Tag Archive: U.S. Geological Survey


USGS - science for a changing world

Released: 1/3/2014 1:00:00 PM

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communications and Publishing
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
Reston, VA 20192
Richard  Blakely, USGS 1-click interview
Phone: 650-269-6726Craig Weaver, USGS 1-click interview
Phone: 206-459-6457Gerry Bozarth, Spokane EM
Phone: 509-477-7613

A sequence of 105 small (less than magnitude 4) earthquakes occurred beneath Spokane in 2001, accompanied by a small increase (1/2 inch) in ground elevation.  The shape of the deforming ground surface was consistent with movement on a northeast-trending fault beneath Spokane, yet no known mapped faults in Spokane have been active in the last 1.6 million years.  To find the Spokane fault that caused 105 earthquakes in 2001, and evaluate its potential for large earthquakes in the future, scientists turned to geophysical tools to “see” below the surface.  Knowing a fault’s length, depth, and history of earthquakes helps us prepare for future earthquake hazards.“As the director of Spokane Emergency Management, we work diligently on preparing our community for disasters which includes identifying hazards in our area. The USGS has performed studies and their preliminary findings will help us develop effective mitigation strategies,” said Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich.
IllustrationIn an “aeromagnetic survey,” a magnetic sensor, towed by an airplane, is flown back and forth close to the ground and along closely spaced, parallel lines, recording the minute changes in the magnetic field. Geologic processes often bring together rocks with slightly different magnetic properties, and these variations cause very small magnetic fields above the Earth’s surface. The differences in the magnetic field are called “anomalies.” Credit: USGS“Geologic processes often bring together rocks with slightly different magnetic properties, and these variations cause very small differences in magnetic fields above the Earth’s surface,” explained the study’s lead author, USGS geophysicist Richard Blakely.  “In an aeromagnetic survey, a magnetic sensor is flown back and forth close to the ground and along closely spaced, parallel lines.  After data processing, we arrive at a map of ‘magnetic anomalies’ reflecting the variations in the magnetic signal of the rocks and geology of the upper part of the Earth’s crust.”

SPOKANE, Wash. —Preliminary interpretations of a recent geophysical survey confirm the presence of earthquake faults and reveal the possibility of previously unknown faults beneath the greater Spokane area.

During the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook an airborne magnetic survey over the Spokane area to help understand the geologic reasons for a series of earthquakes and ground uplift that occurred several years earlier.

Low-Flying airplane for mapping fault zonesThe Spokane aeromagnetic survey was flown with a Cessna 180, owned and operated by a private company under contract to the USGS, and specially modified for low-altitude geophysical surveys. The magnetic sensor is located in the “stinger” protruding from the rear of the aircraft. Credit:  Michael Hobbs , EDCON-PRJ, Inc.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

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Oklahoma  -  4 EQs  January 4th  2013 photo Oklahoma-4EQsJanuary4th2013_zps765e7631.jpg

4 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 3.7 – 17km NNW of Langston, Oklahoma

    2014-01-04 17:33:32 UTC-06:00 4.6 km

  2. M 3.2 – 15km NNW of Chandler, Oklahoma

    2014-01-04 15:26:17 UTC-06:00 5.0 km

  3. M 3.5 – 2km NNE of Cherokee, Oklahoma

     2014-01-04 14:35:32 UTC-06:00 12.6 km

  4. M 2.7 – 5km NW of Jones, Oklahoma

    2014-01-03 23:27:25 UTC-06:00 5.0 km

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Oklahoma Earthquake Activity Picks Up With 3.5 & 3.7 Quakes

DAHBOO77

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KBTX - HomePage - Headlines

Earthquake Rattles Oklahoma Sunday Morning

 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK The U.S. Geological Survey says a 4.1 magnitude earthquake rattled an area about 30 miles north-northeast of Oklahoma City early Sunday and was followed by a smaller quake hours later in the state. There were no reports of any injuries or damages from either temblor.

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  – Earthquake

English: Panorámica de la Ciudad de Concepción...

English: Panorámica de la Ciudad de Concepción, Chile. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

6.0 magnitude earthquake strikes Chile

Written by

WKYC Weather

CONCEPCION, Chile — An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.0 struck on Sunday evening in southern Chile.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake was located south of Concepcion and occurred about 10 miles below the surface. There were no immediate reports of damage or major injuries from the tremblor.

Ironically, the quake struck on the first anniversary of an 8.8  magnitude quake that left 521 people dead and several thousand homeless in 2010.

WKYC-TV

Date/Time (UTC) Magnitude Area Country State/Prov./Gov. Location Risk Source Details
13.11.2012 06:37:02 4.0 South-America Chile Coquimbo Ovalle VulkĂĄn 0 There are airport(s) nearby the epicenter. VulkĂĄn 0 EMSC Details
13.11.2012 06:37:24 6.0 South-America Chile Aisén del General Carlos Ibáńez del Campo Puerto Chacabuco VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 EMSC Details
13.11.2012 06:06:08 5.4 South America Chile Aisén del General Carlos Ibáñez del Campo Puerto Chacabuco VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 VulkĂĄn 0 USGS-RSOE Details

Earthquakes

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 22:33 PM
3.0 7.0 MAP

USGS Near The East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 07 22:15 PM
4.6 58.3 MAP

EMSC Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 07 22:15 PM
4.6 58.0 MAP

EMSC Romania
Apr 07 22:10 PM
2.6 111.0 MAP

EMSC Romania
Apr 07 21:36 PM
2.4 110.0 MAP

GEOFON Central Mid Atlantic Ridge
Apr 07 20:37 PM
5.2 10.0 MAP

USGS Central Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 07 20:37 PM
5.0 10.0 MAP

EMSC Central Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 07 20:37 PM
5.0 10.0 MAP

EMSC Banda Sea
Apr 07 20:09 PM
5.1 91.0 MAP

GEOFON Banda Sea
Apr 07 20:09 PM
5.1 86.0 MAP

USGS Banda Sea
Apr 07 20:09 PM
5.2 76.4 MAP

GEOFON Banda Sea
Apr 07 20:05 PM
4.8 106.0 MAP

EMSC Banda Sea
Apr 07 20:05 PM
4.8 106.0 MAP

USGS Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii
Apr 07 19:02 PM
2.5 6.8 MAP

EMSC Central Turkey
Apr 07 19:01 PM
2.7 5.0 MAP

USGS Salta, Argentina
Apr 07 18:18 PM
4.6 173.3 MAP

EMSC Salta, Argentina
Apr 07 18:18 PM
4.6 173.0 MAP

EMSC Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 07 18:01 PM
2.4 7.0 MAP

EMSC Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 07 17:55 PM
3.3 5.0 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 16:10 PM
3.2 15.0 MAP

GEOFON Off Coast Of Central Mexico
Apr 07 15:30 PM
4.6 12.0 MAP

USGS Off The Coast Of Nayarit, Mexico
Apr 07 15:30 PM
4.6 15.5 MAP

EMSC Off Coast Of Sinaloa, Mexico
Apr 07 15:30 PM
4.6 10.0 MAP

EMSC Western Turkey
Apr 07 15:26 PM
2.7 8.0 MAP

EMSC Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 07 15:24 PM
2.5 8.0 MAP

USGS Central Alaska
Apr 07 15:16 PM
3.3 109.3 MAP

EMSC Aegean Sea
Apr 07 15:13 PM
2.9 10.0 MAP

EMSC Sicily, Italy
Apr 07 15:06 PM
2.6 8.0 MAP

EMSC Crete, Greece
Apr 07 14:52 PM
2.8 8.0 MAP

USGS Southern California
Apr 07 14:39 PM
2.9 5.8 MAP

GEOFON Flores Sea
Apr 07 14:38 PM
4.3 267.0 MAP

EMSC Sicily, Italy
Apr 07 13:55 PM
2.6 20.0 MAP

EMSC Western Turkey
Apr 07 13:45 PM
2.7 31.0 MAP

USGS Southern Alaska
Apr 07 13:43 PM
2.6 133.8 MAP

EMSC Kuril Islands
Apr 07 13:30 PM
3.7 90.0 MAP

USGS Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
Apr 07 13:21 PM
2.5 34.0 MAP

EMSC Sicily, Italy
Apr 07 12:15 PM
2.5 35.0 MAP

EMSC Sicily, Italy
Apr 07 12:02 PM
2.6 27.0 MAP

EMSC New Britain Region, P.n.g.
Apr 07 11:58 AM
5.7 46.0 MAP

USGS New Britain Region, Papua New Guinea
Apr 07 11:58 AM
5.8 39.6 MAP

GEOFON New Britain Region, P.n.g.
Apr 07 11:58 AM
5.7 10.0 MAP

EMSC Sicily, Italy
Apr 07 11:52 AM
3.2 18.0 MAP

EMSC Northern Italy
Apr 07 11:30 AM
2.6 27.0 MAP

EMSC Western Turkey
Apr 07 11:29 AM
2.5 10.0 MAP

GEONET Canterbury
Apr 07 10:56 AM
2.6 15.0 MAP

EMSC Lake Baykal Region, Russia
Apr 07 10:20 AM
4.1 10.0 MAP

USGS Northern California
Apr 07 09:25 AM
2.6 0.2 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 09:22 AM
2.6 5.0 MAP

EMSC Western Turkey
Apr 07 09:22 AM
2.4 10.0 MAP

GEOFON Fiji Islands Region
Apr 07 08:44 AM
4.7 541.0 MAP

USGS Fiji Region
Apr 07 08:44 AM
4.8 544.3 MAP

EMSC Fiji Region
Apr 07 08:44 AM
4.8 537.0 MAP

EMSC Greece
Apr 07 08:39 AM
2.5 1.0 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 08:38 AM
2.4 9.0 MAP

USGS Kodiak Island Region, Alaska
Apr 07 08:32 AM
3.2 76.4 MAP

EMSC Central Turkey
Apr 07 08:20 AM
2.6 5.0 MAP

EMSC Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 07 06:45 AM
3.4 2.0 MAP

EMSC Central Turkey
Apr 07 06:12 AM
2.4 8.0 MAP

USGS Mona Passage, Dominican Republic
Apr 07 05:19 AM
3.2 116.8 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 04:49 AM
2.8 12.0 MAP

EMSC Central Italy
Apr 07 04:42 AM
2.6 11.0 MAP

USGS Panama
Apr 07 03:50 AM
4.0 36.4 MAP

EMSC Panama
Apr 07 03:50 AM
4.0 36.0 MAP

USGS Bering Strait
Apr 07 03:26 AM
4.2 15.7 MAP

GEONET Taranaki
Apr 07 02:23 AM
3.2 20.0 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 01:23 AM
2.6 5.0 MAP

EMSC Eastern Turkey
Apr 07 01:20 AM
2.5 7.0 MAP

USGS New Ireland Region, Papua New Guinea
Apr 07 00:57 AM
4.4 113.2 MAP

EMSC New Ireland Region, P.n.g.
Apr 07 00:57 AM
4.4 113.0 MAP

EMSC New Siberian Islands, Russia
Apr 07 00:12 AM
3.9 20.0 MAP

Earthquake Recap: Upward of 10 Quakes Hit Santa Clara County

Multiple earthquakes hit Los Altos, Gilroy and Morgan Hill from April 2 to 6.

By Corinne Speckert

Thirteen earthquakes, averaging a magnitude of 1.9 on the Richter scale, struck Santa Clara County this week.

The largest quake, with a magnitude of 2.9, occurred just nine miles north of Morgan Hill at 2:42 a.m. Thursday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey website.

Three tremors rocked the county on Friday alone, with a 1.8 magnitude quake striking three miles south of Los Altos and 20 minutes from Campbell at 5:11 p.m. A slightly smaller quake, registering at 1.5, hit three miles from Los Altos the day before at 11:59 a.m…..

Read Full Article Here

Rise in small Midwestern earthquakes probably due to oil and gas production, study suggests

By Associated Press,

NEW YORK — Oil and gas production may explain a sharp increase in small earthquakes in the nation’s midsection, a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey suggests.

The rate has jumped six-fold from the late 20th century through last year, the team reports, and the changes are “almost certainly man-made.”

The study said a relatively mild increase starting in 2001 comes from increased quake activity in a methane production area along the state line between Colorado and New Mexico. The increase began about the time that methane production began there, so there’s a “clear possibility” of a link, says lead author William Ellsworth of the USGS.

The increase over the nation’s midsection has gotten steeper since 2009, due to more quakes in a variety of oil and gas production areas, including some in Arkansas and Oklahoma, the researchers say.

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Climate Change

CNN meteorologist: Today’s tornadoes are ‘climate change we are seeing’

On the Tuesday broadcast of “CNN Newsroom,” CNN meteorologist Alexandra Steele declared that tornadoes plowing through the Dallas-Fort Worth area were brought on by climate change.

Steele, formerly of The Weather Channel, also predicted that more extreme weather is on its way.

“It really is [such a strange spring],” Steele said. “That’s kind of the climate change we are seeing. You know, extremes are kind of ruling the roost and really what we are seeing, more become the norm.”

“CNN Newsroom” host Carol Costello said it made her “afraid” about what is in store for next spring.

“It might be unnaturally cold,” said Costello. Steele agreed that future weather would be less predictable.

“This global warming is really kind of a misnomer,” Steele said. “It’s global climate change. So the colds are colder and warms are warmer and severe is more severe.

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Avalanche

Pakistani rescuers search for up to 135 people trapped in avalanche

From Aliza Kassim, CNN

(CNN) — Pakistani rescuers continued to tunnel around a Himalayan military outpost on the Siachen glacier, where up to 135 people were buried by a massive avalanche near the Indian border.

A blanket of rock and snow, covering one square kilometer, slid over the base near the northeastern city of Skardu early Saturday morning, according to a statement from the military.

“It’s a very massive scale slide,” said Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas. “They are under the slide but we haven’t lost hope. The rescue work is on, and we are keeping our fingers crossed.”

A total of 124 army soldiers and 11 civilians were housed at the outpost, having been employed in one of the world’s highest elevation battlegrounds where a series of past conflicts with India have occurred.

Read Full Article And View Video Here

Massive Avalanche Engulfs Pakistani Military Base At Least 120 Soldiers Buried Alive


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Solar Activity

2MIN News Apr7 World Planetary Solar Update

Strong Coronal Mass Ejection


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Articles of Interest

Mexican plan for Gulf deep water wells sparks new worries

Tim Johnson

MEXICO CITY — Two years after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history, Mexico’s state oil company is about to test its hand at drilling at extraordinary depths in the Gulf of Mexico.

If all goes as planned, Petroleos de Mexico, known as Pemex, will deploy two state-of-the-art drilling platforms in May to an area just south of the maritime boundary with the United States. One rig will sink a well in 9,514 feet of water, while another will drill in 8,316 feet of water, then deeper into the substrata.

Pemex has no experience drilling at such depths. Mexico’s oil regulator is sounding alarm bells, saying the huge state oil concern is unprepared for a serious deepwater accident or spill. Critics say the company has sharply cut corners on insurance, remiss over potential sky-high liability.

Mexico’s plans come two years after the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe, the worst oil spill in U.S. history. On April 20, 2010, a semi-submersible rig that the British oil firm BP had contracted to drill a well known as Macondo exploded off the Louisiana coast, killing 11 workers and spewing 4.9 million barrels of oil in the nearly three months it took engineers to stop the spill.

BP has said the tab for the spill — including government fines, cleanup costs and compensation — could climb to $42 billion for the company and its contractors.

Pemex’s plans to sink even deeper offshore wells underscore Mexico’s pressing need to maintain sagging oil production — exports pay for one-third of government operating expenses — along with oil companies’ desire to leverage technology and drill at ever more challenging depths.

Carlos A. Morales, the chief of the Pemex exploration and production arm, which employs 50,000 people, voiced confidence that his company has to the ability to sink wells in ultra-deep water.

“Pemex is ready to undertake the challenge and to do it safely,” Morales said in an interview in his 41st-floor office at Pemex headquarters in this capital city.

“You have to bear one thing in mind,” he said. “Pemex is the biggest operator in the Gulf — including everyone — both in production and in the number of rigs we operate. We are operating more than 80 rigs offshore.”

Read Full Article Here:

A cloud of fear: Greenpeace releases infrared image of giant ‘explosive’ gas spewing from Elgin rig

By Lucy Osborne

It looks like a bizarre piece of 1960s pop art – or perhaps a highly-coloured graphic from an old-style computer game.

But in reality, this neon-bright image of the North Sea is a chilling illustration of just how large the potentially explosive gas cloud spewing from the Elgin platform has become.

The infrared picture, which was taken using a special camera by environmental campaigners, lays bare the extent of the leak’s impact on the atmosphere.

The photograph was released by the Greenpeace activists who have been assessing the potential dangers of the situation since Monday.

The image shows the temperature of the surface of with light tones showing hot areas, and dark tones indicating coldThe image shows the temperature of the surface of with light tones showing hot areas, and dark tones indicating cold

What’s Under Antarctica?
Quake Waves Give First Look

Andrea Mustain, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer

Thanks to a technological explosion in the century since humans first set foot at the South Pole, Antarctic research is thriving.

Yet despite the incredible scientific advances, there are still gaping holes in some very basic knowledge about the frozen continent. Namely, what, exactly, is under all that ice.

It’s not simply a question for idle speculation. Figuring out what’s going on underneath the colossal Antarctic ice sheets is one important puzzle piece in better forecasting what is happening to the ice itself in a changing climate, some glaciologists say.

Scientists have used radar and other imaging technology to uncover some astounding finds under the East Antarctic Ice Sheet: A vast mountain range that rivals the Alps, and Lake Vostok, one of Earth’s largest lakes…..

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Unexplained Melting at the Askja Crater Lake in Iceland

 

If you ever frequent Jon Frímann’s blog, you know that he tends to find all the news about potential Icelandic rumblings before pretty much everyone. Well, he seems to have found something interesting going on up in Iceland – a few news reports (in Icelandic) have been talking about the crater lake on Askja caldera having mysteriously become ice-free over the last month while lakes around it (that aren’t on volcanoes) and at lower elevations are still ice-covered – not to mention that normally the lake isn’t ice-free until June or July. This has lead to a lot of speculation about what exactly is going on at Askja, but thanks to its remote location almost in the middle of Iceland, few people have been out there to see what is going on.

 

A little background on the volcano. Askja is a very complex volcano made up of three calderas. The volcano has mostly erupted basaltic material over its recent history, but it has also had a rhyolitic eruption over 10,000 years ago. Now, usually at a basaltic volcano, the calderas are formed by passive sinking of the land surface, much like we see in Hawai’i. However, at Askja, it appears that the calderas are formed more violently due to explosive eruptions out of the ring fractures bounding the calderas. The youngest caldera formed only 137 years ago (in 1875) and the ~4.5 km diameter feature is home to two crater lakes, Öskjuvatn and Víti. The former is the larger lake, over 200 meters deep, while the latter is a very small, warm crater lake (marked in the photo above near the word “ash?”).

The most recent activity at Askja was in 1961 that produced lava flows near Öskjuvatn – a pattern of eruption that was seen in numerous times since the VEI 5 eruption in 1875. That caldera-forming eruption in 1875 was large enough that ash and tephra fell as far away as Norway and Sweden. Much like the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, the explosivity of the eruption was likely aided by the meltwater that is readily available at Askja. If you go back to the rhyolite eruption in ~8910 B.C., that ash from that caldera-forming event is found over much of Europe…..

 

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