Tag Archive: Stress

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Ipomoea batatas, Convolvulaceae, Sweet Potato, storage roots; Karlsruhe, Germany. The plant is used in homeopathy as remedy: Ipomoea batatas (Ipom-b.)     Llez  



6 Anti-Inflammatory Powerhouses

Clean eating can put out the fire that’s making you sick.

August 24, 2015
Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and cancer. Sure, some inflammation is good—like the acute kind is a form of self-protection, your body’s immune response to a cut or pathogens entering the body. Chronic inflammation, however, means that your body is constantly producing immune cells, which can damage the body. This harmful inflammation is a result of never-ending stress, being overweight, or a diet high in things like sugar, trans fats, and various toxins.But while the wrong diet promotes excessive inflammation, a diet rich in clean foods can help reduce it and its harmful effects on your body. The following foods in particular are anti-inflammatory powerhouses:
Spices and Herbs
Herbs and spices like basil, rosemary, thyme, oregano, turmeric, peppercorns, ginger, and cinnamon are loaded with all sorts of antioxidants that have even been found to reduce pro-inflammatory compounds that build up on meat during grilling. And ginger and turmeric, in particular, have been linked to joint pain relief. Add them to marinades, dressings, spice rubs, and teas for a dose of health and flavor.Soy
Soy can reduce the inflammation marker C-reactive protein, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Incorporate clean sources of soy into your diet, such as tempeh or edamame.Try It: Eating clean has never been tastier or easier!


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Herbs and Spices

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Spices, seasoning, herbs and vegetables
Zak Greant from Vancouver, Canada


Cold Water Fish

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Essaouira,_Fish_Market   Attribution: Donar Reiskoffer



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Boca DoradaNueces



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Colorful Spices and TeasChristopher from Shanghai, China


See how these inflammation busting foods can help you here



“Why we are the way we are: the Internet of our brains. These are axonal nerve fibers in the real brain as determined by the measured anisotropy (directionality) of water molecules inside them. 3T 30 channel GRAPPA DTI scan protocol, deterministic tractography performed using TrackVis/FACT algorithm. You might know the subject :-)”

jgmarcelino from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Wikimedia . org



Disaster Survivors: How Stress Changes the Brain

How well a person recovers from traumatic events may depend  in part on their self-esteem, according to researchers who examined the effects of a major earthquake on the survivors’ brains.

The researchers had conducted brain scans of university students for a study before the Great East Japan Earthquake struck in 2011. After the earthquake, they repeated the scans on 37 of the same people, and tracked stress-induced changes in their brains in the following months.

“Most importantly, what these findings show, is that the brain is dynamic — that it’s responding to things that are going on in our environment, or things that are part of our personality,” said Rajita Sinha, professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, who wasn’t involved in the study. [Top 10 Mysteries of the Mind]

In the brain scans taken immediately after the incident, the researchers found a decrease in the volume of two brain regions, the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex, compared with the scans taken before the incident.

One year later, the researchers repeated the scans and found that the hippocampus continued to shrink, and people’s levels of depression and anxiety had not improved.


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Japan Quake Shows How Stress Alters the Brain

HealthDay April 29, 2014 SHARE

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A small study of people who experienced the devastating 2011 earthquake in Japan shows that although traumatic events can shrink parts of the brain, some of those regions can rebound once a person’s self-esteem returns.

“Higher self-esteem is one of the most important traits of resilience in the context of stressful life events,” said study author Atsushi Sekiguchi, who noted that these latest findings also illustrate that brain changes are dynamic and fluid over time.

Sekiguchi’s prior research had already demonstrated that people with lower self-esteem following a traumatic event are likely to experience a quick, short-term drop in the size of their orbitofrontal cortex and hippocampus. The first brain region is involved in decision-making and emotions, while the second area is involved in memory.

But by tracking the same individuals over time, Sekiguchi’s team observed that the “part of the brain volume which had decreased soon after a stressful life event [ultimately] increased, especially in individuals with [renewed] high self-esteem.”

Sekiguchi, from the division of medical neuroimage analysis at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, and his team report the findings in the April 29 online edition of Molecular Psychiatry.

To gain insight into how the 2011 earthquake — and ensuing tsunami that heavily damaged several nuclear reactors in northern Japan — affected its victims, the researchers focused on 37 men and women who were about 21 at the time.

All had MRI brain scans right after the earthquake, and then again one year later.

At the same time, the earthquake victims were given psychological assessments to gauge anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and other characteristics of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Investigators concluded that none of the patients ever developed full-blown PTSD.

Yet, the group did experience a big dip in self-esteem immediately following the earthquake. And by comparing their brain scans with those of 11 other people taken before the earthquake, the team determined that the loss of self-esteem was accompanied by a downsizing of the brain’s orbitofrontal cortex.


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By Michael,

Many people enjoy debating and discussing personal and political issues. However, in some cases, a debate is less than friendly and can become a source of conflict and stress. Sometimes it seems like “giving in” to agree to disagree and walk away from an argument. However, it can be vital to do that in order to preserve your relationships and protect both your mental and physical health.

Unnecessary fighting and arguing can raise your blood pressure; over time, poor anger management and conflict resolution skills can cause you heart attacks and strokes. In addition, high stress levels can make you more prone to disease in general and can increase your risk of certain types of cancers. For all these reasons, you should learn some simple techniques to help you determine when it’s best to agree to disagree.

Check Your Priorities
If you start getting upset or frustrated during a discussion, take a step back and ask yourself how important the issue is to you. If the discussion is academic or is on a topic that doesn’t really impact your life, then it shouldn’t matter whether your friends or family agree with you or not.

If the topic is one that is important to you for personal reasons, such as the best way to raise children or a discussion about political issues that directly impact your life, ask yourself two additional questions:

1. How likely am I to change the other person’s mind?
2. How important is my relationship with this person?


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Earth  Watch Report –  Drought



Plant Stress Paints Early Picture of Drought

by Kathryn Hansen for Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt MD (SPX)

Plant stress on on August 28, 2012, indicated significant drought in the U.S. Midwest. Credit: NASA/Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio/USDA-ARS

In July 2012, farmers in the U.S. Midwest and Plains regions watched crops wilt and die after a stretch of unusually low precipitation and high temperatures. Before a lack of rain and record-breaking heat signaled a problem, however, scientists observed another indication of drought in data from NASA and NOAA satellites: plant stress.

Healthy vegetation requires a certain amount of water from the soil every day to stay alive, and when soil moisture falls below adequate levels, plants become stressed. Scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) have developed a way to use satellite data to map that plant stress. The maps could soon aid in drought forecasts, and prove useful for applications such as crop yield estimates or decisions about crop loss compensation.

“Crop drought monitoring is of high practical value, and any advance notice of drought conditions helps the farmer make practical decisions sooner,” says Steve Running, an ecologist at University of Montana in Missoula.

A new animation of plant stress (top) shows how drought evolved across the United States from January 2010 through September 2012. In spring 2010, satellites measured cool leaf temperatures, indicating healthy plants and wetter-than-average conditions (green), over many areas across the country.

By summer 2011, satellites saw the warming of stressed vegetation, indicating significantly lower-than-usual water availability (red) in many areas, most notably in Texas. Crops were either dead or would soon be dead.

Drought in 2012 was the most severe and extensive in at least 25 years, according to the USDA’s Economic Research Service. By August 60 percent of farms were in areas experiencing drought, and by mid-September USDA had designated more than 2,000 counties as disaster areas.

“2012 was record-breaking, this was just a huge event,” says Martha Anderson with USDA-ARS in Beltsville, Md., who is working with a team to develop the plant stress indicator for drought and presented the research Dec. 5, at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

The 2012 event is what experts call a flash drought, meaning that it evolved quickly and unexpectedly. Low soil moisture was further depleted by the heat wave that started in May, and drought abruptly followed. By about May 5 the core regions of drought began to appear on the plant stress map – earlier than the signs of drought appeared in other indicators, such as rainfall measurements.

“We think there’s some early-warning potential with these plant stress maps, alerting us as the crops start to run out of water,” Anderson says.

Signals of plant stress may often appear first in satellite-derived maps of vegetation temperature before the crops have actually started to wilt and die. “The earlier we can learn things are turning south, presumably the more time we have to prepare for whatever actions might be taken.”

For example, farmers may decide they need to buy supplemental feed from outside the drought-affected area to support their livestock, or they may need to adjust contract or insurance decisions.

The U.S. Drought Monitor already uses a combination of indices, such as rainfall, to describe drought conditions each week. The monitor currently does not include plant stress, but the potential is being explored.

“Plant stress is one representation of drought impacts, and the drought monitoring community agrees that you can’t do this with just one tool – you need a lot of different tools,” Anderson says.

Plant stress information has the potential to improve the skill of existing forecasts that predict drought out to weeks or months. Also, because the plant stress information is derived from satellites, it can describe drought conditions in areas where rain gauge and radar networks are sparse – and it can do so at the scale of individual fields.

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Health And Wellness Report



Holistic Health  :   Health –



Five mental habits that steal years from your life


by: Mike Bundrant

(NaturalNews) Shocking research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism suggests that chronic stress increases your chance of death five-fold. Beyond that, stress tends to spoil life along the way. So, we all owe it to ourselves to get it under control.

One of the best ways to manage stress is to stop causing it. Here are five common mental habits that contribute to chronic stress, including what you can do about each one.

1. Self-criticism

Self-criticism usually shows up in the form of an unrelenting inner voice. No matter what you think, say or do, this part of your psyche has some scathing remark to make about it. Even your best intentions can be drowned in a sea of criticism.

What to do: Listen. It’s that simple. Listen to your critical voice as if it were a friend who had something important to say. It’s amazing what happens when people stop resisting their inner critic and simply listen, then ask for more.

More? Absolutely. Hear yourself out. If you are going to make the effort to criticize yourself in the first place, you might as well make a full attempt to understand it. Tolerate the criticism long enough to comprehend the underlying intention. You know you understand it when you can genuinely appreciate it and take the intended message into account.

2. Blame

The mother of all relationship issues, blame miraculously keeps you from having to accept responsibility for mistakes or admit you are wrong. Alas, the price for such a miracle is steep – you end up miserable. Most chronic blamers see themselves as victims in a world of incompetent, unfriendly, idiotic ne’er-do-wells.

To notice when others are incompetent and unfriendly is one thing. To position yourself as their victim is another matter entirely. To hold others accountable is one thing. To resent them in blame is another.

What to do:
Put yourself in the other’s shoes before you make any conclusions. Hold others accountable with compassion, not blame.

3. Autopilot thinking

Medical researchers suggest that autopilot thinking associated with the brain’s default mode network creates a ton of mental and physical stress. When your mind chatters on and on endlessly, it is not necessarily good for you. A fair amount of body tension usually accompanies autopilot thinking. Your body is not calm when your mind is not.

What to do: Engage your conscious mind. Write down all the autopilot thoughts for 60 seconds or so, then tune it to some white noise (the hum of the refrigerator, the sound of a fan blowing). You’ll be amazed at how your mind and body calm down.

4. Catastrophizing

Catastrophizing is taking a stressful thought and running with it to an extreme negative outcome. For example, you have the thought, I am late for work. Your mind gets a hold of this one and runs away with it. Oh no, I really am late! My boss is going to be so upset. He is really getting sick of me, I can tell. I’ll probably get fired. Then, I’ll have no money and no one will want to hang around me. I’ll lose my home and end up living under a bridge!

What to do: Write it down. Rather than resist, just take out a pen and paper. Write down the catastrophe. This slows down the runaway thought train. Look at it objectively and acknowledge there is a part of you that is fearful. We all have fears – this is completely normal. Take a deep breath and move on.

5. Withholding

This is common among men. Something bothers them and rather than express it, they suck it up and brood on it for a few hours to a few days….to a lifetime. Withholding your thoughts and feelings from others denies them the opportunity to work anything out with you. It’s a passive aggressive punishment that keeps the withholder in a state of chronic resentment and stress.

What to do: Express it (maturely). Holding onto grudges and biting back your feelings requires a tremendous amount of energy. Emotions are physical and it takes muscle tension to hold them back. Have you ever noticed someone holding back an emotion? They stop breathing and tense their muscles, physically blocking the flow of emotional energy. The muscle tension required to hold back the emotion soon becomes chronic muscle tension. It’s exhausting.

Learning to manage your mind is one of the best things you can do for your health!

Sources for this article include:

About the author:
Get the free mini-course taken by more than 15,000 people, Three Soul Stirring Questions That Reveal your Deepest Goals.

For a free, 30-minute strategy session with Mike Bundrant to discuss how this article applies to you, and to learn about life coaching or NLP training, please visit this page at the iNLP Center school of personal development.

Mike Bundrant is the host of Mental Health Exposed, a Natural News Radio program.

Follow Mike on Facebookfor a daily dose of personal development.


Stress Awareness Day: 10 Health Benefits Of Relaxation

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 04/16/2012 8:02 am Updated: 04/16/2012 8:02 am

You may have heard that a little bit of stress is actually good for you. In the just-right amount, that adrenaline rush can power you through a long day at work, boost your workouts and more.

But while it feels good to conquer the day, in the end, it just simply feels better — and is more beneficial to your health — to relax.

That’s of particular importance during the month of April, designated now for 20 years as Stress Awareness Month. April 16th, conveniently the day after one of the most stressful days of the year — tax day — is singled out as National Stress Awareness Day.

Why devote an entire month to stress when there are so many other health concerns plaguing our country? Some would argue that stress is our biggest health concern, given that it has been linked to so many other complications, from heart problems to dementia. Recently, CBS reported on a small study that examined the role of stress in seizures — and found that people are often misdiagnosed with epilepsy, when learning helpful relaxation and coping techniques may be a better solution.

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Nuts Linked With Lower Diabetes, Heart Disease Risks: Study

Nuts Diabetes

People who choose nuts as their snack of choice are doing their health a benefit, new research suggests.

A recent study shows that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts and cashews — also have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and heart disease.

The researchers from Louisiana State University Agricultural Center found that nut consumption is linked with lower levels of an inflammation marker called C-reactive protein (which is associated with heart disease and other chronic conditions) and higher levels of the “good” kind of cholesterol.

In addition, people who regularly ate the tree nuts had lower body mass indexes (BMI, a ratio of height to weight) than people who didn’t regularly eat nuts, the study said.

It should be noted that the study was funded by the nonprofit International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. It appeared recently in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

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Wallower, bottler or yeller? Understanding your anger style

By Camille Noe Pagan

Getty Images stock

Find out what your anger style says about you — and how you can find healthier ways to express your emotions.

Ticked off. Fed up. Enraged. Call it what you will, but we’ve all been there. Anger is part of being human, says Norman Rosenthal, MD, professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School. “Problems start when you bottle it up, react now and think later, or feel that a destructive response is justified just because you’re furious,” he says.

In fact, both flying off the handle and wallowing can take a toll on your health, increasing pain perception, depression, and your risk of heart disease. But a healthier response can soothe stress, lower your risk of heart problems and depression, and improve your relationships. If that all sounds too good to be true, get this: Experts say we can all learn to handle our anger more effectively. Here, discover the tempo of your temper, and find yourself a better rhythm.

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Holistic Health

The superfood power of wild caught salmon

By Dr. David Jockers, April 15 2012
(NaturalNews) Foods that have an incredible array of health benefits that go well beyond just their nutrient value are considered superfoods. These foods are typically loaded with a combination of critical fatty acids, anti-oxidant phytonutrients and essential amino acids. Wild-caught salmon found in non-polluted waters is an extraordinary superfood. Wild salmon is rich in long-chain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for healthy neurological and cardiovascular function. Astaxanthin is a unique…

Relaxation and meditation are just as crucial to health as diet and exercise

By Willow Tohi, April 15 2012
(NaturalNews) You gotta relax, man. Life in 2012 means a degree of stress, for just about everyone. Our bodies and minds can take a lot of abuse, but its all too easy to get into a negative cycle, and just keep sinking. You don’t sleep well, you get up late, so you don’t eat, your blood sugar is low, so your temper is short, etc. Stress. If you need more time, more energy, or better sleep, then its worth taking the time to relax and meditate. Believe it or not, this investment in yourself can improve…

The super herbal power of ginger

By Dr. David Jockers, April 15 2012
(NaturalNews) Superfoods are foods and herbs that have a unique concentration of nutrients that synergize together to boost potential. These foods are typically loaded with a combination of critical fatty acids, anti-oxidant phytonutrients and essential amino acids. Ginger is a superfood herb that has been used in many different regions of the world. Ginger is used throughout the world in countries such as China, Japan, India, Greece, Caribbean countries, England and the USA. It is made into ginger…


Pet Health

Anxiety and Compulsive Disorders in Cats

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in Cats

This is a behavioral disorder where a cat will engage in repetitive, exaggerated behaviors that are seemingly without purpose. For example, grooming to the extent that fur is rubbed off; compulsive pacing; repetitive vocalizations; and eating, sucking, or chewing on fabric. If it continues over a long period of time, it may become fixed behavior, no longer requiring the situation or environmental trigger that started the behavior in the first place. The behaviors may reinforce themselves due to the release of pain-relieving chemicals in the brain. The behavior may become a mechanism for coping when the cat is confronted with conditions that conflict with its needs, and owners may be unintentionally reinforcing the behavior by giving the cat attention or food when it behaves compulsively.

Age and gender do not seem to be factors in compulsive behavior. Some breeds or family lines may be predisposed to behavioral compulsions, with Siamese and other Asian breeds overrepresented as commonly exhibiting repetitive meowing and fabric-chewing behavior.

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10 Tips for a Happy and Healthy Kitten

Getting a new kitten is one of the best things in the world. They’re cute, soft as down, and as cuddly as, well, kittens. Nearly irresistible, kittens melt even the toughest of hearts; even Attila the Hun was thought to have several dozen kittens around at any given time (never verified, but he was a soft-on-the-inside kind of guy, so who’s to say?).

It’s good to get things started off on the right paw, and the food and care you choose can make all the difference in the health and happiness of your growing kitten. Here are 10 starter tips for you and your “mew” companion.

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Positivity Mind and Body

Wayne Dyer “I Can Do It”

Uploaded by on Nov 18, 2011

Serena Dyer the Creator and Director of joined her father Dr. Wayne Dyer in Tampa, Florida on November 11, 2011 for the “I Can Do It” conference at the Tampa Convention Center to speak on Child Trafficking.



[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]



The moral collapse of Western Medicine


By S. D. Wells,


(NaturalNews) How in the world did the U.S. change from having the best scientists in the world who were discovering vitamins, minerals, vaccines and cures for disease, to modern times, where the only medicine available is toxic with horrific side effects, and where nutrient-void, chemical-laden food is being sold at almost every restaurant and grocery store, all in the name of corporate profits that keep the public sick and in need of expensive care? In the early 1900’s, America was chock full…


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BASF gives up on pushing GMOs in Europe, moves operations to US where ‘Frankenfoods’ are not labeled


By Ethan A. Huff,


(NaturalNews) The latest health freedom victory in Europe means more toxic “Frankenfoods,” aka genetically-modified (GM) crops, for the United States. reports that Germany-based biotechnology giant BASF is officially calling it quits on trying to push GM crops in Europe. But the company’s withdrawal means that it will be relocating its plant science headquarters from Limburgerhof, Germany, to Raleigh, North Carolina. When explaining why BASF was pulling out of Europe entirely, Stefan…


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Holistic Health


Reverse cataracts naturally to avoid surgery


By Paul Fassa,


(NaturalNews) Cataracts are common occurrences among aging humans and often their pets. They can occur among younger humans also. The symptoms are cloudy vision, extreme glare sensitivity, with a sense of trying to see in heavy fog under certain lighting conditions. This occurs after proteins interlock to form a glaze over the eye lens. The accepted medical advice is surgical intervention, which usually does the trick if you have insurance or can afford up to $5,000 per eye for all the expenses…


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Dirty kids are healthy kids – the Hygiene Hypothesis


By J. D. Heyes,


(NaturalNews) Here’s a concept that most parents will find a little hard to believe: new research shows that it’s possible kids can be too clean. You read that right. That’s because all of the soap dispensers, hand sanitizers and alcohol-tinged wipes could be robbing our kids from exposure to the germs that help strengthen their immune systems. According to new research done on mice, increasing exposure to germs helps develop the immune system, thereby preventing allergies and other immune…


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Baby receives cocktail of seven vaccines, loses ability to speak, recovers with homeopathic shock remedies


By Healthy Times Newspaper,


(NaturalNews) Baby Irene’s dad agreed with his homeopathic physician, Hannah Eagle, about the dangers of vaccines. He certainly did not plan on vaccinating his 4-month old daughter. On December 4, 2011, however, under a tremendous amount of pressure from the family pediatrician, he and his wife acquiesced and allowed a single injection cocktail of seven vaccines, as follows: DPaT (3 vaccines: diphtheria, pertussis, tetnus), HIB, Pneumococcal, Polio, and Influenza.
Baby Irene stopped communicating…


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Oregano is a healing herb and natural anti-biotic


By Dr. David Jockers,


(NaturalNews) Oregano is a wonderful, aromatic herb that is native to the Mediterranean. It is thought to have originated in the mountainous regions of Greece, Turkey and Italy. It was named by the Ancient Greeks “Mountain Joy.” Oregano is one of the most powerful healing herbs and natural anti-biotics ever studied. Oregano has a warming and aromatic flavor to it. It can be very hot and bitter at times when it is picked fresh. The bite usually wanes as it is dried. Oregano became a staple of Italian…


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Pet Health


Does Your Cat Suddenly Bolt from the Room, Looking Back Like Something’s Chasing Her?


By Dr. Becker


She may have a weird syndrome called feline hyperesthesia. The skin and fur on her back — from shoulders to tail — ripples, rolls, twitches… and drives her to distraction. While this may seem like a silly problem, it can actually become quite serious. Learn what other symptoms this condition produces, how it’s usually diagnosed, and the recommended treatment.


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If Your Pet is Stressed Out, This Could Be the Reason


By Dr. Becker


Animals aren’t designed to lay around all day with nothing to do, nowhere to go, and no one to see. Boredom can be a big stressor in the lives of today’s dogs and cats, and stressed out pets often wind up with health and behavior problems.


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Positivity Mind and Body


Quantum Physic applied to Mind Power – Part 1 of 10


Uploaded by yourti


Philosophers, gurus, yogis, thinkers, masters, etc…, thoughts their empirical thinkings were thruths. They are today validated by quantum physic. We are all mighty : proof in the videos…enjoy.

This playlist contains all 10 videos you do not have to click to see the others . Just click once and it will play or you


Click here to view playlist




[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]