Tag Archive: United Arab Emirates


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A tank operated by Saudi-led forces fires at a position of Yemeni fighters in the Labanat area, between Yemen's northern provinces of al-Jawf and Marib on December 5, 2015. (Reuters photo)
A tank operated by Saudi-led forces fires at a position of Yemeni fighters in the Labanat area, between Yemen’s northern provinces of al-Jawf and Marib on December 5, 2015. (Reuters photo)

A new report says mercenaries and military advisers from the infamous US security firm, formerly known as Blackwater, are replacing UAE troops in the Saudi war in Yemen.   

The Beirut-based al-Akhbar newspaper said on Thursday UAE forces are being gradually replaced by recruits from the US-based private military contractor, which now goes by the name, Acamedi.

The move came after the UAE evacuated some of its military sites in Yemen following its failures in several operations, the Lebanese daily added.

According to al-Akhbar, UAE’s move to involve the private military contractor in the Yemen conflict has raised objections among some members of the Saudi-led coalition.

On Wednesday, Yemen’s Arabic-language al-Masirah news website said the commander-in-chief of Blackwater mercenaries in the country was killed in the al-Omari district of Ta’izz Province.

 

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Blackwater: Shadow Army

 FILE - Undated electron microscope image of novel coronavirus particles, also known as the MERS virus, colorized in yellow.

FILE – Undated electron microscope image of novel coronavirus particles, also known as the MERS virus, colorized in yellow.

Lisa Schlein

— The World Health Organization (WHO) says it believes the recent spike in cases of  Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS Corona virus is probably due to a seasonal increase of the disease rather than to any changes in the behavior of the virus.

WHO says similar upsurges have occurred around the same time in the past two years.

WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl says the increase in cases is most likely due to the warmer weather in the Arabian Peninsula and to outbreaks of the disease in two or three hospitals in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

He says health officials do not know how the virus is transmitted from person to person.  But it is clear, he says, the disease does not spread with the same ease that Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, did.

Countries reporting new MERS cases, 2014.

Countries reporting new MERS cases, 2014.

“We do not think it does transmit very efficiently,” said Hartl. “It certainly is not anything like SARS or like diseases like influenza…There is no way we can predict the future.  But, for us, at the moment, certainly this virus MERS does not have the ability to infect in the same way that SARS did.  So, that is a good sign.”

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Benghazi attack could have been prevented if US hadn’t ‘switched sides in the War on Terror’ and allowed $500 MILLION of weapons to reach al-Qaeda militants, reveals damning report

  • Citizens Committee on Benghazi claims the US government allowed arms to flow to al-Qaeda-linked militants who opposed Muammar Gaddafi
  • Their rise to power, the group says, led to the Benghazi attack in 2012
  • The group claims the strongman Gaddafi offered to abdicate his presidency, but the US refused to broker his peaceful exit
  • The commission, part of the center-right Accuracy In Media group, concluded that the Benghazi attack was a failed kidnapping plot
  • US Ambassador Chris Stevens was to be captured and traded for ‘blind sheikh’ Omar Abdel-Rahman, who hatched the 1993 WTC bombing plot

By David Martosko, U.s. Political Editor

The Citizens Commission on Benghazi, a self-selected group of former top military officers, CIA insiders and think-tankers, declared Tuesday in Washington that a seven-month review of the deadly 2012 terrorist attack has determined that it could have been prevented – if the U.S. hadn’t been helping to arm al-Qaeda militias throughout Libya a year earlier.

‘The United States switched sides in the war on terror with what we did in Libya, knowingly facilitating the provision of weapons to known al-Qaeda militias and figures,’ Clare Lopez, a member of the commission and a former CIA officer, told MailOnline.

She blamed the Obama administration for failing to stop half of a $1 billion United Arab Emirates arms shipment from reaching al-Qaeda-linked militants.

‘Remember, these weapons that came into Benghazi were permitted to enter by our armed forces who were blockading the approaches from air and sea,’ Lopez claimed. ‘They were permitted to come in. … [They] knew these weapons were coming in, and that was allowed..

‘The intelligence community was part of that, the Department of State was part of that, and certainly that means that the top leadership of the United States, our national security leadership, and potentially Congress – if they were briefed on this – also knew about this.’

The weapons were intended for Gaddafi but allowed by the U.S. to flow to his Islamist opposition.

 

The Citizens Committee on Benghazi released its interim findings on April 22, 2014 in Washington. Pictured are (L-R) Clare Lopez, Admiral (Ret.) Chuck Kubic, Admiral (Ret.) James 'Ace' Lyons, former CIA officer Wayne Simmons and civil rights attorney John Clarke

The Citizens Committee on Benghazi released its interim findings on April 22, 2014 in Washington. Pictured are (L-R) Clare Lopez, Admiral (Ret.) Chuck Kubic, Admiral (Ret.) James ‘Ace’ Lyons, former CIA officer Wayne Simmons and civil rights attorney John Clarke

 

On September 11, 2012 armed terror-linked militias attacked U.S. diplomatic outposts in Benghazi, Libya, killing four Americans and driving the United States out of that part of the country

On September 11, 2012 armed terror-linked militias attacked U.S. diplomatic outposts in Benghazi, Libya, killing four Americans and driving the United States out of that part of the country

 

‘The White House and senior Congressional members,’ the group wrote in an interim report released Tuesday, ‘deliberately and knowingly pursued a policy that provided material support to terrorist organizations in order to topple a ruler [Muammar Gaddafi] who had been working closely with the West actively to suppress al-Qaeda.’

‘Some look at it as treason,’ said Wayne Simmons, a former CIA officer who participated in the commission’s research.

Retired Rear Admiral Chuck Kubic, another commission member, told reporters Tuesday that those weapons are now ‘all in Syria.’

 

‘Gaddafi wasn’t a good guy, but he was being marginalized,’ Kubic recalled. ‘Gaddafi actually offered to abdicate’ shortly after the beginning of a 2011 rebellion.

‘But the U.S. ignored his calls for a truce,’ the commission wrote, ultimately backing the horse that would later help kill a U.S. ambassador.

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Voice of America

Deadly Virus Surges Through Arab Gulf

FILE - In this June 8, 2011 file photo, a Yemeni manas he leads his camel loaded with his belongings in Taiz, Yemen. Scientists say the mysterious MERS virus has been infecting camels in Saudi Arabia.

FILE – In this June 8, 2011 file photo, a Yemeni manas he leads his camel loaded with his belongings in Taiz, Yemen. Scientists say the mysterious MERS virus has been infecting camels in Saudi Arabia.

Mohamed Elshinnawi

— Saudi Arabia says a deadly virus is rippling through the kingdom as additional cases were reported over the weekend in the United Arab Emirates and Yemen.

Confirmed cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have been seen at two major hospitals in the port city of Jeddah.

Saudi health authorities are embarking on a variety of measures to prevent further spread of the 18-month-long outbreak.

“We have detected 11 cases of (the virus) in Jeddah,” said Dr. Abdul Salam Noorwali, director-general of health in the Makkah region said last week. “Two of the patients have died, while six others have been cured and three cases are under medication,” he said.​

Three of the patients in Jeddah were health workers, including one of the two who died, prompting authorities to temporarily shut down the emergency ward at the city’s King Fahd Hospital.

MERS, by demographicMERS, by demographic

Sami BaDawood, Jeddah’s health affairs director, said the emergency department was closed for disinfection after one health worker there tested positive for the virus and subsequent tests on other staff members showed further infections.
Some patients were transferred to other hospitals while the disinfection was carried out, he said.

The latest figures bring to at least 179 the number of cases of MERS in Saudi Arabia since the virus first appeared in the kingdom in September 2012.

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MERS Virus Hits Middle East Hard Once Again; Saudi Arabia Reports 15 New Cases And 2 Deaths

MERs

The Middle East is experiencing a surge in MERS infections, with two deaths being reported out of Saudi Arabia and Yemen seeing its first. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus may have ties to the notorious SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus that spread to almost 25 countries within a half year, killing 770 of the 8,000 people sickened by it, but it’s far more mysterious and deadly. And while it has remained out of the spotlight lately, recent reports from Saudi Arabia and Yemen confirm new deaths and cases.

Yemen reported its first case ever of the virus. The man, living in Sanaa, works as an aeronautics engineer, according to Reuters. MERS has already infected 212 people and killed 88 according to the World Health Organization. The virus is deadlier than SARS because compared to the amount that become sick, death rates are high. MERS has already killed about 42 percent of those who fell ill.

“The [Yemeni health] ministry is working in effective cooperation with the World Health Organization to confront this virus and is in direct and constant communication with all hospitals to receive information on any other suspected cases,” Public Health Minister Ahmed al-Ansi was quoted as saying by a Yemeni newspaper, according to Al Jazeera.

 

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Saudis Blame Government, Hospitals as Deadly Virus Spreads in Mideast

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has killed 60 percent of the people it has infected

 

A rare respiratory virus that killed more than 100 people in the Middle East in 2012 has resurfaced—and it’s sparking alarm and anger.

New cases of MERS, a virus traced to an Egyptian tomb bat, have turned up again in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, and for the first time in Yemen, too. The rage has been the loudest in Saudi Arabia, which has had the majority of MERS cases. People are upset about what they say are poor levels of hygiene at Saudi hospitals, a lack of public outreach about MERS and mismanagement of the crisis by the Saudi Ministry of Health.

MERS, or Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus, remains a mystery. Researchers and doctors don’t know how it spreads or why it emerged in the first place. Much like the SARS virus, which infected more than 8,000 people in Asia in 2003, when people get MERS they first show symptoms of fever and a mild cough, which may last for several days. That can lead to pneumonia. However, unlike SARS, MERS can ultimately cause rapid kidney failure.

MERS first appeared in September 2012, and while it has infected only 189 people, it has had a fatality rate of 60%. By contrast, less than 10% of the people infected with SARS have died. With a surge of new MERS cases, the hashtag #corona in Arabic was tweeted over 110,000 times in a span of three days. Mapping the social media discussion of the virus shows that the epicenter of the anger is in Jeddah, the scene of one of the more virulent current outbreaks.

Corona virus Saudi 2

Jeddah, one of Saudi Arabia’s largest cities, attracts millions of visitors every year. During the Hajj, the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, Jeddah’s international airport gets up to 2 million visitors from around the world in the span of a week. Last year, 1 million people were forced to forgo the annual Hajj because of concerns over the spread of MERS.

 

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The Daily Star

Foreigner dies of MERS in Saudi Arabia: ministry

April 14, 2014 05:10 PM

Agence France PresseA view of the King Fahd hospital which has closed its emergency department banning the exit and entry of people and patients, on April 9, 2014 in Jeddah.   AFP PHOTO/STRA view of the King Fahd hospital which has closed its emergency department banning the exit and entry of people and patients, on April 9, 2014 in Jeddah. AFP PHOTO/STR

 

JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia: A foreigner has died from MERS in the western Saudi city of Jeddah, where authorities have sought to calm fears over the spreading respiratory illness, the Health Ministry said Monday.

The death of the 70-year-old man brought the toll of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in the most-affected country to 69 fatalities. Four new cases of infection were registered, bringing the kingdom’s total to 194, the ministry said.

It did not disclose the man’s nationality.

Last week panic over the spread of MERS among medical staff in Jeddah had caused a temporary closure of an emergency room at a main hospital, prompting a visit by Health Minister Abdullah al-Rabiah aimed at reassuring an anxious public.

Rabiah briefed the council of ministers on Monday following his visit to hospitals in Jeddah over the weekend.

“The situation concerning the coronavirus is reassuring,” the council said in a statement following its meeting.

The virus was initially concentrated in the eastern region but has now spread across other areas.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

 

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UAE sees two new cases of Mers coronavirus infection

Omani patient succumbs to infection, while man from Abu Dhabi in critical condition

    • By Samihah Zaman, Staff Reporter
    • Published: 21:30 March 27, 2014
    • Gulf News

 

Abu Dhabi: Two new cases of infection by the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (Mers-CoV) in the UAE have been reported to international authorities over the past week, with one of the patients succumbing to the disease.

The victim was a 40-year-old man from Oman, who died on Monday (March 24) at an Abu Dhabi hospital, according to reports submitted by UAE authorities to the World Health Organisation (WHO). He had had underlying medical conditions, and was first admitted to a hospital in Muscat. On March 17, he was admitted to an Abu Dhabi facility. The patient has not recently travelled outside Oman and the UAE, and had no recorded contacts with animals or other Mers-CoV patients.

The second patient is a 49-year-old man from Abu Dhabi whose condition is currently critical. The patient had been admitted to hospital in late February, and was discharged after a few days because his condition had improved. On March 16, he was readmitted, and laboratory tests confirmed Mers-CoV infection.

Although the patient has not travelled recently, he is said to have been in contact with a 68-year-old farm owner from Abu Dhabi who was diagnosed with Mers earlier and is now stable.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

 Electron micrograph of MERS-CoV

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Biological Hazard Oman Governorate of Muscat, Muscat Damage level Details

 

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Biological Hazard in Oman on Thursday, 27 March, 2014 at 05:44 (05:44 AM) UTC.

Description
A 40-year-old man from Oman with underlying medical conditions. He was 1st admitted to a hospital in Muscat on [15 Feb 2014] and was then readmitted to hospital in Abu Dhabi on (17 Mar 2014). His condition deteriorated, and he died on (24 Mar 2014). Laboratory-confirmation was done on (21 Mar 2014). The patient had no history of recent travel outside of Oman and the UAE and had no reported contact with animals or a laboratory-confirmed case. Further epidemiological investigation in ongoing.
Biohazard name: MERS-COv
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

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Omani dies of MERS virus in Abu Dhabi hospital

Muscat –

A 40 year old Omani man with ‘underlying medical conditions’ died of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in Abu Dhabi on Monday.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said that the man was first admitted in a hospital in Muscat on February 15, and then readmitted to a hospital in Abu Dhabi on March 17. “His condition deteriorated and he died on March 24,” the WHO added in a statement.

 

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World Health Organization

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – update

Disease Outbreak News

On 23 March 2014, the National IHR Focal Point of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) notified WHO of an additional laboratory-confirmed case of infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

Details of the case provided to WHO are as follows:

  • A 40 year-old man from Oman with underlying medical conditions. He was first admitted to a hospital in Muscat on 15 February and was then readmitted to hospital in Abu Dhabi on 17 March. His condition deteriorated and he died on 24 March 2014. Laboratory-confirmation was done on 21 March. The patient had no history of recent travel outside of Oman and the UAE, and had no reported contact with animals or a laboratory-confirmed case. Further epidemiological investigation in ongoing.

Globally, from September 2012 to date, WHO has been informed of a total of 200 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with MERS-CoV, including 85 deaths.

WHO advice

Based on the current situation and available information, WHO encourages all Member States to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities. Health-care facilities that provide for patients suspected or confirmed to be infected with MERS-CoV infection should take appropriate measures to decrease the risk of transmission of the virus from an infected patient to other patients, health-care workers and visitors. Health care workers should be educated, trained and refreshed with skills on infection prevention and control.

It is not always possible to identify patients with MERS-CoV early because some have mild or unusual symptoms. For this reason, it is important that health-care workers apply standard precautions consistently with all patients – regardless of their diagnosis – in all work practices all the time.

Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to all patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection. Contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection. Airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures.

Patients should be managed as potentially infected when the clinical and epidemiological clues strongly suggest MERS-CoV, even if an initial test on a nasopharyngeal swab is negative. Repeat testing should be done when the initial testing is negative, preferably on specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

Health-care providers are advised to maintain vigilance. Recent travellers returning from the Middle East who develop SARI should be tested for MERS-CoV as advised in the current surveillance recommendations. All Member States are reminded to promptly assess and notify WHO of any new case of infection with MERS-CoV, along with information about potential exposures that may have resulted in infection and a description of the clinical course. Investigation into the source of exposure should promptly be initiated to identify the mode of exposure, so that further transmission of the virus can be prevented.

People at high risk of severe disease due to MERS-CoV should avoid close contact with animals when visiting farms or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. For the general public, when visiting a farm or a barn, general hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals, avoiding contact with sick animals, and following food hygiene practices, should be adhered to.

WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event nor does it currently recommend the application of any travel or trade restrictions.

 

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MERS-Coronavirus claims life of 40-year-old Omani citizen in UAE

 
Muscat: A 40-year-old Omani died in UAE due to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to World Health Organisation (WHO).

The WHO said that the citizen was first admitted to a hospital in Muscat on February 15 and was then readmitted to hospital in Abu Dhabi on March 17. “His condition deteriorated in Abu Dhabi hospital and he died on March 24,” the WHO said.

A laboratory-confirmation was done on March 21. The patient had no history of recent travel outside of Oman and the UAE, and had no reported contact with animals or a laboratory-confirmed case. “Further epidemiological investigation is going on,” the WHO said.

Globally, from September 2012, WHO has been informed of a total of 200 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with MERS-CoV, including 85 deaths.

In Oman, the MERS-CoV has claimed life of two people.

A 59-year-old patient who was under treatment died on December and the Sultanate’s first MERS coronavirus patient died on November 10, 2013.

The first MERS-CoV victim, who was admitted to the hospital in Nizwa was suffering from diabetes and high blood pressure while the second victim died of lung failure.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Flooding

floods in UAE

Flooded roads bring traffic to a standstill. Photo: twitter.com/khaleejtimes

Rain and Floods Cause Chaos in Gulf Region

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Flash Flood United Arab Emirates [Nationwide] Damage level Details

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Flash Flood in United Arab Emirates on Monday, 20 January, 2014 at 06:48 (06:48 AM) UTC.

Description
Unstable weather continues to grip the UAE on Monday as the National Centre of Meteorology and Seismology (NCMS) warns sailors of rough water in Arabian Gulf and Sea of Oman and motorists of reduced visibility caused by fresh winds blowing up dust. Persistent scattered rainfall could also lead to water ponds, challenging motorists. Meanwhile, the Northern Emirates witnessed heavy to moderate rainfall accompanied by a significant decrease in temperatures and is expected to receive more showers today. Rainwater gathered in low-lying areas and streets of Fujairah and the sky continues to be cloudy, promising more rain in the coming hours, reported Wam. Similarly, Ras Al Khaimah received intermittent heavy rains on Sunday, causing cold weather as the temperature dropped. Rains filled the valleys in mountainous areas and flooded at least three homes. Civil defence personnel were quick to arrive at the residences and suck the water out within a few hours, reported Emarat Al Youm. A rockslide occurred on Jees Mountain Street in Ghalila valley on the north of Ras Al Khaimah, according to a report in Al Khaleej. No injuries have been reported as yet. Schools in the emirate are closed, while police patrols have blocked streets that have flooded. The water currents was so strong that a lamppost fell across. But as the streets were deserted were no casualties. However, there was one rainfall-related traffic accident in which an Asian truck driver was injured when he lost control of the vehicle on the slippery road on Sunday morning. Meanwhile, temperatures are expected to dip further to a minimum of just 5 degree centigrade in the mountains and a minimum of 8 degree C in internal areas.

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WHO, Saudi Arabia update MERS case information


Creatas Images

Healthcare workers are among the latest MERS-CoV patients reported from Saudi Arabia.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently recognized the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) case reported recently in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), while the latest sketchy reports from Saudi Arabia describe five recent cases there, including three in healthcare workers.

In a Dec 22 statement, the WHO confirmed a MERS case in a 68-year-old UAE man, previously reported by the media. The man had a cough when he was hospitalized Dec 14 for joint replacement surgery, and he was moved to an intensive care unit (ICU) Dec 16 because of rapid deterioration, the agency said. His MERS-CoV infection was confirmed Dec 19.

The patient, who has underlying medical conditions, has no recent history of travel or of contact with animals or other MERS patients, the WHO reported. Investigation of his family and healthcare contacts was continuing.

The UAE case raised the WHO’s MERS-CoV count to 166 cases and 71 deaths.

A recent English-language statement from the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH) reported four MERS cases, including one death, and appeared to match up with an earlier machine-translated statement that surfaced Dec 20. An Agence France-Presse (AFP) story published today cites five Saudi cases, at least three of which appear to be those cited in the English-language MOH statement.

The latter statement, officially dated Dec 20, reports cases in:

  • A 73-year-old Saudi man who succumbed to the illness
  • A 53-year-old Saudi man who has chronic illnesses and was in an ICU
  • Two “female residents”—foreign nationals—who work in healthcare and had contact with a MERS patient; the statement gives no ages or other details

Today’s AFP story cited a statement on the Saudi MOH Web site as the source of its information on the five cases, all of which were reported in Riyadh. They involve:

  • A 73-year-old Saudi man who died of the illness
  • A 57-year-old Saudi who has chronic illnesses and is being treated in an ICU
  • A 27-year-old Saudi health worker
  • Two foreign health workers: a 43-year-old woman and a 35-year-old man

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Earth Watch Report   –  Biological Hazards

File:MERS-CoV electron micrograph1.jpg

MERS-CoV particles as seen by negative stain electron microscopy. Virions contain characteristic club-like projections emanating from the viral membrane.

http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/photos.html

Image Source  :  Wikimedia. Org

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Biological Hazard United Arab Emirates Emirate of Dubai, Dubai Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in United Arab Emirates on Friday, 20 December, 2013 at 18:19 (06:19 PM) UTC.

Description
Dubai Health Authority (DHA) has reported a new case of novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the UAE’s emirate. The 68-year-old patient, who suffers from diabetes and chronic kidney failure, was admitted to hospital after showing symptoms of the SARS-like virus. DHA affirmed that it was coordinating with the Ministry of Health and other health authorities in this regard and has taken necessary precautionary measures in line with international recommendations and standards set out by the World Health Organization (WHO) including epidemiological investigations for those in touch with the patient, the WMP said. The Ministry of Health said the first laboratory confirmed case of MERS-CoV was announced by WHO on 20th September 2012 and up to 17th December, 2013, WHO confirmed 165 cases globally.
Biohazard name: MERS-CoV (novel coronavirus)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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UAEInteract

DHA reports new case of MERS-CoV

posted on 21/12/2013

Dubai Health Authority (DHA) announced that it has diagnosed a new case of novel Corona virus (MERS-CoV) in the emirate.

DHA said the 68-year old Emirati patient was admitted to the hospital after showing symptoms of the SARS-like virus and is now receiving medical care at intensive care unit. He is also suffering from diabetes and chronic kidney failure.

DHA affirmed that it is coordinating with the Ministry of Health and other health authorities and has taken necessary precautionary measures in consistence with international recommendations and standards set out by the World Health Organisation (WHO) including epidemiological investigations for those in touch with the patient.

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Saudi Gazette

MERS claims 56th life in Kingdom

Last updated: Saturday, December 21, 2013 11:33 PM

RIYADH – The Health Ministry announced on Saturday a new MERS death, raising to 56 the number of people killed by the coronavirus in the country with the most fatalities.

The victim was a 73-year-old Saudi man, who suffered from chronic illnesses, the ministry said on its website.
It also reported three new cases of the virus.

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Abu Dhabi skyline

iStockphoto
The UAE case is in a 75-year-old Omani who is hospitalized in Abu Dhabi (pictured).

Medical authorities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia announced three new Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases today, one in the UAE and two in Saudi Arabia.

The case detected in the UAE is in a 75-year-old man from Oman who is hospitalized in Abu Dhabi, according to WAM, the UAE’s state news service. The man is visiting the UAE and became ill with respiratory symptoms in October. He is being treated in the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU), according to the report.

The WAM information came from the Abu Dhabi health authority, which said it is coordinating with the UAE’s health ministry and has taken steps recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO).

The man’s infection is the sixth MERS-CoV case detected in the UAE, and he is the second Omani known to be infected with the virus.

Saudi cases

Elsewhere, Saudi Arabia’s health ministry said in a statement in Arabic that one of the country’s newest cases involves a 72-year-old male resident of Riyadh who has several underlying chronic conditions. He is hospitalized in stable condition and is receiving treatment in the ICU.

The other Saudi case is in a previously healthy 43-year-old from Jeddah who is hospitalized in an ICU. The health ministry said the patient had not recently traveled outside of Jeddah.

The new cases announced today would lift the global total to 154 cases, including 64 deaths.

Surveillance efforts

In other developments today, Ziad A. Memish, MD, Saudi Arabia’ s deputy minister for public health, spoke about MERS-CoV at the European Scientific Conference on Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology (ESCAIDE) in Stockholm.

He told the group that active surveillance for the disease is under way, with a special focus on Hajj premises, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) said in live tweets from the meeting. He also noted that one of the key questions about MERS-CoV is why the virus behaves differently in different people, a factor that suggests transmission is more complex than previously thought.

 

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