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Tag Archive: Puerto Rico


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Large ship found in deep water off the Bahamas is the lost freighter El Faro, U.S. authorities said on Monday
  • El Faro sank with 33 crew members in a hurricane last month
  • Wreckage, in an upright position and intact on ocean floor, was initially detected by U.S. Navy salvage team over weekend
  • It was found in vicinity of El Faro’s last known location off Crooked Island in the southeastern Bahamas, NTSB said
  • Wreck is sitting in such deep water – 2,500 feet deeper than the Titanic – that it is beyond the reach of divers 

A large ship found in deep water off the Bahamas is the lost freighter El Faro that sank with 33 crew members in a hurricane last month, U.S. authorities said on Monday.

The wreckage, in an upright position and intact on the ocean floor, was initially detected by a U.S. Navy salvage team over the weekend at a depth of nearly three miles.

It was found in the vicinity of El Faro’s last known location off Crooked Island in the southeastern Bahamas, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said.

 

A large ship found in deep water off the Bahamas is the lost freighter El Faro (pictured in a file photo at sea) that sank with 33 crew members in a hurricane last month, U.S. authorities said on Monday

A large ship found in deep water off the Bahamas is the lost freighter El Faro (pictured in a file photo at sea) that sank with 33 crew members in a hurricane last month, U.S. authorities said on Monday

The 790-ft cargo ship, disappeared on October 1 during a regular weekly run between Florida and Puerto Rico after the captain reported losing propulsion and taking on water

The 790-ft cargo ship, disappeared on October 1 during a regular weekly run between Florida and Puerto Rico after the captain reported losing propulsion and taking on water

The Navy salvage tug Apache subsequently deployed a deep ocean remotely operated submersible, CURV-21, equipped with a camera to confirm the identity of the ship, officials said.

A salvage team will now seek to retrieve the ship’s voyage data recorder – similar to an airplane’s black box – which could contain vital clues for the NTSB-led investigation into what sank the El Faro.

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Puerto Rico - 6.5 Mag EQ  01.12.2014 photo PuertRico-65MagEQ01122014_zps1acb409a.jpg

2 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 6.4 – 57km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

    2014-01-12 22:01:04 UTC-06:00 28.0 km

  2. M 6.4 – 57km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

    2014-01-12 07:25:13 UTC-06:00 97.0 km

 

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Globe with Earthquake Location

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M6.5 – PUERTO RICO REGION

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 6.5
Date-Time
  • 13 Jan 2014 04:01:04 UTC
  • 13 Jan 2014 00:01:04 near epicenter
  • 12 Jan 2014 22:01:04 standard time in your timezone
Location 18.997N 66.829W
Depth 28 km
Distances
  • 56 km (34 mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  • 58 km (35 mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  • 59 km (36 mi) NNW of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  • 67 km (41 mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  • 96 km (59 mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 0.0 km; Vertical 5.2 km
Parameters Nph = 94; Dmin = 66.1 km; Rmss = 1.31 seconds; Gp = 38°
Version = 1
Event ID us c000m1w9

For updates, maps, and technical information, see: Event Page or USGS Earthquake Hazards Program
National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/neic/

 

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

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SFGate

6.5-quake shakes Puerto Rico, causing minor damage

Updated 9:53 pm, Sunday, January 12, 2014

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — A strong earthquake out to sea shook Puerto Rico early Monday, causing minor damage in some places.

Some people reported items falling in their home and dozens said they felt buildings sway in the capital of San Juan, about 59 miles (96 kilometers) from the quake’s epicenter.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a preliminary magnitude of 6.5 and struck just after midnight about 34 miles (56 kilometers) north of Hatillo. It said the quake occurred 17 miles (28 kilometers) deep.

 

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo PuertoRico-22EQsMay18thto19th2013_zps21f89ca1.jpg

 photo PuertoRico-22EQsMay18thto19th2013activityforlast30days_zps575cd1b0.jpg

Puerto Rico – 20 EQs May 18th to 19th 2013 activity for last 30 days

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M3.1 – 90km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-18 05:44:28 UTC

Earthquake location 19.288°N, 66.353°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-18 05:44:28 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 01:44:28 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 00:44:28 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.288°N 66.353°W depth=72.0km (44.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 90km (56mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 92km (57mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  3. 93km (58mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico
  4. 94km (58mi) NNW of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  5. 94km (58mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico

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M3.1 – 112km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-18 09:24:17 UTC

Earthquake location 19.483°N, 66.340°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-18 09:24:17 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 05:24:17 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 04:24:17 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.483°N 66.340°W depth=13.0km (8.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 112km (70mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 113km (70mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  3. 115km (71mi) NNW of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  4. 115km (71mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico
  5. 115km (71mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico

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M3.4 – 112km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-18 12:36:45 UTC

Earthquake location 19.480°N, 66.309°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-18 12:36:45 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 08:36:45 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 07:36:45 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.480°N 66.309°W depth=52.0km (32.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 112km (70mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 113km (70mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  3. 114km (71mi) N of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  4. 114km (71mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico
  5. 114km (71mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico

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M3.3 – 116km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

2013-05-18 13:13:23 UTC

Earthquake location 19.522°N, 66.324°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-18 13:13:23 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 09:13:23 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 08:13:23 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.522°N 66.324°W depth=13.0km (8.1mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 116km (72mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 117km (73mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  3. 119km (74mi) N of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  4. 119km (74mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico
  5. 119km (74mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico

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M3.3 – 108km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

2013-05-18 18:43:48 UTC

Earthquake location 19.447°N, 66.267°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-18 18:43:48 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 14:43:48 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 13:43:48 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.447°N 66.267°W depth=59.0km (36.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 108km (67mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 109km (68mi) N of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  3. 109km (68mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  4. 110km (68mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico
  5. 111km (69mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico

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M3.3 – 108km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

 Islands 2013-05-19 03:15:26 UTC

Earthquake location 18.943°N, 64.671°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 03:15:26 UTC
  2. 2013-05-18 23:15:26 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-18 22:15:26 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

18.943°N 64.671°W depth=8.0km (5.0mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 58km (36mi) N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands
  2. 71km (44mi) NNE of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
  3. 124km (77mi) ENE of Fajardo, Puerto Rico
  4. 137km (85mi) ENE of Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
  5. 149km (93mi) ENE of Carolina, Puerto Rico

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M3.1 – 125km N of Brenas, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 05:42:03 UTC

Earthquake location 19.597°N, 66.360°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 05:42:03 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 01:42:03 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 00:42:03 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.597°N 66.360°W depth=60.0km (37.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 125km (78mi) N of Brenas, Puerto Rico
  2. 126km (78mi) N of Dorado, Puerto Rico
  3. 127km (79mi) N of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico
  4. 128km (80mi) NNW of San Juan, Puerto Rico
  5. 128km (80mi) N of Levittown, Puerto Rico

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M2.9 – 86km N of Culebra, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 05:54:05 UTC

Earthquake location 19.082°N, 65.241°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 05:54:05 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 01:54:05 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 00:54:05 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.082°N 65.241°W depth=8.0km (5.0mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 86km (53mi) N of Culebra, Puerto Rico
  2. 88km (55mi) NNW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
  3. 94km (58mi) NNE of Fajardo, Puerto Rico
  4. 99km (62mi) NE of Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
  5. 108km (67mi) NE of Carolina, Puerto Rico

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M4.1 – 71km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 12:58:56 UTC

Earthquake location 19.108°N, 66.728°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 12:58:56 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 08:58:56 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 07:58:56 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.108°N 66.728°W depth=37.0km (23.0mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 71km (44mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 73km (45mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 74km (46mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  4. 80km (50mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 103km (64mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.0 – 66km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 13:03:02 UTC

Earthquake location 19.091°N, 66.834°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 13:03:02 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 09:03:02 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 08:03:02 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.091°N 66.834°W depth=15.0km (9.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 66km (41mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 68km (42mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 69km (43mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  4. 77km (48mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 103km (64mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M2.7 – 72km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 13:05:09 UTC

Earthquake location 19.145°N, 66.817°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 13:05:09 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 09:05:09 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 08:05:09 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.145°N 66.817°W depth=23.0km (14.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 72km (45mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 74km (46mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 75km (47mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  4. 82km (51mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 106km (66mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M2.7 – 59km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 13:12:48 UTC

Earthquake location 19.015°N, 66.726°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 13:12:48 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 09:12:48 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 08:12:48 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.015°N 66.726°W depth=22.0km (13.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 59km (37mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 60km (37mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 65km (40mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  4. 65km (40mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  5. 89km (55mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M2.6 – 72km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 13:17:02 UTC

Earthquake location 19.137°N, 66.859°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 13:17:02 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 09:17:02 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 08:17:02 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.137°N 66.859°W depth=38.0km (23.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 72km (45mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 72km (45mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 75km (47mi) NNW of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  4. 83km (52mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 108km (67mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.7 – 77km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 13:17:59 UTC

Earthquake location 19.189°N, 66.781°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 13:17:59 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 09:17:59 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 08:17:59 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.189°N 66.781°W depth=39.0km (24.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 77km (48mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 79km (49mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 80km (50mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  4. 85km (53mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 107km (66mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M2.5 – 68km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 14:04:37 UTC

Earthquake location 19.105°N, 66.808°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 14:04:37 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 10:04:37 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 09:04:37 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.105°N 66.808°W depth=31.0km (19.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 68km (42mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 70km (43mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 70km (43mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  4. 77km (48mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 102km (63mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M2.7 – 69km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 14:10:02 UTC

Earthquake location 19.117°N, 66.831°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 14:10:02 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 10:10:02 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 09:10:02 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.117°N 66.831°W depth=31.0km (19.3mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 69km (43mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 71km (44mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 72km (45mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  4. 79km (49mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 105km (65mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.6 – 69km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 15:07:42 UTC

Earthquake location 19.107°N, 66.752°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 15:07:42 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 11:07:42 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 10:07:42 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.107°N 66.752°W depth=38.0km (23.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 69km (43mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 70km (43mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 72km (45mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  4. 76km (47mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 98km (61mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.0 – 65km N of Isabela, Puerto Rico

2013-05-19 15:41:06 UTC

Earthquake location 19.081°N, 66.915°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 15:41:06 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 11:41:06 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 10:41:06 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.081°N 66.915°W depth=20.0km (12.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 65km (40mi) N of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  2. 70km (43mi) NNW of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 76km (47mi) NNE of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
  4. 80km (50mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 109km (68mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.0 – 68km NNW of San Antonio, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 18:01:45 UTC

Earthquake location 19.082°N, 67.304°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 18:01:45 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 14:01:45 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 13:01:45 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.082°N 67.304°W depth=35.0km (21.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 68km (42mi) NNW of San Antonio, Puerto Rico
  2. 70km (43mi) NNW of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 74km (46mi) NNW of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
  4. 88km (55mi) NNW of San Sebastian, Puerto Rico
  5. 143km (89mi) WNW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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M3.1 – 67km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

 2013-05-19 22:28:15 UTC

Earthquake location 19.096°N, 66.823°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-19 22:28:15 UTC
  2. 2013-05-19 18:28:15 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-19 17:28:15 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.096°N 66.823°W depth=35.0km (21.7mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 67km (42mi) N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 69km (43mi) N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  3. 69km (43mi) NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  4. 77km (48mi) NNW of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico
  5. 102km (63mi) NW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

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Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Caribbean Region and Vicinity

Extensive diversity and complexity of tectonic regimes characterizes the perimeter of the Caribbean plate, involving no fewer than four major plates (North America, South America, Nazca, and Cocos). Inclined zones of deep earthquakes (Wadati-Benioff zones), ocean trenches, and arcs of volcanoes clearly indicate subduction of oceanic lithosphere along the Central American and Atlantic Ocean margins of the Caribbean plate, while crustal seismicity in Guatemala, northern Venezuela, and the Cayman Ridge and Cayman Trench indicate transform fault and pull-apart basin tectonics.

Along the northern margin of the Caribbean plate, the North America plate moves westwards with respect to the Caribbean plate at a velocity of approximately 20 mm/yr. Motion is accommodated along several major transform faults that extend eastward from Isla de Roatan to Haiti, including the Swan Island Fault and the Oriente Fault. These faults represent the southern and northern boundaries of the Cayman Trench. Further east, from the Dominican Republic to the Island of Barbuda, relative motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate becomes increasingly complex and is partially accommodated by nearly arc-parallel subduction of the North America plate beneath the Caribbean plate. This results in the formation of the deep Puerto Rico Trench and a zone of intermediate focus earthquakes (70-300 km depth) within the subducted slab. Although the Puerto Rico subduction zone is thought to be capable of generating a megathrust earthquake, there have been no such events in the past century. The last probable interplate (thrust fault) event here occurred on May 2, 1787 and was widely felt throughout the island with documented destruction across the entire northern coast, including Arecibo and San Juan. Since 1900, the two largest earthquakes to occur in this region were the August 4, 1946 M8.0 Samana earthquake in northeastern Hispaniola and the July 29, 1943 M7.6 Mona Passage earthquake, both of which were shallow thrust fault earthquakes. A significant portion of the motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate in this region is accommodated by a series of left-lateral strike-slip faults that bisect the island of Hispaniola, notably the Septentrional Fault in the north and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in the south. Activity adjacent to the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault system is best documented by the devastating January 12, 2010 M7.0 Haiti strike-slip earthquake, its associated aftershocks and a comparable earthquake in 1770.

Moving east and south, the plate boundary curves around Puerto Rico and the northern Lesser Antilles where the plate motion vector of the Caribbean plate relative to the North and South America plates is less oblique, resulting in active island-arc tectonics. Here, the North and South America plates subduct towards the west beneath the Caribbean plate along the Lesser Antilles Trench at rates of approximately 20 mm/yr. As a result of this subduction, there exists both intermediate focus earthquakes within the subducted plates and a chain of active volcanoes along the island arc. Although the Lesser Antilles is considered one of the most seismically active regions in the Caribbean, few of these events have been greater than M7.0 over the past century. The island of Guadeloupe was the site of one of the largest megathrust earthquakes to occur in this region on February 8, 1843, with a suggested magnitude greater than 8.0. The largest recent intermediate-depth earthquake to occur along the Lesser Antilles arc was the November 29, 2007 M7.4 Martinique earthquake northwest of Fort-De-France.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

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 photo PuertoRico-6EQsMay11thto15th2013_zps610de0ae.jpg

M2.5 – 6km E of Espino, Puerto Rico 2013-05-14 19:59:27 UTC

Earthquake location 18.270°N, 67.062°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-14 19:59:27 UTC
  2. 2013-05-14 15:59:27 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-14 14:59:27 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

18.270°N 67.062°W depth=24.0km (14.9mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 6km (4mi) E of Espino, Puerto Rico
  2. 10km (6mi) SW of San Sebastian, Puerto Rico
  3. 11km (7mi) NE of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
  4. 15km (9mi) NNE of Hormigueros, Puerto Rico
  5. 103km (64mi) WSW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

 

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M2.5 – 12km S of La Parguera, Puerto Rico 2013-05-15 04:09:46 UTC

Earthquake location 17.864°N, 67.064°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-15 04:09:46 UTC
  2. 2013-05-15 00:09:46 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-14 23:09:46 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

17.864°N 67.064°W depth=10.0km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 12km (7mi) S of La Parguera, Puerto Rico
  2. 24km (15mi) S of San German, Puerto Rico
  3. 26km (16mi) SSE of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico
  4. 29km (18mi) SW of Yauco, Puerto Rico
  5. 121km (75mi) WSW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

 

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M2.8 – 32km W of Rincon, Puerto Rico 2013-05-15 06:29:13 UTC

 

Earthquake location 18.294°N, 67.554°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-15 06:29:13 UTC
  2. 2013-05-15 01:29:13 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-15 01:29:13 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

18.294°N 67.554°W depth=9.0km (5.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 32km (20mi) W of Rincon, Puerto Rico
  2. 44km (27mi) WSW of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
  3. 45km (28mi) WNW of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
  4. 48km (30mi) WNW of Hormigueros, Puerto Rico
  5. 154km (96mi) W of San Juan, Puerto Rico

 

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M2.5 – 8km SSE of Lamboglia, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-11 03:44:58-05:00
Location
17.913°N 65.953°W
Depth
12.0km

 

 

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M2.8 – 48km NW of San Antonio, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-12 00:29:47-05:00
Location
18.773°N 67.449°W
Depth
8.0km

 

 

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M3.0 – 3km SW of Anasco, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-12 06:36:37-05:00
Location
18.262°N 67.170°W
Depth
109.0km

 

 

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M2.7 – 15km WSW of Pole Ojea, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-13 22:33:35-05:00
Location
17.901°N 67.309°W
Depth
8.0km

 

 

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Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Caribbean Region and Vicinity

 

Extensive diversity and complexity of tectonic regimes characterizes the perimeter of the Caribbean plate, involving no fewer than four major plates (North America, South America, Nazca, and Cocos). Inclined zones of deep earthquakes (Wadati-Benioff zones), ocean trenches, and arcs of volcanoes clearly indicate subduction of oceanic lithosphere along the Central American and Atlantic Ocean margins of the Caribbean plate, while crustal seismicity in Guatemala, northern Venezuela, and the Cayman Ridge and Cayman Trench indicate transform fault and pull-apart basin tectonics.

 

Along the northern margin of the Caribbean plate, the North America plate moves westwards with respect to the Caribbean plate at a velocity of approximately 20 mm/yr. Motion is accommodated along several major transform faults that extend eastward from Isla de Roatan to Haiti, including the Swan Island Fault and the Oriente Fault. These faults represent the southern and northern boundaries of the Cayman Trench. Further east, from the Dominican Republic to the Island of Barbuda, relative motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate becomes increasingly complex and is partially accommodated by nearly arc-parallel subduction of the North America plate beneath the Caribbean plate. This results in the formation of the deep Puerto Rico Trench and a zone of intermediate focus earthquakes (70-300 km depth) within the subducted slab. Although the Puerto Rico subduction zone is thought to be capable of generating a megathrust earthquake, there have been no such events in the past century. The last probable interplate (thrust fault) event here occurred on May 2, 1787 and was widely felt throughout the island with documented destruction across the entire northern coast, including Arecibo and San Juan. Since 1900, the two largest earthquakes to occur in this region were the August 4, 1946 M8.0 Samana earthquake in northeastern Hispaniola and the July 29, 1943 M7.6 Mona Passage earthquake, both of which were shallow thrust fault earthquakes. A significant portion of the motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate in this region is accommodated by a series of left-lateral strike-slip faults that bisect the island of Hispaniola, notably the Septentrional Fault in the north and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in the south. Activity adjacent to the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault system is best documented by the devastating January 12, 2010 M7.0 Haiti strike-slip earthquake, its associated aftershocks and a comparable earthquake in 1770.

 

Moving east and south, the plate boundary curves around Puerto Rico and the northern Lesser Antilles where the plate motion vector of the Caribbean plate relative to the North and South America plates is less oblique, resulting in active island-arc tectonics. Here, the North and South America plates subduct towards the west beneath the Caribbean plate along the Lesser Antilles Trench at rates of approximately 20 mm/yr. As a result of this subduction, there exists both intermediate focus earthquakes within the subducted plates and a chain of active volcanoes along the island arc. Although the Lesser Antilles is considered one of the most seismically active regions in the Caribbean, few of these events have been greater than M7.0 over the past century. The island of Guadeloupe was the site of one of the largest megathrust earthquakes to occur in this region on February 8, 1843, with a suggested magnitude greater than 8.0. The largest recent intermediate-depth earthquake to occur along the Lesser Antilles arc was the November 29, 2007 M7.4 Martinique earthquake northwest of Fort-De-France.

 

 

….

Puerto Rico  –  4 Earthquakes  Ranging From  3.3 to  2.7 Magnitude May  9th to  10th ,  2013.  Total of  14 in the  last 10  days.

 

….

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

Puerto Rico - 4 EQs  May 9th to 10th  2013 photo PuertoRico-4EQsMay9thto10th2013_zps800d2683.jpg
….

M2.8 – 8km SSE of Lamboglia, Puerto Rico 2013-05-10 11:09:23 UTC

Earthquake location 17.915°N, 65.948°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-10 11:09:23 UTC
  2. 2013-05-10 07:09:23 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-10 06:09:23 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

17.915°N 65.948°W depth=12.0km (7.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 8km (5mi) SSE of Lamboglia, Puerto Rico
  2. 19km (12mi) ESE of Guayama, Puerto Rico
  3. 28km (17mi) SSW of Humacao, Puerto Rico
  4. 31km (19mi) SE of Cayey, Puerto Rico
  5. 63km (39mi) SSE of San Juan, Puerto Rico

….

M3.2 – 91km NNE of Luquillo, Puerto Rico 2013-05-10 09:56:32 UTC

Earthquake location 19.128°N, 65.356°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-10 09:56:32 UTC
  2. 2013-05-10 05:56:32 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-10 04:56:32 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.128°N 65.356°W depth=11.0km (6.8mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 91km (57mi) NNE of Luquillo, Puerto Rico
  2. 94km (58mi) NNE of Fajardo, Puerto Rico
  3. 96km (60mi) NNE of Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
  4. 97km (60mi) NNW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
  5. 104km (65mi) NE of Carolina, Puerto Rico

….

M3.3 – 96km N of Culebra, Puerto Rico 2013-05-10 04:39:06 UTC

Earthquake location 19.171°N, 65.320°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-10 04:39:06 UTC
  2. 2013-05-10 00:39:06 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-09 23:39:06 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

19.171°N 65.320°W depth=36.0km (22.4mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 96km (60mi) N of Culebra, Puerto Rico
  2. 99km (62mi) NNE of Fajardo, Puerto Rico
  3. 100km (62mi) NNW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
  4. 102km (63mi) NNE of Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
  5. 110km (68mi) NE of Carolina, Puerto Rico

….

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-09 14:12:55 UTC
  2. 2013-05-09 10:12:55 UTC-04:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-09 09:12:55 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

18.853°N 67.222°W depth=9.0km (5.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 41km (25mi) NNW of San Antonio, Puerto Rico
  2. 44km (27mi) NNW of Isabela, Puerto Rico
  3. 47km (29mi) N of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
  4. 62km (39mi) NNW of San Sebastian, Puerto Rico
  5. 125km (78mi) WNW of San Juan, Puerto Rico

….

M3.2 – 21km SSE of Esperanza, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-08 00:32:39-05:00
Location
17.911°N 65.416°W
Depth
13.0km

….

M2.7 – 20km NNE of Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-06 04:14:05-05:00
Location
18.641°N 66.647°W
Depth
73.0km

….

M2.5 – 13km N of Hatillo, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-05 14:09:44-05:00
Location
18.610°N 66.831°W
Depth
74.0km

….

M2.9 – 70km N of Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-05 01:10:08-05:00
Location
19.101°N 66.606°W
Depth
48.0km

….

M3.3 – 127km N of San Juan, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-04 22:27:50-05:00
Location
19.619°N 66.019°W
Depth
68.0km

….

M2.8 – 129km NNE of Vieques, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-04 20:43:59-05:00
Location
19.497°N 65.332°W
Depth
24.0km

….

M2.7 – 19km NNE of Isabela, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-04 01:16:16-05:00
Location
18.660°N 66.947°W
Depth
14.0km

….

M2.9 – 72km N of Tierras Nuevas Poniente, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-03 18:59:07-05:00
Location
19.117°N 66.445°W
Depth
24.0km

….

M3.3 – 107km N of Culebra, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-03 13:59:50-05:00
Location
19.276°N 65.242°W
Depth
9.0km

….

M3.2 – 136km NNE of Vieques, Puerto Rico

Time
2013-05-03 11:21:25-05:00
Location
19.580°N 65.382°W
Depth
62.0km

….

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of the Caribbean Region and Vicinity

Extensive diversity and complexity of tectonic regimes characterizes the perimeter of the Caribbean plate, involving no fewer than four major plates (North America, South America, Nazca, and Cocos). Inclined zones of deep earthquakes (Wadati-Benioff zones), ocean trenches, and arcs of volcanoes clearly indicate subduction of oceanic lithosphere along the Central American and Atlantic Ocean margins of the Caribbean plate, while crustal seismicity in Guatemala, northern Venezuela, and the Cayman Ridge and Cayman Trench indicate transform fault and pull-apart basin tectonics.

Along the northern margin of the Caribbean plate, the North America plate moves westwards with respect to the Caribbean plate at a velocity of approximately 20 mm/yr. Motion is accommodated along several major transform faults that extend eastward from Isla de Roatan to Haiti, including the Swan Island Fault and the Oriente Fault. These faults represent the southern and northern boundaries of the Cayman Trench. Further east, from the Dominican Republic to the Island of Barbuda, relative motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate becomes increasingly complex and is partially accommodated by nearly arc-parallel subduction of the North America plate beneath the Caribbean plate. This results in the formation of the deep Puerto Rico Trench and a zone of intermediate focus earthquakes (70-300 km depth) within the subducted slab. Although the Puerto Rico subduction zone is thought to be capable of generating a megathrust earthquake, there have been no such events in the past century. The last probable interplate (thrust fault) event here occurred on May 2, 1787 and was widely felt throughout the island with documented destruction across the entire northern coast, including Arecibo and San Juan. Since 1900, the two largest earthquakes to occur in this region were the August 4, 1946 M8.0 Samana earthquake in northeastern Hispaniola and the July 29, 1943 M7.6 Mona Passage earthquake, both of which were shallow thrust fault earthquakes. A significant portion of the motion between the North America plate and the Caribbean plate in this region is accommodated by a series of left-lateral strike-slip faults that bisect the island of Hispaniola, notably the Septentrional Fault in the north and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in the south. Activity adjacent to the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault system is best documented by the devastating January 12, 2010 M7.0 Haiti strike-slip earthquake, its associated aftershocks and a comparable earthquake in 1770.

Moving east and south, the plate boundary curves around Puerto Rico and the northern Lesser Antilles where the plate motion vector of the Caribbean plate relative to the North and South America plates is less oblique, resulting in active island-arc tectonics. Here, the North and South America plates subduct towards the west beneath the Caribbean plate along the Lesser Antilles Trench at rates of approximately 20 mm/yr. As a result of this subduction, there exists both intermediate focus earthquakes within the subducted plates and a chain of active volcanoes along the island arc. Although the Lesser Antilles is considered one of the most seismically active regions in the Caribbean, few of these events have been greater than M7.0 over the past century. The island of Guadeloupe was the site of one of the largest megathrust earthquakes to occur in this region on February 8, 1843, with a suggested magnitude greater than 8.0. The largest recent intermediate-depth earthquake to occur along the Lesser Antilles arc was the November 29, 2007 M7.4 Martinique earthquake northwest of Fort-De-France.

The southern Caribbean plate boundary with the South America plate strikes east-west across Trinidad and western Venezuela at a relative rate of approximately 20 mm/yr. This boundary is characterized by major transform faults, including the Central Range Fault and the Boconó-San Sebastian-El Pilar Faults, and shallow seismicity. Since 1900, the largest earthquakes to occur in this region were the October 29, 1900 M7.7 Caracas earthquake, and the July 29, 1967 M6.5 earthquake near this same region. Further to the west, a broad zone of compressive deformation trends southwestward across western Venezuela and central Columbia. The plate boundary is not well defined across northwestern South America, but deformation transitions from being dominated by Caribbean/South America convergence in the east to Nazca/South America convergence in the west. The transition zone between subduction on the eastern and western margins of the Caribbean plate is characterized by diffuse seismicity involving low- to intermediate-magnitude (M<6.0) earthquakes of shallow to intermediate depth.

The plate boundary offshore of Colombia is also characterized by convergence, where the Nazca plate subducts beneath South America towards the east at a rate of approximately 65 mm/yr. The January 31, 1906 M8.5 earthquake occurred on the shallowly dipping megathrust interface of this plate boundary segment. Along the western coast of Central America, the Cocos plate subducts towards the east beneath the Caribbean plate at the Middle America Trench. Convergence rates vary between 72-81 mm/yr, decreasing towards the north. This subduction results in relatively high rates of seismicity and a chain of numerous active volcanoes; intermediate-focus earthquakes occur within the subducted Cocos plate to depths of nearly 300 km. Since 1900, there have been many moderately sized intermediate-depth earthquakes in this region, including the September 7, 1915 M7.4 El Salvador and the October 5, 1950 M7.8 Costa Rica events.

The boundary between the Cocos and Nazca plates is characterized by a series of north-south trending transform faults and east-west trending spreading centers. The largest and most seismically active of these transform boundaries is the Panama Fracture Zone. The Panama Fracture Zone terminates in the south at the Galapagos rift zone and in the north at the Middle America trench, where it forms part of the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean triple junction. Earthquakes along the Panama Fracture Zone are generally shallow, low- to intermediate in magnitude (M<7.2) and are characteristically right-lateral strike-slip faulting earthquakes. Since 1900, the largest earthquake to occur along the Panama Fracture Zone was the July 26, 1962 M7.2 earthquake.

References for the Panama Fracture Zone:
Molnar, P., and Sykes, L. R., 1969, Tectonics of the Caribbean and Middle America Regions from Focal Mechanisms and Seismicity: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 80, p. 1639-1684.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

Virgin Islands

Virgin Islands

 

3.1

154km N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-10 12:05:53

19.790°N

64.376°W

16.0

2.7

74km NE of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-10 11:37:45

18.972°N

64.210°W

24.0

3.9

3km SW of Darliston, Jamaica

2013-02-10 11:10:09

18.216°N

78.003°W

10.0

4.9

Central Mid-Atlantic Ridge

2013-02-10 08:47:51

6.910°N

33.848°W

10.0

2.5

18km SSE of Arroyo, Puerto Rico

2013-02-10 00:49:55

17.803°N

66.017°W

5.0

3.0

50km E of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-09 18:16:35

18.430°N

64.141°W

87.0

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 

3.0

50km E of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-09 18:16:35

18.430°N

64.141°W

87.0

3.0

21km SE of La Romana, Dominican Republic

2013-02-09 17:51:32

18.295°N

68.827°W

108.0

3.3

85km N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-09 13:04:24

19.186°N

64.516°W

92.0

2.7

25km NW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands

2013-02-09 11:00:28

18.506°N

65.094°W

27.0

2.8

22km SE of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands

2013-02-09 06:38:54

18.219°N

64.757°W

14.0

3.1

76km N of Culebra, Puerto Rico

2013-02-08 23:47:37

18.993°N

65.225°W

30.0

3.9

12km E of Otra Banda, Dominican Republic

2013-02-08 17:10:32

18.661°N

68.545°W

181.0

2.6

20km NNW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands

2013-02-08 03:39:28

18.517°N

64.984°W

34.0

2.9

41km NNW of San Antonio, Puerto Rico

2013-02-07 17:58:48

18.840°N

67.250°W

11.0

2.6

20km N of Culebra, Puerto Rico

2013-02-07 17:21:47

18.488°N

65.287°W

102.0

3.2

45km NNE of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-07 10:14:30

18.794°N

64.447°W

53.0

2.6

34km NNE of Culebra, Puerto Rico

2013-02-07 09:40:38

18.595°N

65.199°W

78.0

2.9

49km NE of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-07 06:40:01

18.729°N

64.280°W

41.0

3.1

15km E of Cookshire-Eaton, Canada

2013-02-07 05:30:18

45.410°N

71.440°W

5.0

3.7

140km S of Boca de Yuma, Dominican Republic

2013-02-07 05:20:25

17.110°N

68.490°W

9.0

5.0

Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

2013-02-06 20:18:40

46.506°N

27.373°W

14.1

3.0

131km NNE of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 17:07:15

19.548°N

64.250°W

65.0

2.5

38km NNW of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 14:18:29

18.681°N

65.003°W

56.0

3.3

125km N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 11:05:13

19.554°N

64.637°W

39.0

3.3

131km N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 04:55:36

19.590°N

64.789°W

7.0

3.0

76km NE of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 04:05:58

18.987°N

64.203°W

50.0

2.7

68km N of Road Town, British Virgin Islands

2013-02-06 00:11:09

19.027°N

64.743°W

44.0

 Earth Watch Report

 

 

East Coast faces variety of tsunami threats

The most likely source for an East Coast tsunami would be an underwater avalanche along the continental slope.

By Douglas Main, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer
tsunami evacuation route sign
An offshore earthquake of magnitude 4.5 or above could cause submarine avalanches and create dangerous tsunamis with waves higher than 26 feet. (Photo: epugachev/flickr)
An offshore earthquake of magnitude 4.5 or above could cause submarine avalanches and create dangerous tsunamis with waves higher than 26 feet.

The most likely source for an East Coast tsunami would be an underwater avalanche along the continental slope.

Although the risk is small, tsunamis are possible on the East Coast of the United States from a variety of sources, according to new research.

And as Hurricane Sandy showed, the region is completely unprepared for a major influx of water, said U.S. Geological Survey researcher Uri ten Brink.

The most likely source for an East Coast tsunami would be an underwater avalanche along the continental slope, according to research presented by ten Brink and others earlier this month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Charlotte, N.C. Ten Brink also outlined several other possible sources of tsunamis, including earthquakes and even collapsing volcanoes.

Underwater avalanches

An offshore earthquake of magnitude 4.5 or above could cause submarine avalanches and create dangerous tsunamis with waves higher than 26 feet (8 meters), ten Brink told OurAmazingPlanet. Underwater canyons and bays could focus these waves and make them even bigger.

A 7.2-magnitude earthquake off the southern coast of Newfoundland in 1929 caused a large underwater landslide, creating a large wave that rushed ashore and killed 28 people on the island, ten Brink said. The waves were up to 26 feet high until some reached narrow inlets, where they grew to 43 feet (13 m), he said.

While the tsunami was catastrophic for Newfoundland, it created only small waves for most of the U.S. coast and didn’t cause any fatalities there. That’s typical of tsunamis from submarine landslides: They tend to be large for nearby areas but quickly taper off, ten Brink said.

While this is the only example of a tsunami near the East Coast in recorded history, there are plenty of areas along the continental slope – where the North American continent ends and drops into the Atlantic Ocean basin – at risk for these landslides, ten Brink said.

Ten Brink and his colleagues are currently taking core samples of sediment from the submarine canyons along the continental slope, to find evidence of past landslides and how often landslides occur, he said. His team has been working for more than five years to map these submarine canyons with sonar to highlight areas most at risk of landslides, he added.

The Puerto Rico trench

The movement of tectonic plates beneath the ocean can create waves that travel much farther than those caused by submarine landslides, because they involve the movement of a much larger volume of water, with longer waves that don’t quickly dissipate, ten Brink said. The most dangerous earthquakes are those at subduction zones, where one plate dives beneath another.

While the most infamous subduction zones are found around the Pacific Ring of Fire – such as the one that set off the massive 2011 Japan tsunami – there is indeed a subduction zone capable of creating tsunamis near the East Coast. In the northeast Caribbean, the area called the Puerto Rico trench features a subduction zone.

When the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hit, ten Brinks’ group received funding from the U.S. government to study the tsunami potential of the Puerto Rico trench. Although its work is still ongoing, his group has found that much of the fault doesn’t appear capable of creating an earthquake and tsunami large enough to cause big problems for the East Coast. But a tsunami originating there could cause significant destruction in the Caribbean.

University of Puerto Rico researcher Zamara Fuentes, who isn’t involved in ten Brinks’ research, said one quake in this region in 1918 created a tsunami that killed 116 people on Puerto Rico. Fuentes studies sediment cores around the Caribbean to look for evidence of past tsunamis. Based on historical records, the USGS says 27 tsunamis in the Caribbean have caused fatalities and extensive damage since the 16th century.

Risks across the Atlantic

Another possible source for East Coast tsunamis is the Azores-Gibraltar Transform Fault, off the coast of Portugal. One massive earthquake along this fault in 1755 destroyed most of Lisbon and created a tsunami recorded as far away as Brazil. It was barely noticed on the East Coast, however, ten Brink said. His group has created computer models that suggest underwater mountains west of Portugal helped reduce the impact of this tsunami by slowing the waves and disrupting their movement – and they could do the same thing in the future.

The nearby Canary Islands, off the coast of Morocco, also present a possible hazard. One large volcano on the island of La Palma, called Cumbre Vieja, could erupt, collapse and create a large tsunami capable of reaching the East Coast. A 2001 study suggested this series of events could send a 70-foot (21 m) wave crashing into the East Coast. But ten Brink said that study hasn’t held up to subsequent review, and that the wave would be unlikely to exceed several feet in height by the time it reached North America. “I don’t see it as a credible threat,” he said.

The last possible tsunami source is a slow-moving fault north of Cuba, which has caused earthquakes in the past and possibly could create a tsunami that affected Florida and the Gulf Coast. Due to the current political situation, neither Cuban nor American researchers can conduct research in the area, he said.

To get a good idea of how often tsunamis from this or any source are likely to strike the East Coast in the future, ten Brink and others are trying to peer back in time – but much remains to be discovered. “There are more questions than answers at this point,” ten Brink said.

Earth Watch Report  –  Seismic Activity

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: November 16, 2012 13:19:04 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

 ANWB 24hr plot

CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

 BBGH 24hr plot

CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

 BCIP 24hr plot

CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

 GRGR 24hr plot

CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

 GRTK 24hr plot

CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

 GTBY 24hr plot

CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

 MTDJ 24hr plot

CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

 SDDR 24hr plot

CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

 TGUH 24hr plot

IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

 BJT 24hr plot

IC/ENH, Enshi, China

 ENH 24hr plot

IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Autonomous Region, China

 HIA 24hr plot

IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

 LSA 24hr plot

IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

 MDJ 24hr plot

IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Hainan Province, China

 QIZ 24hr plot

IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

 ADK 24hr plot

IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

 AFI 24hr plot

IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

 ANMO 24hr plot

IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

 ANTO 24hr plot

IU/BBSR, Bermuda

 BBSR 24hr plot

IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

 BILL 24hr plot

IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

 CASY 24hr plot

IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

 CCM 24hr plot

IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

 CHTO 24hr plot

IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

 COLA 24hr plot

IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

 COR 24hr plot

IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

 CTAO 24hr plot

IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

 DAV 24hr plot

IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

 DWPF 24hr plot

IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

 FUNA 24hr plot

IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

 FURI 24hr plot

IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

 GNI 24hr plot

IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

 GRFO 24hr plot

IU/GUMO, Guam, Mariana Islands

 GUMO 24hr plot

IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

 HKT 24hr plot

IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

 HNR 24hr plot

IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

 HRV 24hr plot

IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

 INCN 24hr plot

IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

 JOHN 24hr plot

IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

 KBS 24hr plot

IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

 KEV 24hr plot

IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

 KIEV 24hr plot

IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

 KIP 24hr plot

IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

 KMBO 24hr plot

IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

 KNTN 24hr plot

IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

 KONO 24hr plot

IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

 KOWA 24hr plot

IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

 LCO 24hr plot

IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

 LSZ 24hr plot

IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

 LVC 24hr plot

IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

 MA2 24hr plot

IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

 MAJO 24hr plot

IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

 MAKZ 24hr plot

IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

 MBWA 24hr plot

IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

 MIDW 24hr plot

IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

 MSKU 24hr plot

IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

 NWAO 24hr plot

IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Ecuador

 OTAV 24hr plot

IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

 PAB 24hr plot

IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

 PAYG 24hr plot

IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

 PET 24hr plot

IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

 PMG 24hr plot

IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

 PMSA 24hr plot

IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

 POHA 24hr plot

IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

 PTCN 24hr plot

IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

 PTGA 24hr plot

IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

 QSPA 24hr plot

IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermadec Islands

 RAO 24hr plot

IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

 RAR 24hr plot

IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

 RCBR 24hr plot

IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

 RSSD 24hr plot

IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

 SAML 24hr plot

IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

 SBA 24hr plot

IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

 SDV 24hr plot

IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

 SFJD 24hr plot

IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

 SJG 24hr plot

IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

 SLBS 24hr plot

IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

 SNZO 24hr plot

IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

 SSPA 24hr plot

IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

 TARA 24hr plot

IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

 TATO 24hr plot

IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

 TEIG 24hr plot

IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

 TIXI 24hr plot

IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

 TRIS 24hr plot

IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

 TRQA 24hr plot

IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

 TSUM 24hr plot

IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

 TUC 24hr plot

IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

 ULN 24hr plot

IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

 WAKE 24hr plot

IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

 WCI 24hr plot

IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

 WVT 24hr plot

IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

 XMAS 24hr plot

IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

 YAK 24hr plot

IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

 YSS 24hr plot

Earth Watch Report  – Seismic Activity

GSN Stations

These data update automatically every 30 minutes. Last update: November 13, 2012 09:19:17 UTC

Seismograms may take several moments to load. Click on a plot to see larger image.

CU/ANWB, Willy Bob, Antigua and Barbuda

 ANWB 24hr plot

CU/BBGH, Gun Hill, Barbados

 BBGH 24hr plot

CU/BCIP, Isla Barro Colorado, Panama

 BCIP 24hr plot

CU/GRGR, Grenville, Grenada

 GRGR 24hr plot

CU/GRTK, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

 GRTK 24hr plot

CU/GTBY, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

 GTBY 24hr plot

CU/MTDJ, Mount Denham, Jamaica

 MTDJ 24hr plot

CU/SDDR, Presa de Sabaneta, Dominican Republic

 SDDR 24hr plot

CU/TGUH, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

 TGUH 24hr plot

IC/BJT, Baijiatuan, Beijing, China

 BJT 24hr plot

IC/ENH, Enshi, China

 ENH 24hr plot

IC/HIA, Hailar, Neimenggu Province, China

 HIA 24hr plot

IC/LSA, Lhasa, China

 LSA 24hr plot

IC/MDJ, Mudanjiang, China

 MDJ 24hr plot

IC/QIZ, Qiongzhong, Guangduong Province, China

 QIZ 24hr plot

IU/ADK, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

 ADK 24hr plot

IU/AFI, Afiamalu, Samoa

 AFI 24hr plot

IU/ANMO, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

 ANMO 24hr plot

IU/ANTO, Ankara, Turkey

 ANTO 24hr plot

IU/BBSR, Bermuda

 BBSR 24hr plot

IU/BILL, Bilibino, Russia

 BILL 24hr plot

IU/CASY, Casey, Antarctica

 CASY 24hr plot

IU/CCM, Cathedral Cave, Missouri, USA

 CCM 24hr plot

IU/CHTO, Chiang Mai, Thailand

 CHTO 24hr plot

IU/COLA, College Outpost, Alaska, USA

 COLA 24hr plot

IU/COR, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

 COR 24hr plot

IU/CTAO, Charters Towers, Australia

 CTAO 24hr plot

IU/DAV,Davao, Philippines

 DAV 24hr plot

IU/DWPF,Disney Wilderness Preserve, Florida, USA

 DWPF 24hr plot

IU/FUNA,Funafuti, Tuvalu

 FUNA 24hr plot

IU/FURI, Mt. Furi, Ethiopia

 FURI 24hr plot

IU/GNI, Garni, Armenia

 GNI 24hr plot

IU/GRFO, Grafenberg, Germany

 GRFO 24hr plot

IU/GUMO, Guam, Germany

 GUMO 24hr plot

IU/HKT, Hockley, Texas, USA

 HKT 24hr plot

IU/HNR, Honiara, Solomon Islands

 HNR 24hr plot

IU/HRV, Adam Dziewonski Observatory (Oak Ridge), Massachusetts, USA

 HRV 24hr plot

IU/INCN, Inchon, Republic of Korea

 INCN 24hr plot

IU/JOHN, Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

 JOHN 24hr plot

IU/KBS, Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, Norway

 KBS 24hr plot

IU/KEV, Kevo, Finland

 KEV 24hr plot

IU/KIEV, Kiev, Ukraine

 KIEV 24hr plot

IU/KIP, Kipapa, Hawaii, USA

 KIP 24hr plot

IU/KMBO, Kilima Mbogo, Kenya

 KMBO 24hr plot

IU/KNTN, Kanton Island, Kiribati

 KNTN 24hr plot

IU/KONO, Kongsberg, Norway

 KONO 24hr plot

IU/KOWA, Kowa, Mali

 KOWA 24hr plot

IU/LCO, Las Campanas Astronomical Observatory, Chile

 LCO 24hr plot

IU/LSZ, Lusaka, Zambia

 LSZ 24hr plot

IU/LVC, Limon Verde, Chile

 LVC 24hr plot

IU/MA2, Magadan, Russia

 MA2 24hr plot

IU/MAJO, Matsushiro, Japan

 MAJO 24hr plot

IU/MAKZ,Makanchi, Kazakhstan

 MAKZ 24hr plot

IU/MBWA, Marble Bar, Western Australia

 MBWA 24hr plot

IU/MIDW, Midway Island, Pacific Ocean, USA

 MIDW 24hr plot

IU/MSKU, Masuku, Gabon

 MSKU 24hr plot

IU/NWAO, Narrogin, Australia

 NWAO 24hr plot

IU/OTAV, Otavalo, Ecuador

 OTAV 24hr plot

IU/PAB, San Pablo, Spain

 PAB 24hr plot

IU/PAYG Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Islands

 PAYG 24hr plot

IU/PET, Petropavlovsk, Russia

 PET 24hr plot

IU/PMG, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

 PMG 24hr plot

IU/PMSA, Palmer Station, Antarctica

 PMSA 24hr plot

IU/POHA, Pohakaloa, Hawaii

 POHA 24hr plot

IU/PTCN, Pitcairn Island, South Pacific

 PTCN 24hr plot

IU/PTGA, Pitinga, Brazil

 PTGA 24hr plot

IU/QSPA, South Pole, Antarctica

 QSPA 24hr plot

IU/RAO, Raoul, Kermadec Islands

 RAO 24hr plot

IU/RAR, Rarotonga, Cook Islands

 RAR 24hr plot

IU/RCBR, Riachuelo, Brazil

 RCBR 24hr plot

IU/RSSD, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

 RSSD 24hr plot

IU/SAML, Samuel, Brazil

 SAML 24hr plot

IU/SBA, Scott Base, Antarctica

 SBA 24hr plot

IU/SDV, Santo Domingo, Venezuela

 SDV 24hr plot

IU/SFJD, Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

 SFJD 24hr plot

IU/SJG, San Juan, Puerto Rico

 SJG 24hr plot

IU/SLBS, Sierra la Laguna Baja California Sur, Mexico

 SLBS 24hr plot

IU/SNZO, South Karori, New Zealand

 SNZO 24hr plot

IU/SSPA, Standing Stone, Pennsylvania USA

 SSPA 24hr plot

IU/TARA, Tarawa Island, Republic of Kiribati

 TARA 24hr plot

IU/TATO, Taipei, Taiwan

 TATO 24hr plot

IU/TEIG, Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico

 TEIG 24hr plot

IU/TIXI, Tiksi, Russia

 TIXI 24hr plot

IU/TRIS, Tristan da Cunha, Atlantic Ocean

 TRIS 24hr plot

IU/TRQA, Tornquist, Argentina

 TRQA 24hr plot

IU/TSUM, Tsumeb, Namibia

 TSUM 24hr plot

IU/TUC, Tucson, Arizona

 TUC 24hr plot

IU/ULN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

 ULN 24hr plot

IU/WAKE, Wake Island, Pacific Ocean

 WAKE 24hr plot

IU/WCI, Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, USA

 WCI 24hr plot

IU/WVT, Waverly, Tennessee, USA

 WVT 24hr plot

IU/XMAS, Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati

 XMAS 24hr plot

IU/YAK, Yakutsk, Russia

 YAK 24hr plot

IU/YSS, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk, Russia

 YSS 24hr plot