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Tag Archive: Tehran


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PressTV News Videos PRESS TV

Mon Dec 7, 2015 7:18PM
A digital rendering of the H1N1 virus
A digital rendering of the H1N1 virus

At least 33 people have lost their lives following an outbreak of swine flu mainly in two southeastern Iranian provinces in the past three weeks, Iran’s deputy health minister says.

Ali Akbar Sayyari said on Monday that the flu left 28 people dead in Kerman Province and five, including four pregnant women, in Sistan and Baluchestan.

He added that there are more cases of infection across the country.

 

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Swine flu outbreak nears Tehran as Iran death toll tops 40

AFP
The World Health Organisation declared the swine flu pandemic over in August 2010

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The World Health Organisation declared the swine flu pandemic over in August 2010 (AFP Photo/Sam Panthaky)

Tehran (AFP) – An outbreak of swine flu in Iran has claimed 42 lives since mid-November, including in a province neighbouring Tehran, Health Minister Hassan Hashemi said Thursday.

Hashemi, quoted by ISNA news agency, said 33 deaths from the H1N1 virus were recorded in Kerman and five in Sistan-Baluchistan, both provinces in southeastern Iran.

The other four deaths were in three northern provinces, including one in Karaj, near the capital, he said in an update recording nine new fatalities since Monday.

Hashemi has said the number of deaths from flu was similar to previous years, but that it was becoming harder to treat.

“This flu comes from beyond our borders, especially from Sistan-Baluchistan” near Pakistan, the minister said Monday. “But every year it becomes wilder and more resistant” to treatment.

 

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The Guardian Nigeria

Iran swine flu outbreak kills 33 in three weeks: state media

  • By AFP on December 7, 2015 5:32 pm

pigAn outbreak of swine flu has left 33 people dead in two provinces of southwestern Iran in the last three weeks, the official IRNA news agency reported on Monday.

IRNA quoted Deputy Health Minister Ali Akbar Sayyari as saying there had been 28 deaths in Kerman province and five in Sistan-Baluchistan and warning the H1N1 virus was likely to spread to other areas including the capital Tehran.

“The health ministry predicts that the virus will spread in the coming days to Tehran, West and East Azerbaijan and Kermanshah provinces more than to other places,” he said.

 

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An outbreak of swine flu has left 33 people dead in two provinces of southwestern Iran in the last three weeks, the official IRNA news agency reported on Monday. IRNA quoted Deputy Health Minister Ali Akbar Sayyari as saying there had been 28 deaths in Kerman province and five in Sistan-Baluchistan and warning the H1N1 virus was likely to spread to other areas including the capital Tehran. “The health ministry predicts that the virus will spread in the coming days to Tehran, West and East Azerbaijan and Kermanshah provinces more than to other places,” he said. Nearly 600 people have been hospitalised in Kerman province over the outbreak, the head of the province’s medical university, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, told the ISNA news agency. “Traces of the H1N1 virus were uncovered three weeks ago and we were the first province to report the epidemic,” Haghdoost said. He called for limited travel during a three-day holiday weekend due to start on Thursday in order to prevent the spread of the virus. A major H1N1 outbreak in 2009 sparked a World Health Organization pandemic alert in June 2009, after the virus emerged from Mexico and the United States. The alert was lifted in August 2010 and the outbreak left some 18,500 people dead in 214 countries.

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Iran Asks UN to Address US Refusal to Issue Envoy Visa

FILE - Hamid Aboutalebi, an Iranian diplomat, who was recently named as Iran's ambassador at the United Nations, speaks at his office in Tehran, Iran.

FILE – Hamid Aboutalebi, an Iranian diplomat, who was recently named as Iran’s ambassador at the United Nations, speaks at his office in Tehran, Iran.

VOA News

Iran is asking a United Nations committee to hold a special meeting on the refusal of the United States to issue a visa to Iran’s choice for its ambassador to the U.N.

American officials object to Iran’s selection of Hamid Abutalebi because of his alleged involvement in the 1979 seizure of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. White House spokesman Jay Carney said last week the choice is “not viable.”

In a letter Monday, Iran’s mission to the U.N. said that decision has “negative implications” diplomatically and creates a dangerous precedent. It says denying a visa to a U.N. member state goes against the U.N. charter and international law.

Iran wants the U.N. Committee on Relations with the Host Country to urgently address the issue.

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Trend .az

U.S. adopts harsher tone in U.N. envoy dispute with Iran

Photo: U.S. adopts harsher tone in U.N. envoy dispute with Iran / Iran

The United States adopted a harsher tone toward Iran’s proposed U.N. ambassador on Tuesday, calling Tehran’s choice of Hamid Abutalebi “unacceptable” and tying him to the 1979-1981 U.S. hostage crisis in Tehran, Reuters reported.

While it did not detail what the veteran diplomat may have done during the period, when radical Iranian students seized the U.S. embassy and held 52 U.S. hostages for 444 days, the State Department for the first time linked the U.S. decision not to issue him a visa to those events.

“He himself has said he was involved and, given his role in the events of 1979, which clearly matter profoundly to the American people, it would be unacceptable for the United States to grant this visa,” State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters at her daily briefing.

Abutalebi has said that he acted only as a translator.

Previously U.S. spokespeople used softer language, saying the choice was not “viable.”

 

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NUKEWARS


by Staff Writers
Muscat (AFP) March 13, 2014

 

Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif of Shiite Iran on Thursday sought to allay concerns among mainly Sunni Muslim Gulf Arab monarchies mistrustful of Tehran over its nuclear ambitions.

“Our message to the other countries of the Persian Gulf is a message of friendship, fraternity and cooperation,” Zarif said in the Omani capital Muscat, where he is accompanying President Hassan Rouhani on a landmark visit.

The sultanate maintains strong links with Tehran, and has played an important intermediary role between Western countries and the Islamic republic.

Gulf Arab countries have expressed concern about the reliability of Iran’s sole nuclear power plant at Bushehr and the risk of radioactive leaks in case of a major earthquake, as well as a possible military dimension to Iran’s nuclear drive.

Iran insists that its atomic ambitions are peaceful, despite fears in Israel and the West that these mask a covert drive to acquire the bomb.

“Iran is ready for strong and fraternal relations with all the states of the region,” said Zarif, who has embarked on a charm offensive towards the Gulf since Rouhani became Iran’s president in August.

 

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NUKEWARS

Iran’s Rouhani extends hand to Gulf monarchies


by Staff Writers
Muscat (AFP) March 13, 2014

 

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani sought Thursday to mend fences between his mainly-Shiite country and Sunni-dominated Gulf monarchies distrustful of Iran’s nuclear ambitions and its support of the Syrian regime.

Rouhani, winding up a two-day visit to Oman, said the Islamic republic offered “a hand of fraternity to all the countries of the region.”

“Relations with one country should not grow at the expense of another. We want to see the countries of the region live in peace, understanding and friendship,” Rouhani told a business gathering in Muscat.

The sultanate maintains strong links with Iran and has played an important role as mediator between Western countries and Tehran.

But other members of the Gulf Cooperation Council, which besides Oman also comprises Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, have cool relations with Tehran.

Its Arab neighbours have expressed concern about the reliability of Iran’s sole nuclear power plant at Bushehr in the southern Gulf and the risk of radioactive leaks should it be hit by a major earthquake.

Like world powers, they also fear a possible military dimension to Iran’s nuclear drive, despite repeated assertions by Tehran that its atomic ambitions are peaceful.

Ties between Gulf countries and Iran have also been strained by Tehran’s backing of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime in its battle against rebels supported by the Arab monarchies.

“Cooperation and rapprochement would benefit the whole region,” said Rouhani, adding that his country is “open to investors from the region, especially Omanis.”

Oman and Iran are seeking to expand trade, which reached $1 billion last year, and bilateral investments which they expect will top $10 billion by the end of this year, Iranian Ambassador Ali Akbar Sibeveih said Monday.

 

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NUKEWARS


by Staff Writers
Tehran (AFP) Feb 09, 2014


UN nuclear experts tackle Iran on arms allegations
Tehran (AFP) Feb 08, 2014 – Iran said talks Saturday with the UN atomic watchdog over allegations of Tehran’s past weapons work and additional safeguards were constructive and have been extended for another day.
The five-hour-long meeting came as the Islamic republic’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, demanded tolerance from critics of President Hassan Rouhani ahead of fresh talks with world powers.Negotiations between Iran and the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are building on a framework deal agreed in November that requires Tehran to take six practical steps by Tuesday.Chief inspector Tero Varjoranta and four experts are assessing the implementation of those measures, Iranian Atomic Energy Organisation spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said.

The official IRNA news agency quoted Kamalvandi as saying that the talks were “good, constructive and are progressing”.

He said both side had agreed to continue the talks on Sunday, which are expected to include long-standing allegations of “possible military dimensions” to Iran’s past nuclear activities.

IAEA director general Yukiya Amano told AFP last month that time was now ripe to ask the “more difficult” questions.

How long this takes “very much depends on Iran. It can be quick or it can be long. It really depends on their cooperation,” Amano said.

Another issue to be discussed is access to the Parchin military facility, suspected of having been used for research pertaining to weapons development prior to 2003, and possibly since, according to the IAEA.

The November deal, struck after two years of on-off talks, was separate from a landmark agreement reached with world powers the same month that has placed temporary curbs on Iran’s nuclear activities.

Implementation of the IAEA deal began in December, when inspectors visited Arak, where the small unfinished heavy water reactor has been hit by delays.

The site is of international concern because Iran could theoretically extract weapons-grade plutonium from spent fuel if it also builds a reprocessing facility.

Iran says it will continue work there but its atomic chief Ali Akbar Salehi said this week the reactor could be modified to produce less plutonium to “allay the worries.”

The second step was to visit the Gachin uranium mine, which took place in late January.

Also required were information on future research reactors, identifying sites of new nuclear power plants, and clarification on Iranian statements regarding additional enrichment facilities and laser enrichment technology.

All six measures have been implemented.

Iran agreed Sunday to clarify to the UN atomic agency its need for detonators used in nuclear devices, as part of a probe into allegations of its past weapons work.

The move is part of seven new steps agreed between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency to increase transparency over Tehran’s controversial nuclear drive.

And it appears to be the first time in years Iran has agreed to tackle IAEA suspicions that its nuclear work prior to 2003 had “possible military dimensions”.

The development comes with Iran set to resume nuclear talks with world powers later this month, after an initial accord in November imposed curbs on its uranium enrichment to allay concerns that it seeks to acquire atomic weapons.

Capping two-days of talks in Tehran with Iranian officials, the IAEA said Iran agreed to provide “information and explanations for the agency to assess Iran’s stated need or application for the development of Exploding Bridge Wire (EBW) detonators”.

According to the IAEA, Iran told the agency in 2008 that it had developed EBWs for “civilian and conventional military applications” but has yet to explain its “need or application for such detonators”.

Such fast, high-precision detonators could be used in some civilian applications but are mostly known for triggering a nuclear chain reaction. The IAEA believes they form “an integral part of a programme to develop an implosion type nuclear device.”

Mark Hibbs, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said the detonators are “fine wires… designed to perform with exceeding precision and reliability. Without that dependability, the detonations would fail.”

Citing an unnamed Iranian nuclear official, the ISNA news agency said Tehran would “provide information beyond what it had already provided to the agency” on the EBWs.

It did not elaborate.

Earlier, Iran’s envoy to the Vienna-based IAEA, Reza Najafi, said “seven more practical steps” had been agreed between the two sides in a deal that would be implemented by May 15.

Six other steps were agreed under a framework deal struck on November 11.

In the latest agreement, the IAEA will also have “managed access” to the Saghand uranium mine and the Ardakan yellowcake facility where an impure form of uranium oxide is prepared to be fed into centrifuges for enrichment.

Officially unveiled in April 2013, the plant in Ardakan receives raw material from Saghand, some 120 kilometres (75 miles) away. It can reportedly produce up to 60 tonnes of yellowcake annually.

Arak reactor in spotlight

Iran also agreed to submit updated design information and finalise a safeguards mechanism for the so-called heavy water reactor under construction in Arak.

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Pols respond to Iran nuclear deal

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This Is How The Left And Right Reacted To The Breakthrough Iran Nuclear Deal

Nov. 24, 2013, 12:38 AM

Barack Obama IranREUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A major breakthrough deal was reached between Iran and six world powers on Saturday, which President Barack Obama said would help “prevent Iran from building a nuclear weapon.”Soon after the deal was announced — an interim agreement easing some sanctions in exchange for Iran’s suspension of high-grade uranium enrichment — many members of Congress and other political leaders shared their views on social media.

Some Republicans were critical of the program, most notably Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who tweeted, “Unless the agreement requires dismantling of the Iranian centrifuges, we really haven’t gained anything.”

“Deal appears to give Iran billions in exchange for cosmetic concessions that don’t fully freeze or significantly roll back nuclear program,” tweeted Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.).

And Republican Sen. John Cornyn took some flak for dismissing the breakthrough deal as a political ploy when he tweeted, “Amazing what [White House] will do to distract attention from [Obamacare].”

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TruthTube451 (AKA MrGlasgowTruther) TruthTube451 (AKA MrGlasgowTruther)

Published on Sep 17, 2013

What is at stake for Tehran as Washington deals with Syria? Is Obama genuinely interested in diplomacy? And could the dreadful conflict in Syria be used as a means to take on Iran? CrossTalking with Mohammad Marandi and Faheem Younus.

Join my facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/Truthtube451

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Iran-Syria-Lebanon alliance greater danger to Israel than al-Qaeda: Envoy

Israel’s Ambassador to the United Stated Michael Oren says the alliance of Iran, Syria and Lebanon poses the greatest danger to Tel Aviv, adding that Israel prefers al-Qaeda-affiliated operatives to Iranian-backed groups.

“The initial message about the Syria issue was that we always wanted [President] Bashar Assad to go, we always preferred the bad guys who weren’t backed by Iran to the bad guys who were backed by Iran,” the Israeli daily Jerusalem Post quoted Oren as saying.

Oren said Israel was willing to see the overthrow of Assad government before the outbreak of its crisis in March 2011.

He added that the removal of Assad from power would “weaken the alliance” between Iran and the Lebanese resistance movement, Hezbollah.

“The greatest danger to Israel is by the strategic arc that extends from Tehran, to Damascus to Beirut. And we saw the Assad regime as the keystone in that arc,” Oren said.

This is the reason that Israel has wanted Assad to go, either before or after the outbreak of the unrest in Syria, Oren said.

Israel’s hostility toward Lebanon has increased after Hezbollah defeated Tel Aviv in two wars in 2000 and 2006.

Tel Aviv launched two wars on Lebanon in 2000 and 2006. About 1,200 Lebanese, most of them civilians, were killed in the 33-Day War of 2006.

On both occasions, however, Hezbollah fighters defeated the Israeli forces and Tel Aviv was forced to retreat without achieving any of its objectives.

SF/KA/SS

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VOAnews.com

Obama: Syria Deal Could Influence Iran Nuclear Talks

In this image from video pre-taped at the White House in Washington Friday, September 13, 2013, for Sunday morning's ABC program "This Week" President Barack Obama answers questions about pressing national and international issues.In this image from video pre-taped at the White House in Washington Friday, September 13, 2013, for Sunday morning’s ABC program “This Week” President Barack Obama answers questions about pressing national and international issues.
VOA News

U.S. President Barack Obama says he and new Iranian President Hassan Rouhani have exchanged letters about the situation in Syria, and that diplomacy backed by military threat is a model for negotiating with Tehran over its nuclear ambitions.

In a U.S. television interview broadcast Sunday, Obama said Iran should avoid thinking the United States would not launch a military strike in response to Tehran’s nuclear program just because it has not attacked Syria.

He said Iranian leaders understand the U.S. concern about a potential nuclear-armed Iran “is a far larger issue” for the United States than Syria’s chemical weapons.

Obama told ABC News “the threat against … Israel that a nuclear Iran poses is much closer to our core interests,” adding that “a nuclear arms race in the region” would be “profoundly destabilizing.”

Iran says its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, speaking Sunday in Jerusalem, said the recent U.S.-Russian agreement on Syria’s chemical weapons also serves as a “marker” for the international community as it deals with Iran’s suspected nuclear weapons program.

“The threat of force is real and the Assad regime and all those taking part need to understand that President Obama and the United States are committed to achieve this goal. We cannot have hollow words in the conduct of international affairs because that affects all other issues, whether Iran or North Korea or any other,” said Kerry.

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Explosion

10.03.2013 Explosion Iran Governorate of Khuzestan, Bandar Imam Khomeini Damage level
Details

Explosion in Iran on Sunday, 10 March, 2013 at 18:01 (06:01 PM) UTC.

Description
Several people were wounded Sunday in an explosion in Bandar Imam Khomeini, a port city in Iran, but few details have been released. The city is located some 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) southwest of Tehran, in the oil-rich Khuzestan province. Members of Iran’s Arabic-speaking minority have occasionally held demonstrations in recent years in the area, demanding more rights. The Arvand and Ghadir Petrochemical Companies are both located at the port, which is northeast of Kuwait City, and on the banks of the northwestern end of the Persian Gulf. Several cars were damaged and windows in nearby buildings were shattered, including those at a hotel, according to the report late Saturday by the semi-official Iranian news agency ILNA. There were no details offered about the cause of the blast.

Report: Blast injures several people in south Iran

Associated Press – 19 hrs ago

 

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — An Iranian semi-official news agency is reporting that an explosion has injured several people in a port in the south of the country.

The late Saturday report by ILNA did not specify the cause of the blast. It says it also damaged several cars and shattered windows of nearby buildings including a hotel in Imam Khomeini port, some 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) southwest of Tehran.

The port, one of Iran’s major import and export terminals, is located in oil-rich Khuzestan province, the scene of occasional protests in recent years by members of Iran’s Arabic-speaking minority seeking more rights.

Iran in the past has blamed explosions in the province on saboteurs tied to Arab and Western intelligence agencies.

We have prepared a military option for Iran, US general says

By March 5, 2013, 11:15 pm
James Mattis (photo credit: CC-BY U.S. Naval War College/Flickr)

James Mattis (photo credit: CC-BY U.S. Naval War College/Flickr)

Sanctions are not preventing Iran’s nuclear progress, the US Army commander in the Middle East told Congress on Tuesday, adding that he had prepared a military option.

A simple “No, sir” was General James Mattis’s response when asked whether “the current diplomatic and economic efforts to stop Iran from obtaining nuclear capability” were working.

“I think we have to continue sanctions, but have other options ready,” said Mattis, of the Central Command, to the Armed Services Committee during an official hearing.

Mattis said Iran could be convinced to alter its course by “a purely cost-benefit ratio,” but at the moment, he noted, the “nuclear industry continues” apace, despite sanctions.

“Between economic sanctions, diplomatic isolation, and encouragement of behavior that does not cost them such a degree of political support that they end up losing power, there may yet be a way to bring them to their senses,” the general stated.

Such means to bring Iran “to its knees,” Mattis commented in response to another question, did not necessarily entail “open conflict,” but a military operation is “one of the options that I have to have prepared for the president.”

Mattis’s statements came in the wake of a fresh effort on the part of the West to curb Iran’s nuclear program via diplomatic means, and echoed comments made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday.

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France, Israel call for tougher sanctions against Iran

French President Francois Hollande (R) and President of the Israeli regime Shimon Peres meet in Paris, March 8, 2013.

French President Francois Hollande (R) and President of the Israeli regime Shimon Peres meet in Paris, March 8, 2013.
Sat Mar 9, 2013 6:55AM GMT


The United States, the Israeli regime and some of their allies have accused Iran of pursuing nuclear energy activities to covertly build atomic weapons capability.

Using the false allegation, Washington and the European Union have imposed several rounds of illegal unilateral sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

French President Francois Hollande and President of the Israeli regime Shimon Peres say sanctions on Iran over its nuclear energy program are “biting” but stress the importance of imposing tougher restrictions on Tehran.

“I have said how much we want the sanctions to be beefed up, which are already efficient,” Hollande said following a meeting with Peres in Paris on Friday.

He added that Paris believes that “economic sanctions against Iran should be aggravated.”

The United States, the Israeli regime and some of their allies have accused Iran of pursuing nuclear energy activities to covertly build atomic weapons.

Using the false allegation, Washington and the European Union have imposed several rounds of illegal unilateral sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

Israel has threatened to attack Iran’s nuclear facilities based on the unfounded allegation.

Iran has categorically rejected the claim and emphasized that its nuclear energy program follows civilian objectives.

The Israeli regime’s president also called for stronger bans on Iran and said, “The sanctions are effective more than we thought but not enough… and I was very glad to hear from the president (Hollande) that he plans to take more measures because if we can end this danger without military use, it will be better.”

On March 4, the firebrand Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu once again called for a “clear and credible military threat” against Iran.

The Israeli premier claimed that although Iran has not yet crossed “the red line” in its nuclear energy program, it is “putting itself in a position” to do so “very quickly.”

The Israeli threats come despite international efforts to find a political solution to the Western standoff over Tehran’s nuclear energy program.

Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council (China, Russia, France, Britain and the US) plus Germany – the P5+1 group – held the latest round of their talks in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on February 27-28. The two sides agreed to convene again in the Kazakh city on April 5-6 to continue the negotiations after holding “expert-level” talks in the Turkish city of Istanbul on March 17-18.

After the Almaty meeting, both Iran and the P5+1 group expressed hope and optimism about the prospect of their comprehensive negotiations.

On Thursday, Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei pointed to the West’s track record of disregarding its own agreements and statements and noted that the next round of negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 group will be a test of Western sincerity.

SF/HJL/MA

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Iran humiliating US and other Western powers: Chris Bambery

Tue Feb 5, 2013 2:36PM GMT
Interview with Chris Bambery

I think the problem is not so much with Iran’s nuclear program. I think the main problem is with the Islamic Republic of Iran.

I think America in particular has never forgiven in 1979 the resolution and the toppling of the Shah and the hostage crisis, which followed. It was a humiliation to the United States.”

An analyst says US disdain for the Islamic Republic of Iran is the issue, not its civilian nuclear program. The US still feels humiliated from Iran’s toppling of its despot.

Press TV has interviewed Chris Bambery, political commentator, London about this issue. The following is an approximate transcription of the interview.

Press TV: A lot of what Mr. Jalili has said makes a lot of sense. What exactly does the US and its allies have as a problem with the fact that Iran has this civilian nuclear program?

Bambery: I think the problem is not so much with Iran’s nuclear program. I think the main problem is with the Islamic Republic of Iran.

I think America in particular has never forgiven in 1979 the resolution and the toppling of the Shah and the hostage crisis, which followed. It was a humiliation to the United States.

And I think you’d have to say this is real hypocrisy. The statement made today I think is to be welcomed and it’s a good question of who supplied this technology the means by which Israel got nuclear weapons. And the answer is very simple: Britain and France.

Britain and France provided the plutonium and so on in the 1950s and 1960s on the back of the alliance if some will remember in 1956 Israel, Britain and France when they invaded Egypt.

So that is who supplied the technology and no one has ever called as far as I’m aware, the Americans, the British, for inspections of an Israeli nuclear facility – they’ve got nuclear weapons developed secretly. They refuse to deny it, but they are vehemently in opposition to the Iranian nuclear program.

Again it was said today the Iranian government is very clear that it is for peaceful purposes, civilian purposes and they have the right to do that.

I think it’s also worth a mention that in the 1970s Britain American and Germany had no problem with an Iranian nuclear program because that was under the rule of the despot, the Shah.

They were encouraging Iran to develop a nuclear program because the Shah was of course a key ally in the region. So the hypocrisy is unbelievable here both in regards to their actions towards Iran and towards Israel.

Press TV: These talks that Iran is set to hold with the P5+1 group of countries. Mr. Jalili made it clear that Iran was ready to go into these talks in January, but the group keeps delaying and procrastinating.

What really is going on behind the scenes do you think?

Bambery: I think every time it comes closer to an agreement the group changes the rules. And it’s America who is behind that, they keep raising the bar for Iran. There already has been a compromise agreed by Iran courtesy of Brazil over the whole question of uranium enrichment.

Iran has agreed to that and then that was changed at the urging of the Americans. But it seems time and time again the Iranian government accepts something that is put on the table only to have that withdrawn and further demands added on. So I think it has to be a question of good faith.

I think it is time that there was negotiations, Iran has said it is willing to negotiate and I think it is time there was a conclusion.

America should be told to stop raising the odds here. They seem to be putting a demand on Iran to stop their policy and the Iranian government has made it clear and made it clear again today that it is not developing nuclear weapons and it’s opposed to nuclear weapons.

I think the demand that Iran has made for a nuclear-free region and indeed a nuclear-free world is to be welcomed by all peace-loving people.

I should also add I am speaking from London where the British government is set to spend billions it can hardly afford on a new generation of weapons of mass destruction to replace trident nuclear weapons.

So Britain is developing nuclear power stations, Britain is going to buy nuclear weapons from the United states, but then it’s telling Iran what to do. This is again hypocrisy on a grand scale.

SC/JR

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

 

Tehran Battles Plague of ‘Mutant’ Giant Rats with Army Snipers

By Umberto Bacchi

IBTimes

February 20, 2013 1:08 PM GMT

Iran's capital of Tehran is infested by huge rats (Reuters)

Iran’s capital of Tehran is infested by huge rats (Reuters)

 

Iran has sent in sniper teams to clear Tehran’s streets from the massive rodents weighting up to five kilos plaguing 26 district of the Iranian capital, the city’s environmental agency said.

“They seem to have had a genetic mutation, probably as a result of radiations and the chemical used on them,” Ismail Kahram, Teheran city council environment adviser and university professor Ismail Kahram told Qudsonline.ir.

“They are now bigger and look different. These are changes that normally take millions of years of evolution. They have jumped from 60 grams to five kilos, and cats are now smaller than them.”

The “mutated rats” have been running rampant in the capital, as cats are scared off by their giant size and traditional poison appear to have no effect on them.

 

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Iran Dispatches Sniper Teams To Capital To Eliminate ‘Mutant Rats’

Michael Kelley | Mar. 1, 2013, 6:05 PM

raus

The Princess Bride

A Rodent of Unusual Size

Iranian sniper teams are now hunting “genetically mutated” rats in Tehran’s streets, according to Umberto Bacchi of The International Business Times.The capital’s residents kill about one million rats annually, but the rats continue to become larger and more prevalent.

“They seem to have had a genetic mutation, probably as a result of radiations and the chemical used on them,” Tehran city council environment adviser Ismail Kahram said. “They are now bigger and look different. These are changes [that] normally take millions of years of evolution … cats are now smaller than them.”

The council has deployed ten sniper teams “armed with infra-red sighted rifles” because the unusually large rodents — which weigh up to 11 pounds — scare off cats and seem unfazed by traditional rat poisons.

“We use chemical poisons to kill the rats during the day and the snipers at night, so it has become a 24/7 war,” Mohammad Hadi Heydarzadeh, the head of the environmental agency said.

Bacchi notes that 2,205 rats have been shot dead so far, and the council plans to deploy 30 more sniper teams.

Official figures as of 2010 indicate that rats outnumber citizens in southern Tehran by six times.