less severe further south in Argentina and Uruguay, around 100 kilometers (62 mph) per hour, but strong gusts still ripped of roofs and toppled trees and power lines, plunging some regions into darkness.

 

RUDRAPRAYAG, India (CNN) — The death toll in cloudburst that triggered a massive landslide and affected nearly five villages of northern India’s Uttarakhand state, rose to 50 and about 20 people are still reported to be missing.

The cloudburst preceded by incessant rains led to a massive landslide in the state’s Rudraprayag district caused heavy damage in the hilly region rendering almost 500 people homeless.

Search and the rescue operations are in full swing in the cloudburst-hit area, but the official says rains have disrupted the relief and rescue work.

Speaking to Asian News International in the state capital Dehradun, director of the Disaster Management and Mitigation Department (DMMD), Piyush Rautela said the rescue operations are in full swing in the region and also the basic necessities are being provided to the homeless people staying in relief camps.

“The incident happened on September 13 and 14 which affected four to five villages around Ukhimath. Again there were incidents of landslides in the morning of September 16. From this incident, so far 50 bodies have been recovered, and 20 people are still reported to be missing. The operation to search the missing people is going on.

The personnel from ITBP (Indo Tibetan Border Police Force), NDRF (National Disaster Response Force) and PAC (Provincial Armed Constabulary) are engaged in rescue operations. All our rescue teams are working. Two relief camps are there in Ukhimath for those who have been affected. About 500 people are staying there.

All the necessary items like food and other basic facilities are being provided to them,” he said

The cloudburst that occurred in the wee hours on last Friday, wreaked havoc in several villages of the area and killed most of the victims in their sleep.

Heavy monsoons have always resulted in calamities in different parts of India with each passing year.

The annual monsoon, vital for South Asia’ s agricultural dependent economy, often wreaks havoc as floods and landslides inundate vast swathes of low-lying lands.
Weather News at TerraDaily.com

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Radiation

 

 

 

Mutated sunflower in Kagawa prefecture

Posted by Mochizuki
Fukushima Diary

Mutated sunflower in Kagawa prefecture

Mutated sunflower was found in Manno cho Kagawa prefecture. Kagawa is in Shikoku.
大きな地図で見る

For the question of the prefectural agriculture and distribution department, an expert commented it may be prolification flower, which is a sort of mutation. This is a rare phenomenon for sunflower.

General causes are

1. Excessive fertilizer

2. Unusual heat

However, it was growing naturally.

The central flower is about 20cm diameter, 14 other ones are 3cm diameter.

It withered 1 week later.

Source

 

 

 
 
 

34% of Fukushima city people want to evacuate, local gov “Measures need to be taken”

Posted by Mochizuki
Fukushima Diary
For the questionnaire, 34% of the people answered they want to evacuate Fukushima city, and local government staff is commenting they need to take measures about this situation.

In May, Fukushima city government sent questionnaires to 5,000 people of over 20 years old living in Fukushima city and to 500 people who evacuated to out of Fukushima city. The valid response rate was 55%.

The result showed 34% of them answered “They want to evacuate even now.”. 31% of them answered “They used to want to evacuate.”.

Among people who evacuated to out of Fukushima city, 27% of them answered “They don’t want to come back.”. 19% of them answered “They don’t want to come back to Fukushima city if possible.”
However, 55% of them answered “They want to come back to Fukushima city.”

The city government staff comments, “The result is very severe. We need to take some measures. “.

 

Related article..Thyroid disease rate spiked to 43.7%, “About 1 in 2 children have nodule or cyst in Fukushima city”
Source 1 2

 

 

 
 
 
 

Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, “Safety limit food is safe enough to keep eating”

Posted by Mochizuki
Fukushima Diary
Before 311, nuclear material to contain more than 100 Bq/Kg of Cs 134 or 137 was treated as nuclear waste. Now it is the safety limit of food in Japan.

Japanese government is still investing into making people consume radioactive food.

On 9/12/2012,  Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Consumer Affairs Agency, food safety commission of Japan and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries published the leaflets.

The purpose is like this below,

食品中の放射性物質に関する国・自治体や生産現場における対策の状況や、食品
に含まれる放射性物質が極めてわずかであることなどを、直接消費者に情報提供す
ることで、正しい理解と不安の解消を図る。

<Translate>

The purpose is to help people understand and resolve their anxiety about radiation properly by supplying consumers with information about how Japanese and local governments take measures about food contamination, and the fact that only little amount of radiation is contained in food.

<End>

 

On the leaflet, they emphasized it’s safe to keep eating potentially contaminated food only if it’s under the safety limit.

Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, "Safety limit food is safe enough to keep eating"

 

<Translate>
If it’s under the safety limit, it’s safe to keep eating.

New safety limit has been introduced since April 2012. If it’s under this safety limit, the total dose for the entire life is less than 1mSv, which is safe adequately.

This safety limit is strictly determined by FAO and WHO and it doesn’t have to be more strict.
<End>

The leaflet is to be distributed at supermarkets or chain stores.

Source

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Pink grasshopper in Yamagata prefecture

Posted by Mochizuki
Fukushima Diary
Pink grasshopper in Yamagata prefecture 2

In Kahoku machi Yamagata prefecture, mutated grasshopper was found on 9/12/2012.

Kahoku machi Yamagata is about 130km from Fukushima plant.

Pink grasshopper in Yamagata prefecture

It’s usually green.
It’s about 3cm, found in Nishisato kindergarten.

Ms. Goto (4) commented, “I’m happy because I like pink.”

 

Source

 

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Epidemic Hazards / Diseases

18.09.2012 Epidemic Hazard USA State of Arizona, [Concho Valley] Damage level Details

Epidemic Hazard in USA on Tuesday, 18 September, 2012 at 18:42 (06:42 PM) UTC.

Description
Residents in the Concho Valley area off of Highway 61 noticed hundreds of prairies dogs had died in a short span of time. Prairie dogs are considered sentinel animals to the fact that plague is in the area. Officials with Arizona Game and Fish were notified by an alert resident and further contact was made with health officials from Apache and Coconino counties, the state health department, as well as experts at Northern Arizona University. NAU is home to the Microbial Genetics and Genomics Center and has been a key player in testing for plague for the past 10 years. The lab sent a team to the area to trap fleas in the prairie dog holes that had recent die-offs. The team’s first visit was on August 27 and results from the lab testing showed positive for plague.
Biohazard name: Yersinia pestis (plague)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Climate Change

Climate change to fuel northern spread of avian malaria

Climate change to fuel northern spread of avian malaria

Avian malaria was found in Alaska in the Common redpoll, pictured here. Credit: Jenny Carlson, SF StateRead more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-climate-fuel-northern-avian-malaria.html#jCp
Malaria has been found in birds in parts of Alaska, and global climate change will drive it even farther north, according to a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.
The spread could prove devastating to arctic bird species that have never encountered the disease and thus have no resistance to it, said San Francisco State University Associate Professor of Biology Ravinder Sehgal, one of the study’s co-authors. It may also help scientists understand the effects of climate change on the spread of human malaria, which is caused by a similar parasite. Researchers examined blood samples from birds collected at four sites of varying latitude, with Anchorage as a southern point, Denali and Fairbanks as middle points and Coldfoot as a northern point, roughly 600 miles north of Anchorage. They found infected birds in Anchorage and Fairbanks but not in Coldfoot. Using satellite imagery and other data, researchers were able to predict how environments will change due to global warming—and where malaria parasites will be able to survive in the future. They found that by 2080, the disease will have spread north to Coldfoot and beyond. “Right now, there’s no avian malaria above latitude 64 degrees, but in the future, with global warming, that will certainly change,” Sehgal said. The northerly spread is alarming, he added, because there are species in the North American arctic that have never been exposed to the disease and may be highly susceptible to it.

Climate change to fuel northern spread of avian malaria

Avian malaria was found in Alaska in the Savannah sparrow, pictured here. Credit: Jenny Carlson, SF State “For example, penguins in zoos die when they get malaria, because far southern birds have not been exposed to malaria and thus have not developed any resistance to it,” he said. “There are birds in the north, such as snowy owls or gyrfalcons, that could experience the same thing.” The study’s lead author is Claire Loiseau, a former postdoctoral fellow in Sehgal’s laboratory at SF State. Ryan Harrigan, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles, provided data modeling for the project. The research was funded by grants from the AXA Foundation and National Geographic. Researchers are still unsure how the disease is being spread in Alaska and are currently collecting additional data to determine which mosquito species are transmitting the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. The data may also indicate if and how malaria in humans will spread northward. Modern medicine makes it difficult to track the natural spread of the disease, Sehgal said, but monitoring birds may provide clues as to how global climate change may effect the spread of human malaria. More information: “First evidence and predictions of Plasmodium transmission in Alaskan bird populations” was written by Claire Loiseau, Ryan J. Harrigan, Anthony K. Cornel, Sue L. Guers, Molly Dodge, Timothy Marzec, Jenny S. Carlson, Bruce Seppi and Ravinder N. M. Sehgal and published Sept. 19 in PLoS ONE. Journal reference: PLoS ONE search and more info website Provided by San Francisco State University search and more info website

Shrinking Snow Depth On Arctic Sea Ice Threatens Ringed Seal Habitat

A ringed seal peaks out from its snow cave. (Credit: Brendan Kelly, NSF)

As sea ice in the Arctic continues to shrink during this century, more than two thirds of the area with sufficient snow cover for ringed seals to reproduce also will disappear, challenging their survival, scientists report in a new study.

The ringed seal, currently under consideration for threatened species listing, builds caves to rear its young in snow drifts on sea ice. Snow depths must be on average at least 20 centimeters, or 8 inches, to enable drifts deep enough to support the caves.

“It’s an absolute condition they need,” said Cecilia Bitz, an associate professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington. She’s a co-author of the study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

But without sea ice, the platform that allows the snow to pile up disappears, ultimately reducing the area where the seals can raise their pups.

Bitz typically focuses on studying the area and thickness of sea ice. “But when a seal biologist telephoned and asked what our climate models predict for snow depth on the ice, I said, ‘I have no idea,'” she said. “We had never looked.”

That biologist was co-author Brendan Kelly of the National Science Foundation and he was curious about the snow depth trend because he was contributing to a governmental report in response to the petition to list the seals as threatened.

The researchers, including lead author and UW atmospheric sciences graduate student Paul Hezel, found that snowfall patterns will change during this century but the most important factor in determining snow depth on the ice will be the disappearance of the sea ice.

“The snowfall rate increases slightly in the middle of winter by the end of the century,” Hezel said. However, at the same time sea ice is expected to start forming later in the year than it does now. The slightly heavier snowfall in the winter won’t compensate for the fact that in the fall — which is also when it snows the heaviest — snow will drop into the ocean instead of piling up on the ice.

The researchers anticipate that the area of the Arctic that accumulates at least 20 centimeters of snow will decrease by almost 70 percent this century. With insufficient snow depth, caves won’t hold up.

Other climate changes threaten those caves, too. For instance, the snow will melt earlier in the year than it does now, so it’s possible the caves won’t last until the young seals are old enough to venture out on their own. In addition, more precipitation will fall as rain, which soaks into the snow and can cause caves to collapse.

The research is important for more than just the ringed seals. “There are many other reasons to study snow cover,” Hezel said. “It has a huge thermodynamic impact on the thickness of the ice.”

Snow on sea ice in fall and winter acts like a blanket that slows the release of heat from the relatively warm ocean into the atmosphere. That means deeper snow tempers sea ice growth.

In the spring, snow has a different impact on the ice. Since snow is more reflective than ice, it creates a cooling effect on the surface. “So the presence of snow helps sustain the icepack into spring time,” Hezel said.

To produce the study, the scientists examined 10 different climate models, looking at historic and future changes of things like sea ice area, precipitation, snowfall and snow depth on sea ice. The resulting prediction for declining snow depth on sea ice this century agreed across all of the models.

The new research comes too late to be cited in the report about ringed seals that was written by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in response to the petition to list the ringed seal as threatened. However, it confirms results that were based on a single model that Bitz provided for the report two years ago. NOAA expects to issue its final decision soon.

The UW scientists on this study were funded by the Office of Naval Research.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of Washington. The original article was written by Nancy Gohring.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


Journal Reference:

P. J. Hezel, X. Zhang, C. M. Bitz, B. P. Kelly, F. Massonnet. Projected decline in spring snow depth on Arctic sea ice caused by progressively later autumn open ocean freeze-up this century. Geophysical Research Letters, 2012; 39 (17) DOI: 10.1029/2012GL052794

Antarctic Ice Area Sets Another Record – NSIDC Is Silent

Day 256 Antarctic ice is the highest ever for the date, and the eighth highest daily reading ever recorded. All seven higher readings occurred during the third week of September, 2007 – the week of the previous Arctic record minimum.

arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/timeseries.south.anom.1979-2008

NSIDC does not mention the record Antarctic cold or ice on their web site, choosing inside to feature an article about global warming threatening penguins.

National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)

NSIDC does have a completely nonsensical discussion page explaining why Antarctic ice does not affect the climate.

Scientists monitor both Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, but Arctic sea ice is more significant to understanding global climate because much more Arctic ice remains through the summer months, reflecting sunlight and cooling the planet.

Nonsense. There is very little sunlight reaching the Arctic Ocean in September, and much more reaching Antarctic ice – because it is located at lower latitudes. Arctic ice took its big decline in mid-August, after the sun was already low in the sky.

Sea ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, south of the tip of South America, has recently experienced a significant decline. The rest of Antarctica has experienced a small increase in