Tag Archive: Transportation Security Administration


Mom held in airport for hours after refusing to let TSA x-ray her breast-milk gets $75,000 in legal settlement

By Associated Press

A Southern California woman who was held at a Phoenix airport four years ago after refusing to have her breast milk X-rayed said Wednesday she has reached a tentative settlement with the Transportation Security Administration.

Stacey Armato, who filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Phoenix, said TSA officials have tentatively offered her $75,000, along with promises to retrain agents and clarify its guidelines on screening breast milk.

The reassurances about revised training and rules were more important than the monetary compensation, she said.

Refused: Stacey Armato of Hermosa Beach, California, was held at a Phoenix airport in 2010 after refusing to have her breast milk for son Lorenzo, pictured, x-rayed

Refused: Stacey Armato of Hermosa Beach, California, was held at a Phoenix airport in 2010 after refusing to have her breast milk for son Lorenzo, pictured, x-rayed

‘We had been waiting for them to really kind of confirm that they would be retraining everybody and making these policy updates,” Armato said. “When we finally got confirmation of that, that was really reassuring.’

TSA spokesman Ross Feinstein declined to comment on a “pending matter.” He confirmed that current TSA regulations classify breast milk as liquid medication. As a result, parents are permitted to bring an amount larger than the 3 ounces normally allotted for liquids.

According to the agency’s website, officers now use a bottled liquid scanner system in most airports to screen medically necessary liquids for explosives or other threats. The system uses lasers, infrared or electromagnetic resonance, rather than X-rays.

That was not an option at the time for Armato, who said she was accustomed to having a visual inspection for breast milk when traveling.

Armato, of Hermosa Beach, said she asked for an alternate screening of her breast milk at a security checkpoint at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport on Feb. 1, 2010. She cited concerns about exposing the milk to radiation.

According to a 2013 complaint from Armato, agents denied her request and then detained her in a glass enclosure for 40 minutes.

 

Read More Here

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TSA delays knives rule

TSA via AP

This handout image provided by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) shows a page from a TSA pamphlet of Changes to Prohibited Items List (PIL), of the sizes of knife blades not allowed on airplanes as per a new policy that was set to go into effect April 25.

The Transportation Security Administration has decided to delay a controversial new rule that would have allowed small knives to be carried on passenger aircraft, the agency said Monday,

Bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment that was set to be permitted under the new rule, will also stay banned, for now.

The TSA calls this a temporary delay, but has not decided a new implementation date.

The new rule for small blades — shorter than 2.36 inches in length and less than 1/2 inch in width — had been set to go into effect April 25th.

 

Read Full Article Here

Flight Attendants: TSA Policy To Allow Small Knives Onto Planes ‘Dangerous’

March 6, 2013 8:49 AM
File photo of a TSA checkpoint. (credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

File photo of a TSA checkpoint. (credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — Airline passengers will be able to carry small knives, souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes beginning next month under a policy change announced Tuesday by the head of the Transportation Security Administration.

The new policy conforms U.S. security standards to international standards, and allows TSA to concentrate its energies on more serious safety threats, the agency said in a statement.

The announcement, made by TSA Administrator John Pistole at an airline industry gathering in New York, drew an immediate outcry from unions representing flight attendants and other airline workers, who said the items are still dangerous in the hands of the wrong passengers.

Transport Workers Union Local 556, which represents over 10,000 flight attendants at Southwest Airlines, called the new policy “dangerous” and “shortsighted,” saying it was designed to make “the lives of TSA staff easier, but not make flights safer.”

“While we agree that a passenger wielding a small knife or swinging a golf club or hockey stick poses less of a threat to the pilot locked in the cockpit, these are real threats to passengers and flight attendants in the passenger cabin,” the union said in a statement.

The policy change was based on a recommendation from an internal TSA working group, which decided the items represented no real danger, said David Castelveter, a spokesman for the agency.

The presence on flights of gun-carrying pilots traveling as passengers, federal air marshals and airline crew members trained in self-defense provide additional layers of security to protect against misuse of the items, he said. However, not all flights have federal air marshals or armed pilots onboard.

The new policy permits folding knives with blades that are 2.36 inches or less in length and are less than 1/2-inch wide. The policy is aimed at allowing passengers to carry pen knives, corkscrews with small blades and other knives.

Passengers also will be allowed to bring onboard as part of their carry-on luggage novelty-sized baseball bats less than 24 inches long, toy plastic bats, billiard cues, ski poles, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and two golf clubs, the agency said. The policy goes into effect on April 25.

Security standards adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization, a U.N. agency, already call for passengers to be able to carry those items. Those standards are non-binding, but many countries follow them.

 

 

Read Full Article Here

 

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Some 9/11 families angry over loosened TSA rules on knives

Knives allowed on flights from April 25, 2013.

Knives allowed on flights from April 25, 2013. / Transportation Security Administration

NEW YORK Some family members of Sept. 11 attack victims are speaking out against new airport security rules that permit small knives on planes.

The Transportation Security Administration announced Tuesday that people will be allowed to carry folding knives with blades 2.36 inches or less onto planes.

The new rules, to go into effect next month, also permit souvenir baseball hats, golf clubs and other previously banned sports equipment.

Debra Burlingame’s brother Charles Burlingame, the pilot of Americans Airlines Flight 77, was killed when his plane was hijacked and crashed into the Pentagon. She told CBS News that the TSA’s plan is dangerous.

 

 

Read Full Article Here

 

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Fliers call knives-on-planes policy ‘common sense’

Fliers call knives-on-planes policy 'common sense'Credit: Getty Images

by RAQUEL MARIA DILLON / Associated Press

Posted on March 6, 2013 at 8:42 AM

Updated yesterday at 8:44 AM

 

LOS ANGELES  — Passengers reacted with shrugs but largely agreed with a new policy announced by the Transportation Security Administration that airline passengers will be able to carry small knives and previously forbidden sports equipment on planes.

“It’s common sense,” said Pat O’Brien, who stood at Los Angeles International Airport after arriving from Durango, Colo. “You can make anything into a knife so I don’t have a problem with it at all. You can sharpen a credit card to make a sharp implement.”

Aviation security consultant John L. Sullivan agreed with O’Brien, saying a pen or toothbrush can be sharpened like the “shivs” inmates sometimes make in prison.

“There are a lot of things you can use on an airplane if you are intent on hurting someone,” said Sullivan, co-founder of the Welsh-Sullivan Group in Dallas. “Security is never 100 percent.”

The changes announced by the TSA Tuesday take effect April 25. Box cutters, razor blades and knives that don’t fold or that have molded grip handles will still be prohibited.

The new policy also allows for souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment to be carried on instead of checked, a move that brought a thumbs up from Dean Rhymer, who plays club hockey for the Junior Los Angeles Kings and strode into the terminal at LAX carrying his hockey stick.

“I think it’ll be helpful,” Rhymer said. “It’s easier to carry it on to bring it places.”

Sullivan, speaking as a passenger not a consultant, worried more about the sporting goods than the small knives, saying the “last thing I need is someone getting on a plane taking up valuable space with their pool cues and hockey sticks.”

 

Read Full Article Here

Indoctrination is  a  very interesting thing.  How  do you  accustom a population to having their civil liberties  encroached  upon?

…..

Declare the  need  for  enhanced security and the need  to  remove  security  risks  that  would come from certain objects  or  personal  belongings.  Yell terrorist activity,  possible  endangerment  of a  flight  due to  liquids and gels (  in some  cases  even  breast milk and  that life threatening  full tube of  toothpaste).

Carry on until you take the  fight  out  of them.  Once  the populace  has become  accustomed to  being  molested  or  irradiated they are told  it is  safe  to  relax and  begin to allow   all the  items  they  told you  were a  danger to  your  safety.

…..

It  seems  they are  no longer  dangerous  after all,  hehehehe,   Our Bad…..    But ,  good   news,  you  don’t have  worry because   we  are here  to  stay.  That  way  we can ensure  your safety from  all those potential terrorist  weapons as  you  fly  while  coping a  feel,

   
Image source                                                        Image  source

Image source                                                Image source

messing  with  your  colostomy  bag,   rummaging  around in  your  adult  diapers,

or  scaring the  living  daylights  out of  your  children.

Image source                                                 Image source

    

Image source                                          Image source

because  we can .  Just  to  let  you  know  who’s really in charge.

Have a  nice  flight !!

~Desert Rose~

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By Jeff Plungis – Mar 5, 2013 1:05 PM CT

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration will let people carry small pocketknives onto passenger planes for the first time since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, along with golf clubs, hockey sticks and plastic Wiffle Ball-style bats.

The agency will permit knives with retractable blades shorter than 6 centimeters (2.36 inches) and narrower than 1/2 inch, TSA Administrator John Pistole said today at an aviation security conference in Brooklyn. The change, to conform with international rules, takes effect April 25.

Passengers will also be allowed to board flights with some other items that are currently prohibited, including sticks used to play lacrosse, billiards and hockey, ski poles and as many as two golf clubs, Pistole said.

The changes attracted criticism from labor unions representing flight attendants.

“This policy was designed to make the lives of TSA staff easier, but not make flights safer,” Stacy Martin, president of the Transportation Workers Union local that represents Southwest Airlines Co. flight attendants, said in a statement.

“While we agree that a passenger wielding a small knife or swinging a golf club or hockey stick poses less of a threat to the pilot locked in the cockpit, these are real threats to passengers and flight attendants in the passenger cabin,” Martin said.

‘Shortsighted Decision’

Pistole’s announcement reflects “a poor and shortsighted decision by the TSA,” the Flight Attendants Union Coalition, representing five labor groups, said in a statement. “We believe that these proposed changes will further endanger the lives of all flight attendants and the passengers we work so hard to keep safe and secure.”

Changes removing items like sporting goods from the prohibited list are based on recommendations from a TSA working group that’s trying to weed out commonly confiscated items that don’t present a security threat, agency spokesman David Castelveter said.

“These are popular items we see regularly,” Castelveter said. “They don’t present a risk to transportation security.”

Pistole, the former No. 2 official at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has stressed the use of intelligence and “risk- based” security during his tenure leading TSA. The agency is moving away from uniform procedures that apply to every passenger and toward efforts to perform background checks on passengers before they arrive at an airport.

Read Full Article Here

This  report  says  the  cabin  was  surrounded and  police  heard  a  sungle  gun shot  from coming  from inside the  cabin.  All ther other  reporst register gunshots until the   fire starts.  I  find  this  very   curious…….

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Dorner surrounded by police in cabin after gun battle

February 12, 2013 |  2:15 pm
LA Now

Map: Approximate location of incident shown in red. Accused killer Christopher Dorner was surrounded by police inside a Big Bear area cabin after getting into a gun battle Tuesday that left two San Bernardino County Sheriff’s deputies injured, officials said.

Days ago, Dorner broke into a cabin off Route 38, a source said. He allegedly tied up the couple inside and held them hostage until Tuesday morning when he left. It is unclear whether Dorner stole their vehicle or another, but Fish and Wildlife officers knew to be on the lookout for a white pickup truck when they spotted Dorner driving one and attempted to stop him, the source said.

Dorner crashed the truck during the ensuing chase and allegedly exchanged gunfire with the officers as he fled into another cabin, where he was quickly surrounded by San Bernardino sheriff’s deputies. The source said one deputy was hit as Dorner fired out of the cabin and a second was injured when Dorner exited the back of the cabin, deployed a smoke bomb and opened fire again in an apparent attempt to flee. Dorner was driven back inside the cabin, the source said.

PHOTOS: Manhunt for ex-LAPD officer

The extent of the deputies’ injuries was unknown. There was initial confusion as to where a helicopter should land to evacuate the injured officers,  so deputies used their own smoke bombs to give them enough cover to carry the wounded to a pickup truck that carried them to the waiting helicopter.

Officers have crisscrossed California for days pursuing the more than 1,000 tips that poured in about Dorner’s possible whereabouts — including efforts in Tijuana, Mexico, San Diego County and Big Bear — and serving warrants at homes in Las Vegas and Point Loma.

Statewide alerts were issued in California and Nevada, and border authorities were alerted. The Transportation Security Administration also had issued an alert urging pilots and other aircraft operators to keep an eye out for Dorner.

TIMELINE: Manhunt for ex-LAPD officer

The search turned to Big Bear last week after Dorner’s burning truck was found on a local forest road.

At the search’s height, more than 200 officers scoured the mountain, conducting cabin-by-cabin checks. It was scaled back Sunday — about 30 officers were out in the field Tuesday, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department said.

Dorner allegedly threatened “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against police in a lengthy manifesto that authorities say he posted on Facebook. The posting named dozens of potential targets, including police officers, whom Dorner allegedly threatened to attack, according to authorities.

FULL COVERAGE: Sweeping manhunt for ex-cop

Records state that the manifesto was discovered by authorities Wednesday, three days after the slaying of an Irvine couple: Monica Quan, a Cal State Fullerton assistant basketball coach, and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, a USC public safety officer.

Quan was the daughter of a retired LAPD captain whom Dorner allegedly blamed in part for his firing from the force in 2009.

Federal documents also provide new details on Dorner’s alleged attack against officers early Thursday in Riverside County.

The first shooting was in Corona after an eyewitness reported a person matching Dorner’s description at a gas station, telling an LAPD officer “who was detailed to the area to protect one of the officials whom Dorner had threatened,” according to the court records.

“When the officer drove by the gas station, the suspect exited his vehicle and fired an assault rifle at the officer, hitting the officer’s vehicle,” according to the court records.

The LAPD later said the officer received a grazing wound.

About 30 minutes later, Dorner opened fire on Riverside police officers “who were in the area searching for Dorner,” the documents said. On that detail, the account conflicts with a statement provided to the media by Riverside police officials, who said the officers were stopped at a red light and were not looking for Dorner.

Riverside Officer Michael Crain, 34, a married father of two who served two tours in Kuwait as a rifleman in the Marines, was killed in the attack. His partner remains hospitalized, Police Chief Sergio Diaz said, and it was unclear if he would be able to return to active duty.

Dorner was charged Monday with one count of murder, with special-circumstance allegations in the killing of a peace officer and the discharge of a firearm from a vehicle, in connection with Crain’s death. He faces three additional charges of attempted murder.

Riverside Dist. Atty. Paul Zellerbach said because of the special-circumstance allegations, Dorner could be eligible for the death penalty if convicted.

ALSO:

Dorner shootout: ‘Hundreds of rounds’ fired during gun battle

Dorner gun battle: 2 officers shot, ‘deputies are everywhere’

Dorner manhunt: Investigators pursue 1,000 tips about ex-cop

–Andrew Blankstein, Richard Winton, Kate Mather, Matt Stevens, Joel Rubin and Julie Cart

Map: Approximate location of incident shown in red. Credit: Google Maps

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The Reporter  states  that  he is  25 feet  away.  Since  when are  Press  and  civilians  allowed that  close  to   a  potential  shoot out?

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LAPD: No search of cabin so far, body not recovered

(CBS 8) – Despite several reports that fugitive murder suspect Christopher Dorner’s body was located inside a burned cabin near Big Bear, an LAPD spokesman made it clear officials had not recovered a body as of Tuesday evening.

In an 8 p.m. press conference, Cmdr. Andy Smith said the cabin had not been searched, and that it was still too hot for crews to enter and begin their investigation.

“Any reports of a body being found are not true,” Smith said. “Any reports of that body being identified as Christopher Dorner are not true.”

THIS IS A STORY UPDATE. For an earlier story, read below.

BIG BEAR, Calif. (AP) — The extraordinary manhunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of three murders converged Tuesday on a mountain cabin where he was believed to have barricaded himself inside, engaged in a shootout that killed a deputy and then never emerged as the home went up in flames.

A single gunshot was heard from within, and a charred body was found inside.

If the man inside proves to be Christopher Dorner, the search for the most wanted man in America over the last week would have ended the way he had expected — death, with the police pursuing him.

Thousands of officers had been on the hunt for the former Navy reservist since police said he launched a campaign to exact revenge against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing. They say he threatened to bring “warfare” to officers and their families, spreading fear and setting off a search for him across the Southwest and Mexico.

“Enough is enough. It’s time for you to turn yourself in. It’s time to stop the bloodshed,” LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith said at a news conference held outside police headquarters in Los Angeles, a starkly different atmosphere than last week when officials briefed the news media under tight security with Dorner on the loose.

A short time after Smith spoke Tuesday, smoke began to rise from the cabin in the snow-covered woods near Big Bear Lake, a resort town about 80 miles east of Los Angeles. Flames then engulfed the building — images that were broadcast on live television around the world. TV helicopters showed the fire burning freely with no apparent effort to extinguish it.

“We have reason to believe that it is him,” said San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman, adding that she didn’t know how the fire started.** She noted there was gunfire between the person in the cabin and officers around the home before the blaze began.

Read Full Article Here

** San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman, adding that she didn’t know how the fire started.**

Yet in the  videos below  you  can  clearly  hear the   police  officers  discussing  getting the  burner  ready and  that the  burner  had  indeed been  started.  So  if  they  don’t  know   how  the  fire  started   what   was  te  burner they were  referring to ?

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Christopher Dorner GunFight (Caught on Tape) TV Reporter Gets Caught in the Middle

Published on Feb 12, 2013

A local CBS reporter was caught in a huge police firefight with suspected killer Christopher Dorner on Tuesday.

Dorner, who is alleged to have killed at least three people, is in Big Bear, California, on the run from authorities.

Carter Evans, who works for KCBS and KCAL, was with police, and the station stayed with him on the phone as he reported the situation. Gunfire could be heard throughout.

“It certainly sounds like a lot of gunfire,” the station’s anchor said to Evans.

“We don’t want to get caught in the crossfire,” Evans said. Just then a loud, sustained volley of gunfire was heard. Someone shouted, “Get the f–k out of here!” More gunfire followed. When the anchor asked Evans if he was still there, there was no response.

CBS confirmed that he was OK, and Evans was back on air shortly later.

Correction: this post initially said Evans works for KTLA.

Cops torch cabin where Christopher Dorner was held up

SDSaxMan

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** San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman, adding that she didn’t know how the fire started.**

Yet in the  videos below  you  can  clearly  hear the   police  officers  discussing  getting the  burner  ready and  that the  burner  had  indeed been  started.  So  if  they  don’t  know   how  the  fire  started   what   was  te  burner they were  referring to ?

** Ok  we’re  going to go  forward  with the  plan  with the  burner  @ 1:04 on this  video and  further  on  dispatcher confirms going  ahead  with the  burner  and  a  fire  has  started…….hmmmmmmm

Published on Feb 12, 2013

Scanner recording of Cop Killer Christopher Dorner Held up in cabin.Listen to the actual conversation between the police as they plan and burn the cabin down.

Christopher Dorner’s Body NOT Found, Despite Reports

ssman?feature=watch” data-sessionlink=”feature=watch&ei=fTwbUfCOO8arsQK37oCIDw”>Les Grossman

Published on Feb 12, 2013

DORNER BODY DEAD cabin | LAPD told reporters that no body has been identified in the cabin in which Christopher Dorner was believed to have been hiding, following a shootout and fire.

“No body has been located yet,” Commander Andrew Smith said, telling reporters that the building was still too hot for investigators to enter.

“That burned cabin has not even been entered by investigators yet,” Smith said. “We are still on a holding pattern to search that.”

Earlier reports had indicated that a body had been identified.

The standoff with Dorner, a former member of the LAPD, reached a violent close near a rustic cabin in the Big Bear ski area east of Los Angeles. Since Feb. 3, he’s accused of a crime spree that left four people dead, including two officers, and several others wounded in shootings in L.A. and nearby San Bernadino County.

Chris Dorner Cornered: CNN Cuts Live Feed: Alex Predicts They Will Torch Him

TheAlexJonesChannel

Published on Feb 12, 2013

Once again CNN cuts the live feed so we cannot see the news.
http://www.infowars.com/cnn-cuts-live…

Crossroads News : Changes In The World Around Us And Our Place In It  –  Invasion  of Privacy-  Security-  Surveillance

Next generation of airport scanners will scan every single molecule in your body

airport

by: J. D. Heyes

(NaturalNews) New airport scanners used by the Transportation Security Administration are already too revealing, and potentially very dangerous to your health. But they’re going to seem tame by comparison once the next generation of scanners arrives – and they are on their way.The U.S. government is developing what are called Picosecond Programmable Laser scanners, through the Department of Homeland Security – machines that will be capable of scanning every single molecule in your body.

What’s worse, especially in terms of privacy, travelers likely won’t even know they’re being watched, since the machine can be operated from distances in excess of 150 feet, according to reports.

Technology, once again, can be a double-edged sword.

Scan anyone, anywhere, anytime

The scanner, which Homeland Security officials believe could be ready to use within a few years, will be employed in airports, but it is going to be small and light enough to be very portable, meaning it could also be installed in any building or deployed along any street. It is reportedly 10 million times faster and a million times more sensitive that scanners currently used by the TSA and U.S. Border Patrol and customs agents at border crossings and ports of entry.

According to a report by Gizmodo.com, the government subcontracted with the CIA’s venture capital/technology acquisition branch, In-Q-Tel, to work on development of the device with Genia Photonics, a company that has acquired 30 patents relating to the molecular-level scanners.

According to the Genia, the scanner is able to “penetrate clothing and many other organic materials and officers spectroscopic information, especially for materials that impact safety such as explosives and pharmacological substances.”

The technology isn’t new, per se, it’s just millions of times faster than ever. Back in 2008, a team at George Washington University built a similar laser spectrometer but just used a different process. That machine was able to sense drug metabolites in urine in under a second, trace the amount of gunpowder residue on a dollar bill and even certain chemical changers that were taking place in a plant leaf.

Russia has developed similar technology; scientists there announced in April that their “laser sensor can pick up a single molecule in a million from up to 50 meters away.”

In-Q-Tel notes that “an important benefit of Genia Photonics’ implementation as compared to existing solutions is that the entire synchronized laser system is comprised in a single, robust and alignment-free unit that may be easily transported for use in many environments… This compact and robust laser has the ability to rapidly sweep wavelengths in any pattern and sequence.”

Honestly, privacy will be a thing of the past

This device can literally – and likely will – be used everywhere by the Leviathan and its many domestic “law enforcement” agencies, so they can invade your privacy at will.

As is usually the case in recent years regarding the development and use of sophisticated surveillance technology, there has been little governmental or legal debate on the mind-blowing implications to personal privacy; what are the limits to such technology? What privacy rights can Americans continue to expect – and receive – while in public? What’s to stop law enforcement from utilizing this kind of technology improperly?

As Gizmodo points out, what sort of molecular tags will authorities be searching for and who gets to decide?

“If you unknowingly stepped on the butt of someone’s joint and are carrying a sugar-sized grain of cannabis like [an] unfortunate traveler currently in jail in Dubai, will you be arrested?” the website asked. “And, since it’s extremely portable, will this technology extend beyond the airport or border crossings and into police cars, with officers looking for people on the street with increased levels of adrenaline in their system to detain in order to prevent potential violent outbursts? And will your car be scanned at stoplights for any trace amounts of suspicious substances? Would all this information be recorded anywhere?”

All good questions. All without answers.

Sources:

http://gizmodo.com

http://www.newstrackindia.com

http://www.infowars.com

http://washington.cbslocal.com

American Airlines employee suspended after DHS put him on no-flight list with no apparent reason

RT
American Airlines aircraft

© The Associated Press/Tony Gutierrez

After ending up on the US government’s no-fly list under suspicion of terrorism, an American Airlines employee had to stop going to work after being with the airline for 13 years. The no-fly list sent the now-unemployed man spiraling into debt.

Luis Montano ended up on the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) no-fly list in August and has struggled financially ever since. The American Airlines employee was told to “go home” after the government prohibited him from boarding a plane. As an airline employee labeled as a potential terrorist, the man could not fulfill the duties that his job demanded.

“[I was] in shock,” Montano said. “Just like, I couldn’t understand how you can just be put on a list for no reason, haven’t been contacted by the government.”

Montano had spent 13 years working for American Airlines as a gate agent, in cargo operations, and at the company’s Florida headquarters. Now, he is struggling to pay his bills and his employers told him he could lose his job permanently.

“Two months without work because of being on the no-fly list,” he told NBC Miami. “I basically have been doing a lot of research concerning the TSA’s no-fly list. I have been trying to basically reach out for help.”

Help came in the form of the news media. After NBC’s Team 6 Investigators contacted TSA, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FBI, he was removed from the no-fly list and told in a letter that he was no longer considered a potential terrorist.

Montano is waiting to be cleared by American Airlines’ security before being granted permission to return to work, but the man still remains baffled about the ordeal.

“In July I traveled and in August, I’m told on the no-fly list,” he said.

The list, which was created during the George W. Bush administration and is maintained by the Department of Homeland Security’s Terrorist Screening Center, contains thousands of names that US officials view as a potential threat. Almost 90,000 names have been on the list at one point. It was established after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and more than doubled the number of names after Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab tried to bring a bomb hidden in his underwear onto a US flight.

The American Civil Liberties Union considers this list, which often adds names of individuals who are lawful US residents or citizens, unconstitutional. The no-fly list has sometimes left travelers stranded in foreign countries, unable to return to their homes in the US.

“The Constitution does not permit such a fundamental deprivation of rights to be carried out under a veil of secrecy and in the absence of even rudimentary due process,” the ACLU writes on its website. “The government has provided no process for individuals denied boarding on commercial flights to or from the United States or over U.S. airspace to find out the reasons for their inclusion on the no-fly list or to rebut the evidence or innuendo against them.”

The no-fly list has often been criticized for instigating racial profiling.

Via Stan Deyo.com pod cast

https://i2.wp.com/standeyo.com/Podcast/Show_Images/Stats.jpg

Tuesday November 13th, 2012 3:31am

Crossroads News : Changes In The World Around Us And Our Place In It

 

 

 

Government Overreach  :  Fundamental Rights – Whistle Blowers

 

 

Published on Sep 1, 2012 by

I uploaded this video as an example of the type of abuses that go on every day at the TSA. The TSA detains people or removes them from flights every day for non-security, punitive reasons. Passengers have missed their flights because they didn’t want their breast milk screened in the x-ray detector, because they were carrying a cupcake, because they were wearing a shirt with a satirical logo, because they had a purse with a gun emblem on it, the list goes on. When this happens, passengers have no recourse. Complaints to the TSA result in the TSA denying there was any wrong doing, and the offending officer goes unpunished. Passengers should have rights, and TSA agents should know that there are consequences for intimidation and bullying.

Here is my story:
I was at the Houston airport in August for a layover. At the gate they were “testing” everyone’s liquids. Normally I hide my water bottle in my bag when I see this, but we were running late and I didn’t have time. I drank my water instead of letting them test it, and was kicked off my flight.
I was able to get on the very next flight out of houston-and even managed an upgrade! (thanks United)
Sorry for crappy phone video-but the audio is what I wanted to post.

If you are interested in TSA reform, here are some websites:
http://www.righttofly.org
http://tsanewsblog.com/

By Keith Laing

A majority of Americans hold a positive view of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), according to a new Gallup poll released Wednesday.

The survey showed 54 percent of 1,014 adults who were polled saying TSA was doing either an “excellent” or a “good” job handling airport security. Thirty percent of the poll’s respondents said the agency was doing an “only fair” job, and 12 percent said TSA’s performance was “poor.”

The findings come after lawmakers questioned the performance of TSA employees in the days before Congress left Washington for its traditional August recess.
“The majority of Americans do not support the government’s current approach, and when they hear that the people at TSA that are supposed to enforce and ensure their security are engaged in gross misconduct, it only makes matters worse,” House Transportation Security subcommittee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) said during a hearing last week.

“Stealing from checked luggage; accepting bribes from drug smugglers; sleeping or drinking while on duty. This kind of criminal behavior and negligence has contributed significantly to TSA’s shattered public image,” Rogers continued.

The Gallup poll found just 41 percent of Americans think TSA is either effective or extremely effective in preventing terrorists from hijacking American airplanes, however.

Forty-four percent said the agency was only “somewhat effective” at preventing terrorism, while 13 percent said TSA was either “not too effective” or “not effective at all.”

The poll found that about 50 percent of Americans reported having flown on an airplane in the past year. Respondents who had flown more than three times gave a 56 percent “excellent” or “good” rating, while 52 percent of people who had not flown at all rated the agency favorably.

Gallup said the findings showed “[T]he American public gives the TSA a generally good report card, with a slight majority rating its overall job performance in positive terms.

“The fact that Americans who fly have a slightly more positive opinion of the agency than those who haven’t flown recently suggests that experience with the TSA at airports does not detract from this image and may enhance it,” the polling agency said. “Opinions about the effectiveness of the TSA are mixed, although most Americans and U.S. air travelers say the procedures are at least somewhat effective at preventing terrorism.”

The full TSA opinion poll can be read here.