Tag Archive: Sochi


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One of the many stray dogs in Sochi that need forever homes.
Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

February 22, 2014

It looks like more Sochi dogs will be finding a new home here in the U.S. A couple of athletes have brought a few of them home and now another familiar face is stepping up to help these cute pooches. According to People on Feb, 21. former “BacheloretteAli Fedotowsky has followed suit and is headed back to the States with an adorable puppy by her side.

Fedotowsky has been in Sochi covering the Olympics for E! News and she is also an animal lover. She has been tweeting on how hungry the homeless dogs are and she has taken it upon herself to feed them in the streets while she was there.

The stray pups have been in the news ever since it was reported that they have been roaming the streets near the Olympic buildings and authorities had started exterminating them. A couple of Olympians, skier Gus Kenworthy and snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis, fell in love with a few of the dogs and started the ball rolling in bringing them back to the U.S.

Ali Fedotowsky has now joined in the efforts to find these canines their forever homes. She took to her Twitter to write her excitement about one of the sweet pups she had in hand.

“Got this little gal at a Sochi shelter. On my way to the vet to get her health certificate and passport so I can hopefully bring her back to the USA to be adopted,” the 29-year-old reality star wrote. “I can’t save them all, but I know someone in the states would love to have this little sweetheart!!!”

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PEOPLE

Ali Fedotowsky & Katherine Heigl Team Up to Rescue Strays in Sochi

02/23/2014 at 11:35 AM EST

Ali Fedotowsky & Katherine Heigl Team Up to Rescue Strays in Sochi
Ali Fedotowsky and Katherine Heigl

More celebrities are standing up for stray dogs in Sochi.

On Saturday afternoon, Katherine Heigl and her mother, Nancy, joined forces with Ali Fedotowsky to help find happy homes for two pups the former Bachelorette star fell in love with and brought back from Sochi (where she was an Olympic correspondent for E! News).

“This is Adler, which is a town next to Sochi,” Fedotowksy tells PEOPLE of one of the dogs she flew in with on Saturday afternoon. “She’s very playful.” A male dog, Sochi, had been ill on the flight and wasn’t so energetic.

Katherine, 35, and Nancy waited anxiously at Los Angeles International Airport to pick up the two dogs from Fedotowsky, 29, whose role in the rescue process was to get them to the United States safely. They heard of Sochi’s illness prior to his arrival: “Sochi hasn’t eaten in 15 hours and is throwing up so we are hoping that it’s just from the travel,” Katherine said as she arrived at LAX.

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PEOPLE

The Daily Treat: Snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis to Bring Home Stray Dog from Sochi

02/18/2014 at 05:00 PM EST

Lindsey Jacobellis Bringing Stray Pup Home from Sochi: Photo
Lindsey Jacobellis and her new puppy
Courtesy Holly Brooks

Forget gold medals – dogs are the most coveted accessory in Sochi, Russia, right now.

Like U.S. Olympic freeskier Gus Kenworthy, snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis is bringing one of the city’s stray dogs home to the United States.

“This Sochi Stray scored a one way ticket to the USA with [Lindsey],” Tweeted Jacobellis’s teammate, Holly Brooks, on Monday, sharing a photo of the snowboarder cuddling her adorable pup.

Canine cupid struck right around Valentine’s Day for the 28-year-old athlete, who posted an affectionate photo of her own to Instagram on February 15. “Me and my pup,” wrote Jacobellis, a self-described animal lover.

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Gus Kenworthy’s puppies: Olympian has ‘puppy love’ over Sochi’s strays

Gus Kenworthy is in love – with Sochi’s stray pups. The American freeskier who took the silver today is planning on returning home with more than just a medal to show off. Kenworthy hopes to fly back to Colorado with a family of Sochi’s stray puppies.

Yahoo! Sports said today that the 22-year-old, who picked up the silver medal as part of a U.S. podium sweep in the new Slopestyle sport, plans to rescue dogs – a mother and four pups – that live in a security tent near the Gorki Media Center, about two miles away from the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park skiing venue.

“I’m doing all that I can to try and bring them back with me,” Kenworthy said. “They’re like the cutest things ever.”

Kenworthy, as well as many other Olympic athletes, have been buzzing over recent stories regarding thousands of Sochi stray dogs, who have been ordered rounded up and killed by city officials – an attempt to “clean up” the streets of Sochi for the games.

Sochi stray dogs: Dogs smuggled out of Sochi to prevent city contracted killing

“I’ve been a dog lover my whole life and to find the cutest family of strays ever here at the Olympics was just a fairy-tale way to have it go down,” Kenworthy said, shortly after winning his silver today.

He tweeted his intentions Wednesday and, as you might expect, was inundated with positive responses.

According to MSN on Wednesday, animal lovers and animal rights advocates are removing stray dogs and “smuggling” them out of the city before they are rounded up for mass euthanasia.

The International Olympic Committee has responded to the allegations that the city ordered thousands of strays exterminated by stating that no “healthy” dogs are being killed in Sochi, a report that those on the streets decry as being absolutely untrue.

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How to adopt a stray dog from Sochi

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SOCHI, Russia — If you want to adopt a stray dog from Sochi, the first thing you should probably do is get on a plane to Sochi.

It can be done over the phone and e-mail, said Humane Society International director for companion animals and engagement Kelly O’Meara, but it will require significant cooperation from a local and several layers of logistics that would be much less complicated in person.

The good news, though, is that any American already in Sochi or planning on coming during the Olympic Games can bring home one of the now-famous pups relatively easily and inexpensively in most cases.

SHELTER: For now, there is a home for some

The prevalence of stray dogs — and the local organizing committee’s decision to hire a pest control company to kill thousands of them — was a predominant story line in the lead-up to the Olympics. Since then, a temporary shelter backed by a Russian billionaire has opened up just outside of town, and the attention devoted to the issue has inspired many Americans to ask about how they can adopt one of the dogs that survived.

Typically, O’Meara said, the Humane Society encourages Americans to adopt pets domestically, since there are many who need homes. But with Sochi in the spotlight, HSI has posted a point-by-point guide on its Web page detailing how to bring one home from Russia.

“I think it’s a situation where everyone’s hearing about the very sad and terrible means of killing these dogs and people are feeling a bit helpless in what they can do,” O’Meara said in a phone interview Monday. “This is a life-or-death situation for many of them that are being seen in and around Sochi, and that’s why people are sort of jumping in and asking how they can help.”

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Olympics volunteers sit near two stray dogs outside the Gorki media center in Krasnaya Polyana near Sochi, Russia, Jan. 30, 2014.

Olympics volunteers sit near two stray dogs outside the Gorki media center in Krasnaya Polyana near Sochi, Russia, Jan. 30, 2014.

Reuters

Oleg Deripaska’s gesture could help save hundreds of dogs that are in danger of being rounded up and destroyed as the host city on the Black Sea tries to clear them off the streets.

It could also help keep Deripaska in Putin’s good books after speculation over the dogs’ fate threatened to undermine the Russian president’s hopes of using the Games to portray Russia as a tolerant, modern state.

“You don’t see what’s going on here [in Sochi]?” Sonya Turpyetkina, a veterinarian, said of the treatment of the many dogs that roam free. “I keep seeing poisoned bait. This is repulsive, they are dying in horrible pain.”

She is a volunteer at the shelter funded by Deripaska at Baranovka near Sochi. As she spoke to Reuters at the shelter, he was visiting the site, showing a group of people around.

The shelter houses only about 40 dogs in basic pens, but city officials say such protection offers the animals a chance of finding a permanent owner and home.

A Sochi city official said no healthy dogs were being killed in the city even though a local company says it has a contract to round them up, and the International Olympic Committee also has said only sick and dying dogs are being destroyed.

But animal rights activists have launched a campaign to save the dogs, which has attracted negative publicity to Sochi and appears to have prompted Deripaska to step in.

He has been quoted as saying he has loved dogs since he was a boy. But his act is far from his first that could be beneficial to the Games, which he says he believes can turn Sochi into a thriving modern resort.

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Updated Feb. 6, 2014 12:59 p.m. ET

Russia deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak, left, and Russian Olympic Committee President Alexander Zhukov, right,smile ahead of a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the opening of a center for fans of the Russian national team in Sochi on Thursday. Mr. Kozak dismissed complaints that hotels built for the Olympics weren’t ready in time. ZUMAPRESS.com

SOCHI, RussiaRooms without doorknobs, locks or heat, dysfunctional toilets, surprise early-morning fire alarms and packs of stray dogs: These are the initial images of the 2014 Winter Olympics that foreign journalists have blasted around the world from their officially assigned hotels—and the wave of criticism has rankled Russian officials.

Dmitry Kozak, the deputy prime minister responsible for the Olympic preparations, seemed to reflect the view held among many Russian officials that some Western visitors are deliberately trying to sabotage Sochi’s big debut out of bias against Russia. “We have surveillance video from the hotels that shows people turn on the shower, direct the nozzle at the wall and then leave the room for the whole day,” he said. An aide then pulled a reporter away before Mr. Kozak could be questioned further on surveillance in hotel rooms. “We’re doing a tour of the media center,” the aide said.

A spokesman for Mr. Kozak later on Thursday said there is absolutely no surveillance in hotel rooms or bathrooms occupied by guests. He said there was surveillance on premises during construction and cleaning of Sochi’s venues and hotels and that is likely what Mr. Kozak was referencing. A senior official at a company that built a number of the hotels also said there is no such surveillance in rooms occupied by guests.

Mr. Kozak toured the giant, gleaming new media center Thursday morning, marveling at the huge workspace built specially for the thousands of journalists who have come from around the world to cover the Games.

Asked about the widely reported problems with hotel rooms not being ready for guests, he was dismissive. “We’ve put 100,000 guests in rooms and only gotten 103 registered complaints and every one of those is being taken care of,” he said. (It wasn’t clear what Mr. Kozak was counting as a registered complaint.)

In a news conference, Mr. Kozak said he had no “claims against Western or Russian journalists who are doing their jobs.” Most of the critical views of the accommodations or preparations amount to “small imperfections in the Olympic facilities and tourist infrastructure,” Mr. Kozak said, noting that it wasn’t long ago that the entire Olympic area was an “open field.”…..

Construction laborers Thursday work on the pavement of an unfinished apartment building in the mountain media village at the Rosa Khutor alpine resort near Sochi. michael dalder/Reuters

To build the facilities for the roughly $50 billion Sochi Olympics, Russia has built nearly an entire city from scratch. Organizers completed all the sporting venues, including the hockey and figure skating arenas, well ahead of time, as well as two villages for the Olympic competitors—one in the mountains and one by the sea.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Christmas service in Sochi.Zoom

AFP

Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Christmas service in Sochi.

Alexei Kudrin is seen as having good chances to succeed Dmitry Medvedev as Russian prime minister. In a SPIEGEL interview, he speaks about the need for more democracy in his country, President Putin’s pragmatism and the dangers still facing the euro zone.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Kudrin, why have you described the past year as being, both politically and economically, a lost year for Russia? It sounds bitter.

 

ANZEIGE

Kudrin: Economic reform came to a standstill, and political reforms didn’t produce the results I had hoped for. Although people can now elect governors directly once again, there are too many obstacles for candidates that are not backed by the government. But I do see one important, positive trend: A new, active civil society has developed.

SPIEGEL: But isn’t it already on the wane once again? The number of people attending protests against President Vladimir Putin is declining.

Kudrin: You shouldn’t base your assessment of civil society solely on the number of demonstrators. And besides, only a radical minority was calling for Putin’s resignation at the first major demonstrations. The majority took to the streets because parliamentary elections were not being conducted fairly. But they recognized that a majority of the people elected Putin. Why then should Putin resign? The majority of the demonstrators didn’t want the government overthrown from one day to the next. But it does want fundamental reforms.

SPIEGEL: What is the first thing that should be done?

Kudrin: Russia needs free elections. It will be a difficult and protracted process, which is something I pointed out in my speech at the mass demonstration way back in December 2011. Simply repeating the bogus parliamentary election, as some were demanding at the time, wouldn’t have done much good. For the most part, it would have produced a similar outcome, because there wouldn’t have been any strong, new parties yet. We have to develop new parties and pass laws that prevent election fraud. Candidates should have equal access to the media, and business owners who fund opposition parties should no longer be punished for doing so. The apparatus of state cannot be used to support a specific party. This has been so widespread until now that we even have a term for it in Russia: “administrative resources.” Russia has to take a chance with more democracy.

SPIEGEL: Why didn’t Putin seek a dialogue with the opposition instead of launching a series of repressive laws?

Kudrin: In the wake of obvious election fraud, I went to see him and proposed precisely such a dialogue. The time is ripe for more political competition. Putin didn’t reject the idea at the time, but said that he would come back to it later on. Then he apparently weighed his options and chose a different path.

SPIEGEL: You and Putin have been friends since the 1990s and you could become prime minister if Dmitry Medvedev falls. You were also Russia’s finance minister for 11 years. Is the president open to criticism from you and others?

Kudrin: He’s a very good listener. He listens to all positions during meetings and then he makes his decision. Sometimes he supported me when most of the others were against me, and sometimes he didn’t. Above all, Putin is pragmatic.

SPIEGEL: How successful was your attempt to mediate between Putin and the opposition?

Kudrin: I failed, but I’m glad I tried.

 

Read Full Interview Here