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Tag Archive: Utah


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NBC NEWS

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Utah’s Strategy for the Homeless: Give Them Homes

Utah’s Chronic Homeless Rate Drops 91% When It Gives the Needy Housing2:30

By the end of 2015, the chronically homeless population of Utah may be virtually gone. And the secret is quite simple:

Give homes to the homeless.

“We call it housing first, employment second,” said Lloyd Pendleton, director of Utah’s Homeless Task Force.

Even Pendleton used to think trying to eradicate homelessness using such an approach was a foolish idea.

“I said: ‘You guys must be smoking something. This is totally unrealistic,'” Pendleton said.

But the results are hard to dispute.

In 2005, Utah was home to 1,932 chronically homeless. By April 2015, there were only 178 — a 91 percent drop statewide.

“It’s a philosophical shift in how we go about it,” Pendleton said. “You put them in housing first … and then help them begin to deal with the issues that caused them to be homeless.”

Chronically homeless persons — those living on the streets for more than a year, or for four times in three years, and have a debilitating condition — make up 10 percent of Utah’s homeless population but take up more than 50 percent of the state’s resources for the homeless.

 

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ScienceDaily: Your source for the latest research news

 

 

 

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Tree rings reveal nightmare droughts in Western U.S.

May 1, 2014
Source:
Brigham Young University
Summary:
Scientists extended Utah’s climate record back to 1429 using tree rings. They found Utah’s climate has seen extreme droughts, including one that lasted 16 years. If history is repeated in the rapidly growing Western states, the water supply would run out based on current consumption.

Scientists extended Utah’s climate record back to 1429 using tree rings. They found Utah’s climate has seen extreme droughts, including one that lasted 16 years. Credit: Image courtesy of Brigham Young University

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If you think the 1930s drought that caused The Dust Bowl was rough, new research looking at tree rings in the Rocky Mountains has news for you: Things can get much worse in the West.

In fact the worst drought of this century barely makes the top 10 of a study that extended Utah’s climate record back to the year 1429.

With sandpaper and microscopes, Brigham Young University professor Matthew Bekker analyzed rings from drought-sensitive tree species. He found several types of scenarios that could make life uncomfortable in what is now the nation’s third-fastest-growing state:

  • Long droughts: The year 1703 kicked off 16 years in a row with below average stream flow.
  • Intense droughts: The Weber River flowed at just 13 percent of normal in 1580 and dropped below 20 percent in three other periods.
  • Consecutive worst-case scenarios: The most severe drought in the record began in 1492, and four of the five worst droughts all happened during Christopher Columbus’ lifetime.

“We’re conservatively estimating the severity of these droughts that hit before the modern record, and we still see some that are kind of scary if they were to happen again,” said Bekker, a geography professor at BYU. “We would really have to change the way we do things here.”

Modern climate and stream flow records only go back about 100 years in this part of the country, so scientists like Bekker turn to Mother Nature’s own record-keeping to see the bigger picture. For this study, the BYU geographer took sample cores from Douglas fir and pinyon pine trees. The thickness of annual growth rings for these species is especially sensitive to water supply.

 

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Hazmat

"James

James Holland, hydrologist/geologist with the Kanab Field Office of the United States Bureau of Land Management, examines an oil-covered rock with the Forest Service’s Joe Harris and BLM’s Sarah Schlanger in Little Valley Wash in the Upper Valley region of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

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April 01 2014 07:40 AM Environment Pollution USA State of Utah, [Little Valley Wash, Grand Staircase National Monument] Damage level Details

 

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Environment Pollution in USA on Tuesday, 01 April, 2014 at 07:40 (07:40 AM) UTC.

Description
Hikers exploring the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument in Southern Utah last week happened upon an oil spill over four miles in length in an area known as Little Valley Wash. The spill is thought to be old, based on the dense, asphalt-like consistency of the oil, said Larry Crutchfield, Bureau of Land Management public affairs specialist. And it’s a good thing the oil is so thick, he added, because that means the spill will stay put for a while. “The good news is that there is no oil actively moving in the wash,” Crutchfield said. Because the oil in the wash is nearly as thick as asphalt, he added, it is not posing an immediate threat to surrounding areas. However, he said there is evidence suggesting it did move last September when massive monsoon rains created a violent flash flood in the wash. The area typically does receive some rain in the springtime, he said, but not nearly enough to fill the part of the wash where the oil is, which is far upstream. The BLM isn’t taking any chances, however, and plans to secure the area with booms and other equipment to help protect monument resources and water sources. Although preliminary reports last week suggested the spill may have originated from a leak that occurred last month in a nearby pipeline operated by Citation Oil, Crutchfield said the oil found in the wash is very unlikely to have come from a recent leakage.”The Citation oil line did spring a pinhole-sized leak,” Crutchfield said. That leak spilled about 10 barrels of oil before it was discovered and patched last month. The oil that flows through the pipeline has a low viscosity and would be very fluid, he said �” not the thick, viscous, asphalt-like substance found in the wash. The oil in the wash appears to have been there for some time, he said. In fact, investigators currently suspect the spill had been buried beneath the wash until it was exposed by a violent flash flood last fall, which explains why the spill hadn’t been reported in previous years. When asked who might have buried the spill, Crutchfield said it’s quite possible that it was covered by sediment deposited by an earlier flood. There is no way of knowing for sure before BLM investigators complete their assessment of the incident. “We have an idea of where the oil may have come from, but it would be entirely inappropriate for me to speculate at this point,” Crutchfield said. The first priority, he said, is to assess the danger that the oil poses to the surrounding environment. “The important thing at this stage is that we are taking action,” he said. “Citation Oil is taking action. We are working together to figure out what exactly happened.”

 

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Sun Independent.com

Massive oil spill discovered at Grand Staircase National Monument

 

Monday, 03-31-2014, 08:30 PM
Written by Michael Flynn

Hikers exploring the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument in Southern Utah last week happened upon an oil spill over four miles in length in an area known as Little Valley Wash.

The spill is thought to be old, based on the dense, asphalt-like consistency of the oil, said Larry Crutchfield, Bureau of Land Management public affairs specialist. And it’s a good thing the oil is so thick, he added, because that means the spill will stay put for a while.

“The good news is that there is no oil actively moving in the wash,” Crutchfield said. Because the oil in the wash is nearly as thick as asphalt, he added, it is not posing an immediate threat to surrounding areas. However, he said there is evidence suggesting it did move last September when massive monsoon rains created a violent flash flood in the wash.

The area typically does receive some rain in the springtime, he said, but not nearly enough to fill the part of the wash where the oil is, which is far upstream. The BLM isn’t taking any chances, however, and plans to secure the area with booms and other equipment to help protect monument resources and water sources.

 

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Published: Friday, April 4 2014 7:46 p.m. MDT

James Holland, hydrologist/geologist with the Kanab Field Office of the federal Bureau of Land Management, left, points to asphalt-like patches of oil in Little Valley Wash in the Upper Valley region of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument near Escalante on Friday, April 4, 2014. Holland, along with Joe Harris of the Forest Service, Mark Bing, central regional manager of Citation Oil and Gas Corp., Terry Tolbert, wildlife biologist, and Julie Sueker of Arcadis Environmental Consulting Group, hiked the 4-mile stretch of the wash where the oil was discovered.

Laura Seitz, Deseret News

 

ESCALANTE, Garfield County — Remnants from at least one large oil spill found by hikers on March 23 in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has officials wondering how and when the damage occurred.

As many as 4 miles in the Little Valley Wash now contain the aftermath of the spill, with about 1.5 miles of 6-inch thick oil flows contained in the mostly dry stream bed. Bureau of Land Management officials who manage the monument say it’s likely the leak happened decades ago.

BLM officials hypothesize that the spill became encased in sediment deposits over time, making it difficult or impossible to see in most areas. Last September, intense floods washed down the drainage, possibly unburying the oil deposit and carrying parts of it downstream for 2.5 miles.

Boulders and tree trunks in the drainage now demonstrate the depth of the initial oil flows, with steady black lines as many as 2 feet above the stream bed. Black splotches are found in other areas, with vegetation collecting the oil as it flowed along with the flood waters.

Long stretches of oil patches not mixed with sediment have liquified in regions exposed to the sun.

“It’s not what we want to see here,” associate monument manager Sarah Schlanger said during an examination of the area Friday.

 

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Girl with terminal cancer donates Make-A-Wish money to her school

She may not make it to the basketball and volleyball games of her beloved high school teams, but a teenager with a rare type of terminal cancer is making sure they will play in style.

friends

Courtesy Heather Glover
Jayci Glover, right, and a friend share a happy moment. The terminally-ill teen loves mangoes so a local business created a mango smoothie named for her.

When approached by the Make-A-Wish Foundation recently, Jayci Glover, a 13-year-old who lives in Kanab, Utah, simply asked for a new scoreboard for the local high school, where the students and athletes have embraced the girl and kept her spirits up during a difficult year.

“She just decided that she didn’t really need anything, that she has everything she wants and wanted to give something back to all of her friends and the local community that’s done so much to support her,” her mother, Heather Glover, told TODAY Moms.

Her mother said the family wasn’t surprised at all that Jayci’s would think of somebody else when making her wish.

“We had suspected all along that she was going to choose something for her two little sisters or for her friends… She can never think of anything she wants – for Christmas or birthdays.”

Make-A-Wish is paying $7,500 towards the cost of the new scoreboard, which will cost $20,000, said Karen Kelly, who is Jayci’s great aunt and works at the school. The plans are to put Jayci’s name on the scoreboard so she is always there in spirit and cheering on the teams.

The girl, who was diagnosed with peripheral T-cell lymphoma, is at home on hospice care now after spending much of last year in and out of the hospital, Jayci’s mom said.

“There just aren’t any more things they can try. We’ve tried every proven lymphoma treatment that there is and her cancer continued to grow through every single one of them,” Glover said.

event

Courtesy Karen Kelly
The Make-A-Wish check was presented during a ceremony at the local high school on Feb. 12.

“We just reached a decision… to just come home and try to let her be in her home with her two little sisters for as long as we can. We don’t know how long that will be. We don’t think it will be too long.”

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Hero teen, 13, with terminal cancer GIVES AWAY her Make-A-Wish to her school to buy new $7,500 scoreboard rather than enjoy a dream trip

  • Jayci Glover, 13, is fighting a rare form of terminal lymphoma which has caused her to gain over 160lbs in the past year
  • When the brave student received a $7,500 gift from Make-A-Wish she decided to give it to her high school rather than spend it on herself
  • The check was presented before a school basketball game earlier this month and the team wore ‘Fight Like Jayci’ T-shirts
  • Jayci left hospital for the last time on February 12 and received a hero’s welcome in her hometown of Kanab, Utah

By Daily Mail Reporter

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A Utah teenager with terminal cancer has made an incredibly selfless gesture after donating her $7,500 Make-A-Wish foundation gift to her high school.

Jayci Glover, 13, has been fighting a rare form of terminal lymphoma for over a year, which has caused the previously healthy young girl to gain over 160lbs.

When Make-A-Wish asked Jayci what she would like to do with the money, rather than ask for a trip to theme park, or a chance to meet a celebrity or sports star, she decided to gave her gift to Kanab High School to pay a new scoreboard for the gym.

 

Jayci Glover, 13, has been fighting a rare form of terminal lymphoma for over a year, which has caused the previously healthy young girl to gain over 160lbs

Jayci Glover, 13, has been fighting a rare form of terminal lymphoma for over a year, which has caused the previously healthy young girl to gain over 160lbs

Jayci Glover, 13, has been fighting a rare form of terminal lymphoma for over a year, which has caused the previously healthy young girl to gain over 160lbs

 

 

Make-A-Wish presented Jayci Glover's $7,500 check to Kanab High School before a basketball game on February 12

Make-A-Wish presented Jayci Glover’s $7,500 check to Kanab High School before a basketball game on February 12

 

The foundation presented a $7,500 check to the school, in Jayci’s name, before a basketball game on February 12, reports Yahoo News.

The boy’s team also paid tribute to their benefactor with ‘Fight Like Jayci’ T-shirts and every player also gave her a rose and a hug or kiss before the game.

 

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A beef jerky recall is in effect over concerns that packages were misbranded and failed to include a potential allergy-triggering ingredient, reports The Associated Press on Feb. 12.

Salt Lake City-based Prime Snax Inc. is recalling all jerky products made before Feb. 2 that have already been shipped around the country. The products were found to be mislabeled on the packaging and did not include the ingredient soy lecithin – an emulsifier or binding agent that some individuals are allergic to.

According to the USDA’s news release, the products subject to recall bear the establishment number “EST. 18951” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection. The expiration date on the packages will be prior to August 11, 2015, in the format of “mm dd yy.”

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Today's Ideas and Actions | OurFuture.org

 

 

January 17, 2014

 

Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.

Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.

  • City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
  • Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an  ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
  • Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
  • Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.

This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards  –  Mass Animal Deaths

Unknown illness: This undated image provided by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah shows one of four bald eagles that were brought in with odd symptoms. All later died

Unknown illness: This undated image provided by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah shows one of four bald eagles that were brought in with odd symptoms. All later died

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Biological Hazard USA State of Utah, [Utah-wide] Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in USA on Friday, 03 January, 2014 at 04:05 (04:05 AM) UTC.

Description
A growing number of bald eagle deaths in Utah have left state wildlife officials without any solid explanations as they continue to dig into the mystery in search of answers. This month, 21 bald eagles have been found with a mysterious illness, of which 16 have died. Normally the state sees bald eagle numbers range between 700 and 1200 during their winter migration from the North and wildlife officials expect to see just a few cases of deaths or those needing help as a result of injuries or illness. The sudden number of deaths and unexplained symptoms has everyone worried. Residents began finding the downed eagles earlier this month, and at least nine have been taken to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah for treatment, which is currently taking care of four survivors. Rescuers there recount the difficulty of watching a fierce national symbol of strength inexplicably suffering from debilitating symptoms that include body tremors, seizures, paralysis, and weakness in their wings, legs and feet. “It’s just hard to have your national bird in your arms, going through seizures in a way it can’t control ? when you can see it’s pain but don’t know what’s happening to it,” Buz Marthaler, co-founder of the rehabilitation center, told the LA Times. Experts are trying to rule out suspected causes, which range from diseases, neurotoxins, lead poisoning and radiation from the Fukushima meltdown.

Leslie McFarlane, Utah wildlife disease coordinator, told Reuters that poisoning from lead ammunition has at least been ruled out in preliminary tests of carcasses by National Wildlife Health Center’s lab in Wisconsin and that diseases are suspected because of the symptoms the eagles are showing. Other types of poisoning aren’t high on the list of culprits because of the cases of eagles being found spread across several counties. The symptoms resemble West Nile virus, but according to McFarlane that would be unlikely because there are few mosquitoes at this time of year. Officials also looking into whether the deaths could have anything to do with a die-off of grebes at Great Salt Lake in November, which was caused by avian cholera �” a bacteria the eagles could have come into contact with by eating the infected birds. This week a wildlife official from Idaho reached out and said eagles there were also getting sick, which could mean the raptors were already ill before they got to Utah, according to the LA Times.

Still, the worst fear seems to be identifying the cause and finding out that human intervention won’t be able to stop it from killing more of these iconic birds. “There’s all kinds of diseases out there in nature that take the lives of wildlife. You know, a lot of those diseases, there’s not a whole lot that people can do about them. That’s just what happens out in nature,” Mark Hadley, a spokesman for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, told the Public News Service. While they wait for the results of mores tests, wildlife experts are advising people who find eagles who are downed or appear to be in distress to leave them be and call the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources for help.

Biohazard name: Mass. Die-off (bald eagle)
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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  • At least 27 birds have died since the beginning of December
  • Symptoms, including paralysis and seizures, baffled experts
  • Lab tests confirmed cases of West Nile in dead and dying birds

By Associated Press Reporter

 

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The mystery illness that has killed 27 bald eagles in Utah this month appears to be West Nile Virus, state officials said Tuesday.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources said in a statement Tuesday that that laboratory tests done on some of the first birds found indicate they died from West Nile Virus.

Since December 1, officials have found the birds in northern and central Utah. All were either dead or were ill and later died during treatment.

Unknown illness: This undated image provided by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah shows one of four bald eagles that were brought in with odd symptoms. All later died

Unknown illness: This undated image provided by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah shows one of four bald eagles that were brought in with odd symptoms. All later died

The eagles displayed similar symptoms, including head tremors, signs of seizures, weakness in legs and feet and a paralysis of the bird’s wings.

Beyond the 27 that have died, officials said five eagles were being treated at a wildlife rehabilitation center Tuesday. They appeared to be responding well to treatment, officials said.

Utah wildlife officials aren’t sure how the eagles caught the virus, but they suspect the birds contracted it by eating Eared Grebes that were infected with the virus and died recently.

West Nile Virus, which is spread by mosquitoes, usually infects eagles and other birds during warmer months.

 

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SFGate

Published 7:43 pm, Sunday, December 29, 2013

This bald eagle is one of four that were brought to a Utah rehabilitation center with body tremors and paralysis before they eventually died. Twenty bald eagles have died in the state in the past few weeks, and a new ailing eagle surfaces almost daily. Scientists say the birds were not shot by hunters or poisoned. Photo: Associated Press
This bald eagle is one of four that were brought to a Utah rehabilitation center with body tremors and paralysis before they eventually died. Twenty bald eagles have died in the state in the past few weeks, and a new ailing eagle surfaces almost daily. Scientists say the birds were not shot by hunters or poisoned. Photo: Associated Press

Salt Lake City

Bald eagles are dying in Utah – 20 in the past few weeks alone – and nobody can figure out why.

Hundreds of the majestic birds – many with wing spans of 7 feet or more – migrate here each winter, gathering along the Great Salt Lake and feasting on carp and other fish that swim in the nearby freshwater bays.

Earlier this month, however, hunters and farmers across five counties in northern and central Utah began finding the normally skittish raptors lying listless on the ground. Many suffered from seizures, head tremors and paralysis in the legs, feet and wings.

Many of the eagles were brought to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah, where Buz Marthaler and other handlers tried to save the birds. Within 48 hours most were dead.

“It’s just hard to have your national bird in your arms, going through seizures in a way it can’t control – when you can see its pain but don’t know what’s happening to it,” said Marthaler, 56, co-founder of the facility in Ogden.

State wildlife specialists are also baffled. For weeks, officials have sent birds for necropsies at the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., hoping the results would offer clues.

Read More Here

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 Science X network

Phys.Org

Bald eagle deaths in Utah alarm and mystify scientists

Dec 29, 2013 by John M. Glionna

Bald eagles are dying in Utah – 20 in the past few weeks alone – and nobody can figure out why.

Hundreds of the majestic birds – many with wing spans of 7 feet or more – migrate here each winter, gathering along the Great Salt Lake and feasting on carp and other fish that swim in the nearby freshwater bays.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-bald-eagle-deaths-utah-alarm.html#jCp

Earlier this month, however, hunters and farmers across five counties in northern and central Utah began finding the normally skittish raptors lying listless on the ground. Many suffered from seizures, head tremors and paralysis in the legs, feet and wings.

Many of the eagles were brought to the mammoth Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah, where Buz Marthaler – a longtime animal caretaker – and other handlers tried to save the birds. Within 48 hours most were dead.

Earlier this month, however, hunters and farmers across five counties in northern and central Utah began finding the normally skittish raptors lying listless on the ground. Many suffered from seizures, head tremors and paralysis in the legs, feet and wings.

Many of the eagles were brought to the mammoth Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah, where Buz Marthaler – a longtime animal caretaker – and other handlers tried to save the birds. Within 48 hours most were dead.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-bald-eagle-deaths-utah-alarm.html#jCp

“It’s just hard to have your national bird in your arms, going through seizures in a way it can’t control – when you can see it’s pain but don’t know what’s happening to it,” said Marthaler, 56, co-founder of the facility in Ogden.

“As a human being, you just have problems with that. And when you lose one, it just grabs your heart.”

State wildlife specialists are also baffled. For weeks, officials have sent birds for necropsies at the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., hoping the results would offer clues.

They began to rule out obvious possibilities: The birds were not shot by hunters, and officials don’t believe the birds were poisoned. “There doesn’t seem to be anything suspicious in that regard,” said Mitch Lane, a conservation officer with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, who has responded to numerous reports of downed or sick eagles.

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PreventDisease.com

Dec 15, 2013 by DAVE MIHALOVIC

Citing low demand, high costs – and questioning the benefits, Utah’s Public Department of Health does not stock or recommend Gardasil HPV vaccine. The decision to exclude the vaccine from its public health clinics was made by the agency’s director, contrary to the area’s Board of Health.

 
Utah Public Health Bans Gardasil Vaccine photo UtahPublicHealthBansGardasilVaccine_zps12f8df3f.jpg
 

“The backlash and sentiment against it was strong enough that there’s no reason to go there,” physician David Blodgett explained. “No one wants it and it’s too expensive when we’re not funded to provide it.”

The vaccine isn’t mandated in Utah. But the Utah Department of Health has been recommending it for preteen girls since 2006, and for boys since 2011.

At 42 percent, Utah ranks lowest in the nation for completion of the three-injection series among girls who start it.

Unproven Science and Increasing Reports of Side Effects

Official reasons for the slow uptake are varied, but informed parents who have increasingly become skeptical of vaccination, especially the HPV vaccine are likely making the difference.

Just a few months ago, hundreds of adverse reactions from the cervical cancer vaccine in Japan caused vaccine injuries and disability in many teenagers courtesy of Cervarix and Gardasil HPV injections. In July, 2013, the Japanese health ministry issued a nationwide notice that cervical cancer vaccinations should no longer be recommended in Japan. Japanese teens who received the vaccines are now in wheelchairs with damage to their brains and spinal cord.

The HPV vaccine is possibly the biggest vaccine hoax in the last century. HPV vaccines are nothing more than a worldwide exercise in profiteering at the expense of children’s health. Due to the overwhelming amount of side effects associated with the vaccine, health agencies are now encouraging health professionals not to report adverse reactions, a clear indication that something is very wrong.

Earlier this month, Mr. Jean-Christophe Coubris, defence lawyer for Marie-Oceane, a HPV vaccine injured teen, has filed charges with the French public prosecutor in Bobigny, in the outskirts of Paris, against both Laboratoire Sanofi Pasteur MSD and the French authority Agence Nationale du Medicament (ANSM), the French National Medicines Agency, for breach of their manifest duty to ensure safety and for disregard of the precautionary and prevention principles.

“To be dissuaded by cost issues, or to not stock the vaccine due to low public demand, is disingenuous, especially for someone with responsibilities to protect the public,” said said William Cosgrove, a pediatrician in Murray and a member of the Utah Scientific Immunization Advisory Committee. “I believe the real medical issues here are clouded by a moralistic belief system that precludes any frank discussion about sexuality in adolescents.”

Blodgett cites other problems with Gardasil, namely that it was fast-tracked through the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a belief that its benefits were oversold by drug maker Merck.

Thanks to the wealth of information available on the HPV vaccine, the proportion of insured girls and young women completing the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among those who initiated the series has dropped significantly — as much as 63 percent — since the vaccine was approved in 2006, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston.

The study, published in Cancer, reveals the steepest decline in vaccine completion among girls and young women aged nine to 18 — the age group according to medical officials that should receive the vaccine in three doses over six months — a message that has been drilled into parents for just over five years.

“The science wasn’t good… We had physicians in our community arguing that we not make it available,” said Blodgett.

Just two years ago, a publication in the Annals of Medicine exposed the fraudulent nature of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Key messages the researchers report include a lack of evidence for any HPV vaccines in preventing cervical cancer and lack of evaluation of health risks. The researchers stated that physicians should adopt a more rigorous evidence-based medicine approach, in order to provide a balanced and objective evaluation of vaccine risks and benefits to their patients.

The Public Isn’t Buying Medical Hype

It’s not the only risk and the vaccine is claimed to cut the risk by only 17 percent. Cancers caused by HPV are extremely rare and vaccination comes with no guarantee for long-term protection and high risk of side effects.

Weighed against the vaccine’s risks, “the public isn’t buying it,” said Blodgett. “It’s eroding public trust in immunization programs.”

“It’s a complicated vaccine that requires discussion about [sexual health] and a physical exam and follow-up visits with a doctor,” said the agency’s director, Joseph Shaffer. “My feeling is that’s better held in the physician’s office than here at the health department.”

Fear that Gardasil is dangerous hasn’t been eased by the FDA’s assurances. The agency approved and monitors the drug and says its safety profile matches those of other vaccines, but the evidence that continues to coming forward from the U.S. and around the world are proving different.

Earlier this month, national talk show host Katie Couric featured a woman on daytime TV who said the HPV vaccine killed her daughter. The show was roundly criticized by other media, including Slate and Forbes magazine.

Sources:
sltrib.com

Dave Mihalovic is a Naturopathic Doctor who specializes in vaccine research, cancer prevention and a natural approach to treatment.


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