Tag Archive: Protest


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At least 100 people have been arrested in Brussels, where hundreds more protested against TTIP, an impending free trade deal between the US and the EU, as the next round of TTIP talks approaches.

Roads were paralyzed in the Belgian capital as a force of more than 600 activists descended on EU headquarters, blocking traffic and the venue of the EU leaders summit in protest against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

People carried signs and chanted slogans such as “Stop TTIP, stop austerity” and “Sorry for the inconvenience. We’re trying to save the world,” at the march in Brussels on Thursday. “TTIP is death” another sign read. One group of protesters displayed a balloon ‘Trojan Horse’ as an allegory for the deal.

 

 

Published time: March 01, 2014 02:14

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police during clashes taking place during a protest over the death of detainee Jaffar Mohammed Jaffar at a hospital, ahead of his funeral in the village of Daih, west of Manama, February 27, 2014. (Reuters)

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police during clashes taking place during a protest over the death of detainee Jaffar Mohammed Jaffar at a hospital, ahead of his funeral in the village of Daih, west of Manama, February 27, 2014. (Reuters)

A funeral in a Bahraini village of a man who died in police custody has ended with police using teargas and stun grenades to disperse the crowd that engaged them with stones and petrol bombs, according to the authorities.

The Shiite village of Daih was holding a funeral for a 23-year-old Mohammed Jaafar who died in custody, after being accused of smuggling weapons. His death is the second in 2014 of a person held on security-related charges. The main opposition al-Wefaq group said that the young man was denied medical treatment in custody, while one activist said he had been tortured, Reuters reports. The accusations have been denied by the authorities.

Following the funeral, scuffles with police erupted. The people started throwing rocks, metal rods and reportedly petrol bombs at the police who used tear gas and stun grenades to disperse the crowd. No casualties have so far been reported.

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Forbes

 

Bulldozing Free Speech

How people respond to criticism can reveal a lot about their character.  Some might try to debate or reason with those they disagree with.  Others prefer to ignore critics.  City officials in Honolulu take a different approach: They use a bulldozer.

Choon James is a successful real estate broker with over two decades of experience in Hawaii.  But the city of Honolulu is seeking to seize property she’s owned for almost a decade to build what she calls a “super-sized” fire station in rural Hauula.

Since January 2010, she has put up signs to protest Honolulu’s use of eminent domain.  These signs declare “Eminent Domain Abuse: Who’s Next?” and “YouTube Eminent Domain Abuse—Hawaii.”  For more than three years these signs have been up without any incident.

But now the city is showing a callous disregard for Choon’s freedom of speech.  Back in May, Honolulu seized two of her eminent domain protest signs.  Without her consent, city employees went onto the property and seized and impounded her signs before damaging them. Even worse, the city slapped her with a notice for trespassing, for property she is trying to defend in court.

After these signs were torn down, Choon placed three more signs there.  These lasted just a few months before the city once again seized the signs.  This time, Honolulu was much more dramatic.  On October 18, city workers, backed by police officers, squad cars and a bulldozer, came by and literally bulldozed those protest signs.

The city’s actions show a shameful lack of respect for the First and Fourth Amendments.  Citizens have a right to protest government actions.  The First Amendment was enacted precisely to protect citizens who criticize the government from retaliation.  Lawsuits challenging Honolulu’s unreasonable seizures and chilling attacks on free speech are now pending in federal court.

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The Telegraph

Ukraine and the growing number of disappeared

  David Blair reports on a secret campaign against dissent

Anti-government protests in Ukraine....epa04049795 A protester stands guard on a barricade near a line of riot police during the continuing protest in Kiev

A protester stands guard on a barricade near a line of riot police during the continuing demonstrations in Kiev Photo: EPA

In normal times, the route from the golden domes of Mikhailovsky Cathedral to the grandeur of Independence Square in the heart of Kiev might count among the most beautiful walks in Europe.

On the morning of January 3, a young Ukrainian set out on this 10-minute journey across a carpet of snow. But Rostislav Tolstoy, a 31-year-old protester swept up in the struggle against the country’s autocratic leader, never reached his destination.

Today, his face stares from a “missing” poster on the wall of Trade Union House, an occupied public building forming the nerve centre of Ukraine’s protest movement. At some point in his short daylight walk, he simply disappeared.

“We always warn people ‘don’t go anywhere alone’,” said Alexeiy Soloviyov, a fellow demonstrator and friend of Mr Tolstoy.

“Unfortunately, he did go out by himself. We called him constantly for three days, but he didn’t answer his phone. We called all hospitals, morgues and police stations – but there was no news.”

As Ukraine’s turmoil enters its third month, President Viktor Yanukovych remains locked in confrontation with tens of thousands of demonstrators occupying central Kiev behind icebound barricades.

An anti-government activist shines a laser pointer toward police at a barricade in central Kiev (AP)

Mr Yanukovych, a burly former electrician, who served time in jail for theft and assault in his youth, has not yet steeled himself to clear the protest camps in Independence Square with a full scale assault.

Rather than risk such bloodshed and obloquy, Mr Yanukovych’s security forces have chosen an alternative strategy: they are trying to cripple the rallies with a covert campaign of abduction and torture.

Daily incidents lift the veil on this silent offensive by a desperate president.

The first pillar of the effort is straightforward harassment. Thousands of demonstrators have found their names, addresses and birth dates suddenly appearing online. These long lists also disclose the colour, make and registration number of their cars.

The effect of releasing this information – which could only have emerged from a government database – was incendiary in the literal sense. Cars belonging to protesters have been set ablaze in the middle of the night, with perhaps 200 receiving this treatment so far.

This kind of vandalism is carried out by people derisively known as “Tutuskhi” – jobless youths hired by the government to cause trouble.

Above them stands a more dangerous tier of state agents, centred around the SBU, Ukraine’s domestic intelligence service. To retain deniability, the evidence suggests that hardened criminals are paid by the SBU to do the bloodiest jobs.

This nexus between the secret police and organised crime controls the second pillar of Mr Yanukovych’s hidden offensive: the kidnapping of protesters.

The ordeal of Dmytro Bulatov, a prime mover behind the protests, provides the most compelling recent evidence. After he went missing in Kiev on 22 Jan, nothing was heard from Mr Bulatov until Thursday night, when he staggered into a village outside the capital having been dumped in a forest by his captors.

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Ukraine protest leader says he was tortured into saying he was a US spy

Anti-government activist Dmytro Bulatov calls for guarantee he will not be prosecuted after fleeing to Lithuania

Dmytro Bulatov holds up his hands to show marks where he says nails were driven through his hands

Ukrainian opposition activist Dmytro Bulatov at a press conference at Vilnius University hospital. He says his kidnappers beat him and drove nails through his hands. Photograph: Petras Malukas/AFP/Getty Images

A Ukrainian anti-government activist who fled the country after being abducted said he had been forced under torture to declare himself a US spy.

Dmytro Bulatov, the leader of a protest group known as AutoMaidan, said his kidnappers forced him to say on camera that he had accepted money from the US embassy to organise anti-government protests in Ukraine.

“I was telling them lies just to stop the torture … at one point I asked them to kill me because I couldn’t stand it any more,” the 35-year-old said on Thursday, speaking at the Vilnius University emergency hospital in Lithuania where he is being treated after leaving Ukraine on Sunday.

Bulatov was found bloodied and injured in woods outside Kiev on 30 January. He said unidentified assailants had driven nails through his hands in a “crucifixion” and had beaten him during a week in captivity.

EU leaders offered to help the activist after Ukrainian police said they wanted to charge him with taking part in “mass disorder”.

The potential charges relate to AutoMaidan’s protests, which involve convoys of sometimes hundreds of cars driving to the homes of allies of the Ukrainian president, Viktor Yanukovych.

Bulatov described his kidnap as “the worst experience I’ve ever had” and said he still suffers severe headaches and dizziness.

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Ukrainian protestor shows scars where he was nailed to a cross when he was crucified by government supporters ‘and forced to declare he was a US spy’

  • Dmytro Bulatov says kidnappers kept him in the dark for more than a week
  • 35-year-old told rescuers he was severely tortured then dumped in forest
  • He has scars from where nails were hammered through both hands
  • Bulatov is a member of Automaidan, an anti-government car owner group
  • Kidnapping is the latest attack on a Ukrainian anti-government protester
  • President Viktor Yanukovych is accused of ‘intimidating the opposition’
  • Attack comes as anti-government protests in Ukraine continue to grow

By Lizzie Parry and John Hall

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A Ukrainian anti-government activist who fled the country after being abducted said he was tortured and forced to admit he was an American spy.

Dmytro Bulatov, 35, a member of Automaiden – a group of car owners that has taken part in protests against President Viktor Yanukovyvh – went missing on January 22.

He said he was kidnapped, crucified and had part of his ear cut off as his captors forced him to say on camera that he had accepted money from the US Embassy, to organise anti-government protests in the country.

He was discovered outside Kiev yesterday and told rescuers that his kidnappers kept him in the dark for more than a week, beat him severely, nailed him to a cross and sliced off a piece of ear, before eventually dumping him in a forest.

 

Ukrainian opposition activist Dmytro Bulatov holds up his hands to reveal the scars left when kidnappers nailed him to a cross, holding captive for a week

Ukrainian opposition activist Dmytro Bulatov holds up his hands to reveal the scars left when kidnappers nailed him to a cross, holding captive for a week

Bulatov said his captors forced him to admit he was a US spy. He said: 'I was telling them lies just to stop the torture'

Bulatov said his captors forced him to admit he was a US spy. He said: ‘I was telling them lies just to stop the torture’

The 35-year-old told rescuers that his kidnappers kept him in the dark for more than a week, beat him severely, nailed him to a cross and sliced off a piece of his ear

The 35-year-old told rescuers that his kidnappers kept him in the dark for more than a week, beat him severely, nailed him to a cross and sliced off a piece of his ear

Ukrainian opposition leader Vitali Klitschko speaks to Dmytro Bulatov in the Kiev hospital where he is receiving treatment after the alleged kidnapping

Ukrainian opposition leader Vitali Klitschko speaks to Dmytro Bulatov in the Kiev hospital where he is receiving treatment after the alleged kidnapping

Bulatov talks to the media in a hospital in Vilnius, Lithuania. He fled the Ukraine for fear of being prosecuted

Bulatov talks to the media in a hospital in Vilnius, Lithuania. He fled the Ukraine for fear of being prosecuted

Dmytro Bulatov's badly swollen hands appeared to show nail marks from his alleged crucifixion

Dmytro Bulatov’s badly swollen hands appeared to show nail marks from his alleged crucifixion

Opposition leader Petro Poroshenko (right) rushed to the hospital where Bulatov (left) was taken

Opposition leader Petro Poroshenko (right) rushed to the hospital where Bulatov (left) was taken

‘I was telling them lies just to stop the torture… At one point I asked them to kill me because I couldn’t stand it any more,’ said the 35-year-old, speaking at the Vilnius University Emergency Hospital in Lithuania where he is being treated after leaving Ukraine on Sunday.

He said unidentified assailants had driven nails through his hands in a ‘crucifixion’ and had beaten him during a week in captivity.

‘They crucified me, they nailed down my hands. They cut off my ear, they cut my face. There isn’t a spot on my body that hasn’t been beaten…Thank God I am alive,’ Bulatov told Ukraine’s Channel 5.

Footage shows his face and clothes covered in blood and his swollen hands showing nail marks.

EU leaders offered to help the activist after Ukrainian police said they wanted to charge him with taking part in ‘mass disorder’ related to protests consisting of convoys of sometimes hundreds of cars driving up to the homes of allies of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

Bulatov described his kidnap as ‘the worst experience I’ve ever had’. He still suffered severe headaches and dizziness.

Video of his bloodied face has been replayed repeatedly on opposition television channels in Ukraine, fuelling anger among protesters occupying main streets and public buildings across the country.

Bulatov said he would not return to Ukraine unless he got guarantees that he will not be prosecuted.

‘I want my government to give guarantees to the international community that I will not be politically prosecuted,’ he said.

‘The government should close all criminal cases against activists, including me, who have taken part in the protests.’

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Published time: June 13, 2013 13:13
Edited time: June 14, 2013 16:43

Media takes images of a protester holding a flag in front of a riot police vehicle during a protest at Taksim Square in Istanbul (Reuters / Osman Orsal)

Media takes images of a protester holding a flag in front of a riot police vehicle during a protest at Taksim Square in Istanbul (Reuters / Osman Orsal)

Turkey’s TV watchdog fined four TV channels over their live coverage of the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul, citing that the broadcasts were “harming the physical, moral and mental development of children and young people.”

The Radio and Television Supreme Council fined private channels including Halk TV, Ulusal TV, Cem TV and EM TV.

Halk TV has gained local popularity because of their 24-hour live coverage of protests in Turkey, as most of the mainstream media have been slammed for their lack of reporting on the protests in the country.

As the unrest unfolded almost two weeks ago, mainstream Turkish media did not cover the violent police clashes, but instead broadcast nature and history documentaries, and cooking shows.

Many of the other local networks briefly mentioned the protests, but failed to cover the violent clashes in which scores were injured.

Angered protesters had to turn to the internet, especially Twitter, to get the information out.

A protester uses her mobile device as she walks at Gezi Park on Taksim Square in Istanbul (Reuters / Stoyan Nenov)

A protester uses her mobile device as she walks at Gezi Park on Taksim Square in Istanbul (Reuters / Stoyan Nenov)

In response, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan condemned social media’s role in the riots, singling out what he called the “scourge” of Twitter.

“There is now a menace which is called Twitter,” Erdogan said in the beginning of June.

Most recently two Canadian journalists were arrested by police on Wednesday while covering the ongoing protests in Istanbul’s Taksim Square. The two had been held all day and later released.

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RINF Alternative News & Alternative Media Breaking Real News

Protesters Skeptical as Turkish PM Flips From Threats to Concessions

Turkey’s embattled PM Recep Tayyip Erdoganis told protesters last night that he will halt plans to redevelop Gezi Park until Turkish courts rule on an appeal and launch a public referendum if the rule falls in the government’s favor.

 

 

(Photo: Joshua Kahn Russell/Monument at Taksim Square) The move comes a day after European parliament voted to condemn the PM’s violent crackdown on Turkey’s ballooning protests that has left five dead and over 5,000 injured.

Erdogan’s Wednesday threats to shut down the protests in 24 hours were followed by late-night private meetings Thursday with members of the Taksim Solidarity, one organization behind the Taksim Square protests that has gained heightened visibility.

Just outside of the Thursday meetings, police fought back protesters. PressTV reports:

Witnesses said police fired tear gas at some 200 protesters who had gathered in Ankara city centre, near the offices of the prime minister, while the meeting was underway. Five demonstrators were also arrested.

The PM’s gesture towards concession appeared an attempt to quiet Turkey’s mass mobilizations, now well into their third week, as the U.S.-backed head of government faces a growing political crisis.

Taksim Solidarity members who attended the private meeting declared that the question of whether to accept the PM’s latest move ultimately rests with protesters, many of whom are not affiliated with Taksim Solidarity. CBS reports:

 

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‘We have not responded to punches with punches. From now on security forces will respond differently,’ Turkish PM says

 

 

Turkey: protesters at entrance to Gezi Park

Protesters at the entrance to Gezi Park, which Istanbul’s governor has ordered them to clear for their own safety. Photograph: Sedat Suna/EPA

 

Turkey‘s prime minister defied a growing wave of international criticism on Wednesday and issued a chilling warning to the protesters who have captured central Istanbul for a fortnight, declaring that the demonstrations against his rule would be over within 24 hours.

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s ultimatum, which he said was conveyed to his police chief and interior minister, ratcheted up the tension in Turkey after a relatively calm day following the mass teargas attacks by riot police in Istanbul city centre on Tuesday evening.

“We have not responded to punches with punches. From now on security forces will respond differently,” Erdoğan said after meeting a team said to be representing the protesters for the first time. “This issue will be over in 24 hours.”

The sense of a looming denouement at Gezi Park off Taksim Square in central Istanbul was reinforced when a deputy leader of Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development party (AKP) said the park had to be cleared of demonstrators as soon as possible.

Thousands of protesters again gathered at the park yesterday, with phalanxes of riot police marshalling nearby.

The ruling party’s deputy chairman and government Hüseyin Çelik added that a city-wide referendum could be held on the initial issue that sparked the wave of national protest – whether the park should be demolished to make way for a shopping mall and a replica of an old military barracks.

The belligerent statement, contrasting with more conciliatory language from President Abdullah Gül, who urged dialogue with legitimate peaceful protesters, the vast majority of the tens of thousands who have taken to the streets over the past two weeks.

The sense of a final showdown was reinforced by Istanbul’s governor, Hüseyin Avni Mutlu, who ordered the protesters to clear the park for their own “safety”.

“Families should take their children out of there,” he warned.

 

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Turkish government open to referendum to end protests


Protesters sleep on a bench at the Gezi Park in Istanbul, Turkey. Riot police fired tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets in day-long clashes that lasted into the early hours Wednesday. Photo: AP
Protesters sleep on a bench at the Gezi Park in Istanbul, Turkey. Riot police fired tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets in day-long clashes that lasted into the early hours Wednesday. Photo: AP

Despite the offer, protesters continued to converge on Istanbul’s Taksim Square, the epicentre of repeated clashes between riot police firing tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets.

 

Turkey’s government on Wednesday offered a first concrete gesture aimed at ending nearly two weeks of street protests, proposing a referendum on a development project in Istanbul that triggered demonstrations that have become the biggest challenge to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s 10-year tenure.

 

Despite the offer, protesters continued to converge on Istanbul’s Taksim Square, the epicentre of repeated clashes between riot police firing tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets, and stone-throwing youths for 13 days an early sign that the proposal hadn’t defused the demonstrators’ concerns.

 

Word of such a referendum came after Mr. Erdogan hosted talks with a small group of activists. Many civil society groups behind the protests boycotted those talks in the capital, Ankara, saying they weren’t invited and that the attendees didn’t represent them.

 

The discussion was the first sign that Mr. Erdogan was looking for an exit from the showdown, and came hours after some European leaders expressed concern about strong-arm Turkish police tactics and hopes that the prime minister would soften his stance.

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WORLD BULLETIN

Updating: 13:26, 12 June 2013 Wednesday

 

The headscarfed mother, infant attacked by Gezi Park protestors

 

The headscarfed mother, infant attacked by Gezi Park protestors

A report has been published about the mother who was attacked by a mob of Gezi Park protestors for wearing a headscarf. Both mother and infant suffered physical injury.

 

World Bulletin/News Desk

 

The Taksim Gezi protests, which began with a small group with environmental concerns, have turned into nation-wide protests which have resulted in groups violently attacking people throughout Turkey.

 

The efforts by the secularist-nationalist fronts, which have provided direct support to the protests, to provoke the crowds and polarize society have reached an appalling scale. One mortifying case has been the attack on the daughter-in-law of an AK Party mayor of a township in Istanbul as she was walking with her 6 month old baby.

 

Suffering from trauma, the mother whose entire body is bruised has been unable to nurse her infant since the attack.

 

Read Full Article Here

 

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omer gashi

Published on Jun 11, 2013

Police use rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannon to disperse crowds, sparking fresh fierce clashes with activists.

Video: Police move past barricades into Taksim Square, Istanbul
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Riot police have stormed through barricades to clear Istanbul’s main square prompting fresh clashes with anti-government protesters.

The big push by hundreds of officers at 9am local time forced many thousands of protesters, who had occupied Taksim Square for more than a week, to flee the area.

Diggers mowed down barricades as police used rubber bullets, water cannon, tear gas and stun grenades to disperse crowds, as activists hit back with petrol bombs, fireworks and stones.

Police use tear gas and water cannon to disperse demonstrators

Protesters ran into Gezi Park where many had been camping – and where the demonstration first started on May 31 as a protest against the planned redevelopment of the green space into a shopping centre.

A violent police crackdown then on the protest has turned what started off as a single peaceful demonstration into a national uprising against the Islamist-rooted government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan that is seen by many as authoritarian.

Sky’s Katie Stallard, in Taksim Square, said: “Protesters have set fire to their barricades. They have been throwing rocks at police and we have seen petrol bombs being thrown.

“What some of the protesters are doing is they are trying to grab canisters of gas and throw them back into the police lines.

The police say they are removing banners, barricades. They say that if the protesters leave them to do that they won’t touch them.

“But what is happening is people are coming out from the park and also the surrounding streets in numbers to try to get towards the police lines.

“Once the protesters stop and move back, the police stop too.

“In Gezi Park, protesters are chanting their defiant slogans again, while outside police are clearing sections of Taksim Square.

“The majority of them are there in the central camp and sitting down and trying to keep calm.

“I spoke to one mother yesterday who was determined that they would stay in the park until the end of this operation.”

Demonstrators had earlier manned the barricades and prepared for a possible intervention when officers began massing in the area and replaced activists’ banners with a large Turkish flag and a poster of Mustafa Kemel Ataturk, founder of the republic.

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Police crush barricades in Istanbul square, fire tear gas and water cannons at protesters

ISTANBUL — Hundreds of riot police overran improvised barricades at Istanbul’s Taksim Square on Tuesday, firing tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons in running battles with protesters who have been occupying the area for more than a week.The police raid, which came on the 12th day of nationwide anti-government protests, sparked clashes with groups of demonstrators well into the afternoon. Many other protesters fled into the adjacent Gezi Park, where hundreds have been camping out to stop developers from cutting down trees in the park.
As police moved in, bulldozers began demolishing the barricades and the makeshift shelters.A peaceful demonstration against the park’s redevelopment has morphed into a test of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s authority and a rejection of what some see as his autocratic ways.Erdogan, however, made it clear Tuesday that he had come to the end of his patience with the protesters, whom he accused of sullying Turkey’s image abroad.

“To those who … are at Taksim and elsewhere taking part in the demonstrations with sincere feelings, I call on you to leave those places and to end these incidents, and I send you my love. But for those who want to continue with the incidents I say: ‘It’s over.’ As of now we have no tolerance for them,” Erdogan said, speaking in the capital, Ankara, as the raid was taking place.

“Not only will we end the actions, we will be at the necks of the provocateurs and terrorists, and no one will get away with it,” he added.

The unrest — which has spread to 78 cities across Turkey — has been inspired in part by what some see as Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian style of governing and his perceived attempts to impose a religious and conservative lifestyle in a country with secular laws.

Erdogan, a devout Muslim, says he is committed to Turkey’s secular laws and denies charges of autocracy. Yet as he defended his tough stance, he gave critics little hope of a shift in his position.

“Were we supposed to kneel before them and say please remove your pieces of rags? They can call me harsh, but this Tayyip Erdogan won’t change,” he said.

Erdogan was referring to the banners and posters that activists had hung from a building and a monument at Taksim Square, which police removed.

Erdogan spoke before a meeting with President Abdullah Gul to discuss the protests, their first since they erupted. Contrary to Erdogan, Gul has defended people’s rights to express democratic rights.

By afternoon, the clashes had extended to the very edge of Gezi Park, with acrid tear gas covering its sides, even though authorities had promised not to go into the park. Several people were rushed on stretchers to a first aid station manned by protesters before being taken to ambulances. Others were carried, overcome by tear gas.

Selin Akuner, a volunteer at a makeshift infirmary at the park, said some 300 people had sought treatment, mostly for the effects of tear gas. Nearly 50 people had been hit by rubber bullets or gas canisters, 12 had head traumas and about eight had injured legs or arms, she said. The governor’s office said one demonstrator and one police officer were hospitalized.

Read Full Article and  See Additional Photos Here

Turkish riot police enter Taksim Square in Istanbul

Riot police entered Istanbul’s Taksim Square on Tuesday morning, firing teargas to disperse protesters at the site, which has been the centre of ongoing anti-government demonstrations in Turkey.

By News Wires (text)

Hundreds of Turkish riot police entered Istanbul’s Taksim Square on Tuesday, firing water cannon and teargas to scatter small numbers of protesters involved in demonstrations against plans to redevelop a park there, a Reuters witness said.

Police removed protesters’ banners which had been hung from a building overlooking the square and the local governor said the police had no intention of breaking up the protest in the adjoining Gezi Park.

“Our aim is to remove the signs and pictures on Ataturk statue and the Ataturk Cultural Centre. We have no other aim,” Istanbul Governor Huseyin Avni Mutlu wrote on Twitter. “Gezi Park and Taksim will not be touched.”

 

Read Full Article Here

 

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BBC

Turkey PM Erdogan warns protesters of ‘limited patience’

Supporters of Prime Minister Erdogan gather around his convoy waving flags
Mr Erdogan addressed several rallies of gathered supporters on Sunday

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has warned his patience “has a limit” as anti-government protests continued for a 10th day.

Mr Erdogan dismissed the protesters as “looters”, in a defiant address to supporters in the capital, Ankara.

Thousands of protesters gathered in Istanbul’s central Taksim Square and Ankara’s Kizilay Square on Sunday.

The anti-government unrest was sparked by a police crackdown on a local protest over an Istanbul park.

The initial protest has since spiralled into nationwide demonstrations, with protesters accusing Mr Erdogan’s government of becoming increasingly authoritarian and trying to impose conservative Islamic values on a secular state.

For a second night in a row, riot police fired tear gas and water cannon to disperse the demonstrators in the centre of Ankara on Sunday.

 

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Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan Rejects ‘Dictator’ Claims

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Protesters shout slogans as they hold a Turkish flag during the third day of nationwide anti-government protest at the Taksim square in Istanbul, June 2, 2013. Fierce clashes have followed a police crackdown on a peaceful gathering, as protesters denounced what they see as Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian style. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

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Thousands of protesters gather for the third day of nationwide anti-government protest at the Taskim square in Istanbul, Sunday, June 2, 2013. After days of fierce clashes following a police crackdown on a peaceful gathering as protesters denounced what they see as Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian style. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

ISTANBUL—An estimated ten thousand protesters gathered Sunday on Taksim Square for the third day of protests against Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Initially it appeared things were returning back to normal Sunday morning after most protesters left the square following a morning rain. But at noon, protesters started flooding back into Taksim Square, many waving flags, chanting “Victory, victory, victory” and calling on Erdogan’s government to resign.

Erdogan on Sunday rejected claims that he is a “dictator,” dismissing the protesters as an extremist fringe.

In another speech, delivered an hour later, Erdogan said: “I am not the master of the people. Dictatorship does not run in my blood or in my character. I am the servant of the people.”

Erdogan delivered two speeches Sunday and appeared in a television interview.

Read Full Article and  View Additional  Photos Here

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Turkey PM Erdogan issues warning to Republican opposition

01/06 15:36 CET

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused Turkey’s main opposition party, the Republican People’s Party (CHP), of manipulating this week’s protests in Istanbul.

In a speech at Turkey’s Exporter’s Assembly, Erdogan issued a warning to CHP chief Kemal Kilicdaroglu not to use “provocative words” in his upcoming speech in the city.

Erdogan also vowed to press on with plans to build on Gezi Park in Taksim Square, which has sparked days of demonstrations. Erdogan said he would not give in to “wild extremists.”

The Turkish premier pleaded with the demonstrators to pack up and leave, describing the movement as “ideological” rather than “environmental.”

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Turkish youths shout slogan ” Tayyip, resign! ” as they clash with security forces in Ankara, Turkey, June 1, 2013. Turkish police retreated from a main Istanbul square Saturday, removing barricades and allowing in thousands of protesters in a move to calm tensions after furious anti-government protests turned the city center into a battlefield. (AP Photo / Burhan Ozbilici)

ISTANBUL—Protests that started Friday in Istanbul intensified Saturday with both police and protesters turning out in greater numbers.

Protesters wearing gas masks marched Saturday towards Taksim Square, which has been at the center of the protests. Police used large amounts of tear gas to disperse the protests and put up blockades on the square.

In an apparent attempt to calm tensions, police retreated from the square later in the day, allowing thousands of protesters onto the square.

Chaos erupted in Istanbul Friday after police forcefully ended a sit-in protest against the construction of a shopping mall on a park’s grounds.

“It’s not about a park, it’s about the abuse of state power,” said one protester, who wished to remain anonymous. She had flown into Istanbul from the city of Bodrum, located 500 miles away.

“It’s about media being censored, it’s about democracy! It’s about police attacking innocent people,” she said.

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Reblogged  from :  Blavatar   Here and Now

Published time: June 01, 2013 11:08
Edited time: June 01, 2013 17:56

Activists of the anti-globalist Blockupy movement scuffled with dozens of riot police who charged into a marching crowd to disperse protesters, reports RT’s Peter Oliver. The march has been reportedly stopped.

What was supposed to be a march through the middle of German’s financial capital by anti-austerity demonstrators really lasted only about 500 meters, when several hundred riot police in full kit came among the crowd.

The protesters started throwing paint-filled objects at the police so puddles of paint are here and there, RT’s Peter Oliver reported. Later the paint filled bags were confiscated by police.

The organizers maintain there are tens of thousands of protesters and Peter Oliver witnesses a whole column of protesters going around the ECB headquarters.

The police force has split into two groups now. They do not let anybody through so the demonstration is not moving anywhere, as police and protesters are locked in a stand-off.

Water cannons arrived at the scene of a peaceful protest, Oliver reports.

Watch video of RT correspondent Peter Oliver live from the scene.

Riot police officers have already used pepper spray several times and some people have been taken away, but it is not clear if they have been arrested.

RT’s crew working at the scene has been separated by the riot police dividing demonstrators. The crew reports the use of fences and barbed wire by police.

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

Protests in Frankfurt-am-Main started on Friday when some 3,000 ‘Blockupy’ protesters, clutching signs demanding “humanity before profit”, blocked the main entrance of the ECB, the organizers announced that the coalition has “reached its first goal” of the day.

The anti-globalism march was called to celebrate the anniversary of the ‘Occupy’ rallies by blocking the European Central Bank.

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

The protesters moved to city’s downtown from activists’ camp in the Frankfurt suburbs, set up earlier.

Police reported that though some protesters thrown stones and there were some clashes at the barricades, about 400 people were detained on Friday.

The ECB, which has headquarters at Kaiserstrasse 29, in Frankfurt-am-Main, has promised to remain operational during the planned demonstrations.

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

Photo from twitter.com user @PeterGOliver_RT

Blockupy activists lay blame for the debt crisis in Europe with the banks and in particular the ECB for its role in imposing austerity measures on EU citizens.

 

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