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Tag Archive: Taiwan


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Taiwan Hit by Six More Bird Flu Outbreaks

ThePoultrySite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the poultry industry

 

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Biological Hazard in Taiwan on December 11 2015 04:45 AM (UTC).

Base data

EDIS Number BH-20151211-51211-TWN
Event type Biological Hazard
Date/Time December 11 2015 04:45 AM (UTC)
Last update December 11 2015 04:46 AM (UTC)
Cause of event
Damage level Is not or not known Damage level

Geographic information

Continent Asia
Country Taiwan
County / State Pingtung County
Area
Settlement Changzhi
Coordinate 22° 33.119,120° 32.926

Biohazard information

Biohazard level
Biohazard description
Disease, agent name H5N8 (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus)
Infected person(s) 0
Species Animal (ducks)
Status confirmed
Symptoms

 

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Pingtung County’s animal disease control officials on Thu 10 Dec 2015 culled 8881 ducks after the highly pathogenic bird flu virus H5N8 was found to have infected ducks on a poultry farm in Changzhi Township, officials said. County officials said the farm operator kept the birds in a closed environment in violation of the law and they decided to issue a fine on the owner in accordance with the act governing the prevention of animal infectious diseases. To reduce the risk of spreading virus, local health authorities have worked with the farm owner in disinfecting the area and launched monitoring and sampling of poultry within a 1 km about 0.6 mile radius from the infected farm, said the officials.

 

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ThePoultrySite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the poultry industry

Taiwan Hit by Six More Bird Flu Outbreaks

11 December 2015

TAIWAN – Taiwan has reported six more outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza.

There were four outbreaks of the H5N2 serotype in Pingtung and Hualien counties (see image above). Just over 14,000 birds were destroyed to try and prevent these outbreaks from spreading.

The premises affected included a duck farm, a chicken farm, and chickens in two abattoirs. The cases were discovered after abnormal mortality levels.

 

 

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

M4.5 – 10km NNW of Banqiao, Taiwan 2014-02-11 16:31:03 UTC

Earthquake location 25.105°N, 121.434°E

A map shows the epicenter, top, in red, of the magnitude 4 earthquake that hit Taipei’s Shilin District at 12:31am yesterday.

Photo courtesy of National Taiwan University professor Chen Hung-yu

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February 12 2014 05:39 PM Earthquake Taiwan Shilin District, [Tatun Volcano Group] Damage level Details

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Earthquake in Taiwan on Wednesday, 12 February, 2014 at 17:39 (05:39 PM) UTC.

Description
Northern Taiwan was rocked by a magnitude 4 earthquake at 12:31am yesterday, renewing concerns about the potential for volcanoes in the Tatun Volcano Group in Yangmingshan National Park to erupt. At press time, no casualties had been reported from the quake and only minor damage – to the Pingdeng Elementary School on Yangmingshan �” was reported. Many residents in the area were startled by the quake, which caused a loud rumbling sound. Central Weather Bureau data showed that the epicenter of the quake was in Taipei’s Shilin District , 11.8km north of Taipei City Hall at a depth of 6.3km. The strongest intensity of the quake, Level 4, was detected on Yangmingshan, followed by Level 3 in Wugu in New Taipei City and Taoyuan City, and Level 2 in Taipei and Keelung. The bureau’s records show that 19 earthquakes with a magnitude exceeding 3 have occurred within a 5km radius of the epicenter of yesterday’s quake since 1980. The largest one was in 1988, with a magnitude of 5.3. Yesterday’s quake was the strongest within the perimeter of the Tatun group in 26 years, the bureau said. Seismology Center Director Kuo Kai-wen said the earthquake was a stress adjustment that occurs after lava cools down. “When the lava in a volcano cools down, it shrinks in size. This will subsequently lead to gaps in the rock layers. Pulled by gravity, the rock layer on top falls. This kind of stress adjustment is quite normal,” he said. Yesterday’s quake was not caused by the active fault at the foot of Yangminshan, as its epicenter and the fault are about 6km apart, Kuo said. Nevertheless, the earthquake generated concern that one or more of the Tatun volcanoes might erupt soon. Kuo said that was an unlikely scenario. “The volcanoes in Tatun are generally considered dormant. Currently, only three to five small earthquakes happen in the area per day. On average, the volcanoes could erupt if there are more than 100 to 200 earthquakes per day, and they have to escalate from deep earthquakes to shallow earthquakes,” he said. However, National Taiwan University professor Chen Hongey said the government needs to carefully examine the correlations between yesterday’s magnitude 4 earthquake and the active fault, adding that it was quite unusual for an earthquake to occur at the volcanic zone.

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Event Time

  1. 2014-02-11 16:31:03 UTC
  2. 2014-02-12 00:31:03 UTC+08:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-02-11 10:31:03 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

25.105°N 121.434°E depth=14.0km (8.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 10km (6mi) NNW of Banqiao, Taiwan
  2. 11km (7mi) WNW of Taipei, Taiwan
  3. 18km (11mi) NE of Taoyuan City, Taiwan
  4. 28km (17mi) NNE of Daxi, Taiwan
  5. 804km (500mi) ENE of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

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Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Philippine Sea and Vicinity

The Philippine Sea plate is bordered by the larger Pacific and Eurasia plates and the smaller Sunda plate. The Philippine Sea plate is unusual in that its borders are nearly all zones of plate convergence. The Pacific plate is subducted into the mantle, south of Japan, beneath the Izu-Bonin and Mariana island arcs, which extend more than 3,000 km along the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. This subduction zone is characterized by rapid plate convergence and high-level seismicity extending to depths of over 600 km. In spite of this extensive zone of plate convergence, the plate interface has been associated with few great (M>8.0) ‘megathrust’ earthquakes. This low seismic energy release is thought to result from weak coupling along the plate interface (Scholz and Campos, 1995). These convergent plate margins are also associated with unusual zones of back-arc extension (along with resulting seismic activity) that decouple the volcanic island arcs from the remainder of the Philippine Sea Plate (Karig et al., 1978; Klaus et al., 1992).

South of the Mariana arc, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath the Yap Islands along the Yap trench. The long zone of Pacific plate subduction at the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea Plate is responsible for the generation of the deep Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Yap trenches as well as parallel chains of islands and volcanoes, typical of circum-pacific island arcs. Similarly, the northwestern margin of the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasia plate along a convergent zone, extending from southern Honshu to the northeastern coast of Taiwan, manifested by the Ryukyu Islands and the Nansei-Shoto (Ryukyu) trench. The Ryukyu Subduction Zone is associated with a similar zone of back-arc extension, the Okinawa Trough. At Taiwan, the plate boundary is characterized by a zone of arc-continent collision, whereby the northern end of the Luzon island arc is colliding with the buoyant crust of the Eurasia continental margin offshore China.

Along its western margin, the Philippine Sea plate is associated with a zone of oblique convergence with the Sunda Plate. This highly active convergent plate boundary extends along both sides the Philippine Islands, from Luzon in the north to the Celebes Islands in the south. The tectonic setting of the Philippines is unusual in several respects: it is characterized by opposite-facing subduction systems on its east and west sides; the archipelago is cut by a major transform fault, the Philippine Fault; and the arc complex itself is marked by active volcanism, faulting, and high seismic activity. Subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate occurs at the eastern margin of the archipelago along the Philippine Trench and its northern extension, the East Luzon Trough. The East Luzon Trough is thought to be an unusual example of a subduction zone in the process of formation, as the Philippine Trench system gradually extends northward (Hamburger et al., 1983). On the west side of Luzon, the Sunda Plate subducts eastward along a series of trenches, including the Manila Trench in the north, the smaller less well-developed Negros Trench in the central Philippines, and the Sulu and Cotabato trenches in the south (Cardwell et al., 1980). At its northern and southern terminations, subduction at the Manila Trench is interrupted by arc-continent collision, between the northern Philippine arc and the Eurasian continental margin at Taiwan and between the Sulu-Borneo Block and Luzon at the island of Mindoro. The Philippine fault, which extends over 1,200 km within the Philippine arc, is seismically active. The fault has been associated with major historical earthquakes, including the destructive M7.6 Luzon earthquake of 1990 (Yoshida and Abe, 1992). A number of other active intra-arc fault systems are associated with high seismic activity, including the Cotabato Fault and the Verde Passage-Sibuyan Sea Fault (Galgana et al., 2007).

Relative plate motion vectors near the Philippines (about 80 mm/yr) is oblique to the plate boundary along the two plate margins of central Luzon, where it is partitioned into orthogonal plate convergence along the trenches and nearly pure translational motion along the Philippine Fault (Barrier et al., 1991). Profiles B and C reveal evidence of opposing inclined seismic zones at intermediate depths (roughly 70-300 km) and complex tectonics at the surface along the Philippine Fault.

Several relevant tectonic elements, plate boundaries and active volcanoes, provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the trenches and more diffuse or speculative in the South China Sea and Lesser Sunda Islands. The active volcanic arcs (Siebert and Simkin, 2002) follow the Izu, Volcano, Mariana, and Ryukyu island chains and the main Philippine islands parallel to the Manila, Negros, Cotabato, and Philippine trenches.

Seismic activity along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea Plate (Allen et al., 2009) has produced 7 great (M>8.0) earthquakes and 250 large (M>7) events. Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui and the 1995 Kobe (Japan) earthquakes (99,000, 5,100, and 6,400 casualties, respectively), the 1935 and the 1999 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquakes (3,300 and 2,500 casualties, respectively), and the 1976 M7.6 Moro Gulf and 1990 M7.6 Luzon (Philippines) earthquakes (7,100 and 2,400 casualties, respectively). There have also been a number of tsunami-generating events in the region, including the Moro Gulf earthquake, whose tsunami resulted in more than 5000 deaths.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

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Shilin earthquake renews concern about volcanoes

YANGMINGSHAN PARK:The Central Weather Bureau said the 12:31am quake was the largest one within the perimeters of the Tatun Volcano Group in 26 years

By Shelley Shan  /  Staff reporter

A map shows the epicenter, top, in red, of the magnitude 4 earthquake that hit Taipei’s Shilin District at 12:31am yesterday.

Photo courtesy of National Taiwan University professor Chen Hung-yu

Northern Taiwan was rocked by a magnitude 4 earthquake at 12:31am yesterday, renewing concerns about the potential for volcanoes in the Tatun Volcano Group (大屯火山群) in Yangmingshan National Park to erupt.

At press time, no casualties had been reported from the quake and only minor damage — to the Pingdeng Elementary School on Yangmingshan — was reported.

Many residents in the area were startled by the quake, which caused a loud rumbling sound.

Central Weather Bureau data showed that the epicenter of the quake was in Taipei’s Shilin District (士林), 11.8km north of Taipei City Hall at a depth of 6.3km.

The strongest intensity of the quake, Level 4, was detected on Yangmingshan, followed by Level 3 in Wugu (五股) in New Taipei City (新北市) and Taoyuan City, and Level 2 in Taipei and Keelung.

The bureau’s records show that 19 earthquakes with a magnitude exceeding 3 have occurred within a 5km radius of the epicenter of yesterday’s quake since 1980. The largest one was in 1988, with a magnitude of 5.3.

Read More Here

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EPIDEMICS

Hundreds monitored in Taiwan after bird flu case


by Staff Writers
Taipei (AFP) Jan 01, 2014

 

 

 

The 86-year-old man from the eastern Chinese province of Jiangsu is in stable condition in hospital in Taiwan, where he was on an eight-day tour, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said in a statement.

As many as 500 people may have had contact with him, all of whom are being asked to report to doctors should they develop possible symptoms, the statement added.

The 149 people who may have had close contact include two family members accompanying him on the tour, the tour guide, bus driver, medical personnel and patients sharing the same hospital ward, it said.

“Three medical personnel have shown symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and taken medicines as preventative treatment,” the statement said, adding that they should monitor their condition for two weeks while awaiting the outcome of tests.

They have not been placed in quarantine.

 

Read More Here

 

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Earth Watch Report –  Earthquakes

 
Taiwan  -  6.3mag EQ  October  31st  2013 photo Taiwan-63MagEQOctober31st2013_zpsc254a131.jpg
  3 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 4.7 – 42km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-31 10:47:28 UTC-05:00 4.4 km

  2. M 6.3 – 45km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-31 07:02:09 UTC-05:00 12.0 km

  3. M 4.5 – 18km SSE of Hualian, Taiwan

    2013-10-27 03:27:13 UTC-05:00 47.1 km

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M 6.3 – 45km SSW of Hualian, Taiwan

2013-10-31 12:02:09 UTC

Earthquake location 23.591°N, 121.443°E

Event Time

  1. 2013-10-31 12:02:09 UTC
  2. 2013-10-31 20:02:09 UTC+08:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-10-31 07:02:09 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

23.591°N 121.443°E depth=12.0km (7.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 45km (28mi) SSW of Hualian, Taiwan
  2. 63km (39mi) SE of Buli, Taiwan
  3. 72km (45mi) ESE of Lugu, Taiwan
  4. 87km (54mi) ESE of Nantou, Taiwan
  5. 761km (473mi) ENE of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

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Taiwan  -  6.3 Mag EQ  October 31st  2013 photo Taiwan-63MagEQOctober31st2013_zps1ab19726.jpg
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Tectonic Summary

The October 31, 2013 M 6.3 earthquake southwest of Hualian, Taiwan occurred as the result of shallow oblique-thrust faulting near the central-east coast of the island of Taiwan and the boundary between the Philippine Sea and Eurasia plates. East of the October 31 earthquake, plate boundary tectonics are dominated by the westward subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath Eurasia along the Ryukyu Trench, which runs from southwest Japan to Taiwan. Some authors infer that this subduction continues beneath the east coast of Taiwan. South of the island towards the Philippines, the plate boundary reflects arc-continent collision more than traditional subduction. The October 31 earthquake occurred at the transition between these tectonic regimes, and is a consequence of the convergence between these major plates. At the location of this earthquake, the Philippine Sea plate moves to the northwest with respect to Eurasia at a velocity of approximately 77 mm/yr.

This region of Taiwan is familiar with moderate to large earthquake activity, and has hosted over 60 events of M6 or greater within 250 km of the October 31 event in the past 40 years. Seven of these were M7 or greater, including a M7.4 earthquake 40 km to the north of the October 31 event in November 1986, which caused 13 fatalities.

Seismotectonics of the Philippine Sea and Vicinity

The Philippine Sea plate is bordered by the larger Pacific and Eurasia plates and the smaller Sunda plate. The Philippine Sea plate is unusual in that its borders are nearly all zones of plate convergence. The Pacific plate is subducted into the mantle, south of Japan, beneath the Izu-Bonin and Mariana island arcs, which extend more than 3,000 km along the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. This subduction zone is characterized by rapid plate convergence and high-level seismicity extending to depths of over 600 km. In spite of this extensive zone of plate convergence, the plate interface has been associated with few great (M>8.0) ‘megathrust’ earthquakes. This low seismic energy release is thought to result from weak coupling along the plate interface (Scholz and Campos, 1995). These convergent plate margins are also associated with unusual zones of back-arc extension (along with resulting seismic activity) that decouple the volcanic island arcs from the remainder of the Philippine Sea Plate (Karig et al., 1978; Klaus et al., 1992).

South of the Mariana arc, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath the Yap Islands along the Yap trench. The long zone of Pacific plate subduction at the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea Plate is responsible for the generation of the deep Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Yap trenches as well as parallel chains of islands and volcanoes, typical of circum-pacific island arcs. Similarly, the northwestern margin of the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasia plate along a convergent zone, extending from southern Honshu to the northeastern coast of Taiwan, manifested by the Ryukyu Islands and the Nansei-Shoto (Ryukyu) trench. The Ryukyu Subduction Zone is associated with a similar zone of back-arc extension, the Okinawa Trough. At Taiwan, the plate boundary is characterized by a zone of arc-continent collision, whereby the northern end of the Luzon island arc is colliding with the buoyant crust of the Eurasia continental margin offshore China.

Along its western margin, the Philippine Sea plate is associated with a zone of oblique convergence with the Sunda Plate. This highly active convergent plate boundary extends along both sides the Philippine Islands, from Luzon in the north to the Celebes Islands in the south. The tectonic setting of the Philippines is unusual in several respects: it is characterized by opposite-facing subduction systems on its east and west sides; the archipelago is cut by a major transform fault, the Philippine Fault; and the arc complex itself is marked by active volcanism, faulting, and high seismic activity. Subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate occurs at the eastern margin of the archipelago along the Philippine Trench and its northern extension, the East Luzon Trough. The East Luzon Trough is thought to be an unusual example of a subduction zone in the process of formation, as the Philippine Trench system gradually extends northward (Hamburger et al., 1983). On the west side of Luzon, the Sunda Plate subducts eastward along a series of trenches, including the Manila Trench in the north, the smaller less well-developed Negros Trench in the central Philippines, and the Sulu and Cotabato trenches in the south (Cardwell et al., 1980). At its northern and southern terminations, subduction at the Manila Trench is interrupted by arc-continent collision, between the northern Philippine arc and the Eurasian continental margin at Taiwan and between the Sulu-Borneo Block and Luzon at the island of Mindoro. The Philippine fault, which extends over 1,200 km within the Philippine arc, is seismically active. The fault has been associated with major historical earthquakes, including the destructive M7.6 Luzon earthquake of 1990 (Yoshida and Abe, 1992). A number of other active intra-arc fault systems are associated with high seismic activity, including the Cotabato Fault and the Verde Passage-Sibuyan Sea Fault (Galgana et al., 2007).

Relative plate motion vectors near the Philippines (about 80 mm/yr) is oblique to the plate boundary along the two plate margins of central Luzon, where it is partitioned into orthogonal plate convergence along the trenches and nearly pure translational motion along the Philippine Fault (Barrier et al., 1991). Profiles B and C reveal evidence of opposing inclined seismic zones at intermediate depths (roughly 70-300 km) and complex tectonics at the surface along the Philippine Fault.

Several relevant tectonic elements, plate boundaries and active volcanoes, provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the trenches and more diffuse or speculative in the South China Sea and Lesser Sunda Islands. The active volcanic arcs (Siebert and Simkin, 2002) follow the Izu, Volcano, Mariana, and Ryukyu island chains and the main Philippine islands parallel to the Manila, Negros, Cotabato, and Philippine trenches.

Seismic activity along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea Plate (Allen et al., 2009) has produced 7 great (M>8.0) earthquakes and 250 large (M>7) events. Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui and the 1995 Kobe (Japan) earthquakes (99,000, 5,100, and 6,400 casualties, respectively), the 1935 and the 1999 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquakes (3,300 and 2,500 casualties, respectively), and the 1976 M7.6 Moro Gulf and 1990 M7.6 Luzon (Philippines) earthquakes (7,100 and 2,400 casualties, respectively). There have also been a number of tsunami-generating events in the region, including the Moro Gulf earthquake, whose tsunami resulted in more than 5000 deaths.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

…..

6.6 quake hits Taiwan; no tsunami warning to US coast

6.6 quake hits Taiwan; no tsunami warning to US coast
 

by Associated Press

Posted on October 31, 2013 at 6:06 AM

 

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — A strong earthquake hit eastern Taiwan on Thursday, shaking buildings over a wide area including the capital. There were no immediate reports of serious damage or casualties.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake measured magnitude 6.6 and struck in the evening. It was centered in a remote mountainous area 45 kilometers (28 miles) south-southwest of the coastal city of Hualian at a depth of just 9.3 kilometers (5.8 miles), it said.

In Taipei, the capital, buildings swayed for more than 10 seconds and startled residents ducked for cover.

Read More Here

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Reporters inspect an observation well which is dug to take underground water samples near Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Unit 1 of Tokyo Electric Power Co., in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan.

Kyodo News/AP/File

More Bad News for the Pacific – Taiwanese NPP Leaking Radioactive Water

By John Daly | Tue, 13 August 2013 00:01

Water is an essential ingredient for the operation of most nuclear power plants, from providing the liquid that is flashed to steam to drive turbines to providing coolant for storage of spent fuel. In most NPPs, water is drawn from nearby rivers or from the ocean.

Unfortunately, that reliance can also prove to be a liability.

In reviewing the 11 March 2011 catastrophe that overwhelmed Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s six reactor Fukushima Daiichi NPP, few people remember that it was not the Richter 9.0 earthquake, the fifth largest in modern history, that devastated the facility, but the massive tsunami subsequently generated by the undersea tremor.

Which incidentally killed 25,000 people.

Fukushima Daiichi NPP’s seawall was not high enough to stop the tsunami, which destroyed the facility’s backup diesel generators and fuel tanks upon which keeping the nuclear fuel cool now depended, as the earthquake had severed the facility’s connections to the national electric grid. Nine tsunami generated waves battered the shore.

Related article: The Key to Advancing Nuclear Energy

Two years on, the crippled NPP has yet to be stabilized and its radioactive contents are being spread by – water. On 22 July TEPCO spokesman Masayuki Ono told a regular news conference that plant officials believed that radioactive water that leaked from the wrecked reactors probably seeped into the underground water system and accordingly was likely leaking contaminated water into the sea, acknowledging for the first time a problem long suspected by experts.

How much?

The Japanese government’s Agency for Natural Resources and Energy estimates that 400 tons of groundwater contaminated with radioactive materials are now leaking into the ocean daily from the crippled plant. The Japanese government is now sufficiently alarmed that on 7 August Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a meeting of the Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters, “The problem of contaminated water is the most pressing. Rather than leave it up to TEPCO, the central government will come up with the measures to deal with it. The industry minister will instruct TEPCO in order to implement swift and multilayered measures.”

Moving southwards, Taiwan’s First Nuclear Power Plant on the island’s northern coast, operating since 1979, has spent fuel rod storage pools that have leaked since December 2009.

How much?

According to the Taiwanese government’s watchdog, Control Yuan, the pools of the two reactors leaked 15,370 milliliters and 4,830 milliliters respectively, with the water containing radioactive materials including Caesium-137, Cobalt-60, Manganese-54, and Chromium-51. The most ominous aspect of the report notes that the NPP operator Taiwan Power Co had failed to find the causes and the leaks continue.

Read More  Here

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  • Little Yuan Zai was the first Giant Panda to be born in Taiwan
  • Staff at Taipei Zoo are caring for her around the clock

By Helen Collis

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Adorable Yuan Zai – the first panda to be born in Taiwan – is starting to show her little personality as she grows stronger.

New pictures of the heart-melting Giant Panda cub, who was born last month, show the cute creature rolling around and showing an interest in others.

Little girl Yuan Zai was born at Taipei City Zoo, Taiwan, to Giant Pandas Yuan Yuan and Tuan Tuan.

 

Heart-melting: Little girl Yuan Zai is being cared for around the clock by staff at Taipei City Zoo, Taiwan

Heart-melting: Little girl Yuan Zai is being cared for around the clock by staff at Taipei City Zoo, Taiwan

Spreadeagled: Her little arms and legs outstretched, tiny Yuan Zai is growing stronger after being born to captive parents last month

Spreadeagled: Her little arms and legs outstretched, tiny Yuan Zai is growing stronger after being born to captive parents last month

A team of keepers have been working around the clock to take care of the cub, who was initially kept in an incubator.

But the public will have to wait three months to catch a glimpse of Taiwan’s first newborn panda, officials said in July.

The little girl in the meantime is starting to gain some strength and show some interest in things around her.

Heart melting moment baby giant panda meets mum for the first…

The public will have to wait three months to catch a glimpse of Yuan Zai, the first panda born in Taiwan, officials said in July

The public will have to wait three months to catch a glimpse of Yuan Zai, the first panda born in Taiwan, officials said in July

When held up to her mother’s cage, the cute cub reached out her tiny paws. The mother, transfixed by the tiny bear cub, licked her through the cage.

Staff at Taipei City Zoo have been caring for the miniature panda around the clock.

Their daily routine includes feeding the cub, taking her temperature after each meal, changing her bedding and keeping track of her weight, zoo official Chang Chi-hua said.

Yuan Yuan and her mate, Tuan Tuan, were gifted to Taiwan by China in late 2008 as a cross-Taiwan Strait gesture of goodwill and Yuan Zai is their first cub.

Read More  and Watch Video Here

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Adorable pictures show rare baby panda Tuan Tuan poking her tongue out and giving a wave as she goes from strength to strength in her first few weeks of life

  • Tuan Tuan is growing fast and has already doubled in weight
  • The rare baby cub is beginning to gain some of her black and white coat
  • The Taipei Zoo celebrated her birth after seven attempts at impregnating mother Yuan Yuan over the past three years
  • Yuan Yuan and another panda were given as a gift to the country of Taiwan from China

By Jaymi Mccann

|

It was a momentous occasion earlier this month when nine-year-old Giant Panda Yuan Yuan successfully gave birth to a baby girl cub named Tuan Tuan.

The panda was born at the Taipei Zoo after three years filled with seven failed pregnancies for the mother. Natural pregnancy among pandas is relatively rare.

Now a few weeks older, baby Tuan Tuan is growing fast and has doubled in weight.

The cub is still being cared for behind the scenes at the zoo, and visitors won’t get to see the baby until she is three-months old. To update Tuan Tuan’s admirers, the zoo released a new set of photos of the growing cub hamming it up for the camera.

 
Smiling for the camera: Newborn Giant Panda cub Tuan Tuan is growing fast behind the scenes at the Taipei Zoo

Smiling for the camera: Newborn Giant Panda cub Tuan Tuan is growing fast behind the scenes at the Taipei Zoo

 
 
Hello world! Tuan Tuan was born completely pink, but now she is beginning to gain her black and white color

Hello world! Tuan Tuan was born completely pink, but now she is beginning to gain her black and white color

Counting the days: Zoo visitors won't get to see the cub until she is three-months old

Counting the days: Zoo visitors won’t get to see the cub until she is three-months old

 
Miracle baby: Tuan Tuan is mother Yuan Yuan's first cub after Zoo officials tried for three years to impregnate her through artificial insemination

Miracle baby: Tuan Tuan is mother Yuan Yuan’s first cub after Zoo officials tried for three years to impregnate her through artificial insemination

 
Gift of life: Mother Yuan Yuan was a gift to the Taiwain government from China

Gift of life: Mother Yuan Yuan was a gift to the Taiwain government from China

 
Reunion: Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan together mean 'reunion'

Reunion: Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan together mean ‘reunion’

 

She's staying: China has agreed to let the baby panda stay in Taiwan, though they previously stipulated that any cubs must be returned to the mainland

She’s staying: China has agreed to let the baby panda stay in Taiwan, though they previously stipulated that any cubs must be returned to the mainland

Read More  and  Watch Video Here

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Taiwan aquarium abandons captive whale shark in the sea – Strands twice

whales/Marine_2012/whale_shark_releaseThe whale shark stranded twice shortly after it was abandonned into the sea. Photo courtesy of Environment and Animal Society of Taiwan

Aquarium must not be allowed to acquire a new whale shark
July 2013. Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium ‘released’ a whale shark into the wild that it had held in captivity for 8 years. The Whale shark was released with no preparation for life in the oceans, and was not tagged to enable scientists to track the animal in an effort to help it survive.

The animal had been kept in a small tank where it spent its life swimming slowly in one direction around the tank. The shark was released into the sea much too close to the shore; on release the shark continued to swim in a similar pattern to its pre-release and shortly afterwards stranded on the shoreline, not once, but twice. The shark was eventually re-floated on the first occasion thanks to efforts of the coast guard, local fishermen and conservation workers, but it is not known what happened to the animal after that. The aquarium cliamed that the animal was last seen swimming out to sea, but those who had helped rescue the animal stated that it was already badly injured, and was last seen being towed on the end of a rope out to sea by a boat – They believe it had no chance of surviving, if it wasn’t already dead.

Not a release, but an abandoning
The method that was used for this so-called release appears to be that the over-riding priority was to get rid of the whale shark, with no thought given to its wellbeing.

The Environment and Animal Society of Taiwan (EAST) have been urging the aquarium to release the captive whale shark and not to bring in new ones.

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

frontier soldier helps a man move away from  fast  moving  waters

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Today Tropical Storm China MultiProvinces, [Provinces of Zhejiang and Fujian ] Damage level Details

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Tropical Storm in China on Monday, 15 July, 2013 at 03:02 (03:02 AM) UTC.

Description
Eastern China on Sunday braced for torrential downpours from Typhoon Soulik which forced the evacuation of about 500,000 people after killing two people in Taiwan. Soulik lashed coastal Fujian province with winds of 118 kph when it made landfall but weakened to a tropical depression as it moved inland, the China Meteorological Administration said. More than 500,000 people were evacuated from Fujian and neighboring Zhejiang province as the typhoon approached, with 5,500 soldiers deployed to carry out relief work if needed.

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The Standard

Killer Soulik smashes into east

Monday, July 15, 2013

Eastern China braced itself for torrential downpours from Typhoon Soulik, which forced the evacuation of half a million people after killing two in Taiwan.

Soulik lashed coastal Fujian province with winds of 118 kilometers per hour when it made landfall but had weakened to a tropical depression as it moved inland, the China Meteorological Administration said.

More than half a million people were evacuated from Fujian and neighboring Zhejiang as the typhoon approached, with 5,500 soldiers deployed to carry out relief work if needed. Xinhua News Agency said almost 31,000 ships were called back to port and 20 flights canceled.

Soulik brought a torrential downpour to Xiamen, with 24 centimeters of rain falling on the port city from Saturday to yesterday. Rivers swelled beyond warning levels in some areas, and waves up to 10 meters high pounded sea defenses in Ningde city.

In Taiwan, two people were killed, one was missing and 104 were injured by the storm, with one town reporting widespread landslides and floodwaters a story high.

The northern village of Bailan saw the heaviest rain, with 90 centimeters falling in 48 hours, with winds gusting up to 220km/h.

While Soulik wrought havoc in Taiwan, tearing roofs from homes and causing landslides that blocked roads, eastern China escaped its full force.

“Billboards have been shattered and trees have been uprooted” but no deaths or injuries were reported, Xinhua said.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

Cindy Sui in Taipei says officials are still assessing the extent of the damage

Typhoon SOULIK (07W) Satellite Image

Typhoon
SOULIK (07W)
Satellite Image

Tropical Storm 07W (SOULIK) JTWC ATCF Track

Former Typhoon 07W (SOULIK)
JTWC ATCF Track
(final warning)

Typhoon SOULIK (07W) NWS Guam Error Cone

Former Typhoon
SOULIK (07W)
NWS Guam Error Cone
(final advisory)

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15.07.2013 Tropical Storm Taiwan Multiple areas, [Northern regions] Damage level Details

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Tropical Storm in Taiwan on Saturday, 13 July, 2013 at 10:59 (10:59 AM) UTC.

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Thousands of people were evacuated in Taiwan as a powerful typhoon made landfall on the northern part of the island. Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau said Typhoon Soulik hit the northeast coast early Saturday morning. Businesses and schools were closed and residents were advised to stay indoors. Taiwan’s China Airlines and Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific Airways have warned of significant flight cancellations.

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Tropical Storm in Taiwan on Saturday, 13 July, 2013 at 10:59 (10:59 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Sunday, 14 July, 2013 at 04:55 UTC
Description
Typhoon Soulik has battered Taiwan with torrential rain and powerful winds, leaving one person dead and at least 30 injured. Roofs were ripped from homes, debris and fallen trees littered the streets and some areas were submerged by flood waters during Saturday’s wild weather. One town in central Taiwan reported “widespread” landslides and water levels a storey high. More heavy rain and strong winds are predicted throughout Saturday with the authorities warning of further landslides and flooding. Around 8000 people were evacuated from their homes before the typhoon struck, with hundreds of soldiers deployed to high-risk areas and the whole island declared an “alert zone” by the authorities. In the capital Taipei, a 50-year-old police officer died after being hit by bricks that came loose during the typhoon, the Central Emergency Operation Centre said. Three people were left seriously injured with 31 reported hurt across the island, most injured by trees or flying debris. Soulik made landfall on the northeast coast around 3am Saturday (0600 AEST), packing winds of up to 190km/h, the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) said.

“Heavy rains are expected throughout the day, especially in the mountainous areas in the centre and south,” a weather forecaster from the bureau told AFP. Strong winds were also predicted, he said, but added that the CWB was likely to lift the current land warning on Saturday night as the threat from the typhoon diminishes and it churns towards mainland China. Nine people were rescued from flooded homes in the Shiangshan area of Puli, a town in central Nantou county, which was also hit by landslides. “The water came very fast, catching residents totally unprepared – in some areas, it was one-storey deep,” township official Wu Yuan-ming told AFP. The nine caught in the floodwaters were rescued by firefighters in rubber boats after the river broke its banks, Wu said. “Flooding and landslides were widespread in the town, especially in the areas near mountains,” he added, calling the effects of the typhoon “more serious than we predicted”. Landslides reached the backyards of residents’ homes but they had already evacuated, Wu said.

A major landslide on a mountain road leading to Taian, a central town famous for its hot spring resorts, was also reported by local media. The northern village of Bailan saw the heaviest rain, measuring 900mm over the past two days, with winds gusting up to 220km/h. Streets were submerged under 30cm of seawater in the port city of Keelung, the National Fire Agency said, with flooding also reported in the coastal area of Yilan and in New Taipei City, the area surrounding the capital. Low-lying houses along the Hsintien River through greater Taipei were flooded, including one aboriginal village from which residents had been evacuated Friday, a police officer told AFP. Local television showed roofs ripped from homes in northern Keelung and in Taipei, where 120km/h winds and downpours disrupted power, uprooted trees and left the streets strewn with rubbish. Across Taiwan, electricity supplies in nearly 800,000 homes were down but half had been restored by Saturday afternoon, according to the Taiwan Power Company. Around 170 flights into and out of Taiwan were cancelled or delayed, while offices and schools remained closed, with the public advised to stay indoors.

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Tropical Storm in Taiwan on Saturday, 13 July, 2013 at 10:59 (10:59 AM) UTC.

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Updated: Monday, 15 July, 2013 at 03:05 UTC
Description
Typhoon Soulik’s strong winds caused one of the reactors at Taiwan’s First Nuclear Power Plant to automatically shut down as part of precautionary measures twice on Saturday. At 2:50 a.m. on July 13, strong winds knocked out systems designed to reduce the likelihood of direct lighting strikes on the facility at the plant’s number two reactor unit, resulting in an automatic shutdown. While repairs were carried out on the system, the reading for the number of neutrons became exceedingly high, once again leading to an emergency shutdown as part of protection measures. Taiwan Power Co. nuclear energy spokesman Tsai Fu-feng said both shutdowns are part of protection measures and “there are no safety concerns.” Tsai said however that there is room for improvement in the handling of the power plant. Taipower, as Taiwan Power Company is otherwise known, said yesterday that the affected lighting-reduction systems had been fixed. Taipower said it had planned to submit a report regarding the incident to the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) by yesterday afternoon, though no confirmation of this submission was available at the time of going to print. Upon the report’s approval at the AEC, the power plant is expected to be reconnected to the national power grid. It may take between 8 and 12 hours for activation at the earliest. The typhoon also led to a significant amount of detritus blocking the water inlet. The company will not only need to acquire approval from the AEC but also fix the blockage before the power plant resumes normal function. Tsai said the shutdown would not affect the country’s power supply. To meet the high electricity demand of summer days, Taipower may transfer power from Southern or Central Taiwan to fill the gap, Tsai said. The AEC said similar incidents have happened at the country’s nuclear power plants, and is still waiting on Taipower’s report for a detailed explanation of the cause and description of the accompanying procedures for handling the accident.

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A house sits half submerged in floodwaters caused by typhoon Soulik in Taipei on July 13, 2013. (Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

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HUFFINGTON POST

Typhoon Soulik, Torrential Rains Leave At Least 295 Dead Or Missing In China

Agence France Presse  |  By Posted: 07/15/2013 10:07 am EDT  |  Updated: 07/15/2013 10:11 am EDT

typhoon soulik china

At least 295 people have been confirmed dead or missing after rainstorms and Typhoon Soulik hit China, causing floods, landslides and buildings to collapse, the government said Monday.

Torrential rains have battered the southwestern province of Sichuan since July 7 and have led to 68 deaths, with another 179 people missing, the ministry of civil affairs said in a statement.

 

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