Advertisements

Tag Archive: Rape


Published on Apr 4, 2013

A number of women are in “very bad shape” after allegedly being attacked by pro-government militiamen and a taxi driver.

 

*********************************************************************************************************

 

Three British Women from Gaza Aid Convoy raped by Taxi Driver and Two Libyan Soldiers

Christof Lehmann (nsnbc),- Three British woman working with a humanitarian aid convoy destined for Gaza have been raped by Libyan soldiers in Bengazi, after being kidnapped by the soldiers and a taxi driver. 

Abdelhakim Belhadj, From Al-Qaeda Commander to NATO Ally and Tripoli Military Governor

Abdelhakim Belhadj, From Al-Qaeda Commander to NATO Ally and Tripoli Military Governor

After leaving Britain for the Palestinian Gaza Strip, the aid convoy had been stalled at the Libyan – Egyptian border for several weeks. After the rape, the three women were taken to a Libyan hospital and are reportedly in a bad psychological condition. Two of the perpetrators are soldiers of the regular Libyan military, while the third perpetrator is a taxi driver.

The Libyan Deputy Prime Minister Al-Basri, who visited the three women at the hospital, appeared on the Libyan television station al-Hurra, expressing his regret over, that two of the rapists had been Libyan soldiers. Al-Basri stressed, that the rapists behavior and crime does not reflect the ethics of the Libyan army.

Two of the raped women, who are sisters, were kidnapped together with their father. All three of the women were part of the humanitarian aid convoy. The woman were reportedly raped while the father of the two sisters, and colleague to the third woman was forced to witness the outrage.

The aid convoy has been organized by IHH, a humanitarian NGO based in Turkey. The convoy itself was named after the Marvi Marmara, the Turkish Gaza Flotilla vessel which was boarded by Israeli troops in international waters while en route to the Gaza Strip.

After Libya was overrun by foreign backed Islamist Extremists with ties to the Al-Qaeda linked Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, LIFG, under the command of the mastermind behind the Madrid Train bombings in 2004, Abedelhakim Belhadj, and after a new Libyan government was installed with the aid of NATO and GCC member states, many of the extremists acquired positions of government. The country has since been unstable and the situation is by many described as a state of virtual anarchy.

 

Read Full Article Here

Advertisements

ABCNewsABCNews

Published on Mar 22, 2013

Should the teens who filmed the young woman being sexually assaulted be held accountable?

 

********************************************************************************

Are Anonymous The Heroes Of The Steubenville Rape Case?

By: Wednesday March 20, 2013 10:07 am

 

Questions still surround the Steubenville Rape Case even after the guilty verdict that sent two of the perpetrators to prison for years. David Zirin argues that without the involvement of hackers the case was set to be dropped.

I really think that the heroes in this story are the hackers who got the photos out there because I think that actually led to a kind of shaming process that pushed this trial forward

It is hard to conclusively prove anything in this regard, as is the nature of counter-factuals, but there is some evidence to suggest that the school and law enforcement were not taking the rape seriously, at least initially. One of the journalists covering the rape reported that Steubenville residents were reporting to her that a coverup was taking place.

Soon locals began contacting me stating that they believed there was a cover-up into investigation of the charges. That’s not a new allegation for Steubenville. There is also a belief among residents of Steubenville that high school athletes are given a pass when it comes to accountability for bad behavior.

The notion of giving student athletes or “jocks” a pass on sexual assault or really a number of offenses is nothing new. Athletes are given preferential treatment in a number of ways as Zirin notes.

There is so much hero worship that goes on in high schools and colleges of these young men, and there’s so many adults who effectively pay these men in worship and kiss these guys’ butts…

They’re given women as if women are, in fact, part of a gutter economy that says, ‘You are great, here is what you get,’ and that does breed a culture where these young men don’t understand that ‘no’ means ‘no.’ And it normalizes a culture where young men and women, like in Steubenville, can see what’s happening right in front of their face and yet not see a crime taking place.

 

Read Full Article Here

CNN grieves that guilty verdict ruined ‘promising’ lives of Steubenville rapists

By David Edwards
Sunday, March 17, 2013 13:41 EDT
CNN Candy Crowley reports on guilty verdict in Steubenville rape trial

CNN broke the news on Sunday of a guilty verdict in a rape case in Steubenville, Ohio by lamenting that the “promising” lives of the rapists had been ruined, but spent very little time focusing on how the 16-year-old victim would have to live with what was done to her.

Judge Thomas Lipps announced on Sunday that Trent Mays, 17, and Ma’lik Richmond, 16, would be given a maximum sentence after being found guilty of raping a 16-year-old girl while she was unconscious. Richmond could be released from a juvenile rehabilitation facility by the age of 21 and Mays could be incarcerated until the age of 24.

CNN’s Candy Crowley began her breaking news report by showing Lipps handing down the sentence and telling CNN reporter Poppy Harlow that she “cannot imagine” how emotional the sentencing must have been.

Harlow explained that it had been “incredibly difficult” to watch “as these two young men — who had such promising futures, star football players, very good students — literally watched as they believed their life fell apart.”

“One of the young men, Ma’lik Richmond, as that sentence came down, he collapsed,” the CNN reporter recalled, adding that the convicted rapist told his attorney that “my life is over, no one is going to want me now.”

At that point, CNN played video of Richmond crying and hugging his lawyer in the courtroom.

“I was sitting about three feet from Ma’lik when he gave that statement,” Harlow said. “It was very difficult to watch.”

Read Full Article and Watch Videos Here

*******************************************************************************************

Hacker Group Anonymous Leaks Chilling Video in Case of Alleged Steubenville Rape, Cover-Up

Published on Jan 7, 2013

DemocracyNow.org – We turn to Steubenville, Ohio, where members of a high school football team allegedly raped an underage girl and possibly urinated on her unconscious body over the course of an evening of partying in late August. The young men chronicled their actions on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. But after many in the town of Steubenville, including the high school football coach, rallied to the players’ defense, the hacker group “Anonymous” vowed to release the accused players’ personal information unless an apology was made. Anonymous has since released a video showing a male Steubenville high schooler joking about the alleged victim. We’re joined by three guests: Monika Johnson Hostler, president of the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence; Kristen Gwynne, an associate editor at Alternet; and “X”, a member of the hacktivist group Anonymous using a pseudonym.

******************************************************************************************

Steubenville rape and India gang rape show India isn’t so ‘backward’

By The Christian Science Monitor
Friday, March 15, 2013 21:05 EDT
Steubenville protest 010512 by roniweb via Flickr CC

The December 2012 gang rape in New Delhi, India, deserves the public condemnation and outrage that it has brought. But much of the commentary on the case has gone beyond this, holding up the case as evidence of India’s larger flaws. The subtext writes India off as a backward and incorrigible third world country, whose primitive norms and lack of rule of law put it outside of modern democracies with more reliable norms and laws.

The unfortunate truth is that India’s reported rape rate, and even the slightly higher rate in New Delhi where the gang rape occurred, is less than that of typical European and American rates. In the days following the attack, scores of protests were held all over India but mostly in the New Delhi region where the attack occurred. Democracy went on the move, as thousands upon thousands of people joined in the calls for justice.

The Indian reaction to the incident is in many ways more gratifying and promising than reactions to American rape cases. Take the Steubenville, Ohio, case, which began trial on Wednesday. It has not generated nearly as much public outrage as the case in India. If there is a larger lesson that the gang rape and the public outcry that followed teach us about India, it is one of promise and hope, not alienation and despair.

But commentators have painted a different picture. Lakshmi Chaudhry wrote in The Nation: “[T]here is only one India, a social Darwinian nation where there is no rule of law; where might always makes right, whether your power derives from your gender, money, caste or sheer numbers, as in the case of a gang rape….The young girl who paid an astronomically steep price for an evening out at the movies proved that the so-called ‘new India’ exists in a bubble built on the delusion of safety.”

Is India indeed “a social Darwinian nation,” to be marked off from other, civilized democracies?

According to UN figures, India’s reported rape rate is 1.8 per 100,000 population (Delhi City’s is 2.8), as compared, for example, to Ireland’s 10.7, Norway’s 19.2, or America’s 27.3. Of course, given the intimate nature of the offense and its social stigma, the actual rape rates are generally higher than these official rates based on reports to police. By last official US estimate, only a half to a third of rapes are reported; and it could be that the reporting rates are even worse in other countries, including India. But the larger picture suggests that the India rape problem may not be that different from the West’s.

Read Full Article Here

AFPBy AFP | AFP – 17 hours ago

  • Demonstrators take part in a One Billion Rising rally in New Delhi, on February 14, 2013. Indians were at the forefront of global protests in the campaign for women's rights, galvanised by the recent fatal gangrape that shocked the country

    View PhotoAFP/AFP/File – Demonstrators take part in a One Billion Rising rally in New Delhi, on February 14, 2013. Indians were at the forefront of global protests in the campaign for women’s rights, galvanised by the …more 

Three sisters aged between six and 11 were raped and murdered before their bodies were dumped down a village well in rural western India, police said on Wednesday.

The bodies of the three schoolgirls were found last week, two days after they went missing on February 14 from their home in the Bhandara district of Maharashtra state, police superintendent Aarti Singh told AFP.

“The bodies of the three young girls were found in a well, with their schoolbags and footwear,” Singh told AFP by phone from Nagpur, adding they were aged six, nine and 11.

“The post-mortem has confirmed that the girls were raped and then murdered.”

 

Read Full Article Here

 

Transcript

JIHAN HAFIZ, TRNN CORRESPONDENT, CAIRO: It’s a grim reality that has lately united Egyptian women from all walks of life. Two years of increased sexualized violence against female protesters has forced an ugly epidemic into the national spotlight. The gang rapes and attacks on women in the revolution’s iconic Tahrir Square enraged many Egyptians to organize this protest specifically against sexualized violence. Angry chants condemned a system that condones and perpetuates violence targeting women.

JIHAN FADEL, EGYPTIAN ACTRESS (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): There was harassment before the revolution, but what we have now is gangs. I’m talking about 30, 40, 50 men attacking with knives. That’s not harassment. They’re attacking women with pocket knives. Is that harassment? These are crimes.HAFIZ: Increased attacks singling out female protesters exploded over the past two years, culminating in scenes like this on January 25 last month. Volunteers and activists with anti-harassment campaigns filmed these mob attacks against women this past January 25.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): That’s Reem! There’s Reem! She’s in that one! There is another girl!HAFIZ: Some of them were their fellow volunteers. Here one woman tries to comfort her infant daughter as a mob moves in. Inside these mobs, over a dozen women were gang-raped, relentlessly groped, stripped naked of their clothes, and assaulted with knives and iron rods. In one case, a 19-year-old girl was rushed to emergency surgery with large gashes to her genitalia. Such savagery has provoked women to arm themselves, brandishing their weapons during this march as a clear warning to their attackers.~~~REPORTER (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): Why are you holding this knife in the march?DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): Because no one is going to force us into our homes, no one is going to scare us into hiding in our homes. and we are going to arm ourselves to defend ourselves. And any dog who dares to come near us, I will slice him! These crimes are orchestrated. It’s a social disease and it’s present in this society. But what is happening now is organized crime.~~~HAFIZ: Rights groups and activists are convinced the systematic attacks are products of state-sponsored repression. LODNA DARWISH, ORGANIZER, OPANTISH: This is not the first time that the government uses sexual violence to intimidate men and women, especially women. We’ve been seeing, since Mubarak years until now, the government paying thugs—and it’s proven—to come and sexually harass women. They would come to the protest and not beat up women, just sexually harass them, undress them, drag them undressed—and everybody probably saw the video of the blue-bra girl who was stripped of her clothes and dragged on the streets. This was the army. And then there was the virginity test, the so-called virginity test, which was like a rape incident of the army again, forcing 18 women to go through virginity tests. So it’s a continuous pattern of sexual humiliation.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): Hi. I’m with the campaign against sexual harassment. If there is any harassment in the square—.HAFIZ: A number of newly-formed campaigns combating sexual harassment have been mobilizing within communities and on the streets.DEMONSTRATORS (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): We the women will free Egypt!HAFIZ: As the march roars through this busy neighborhood, scuffles break out between some of the female marchers and male onlookers.DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): He said women are raped and harassed depending on how they dress. So I shamed him! In Arabic and English! I said, does anyone leave their home naked? Even if she dressed indecent, would she leave her home naked? Dog! That’s the Brotherhood’s mentality! They do this so we go back to our homes. But we will never!HAFIZ: Although daily harassment is prevalent in this socially conservative society, the subject is often ignored when addressed.~~~DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): I no longer take my wife out because of harassment. DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): We take a short trip on the metro, and I get into 36 fights.DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): No, no.DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): We don’t have the money to take a cab. If we take any public transportation, I have to sit her far against the window.DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): No, no! There is no such thing!DEMONSTRATOR (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): Don’t put Egypt in that category.~~~SALMA SAID, ORGANIZER, OPANTISH: We’re not only facing the problem of harassment, of sexual harassment; we’re also facing a huge problem of society wanting to be silent about it, the men being extremely aggressive when anyone trying to discuss what is happening.HAFIZ: A recent study found over 80 percent of Egyptian women and over 95 percent of foreign women have experienced sexual harassment. Videos of mob assaults of women started appearing on YouTube years before the revolution. Salma was among some of the first to blog about it several years ago.SAID: And I wrote my testimony about the time, the many, many, many times that I was sexually abused or sexually harassed from when I was a child till, like, now. And I asked other women to write about it as well, because I was—I mean, I was going to go—going crazy because men said that these things don’t happen in Egypt and that Egypt is a religious country and these kind of things. So it happened, and I was sure that the same people who were saying this are the people who are harassing women in the street.HAFIZ: Considered a taboo subject, victims are commonly blamed for the attack while the perpetrator is let off.FADEL: But no one speaks out against it. Why? Because the victim is a woman, because they argue: what brought her there in the first place? Why is she in the streets? Women are supposed to be at home. Those who come to the streets are indecent. Rather than elicit a response, people are mocking it [rather] than responding to it.HAFIZ: In the urban slums and among the rural poor, the issue is practically ignored.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): There is no religion. There’s no life. There is no father who tells their sons, that’s wrong. There is no concern for it. No one walks in the street and considers, this could be my mother or sister and it might happen to her. There is no such talk.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): It used to be just one individual, not the entire society against the girl. And there is no distinction. It doesn’t matter if she’s covered, showing her hair, elderly, a child. There is no distinction.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): I sat down and had a talk with my daughter, because rape and harassment also happens between teachers and the girls, to children my daughter’s age. Of course, she is just a child. She doesn’t understand anything. But I speak with her, and so does Sheren. We tell her not to go into the bathroom with the teacher.HAFIZ: These women have quietly formed a support group to deal with harassment and sexual abuse in their community.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): She didn’t have any pants on.HAFIZ: The silence is slowly being broken. Public discussion is opening up after the latest survivors of the mob attacks braved the backlash and recounted their experiences on national television.UNIDENTIFIED (SUBTITLED TRANSL.): I felt as if I would die in that moment.SAID: They have done an amazing favor for the rest of us, for everyone else, because they didn’t worry about facing their neighbors, their families. They were like, it’s not our fault that we were assaulted; it’s your fault, it’s society’s fault, it’s the men’s fault, it’s the government’s fault; and we are not going to suffer above our suffering from what happened; we have to solve this, and we’re going to speak up and we’re going to talk about it and we’re going to, like, make it explode in everyone’s faces.HAFIZ: But it remains a long upward battle in this patriarchal society. A sheikh from the prominent Al-Azhar Institution issued a fatwa encouraging the rape of women during protests. During Friday’s protests and on the front lines during clashes, women roamed amongst their male counterparts, asserting their resolve and participation in Egypt’s ongoing revolution will remain. Jihan Hafiz for The Real News, Cairo, Egypt.

End

DISCLAIMER: Please note that transcripts for The Real News Network are typed from a recording of the program. TRNN cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.

Saudi Arabia: Islamic cleric rapes, tortures, kills daughter, pays fine

 

Lama al-Ghamdi
Lama al-Ghamdi  Credits:  Twitter.com

In Saudi Arabia an Islamic cleric who admits to raping, torturing and killing his daughter received a fine but no jail time for his heinous crime. Saudi media reports that the father paid 200,000 riyals ($50,000 US) in “blood money” for his crime, but will not be required to serve any time in prison.

In response to the heinous crime, and lack of justice for five-year old victim Lama al-Ghamdi, the women’s rights activist Manal al-Sharif and others issued a press release on Feb 2, and launched a Twitter campaign using the hashtags #AnaLama (Arabic for “I am Lama”) and #IamLama, demanding legislation criminalizing violence against women and children.

February 4, 2013

Rape Squads and Saudi Dollars

By James Lewis

 American Thinker

Forget Springtime for Hitler. In the Era of Obama we have official Arab Springtime for Morsi, complete with Muslim Brotherhood rape squads going out for the very moral purpose of teaching Egyptian girls and women never to escape their sacred house arrest without a male escort. This is Shari’a law as enforced in Saudi Arabia as well as in the city of London.

StrategyPage, an excellent military website, gives us this information about who is paying for the worldwide jihad. On the Sunni side of the street it turns out to be our friends the Saudis:

“Where exactly did the current crop of Islamic terrorists come from? Basically, they came from Saudi Arabia… Saudi Arabia was also exporting billions of dollars, and thousands of Wahhabi preachers… Because of international media networks, Islamic terrorism was no longer a bunch of separate problems…”

And there we are today. The Saudis are using their billions to export 7th century Arabian barbarism to the rest of the world, and the Iranian mullahs across the Gulf are exporting their version to Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Gaza, and Syria. But basically it’s two flavors of the same criminal ideology, which sanctifies rape and killing for the sake of Allah.

As any Muslim theocrat will tell you, women are responsible for being raped. If they cover their bodies properly and are always escorted by their fathers or brothers, they would not be raped. On the other hand, if they escape their home jails and shame the family honor they deserve death.

Read Full Article Here

Are  you  kidding  me?  This is  right on  up there  with the  remarks  stating that pregnancy as a  result  of  rape  was inmpossible because the  woman’s body  had  the means to  shut itself  down and  prevent  pregnancy  as a  rsult of a true rape.  Once  again criminalizing the  victim.  Where  will the  idiocy end?

It is one thing  to be  opposed  to  abortion  because one was just  too lazy or ignorant  to  use  birth  control.  It is , however , a  whole other matter  to  force  the  victim  of an  attack  such as  rape or  incest  to carry  a pregnancy  full term and  deem it  State Evidence!!

 Perhaps if the system  was not  so  corrupt and  inept  then  there  could  be legitimate  and  intelligent   dialogue  on the  subject.  But  the  efficacy  of the  system is  apalling and  severly  lacking  both in  proper  care for unwanted  children and  counseling  for  women  who are   having  trouble  with  unplanned  pregnancies.    More  support  is  needed , more  action and  less  lip service  has  always  gotten the  job  done.  Calling a fetus a  child is not the  answer.  Making laws  and  establishing  a  system that  will properly  care  for  that  child  is the  key  here.  You  cannot  ask of  others  what  you are  unwilling to do  yourselves….PERIOD!!

~Desert Rose~

 

*********************************************************************************

 

Laura Bassett
Huffington Post
Thu, 24 Jan 2013 14:34 CST

New Mexico State Rep. Cathrynn Brown (R) is the author of the bill and one its sponsors.

A Republican lawmaker in New Mexico introduced a bill on Wednesday that would legally require victims of rape to carry their pregnancies to term in order to use the fetus as evidence for a sexual assault trial.

House Bill 206, introduced by state Rep. Cathrynn Brown (R), would charge a rape victim who ended her pregnancy with a third-degree felony for “tampering with evidence.”

“Tampering with evidence shall include procuring or facilitating an abortion, or compelling or coercing another to obtain an abortion, of a fetus that is the result of criminal sexual penetration or incest with the intent to destroy evidence of the crime,” the bill says.

Third-degree felonies in New Mexico carry a sentence of up to three years in prison.

Women enjoy being raped, says supreme court hopeful

MetroNews

Muhammad Daming Sunusi (
Muhammad Daming Sunusi (Picture: YouTube)

A budding supreme court judge has ignited public outrage by saying women enjoy being raped.

Muhammad Daming Sunusi made the quip during a vetting session for Indonesia’s highest court.

When asked his views on the death penalty for rapists, he replied: ‘The rapist and the victim of rape both enjoy it, so we must think carefully before imposing the death penalty.’

According to reports the parliamentary selection panel laughed at his comments, but drew immediate criticism on social media and from rights groups.

Mr Daming later apologised for the remark, which he said was ‘intended to break the ice’.

Speaking at a press conference he declared: ‘I apologise to the Indonesian public from the bottom of my heart. I realise those words shouldn’t have come out from anyone, let alone a justice hopeful.’

Despite the apology two political parties have already said they would vote against Mr Daming being elected as one of 23 judges at the court in Jakarta.

Women’s rights groups have also suggested the chief judge of Palembang high court be censured.

One of the two hospitals which reportedly refused to conduct an exam on a possible rape victim last month.Zoom

DPA

One of the two hospitals which reportedly refused to conduct an exam on a possible rape victim last month.

A 25-year-old possible rape victim was reportedly refused a basic exam at two Catholic hospitals in Cologne last month. The Church says the impression that rape victims can’t be treated at Catholic hospitals is “false.”

The case of a possible rape victim who was reportedly refused treatment by two Catholic hospitals in Cologne last month has prompted a strong reaction by the Catholic Church and local victim advocacy organizations.

 

ANZEIGE

The local daily newspaper, the Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger, published an article Wednesday detailing the experience of an emergency center doctor, Irmgard Maiworm, one night last month. Maiworm told the paper that on Dec. 15, a 25-year-old woman came in to see her, accompanied by her mother.

The woman told the doctor that she had been out with friends on Friday night, and that at one point she went blank, not remembering anything until coming to on a bench in a different part of the city Saturday afternoon.

“I immediately suspected that this young woman might have been drugged with a date-rape drug, so that rape was not to be ruled out,” Maiworm told the paper. The woman reportedly complained of pains and difficulty going to the bathroom and wore soiled clothes.

With her permission, Maiworm contacted the police and informed the woman of the risks of pregnancy and gave her a prescription for the “morning-after pill.” She told the paper that she then called the gynecology department at the neighboring St. Vincent’s Hospital to arrange for the woman to have a gynecological exam, only to be told by the doctor there that such an exam would not be possible.

 

Read Full Article Here