Tag Archive: Peru


Earth Watch Report Banner photo FSPEarthWatchReport900x228Blogger_zps53ef6af0.jpg

……………………………………………………….

 

Peru 7.6Mag Earthquake photo Peru 7.6 Mag earthquake_zpsnibcs37w.png

Peru 7.6 Magnitude Earthquake  11/24/2015

USGS

……….

4 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 4.6 – 150km WNW of Iberia, Peru

    2015-11-25 00:28:16 UTC 600.0 km

  2. M 4.5 – 189km NW of Iberia, Peru

    2015-11-24 23:55:20 UTC 616.9 km

  3. M 4.6 – 181km WNW of Iberia, Peru

    2015-11-24 23:44:12 UTC 595.1 km

  4. M 7.6 – 169km WNW of Iberia, Peru

    2015-11-24 22:45:38 UTC 600.6 km

 

……….

 

……….

NOAA’s National Weather Service

Tsunami.gov

Current date and time is: Nov 25, 2015 20:34 UTC

No Tsunami Warnings, Advisories or Watches are in effect

……….

Globe with Earthquake Location

M7.6 – PERU-BRAZIL BORDER REGION

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 7.6
Date-Time
  • 24 Nov 2015 22:50:52 UTC
  • 24 Nov 2015 17:50:53 near epicenter
  • 24 Nov 2015 16:50:52 standard time in your timezone
Location 10.070S 70.981W
Depth 606 km
Distances
  • 208 km (128 mi) NW of Iberia, Peru
  • 212 km (131 mi) S of Tarauaca, Brazil
  • 221 km (137 mi) SSW of Feijo, Brazil
  • 264 km (163 mi) WNW of Cobija, Bolivia
  • 695 km (430 mi) ENE of Lima, Peru
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 10.0 km; Vertical 7.0 km
Parameters Nph = 90; Dmin = 320.8 km; Rmss = 1.13 seconds; Gp = 61°
Version =
Event ID us 100040×6 ***This event has been revised.

……….

Brazil 7.6 Mag Earthquake photo Brazil 7.6 Mag Earthquake_zpsht5uhemk.png

Brazil 7.6 Mag Earthquake   11/24/2015

USGS

……….

2 earthquakes in map area

  1. M 4.6 – 78km WSW of Tarauaca, Brazil

    2015-11-25 09:26:23 UTC 641.9 km

  2. M 7.6 – 210km S of Tarauaca, Brazil 2015-11-24 22:50:53 UTC 611.7 km

……….

……….

 

……….






ODN

Earth Watch Report  –  Volcanic Activity

Evacuations ordered as Peru volcano spews ash 4 km high

Evacuations ordered as Peru volcano spews ash 4 km high

Volcano Eruption Peru Moquegua Region, [Ubinas Volcano] Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Volcano Eruption in Peru on Thursday, 17 April, 2014 at 03:28 (03:28 AM) UTC.

Description
The Scientific Permanent Monitoring Committee and the Peruvian have declared Ubinas volcano on orange alert, meaning that local communities have to be evacuated. The volcano, which has been active again since September last year, erupted March 31, giving off ash for one thousand meters. The 20 families living in Querapi were temporarily evacuated shortly after the eruption, but are yet to be permanently relocated to Pampas de Hawái. As well as residents of Querapi, people living in Tonohaya, also in Moquegua, and San Juan de Tarucani, Arequipa, also need to be evacuated. Civil Defense chief, Miguel Alayza said that they were waiting for the alert to go from yellow to the more serious orange before they could proceed. Regional president of Moquegua, Martín Vizcarra said that the volcanic activity would affect five thousand people in that area, while in San Juan de Tarucani, Arequipa, 637 families would be affected, according to El Comercio. Ubinas volcano is considered to be the most active volcano of Peru. Eruptions have been reported since 1550.

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Volcano Eruption in Peru on Thursday, 17 April, 2014 at 03:28 (03:28 AM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Friday, 18 April, 2014 at 04:04 UTC
Description
Peruvian authorities have ordered the preventative evacuation of 4,000 people living near the Ubinas volcano, which has been spouting ash clouds up to 4 kilometres high. The Andina state news agency quotes Agriculture Minister Juan Benites as saying it will take three days beginning today to move the residents of two southern districts and their 30,000 sheep, cows, horses, burros and other animals. Peru’s health ministry says about 40 people have complained of eye inflammation and stomach problems from ash that has been falling from Ubinas since March 29. The 5,672-metre volcano is Peru’s most active. It most recent strong eruption period occurred from 2006-2009.

 

…..

Evacuations ordered as Peru volcano spews ash 4 km high

Evacuations ordered as Peru volcano spews ash 4 km high

PanARMENIAN.Net – Peruvian authorities have ordered the preventative evacuation of 4,000 people living near the Ubinas volcano, which has been spouting ash clouds up to 2 miles (nearly 4 kilometers) high.

The Andina state news agency quotes Agriculture Minister Juan Benites as saying it will take three days beginning Thursday, April 17, to move the residents of two southern districts and their 30,000 sheep, cows, horses, burros and other animals.

 

Read More Here

Peru evacuates Ubinas volcano area after ash cloud

Footage shows huge clouds of ash escaping from Ubinas

Officials said it would take three days to move 4,000 residents and their livestock to safer grounds.

Ubinas, Peru’s most active volcano, recently began spewing ash clouds up to 4km (two miles) high.

An eruption of cinder and toxic gases in 2006 killed livestock and forced a similar evacuation.

 

Read More Here

 

 

Related Stories

Enhanced by Zemanta

File:Boomstronken.jpg

Description  :  Boomstronken; foto door Fruggo, juni 2003.

Attribution: Fruggo from nl

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

…..

New Research Shows Tree Roots Regulate CO2, Keep Climate Stable

Climate News Network | February 19, 2014 8:30 am

The argument, put forward by a team from Oxford and Sheffield Universities in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, begins with temperature. Warmer climates mean more vigorous tree growth and more leaf litter, and more organic content in the soil. So the tree’s roots grow more vigorously, said Dr. Christopher Doughty of Oxford and colleagues.

They get into the bedrock, and break up the rock into its constituent minerals. Once that happens, the rock starts to weather, combining with carbon dioxide. This weathering draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, and in the process cools the planet down a little. So mountain ecosystems—mountain forests are usually wet and on conspicuous layers of rock—are in effect part of the global thermostat, preventing catastrophic overheating.

The tree is more than just a sink for carbon, it is an agency for chemical weathering that removes carbon from the air and locks it up in carbonate rock.

That mountain weathering and forest growth are part of the climate system has never been in much doubt: the questions have always been about how big a forest’s role might be, and how to calculate its contribution.

Keeping climate stable

U.S. scientists recently studied the rainy slopes of New Zealand’s Southern Alps to begin to put a value on mountain ecosystem processes. Dr. Doughty and his colleagues measured tree roots at varying altitudes in the tropical rain forests of Peru, from the Amazon lowlands to 3,000 meters of altitude in the higher Andes.

They measured the growth to 30 cm below the surface every three months and did so for a period of years. They recorded the thickness of the soil’s organic layer, and they matched their observations with local temperatures, and began to calculate the rate at which tree roots might turn Andean granite into soil.

Then they scaled up the process, and extended it through long periods of time. Their conclusion: that forests served to moderate temperatures in a much hotter world 65 million years ago.

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta
Fox News Latino - Fair & Balanced
  • Whales Peru.jpg

At least 500 dolphins were found dead in the past few weeks on different beaches in northern Peru and the cause of death is still under investigation, media reports said.

The Peruvian Sea Institute, or Imarpe, sent a team of scientists to investigate why the dolphins beached themselves in the northern regions of Lambayeque and Piura, the El Comercio newspaper reported.

Other beachings of dolphins occurred in the past two years in northern Peru.

The team covered a 142-kilometer (88-mile) stretch of coast on Jan. 28-29, traveling from Pimentel, a resort city in Lambayeque, to the southern part of the reserve in Illescas, located in Piura, the newspaper said, citing officials.

Experts found at least 400 beached dolphins, with the discovery coming after about 100 other dolphins beached themselves in recent weeks.

Read More Here

…..

500 dolphins die in northern Peru

AT least 500 dolphins have been found dead in the past few weeks on different beaches in northern Peru and the cause of death is still under investigation, media reports say.

The Peruvian Sea Institute, or Imarpe, sent a team of scientists to investigate why the dolphins beached themselves in the northern regions of Lambayeque and Piura, the El Comercio newspaper reported.

Other beachings of dolphins occurred in the past two years in northern Peru.

The team covered a 142-kilometre stretch of coast on January 28-29, travelling from Pimentel, a resort city in Lambayeque, to the southern part of the reserve in Illescas, located in Piura, the newspaper said, citing officials.

Experts found at least 400 beached dolphins, with the discovery coming after about 100 other dolphins beached themselves in recent weeks.

Fishermen told the Imarpe team that the dolphins were caught in nets regularly and drowned, the newspaper said.

The scientists, however, confirmed that some young and adult dolphins died at sea and others arrived on the beaches near death.

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:Symptoms of pneumonic plague.svg

Main symptoms of pneumonic plague. Sources are found in main article: Wikipedia:Black_death#Signs_and_symptoms. Model: Mikael Häggström. To discuss image, please see Template_talk:Häggström diagrams

 

File:Xenopsylla chepsis (oriental rat flea).jpg

Male Xenopsylla cheopis (oriental rat flea) engorged with blood. This flea is the primary vector of plague in most large plague epidemics in Asia, Africa, and South America. Both male and female fleas can transmit the infection.

Image Source  :  Wikimedia.Org

Author   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

…..

Biological Hazard Peru Province of Ascope, Mocan [District of Casa Grande] Damage level Details

…..

Biological Hazard in Peru on Wednesday, 11 December, 2013 at 15:08 (03:08 PM) UTC.

Description
The Regional Health Management reported Tuesday, 10 Dec 2013, the 1st victim in 2013 of pneumonic plague in the La Libertad region. It is a 17-year-old, according to the regional manager of health, Jose Evangelista. The regional official did not name the victim, although it was known that he lived with his family in the village of Mocan, located in the district of Casa Grande, in the province of Ascope. As reported by Evangelista, before entering Trujillo Regional Teaching Hospital, where the victim died, he spent several hours in the home of relatives in the village El Milagro in Huanchaco district center. In the area, said the regional manager of health, would have been about 150 families. Therefore, a health brigade came to the area to conduct a campaign to prevent the plague bacteria from spreading.
Biohazard name: Plague (pneumonic)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

…..

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

LocoTV Dos LocoTV Dos

 

Published on Mar 7, 2013

Finally, a Billboard That Creates Drinkable Water Out of Thin Air

I’ve never cared much for billboards. Not in the city, not out of the city — not anywhere, really. It’s like the saying in that old Five Man Electrical Band song. So when the creative director of an ad agency in Peru sent me a picture of what he claimed was the first billboard that produces potable water from air, my initial reaction was: gotta be a hoax, or at best, a gimmick.

Except it’s neither: The billboard pictured here is real, it’s located in Lima, Peru, and it produces around 100 liters of water a day (about 26 gallons) from nothing more than humidity, a basic filtration system and a little gravitational ingenuity.

Let’s talk about Lima for a moment, the largest city in Peru and the fifth largest in all of the Americas, with some 7.6 million people (closer to 9 million when you factor in the surrounding metro area). Because it sits along the southern Pacific Ocean, the humidity in the city averages 83% (it’s actually closer to 100% in the mornings). But Lima is also part of what’s called a coastal desert: It lies at the northern edge of the Atacama, the driest desert in the world, meaning the city sees perhaps half an inch of precipitation annually (Lima is the second largest desert city in the world after Cairo). Lima thus depends on drainage from the Andes as well as runoff from glacier melt — both sources on the decline because of climate change.

Enter the University of Engineering and Technology of Peru (UTEC), which was looking for something splashy to kick off its application period for 2013 enrollment. It turned to ad agency Mayo DraftFCB, which struck on the idea of a billboard that would convert Lima’s H2O-saturated air into potable water. And then they actually built one.

It’s not entirely self-sufficient, requiring electricity (it’s not clear how much) to power the five devices that comprise the billboard’s inverse osmosis filtration system, each device responsible for generating up to 20 liters. The water is then transported through small ducts to a central holding tank at the billboard’s base, where you’ll find — what else? — a water faucet. According to Mayo DraftFCB, the billboard has already produced 9,450 liters of water (about 2,500 gallons) in just three months, which it says equals the water consumption of “hundreds of families per month.” Just imagine what dozens, hundreds or even thousands of these things, strategically placed in the city itself or outlying villages, might do. And imagine what you could accomplish in any number of troubled spots around the world that need potable water with a solution like this.

MAYO DRAFTFCB / UTEC
Mayo DraftFCB says it dropped the billboard along the Pan-American Highway at kilometer marker 89.5 when summer started (in December, mind you — Lima’s south of the equator) and that it’s designed to inspire young Peruvians to study engineering at UTEC while simultaneously illustrating how advertising can be more than just an eyesore. (Done and done, I’d say.)

“We wanted future students to see how engineers can also solve social needs in daily basis kinds of situations,” said Alejandro Aponte, creative director at Mayo DraftFCB.

The city’s residents could certainly use the help. According to a 2011 The Independent piece ominously titled “The desert city in serious danger of running dry,” about 1.2 million residents of Lima lack running water entirely, depending on unregulated private-company water trucks to deliver the goods — companies that charge up to 30 soles (US $10) per cubic meter of H2O, or as The Independent notes, 20 times what more well-off residents pay for their tapwater.

Read more: http://techland.time.com/2013/03/05/f…

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo Peru-70MagEQ9252013_zpsd341c297.jpg

M 7.0 – 50km S of Acari, Peru

 2013-09-25 16:42:42 UTC

Earthquake location 15.882°S, 74.543°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-09-25 16:42:42 UTC
  2. 2013-09-25 11:42:42 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-09-25 11:42:42 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

15.882°S 74.543°W depth=40.0km (24.9mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 50km (31mi) S of Acari, Peru
  2. 95km (59mi) SE of Minas de Marcona, Peru
  3. 123km (76mi) SSE of Nazca, Peru
  4. 137km (85mi) SSW of Puquio, Peru
  5. 502km (312mi) SSE of Lima, Peru

Tectonic Summary

The Peru earthquake of September 25, 2013, occurred as thrust-faulting on or near the thrust-interface at the boundary between the South America plate and the subducting Nazca plate.  The Nazca plate subducts beneath the South America plate at the Peru-Chile trench offshore of western South America, and the thrust interface between the two plates dips east-northeast beneath the South American continent.   At the latitude of the earthquake, the Nazca plate moves to the east-northeast with respect to the South America plate with a velocity of about 70 mm/y.

The boundary-region between the Nazca and South American plates experiences a large number of earthquakes.  The region within 250 km of the epicenter of the earthquake of September 25 had experienced seventeen previous earthquakes of magnitude 6 and larger since 1973.  The largest of these, the magnitude 8.4 earthquake of June 23, 2001, occurred along the plate boundary to the south.  It killed at least 74 people and destroyed over 17,000 homes.  The magnitude 7.7 earthquake of November 12, 1996, killed at least 14 people and left 12,000 homeless.  It occurred along the plate boundary to the north of the September 25 epicenter.

Seismotectonics of South America (Nazca Plate Region)

The South American arc extends over 7,000 km, from the Chilean margin triple junction offshore of southern Chile to its intersection with the Panama fracture zone, offshore of the southern coast of Panama in Central America. It marks the plate boundary between the subducting Nazca plate and the South America plate, where the oceanic crust and lithosphere of the Nazca plate begin their descent into the mantle beneath South America. The convergence associated with this subduction process is responsible for the uplift of the Andes Mountains, and for the active volcanic chain present along much of this deformation front. Relative to a fixed South America plate, the Nazca plate moves slightly north of eastwards at a rate varying from approximately 80 mm/yr in the south to approximately 65 mm/yr in the north. Although the rate of subduction varies little along the entire arc, there are complex changes in the geologic processes along the subduction zone that dramatically influence volcanic activity, crustal deformation, earthquake generation and occurrence all along the western edge of South America.

Most of the large earthquakes in South America are constrained to shallow depths of 0 to 70 km resulting from both crustal and interplate deformation. Crustal earthquakes result from deformation and mountain building in the overriding South America plate and generate earthquakes as deep as approximately 50 km. Interplate earthquakes occur due to slip along the dipping interface between the Nazca and the South American plates. Interplate earthquakes in this region are frequent and often large, and occur between the depths of approximately 10 and 60 km. Since 1900, numerous magnitude 8 or larger earthquakes have occurred on this subduction zone interface that were followed by devastating tsunamis, including the 1960 M9.5 earthquake in southern Chile, the largest instrumentally recorded earthquake in the world. Other notable shallow tsunami-generating earthquakes include the 1906 M8.5 earthquake near Esmeraldas, Ecuador, the 1922 M8.5 earthquake near Coquimbo, Chile, the 2001 M8.4 Arequipa, Peru earthquake, the 2007 M8.0 earthquake near Pisco, Peru, and the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake located just north of the 1960 event.

Large intermediate-depth earthquakes (those occurring between depths of approximately 70 and 300 km) are relatively limited in size and spatial extent in South America, and occur within the Nazca plate as a result of internal deformation within the subducting plate. These earthquakes generally cluster beneath northern Chile and southwestern Bolivia, and to a lesser extent beneath northern Peru and southern Ecuador, with depths between 110 and 130 km. Most of these earthquakes occur adjacent to the bend in the coastline between Peru and Chile. The most recent large intermediate-depth earthquake in this region was the 2005 M7.8 Tarapaca, Chile earthquake.

Earthquakes can also be generated to depths greater than 600 km as a result of continued internal deformation of the subducting Nazca plate. Deep-focus earthquakes in South America are not observed from a depth range of approximately 300 to 500 km. Instead, deep earthquakes in this region occur at depths of 500 to 650 km and are concentrated into two zones: one that runs beneath the Peru-Brazil border and another that extends from central Bolivia to central Argentina. These earthquakes generally do not exhibit large magnitudes. An exception to this was the 1994 Bolivian earthquake in northwestern Bolivia. This M8.2 earthquake occurred at a depth of 631 km, making it the largest deep-focus earthquake instrumentally recorded, and was felt widely throughout South and North America.

Subduction of the Nazca plate is geometrically complex and impacts the geology and seismicity of the western edge of South America. The intermediate-depth regions of the subducting Nazca plate can be segmented into five sections based on their angle of subduction beneath the South America plate. Three segments are characterized by steeply dipping subduction; the other two by near-horizontal subduction. The Nazca plate beneath northern Ecuador, southern Peru to northern Chile, and southern Chile descend into the mantle at angles of 25° to 30°. In contrast, the slab beneath southern Ecuador to central Peru, and under central Chile, is subducting at a shallow angle of approximately 10° or less. In these regions of “flat-slab” subduction, the Nazca plate moves horizontally for several hundred kilometers before continuing its descent into the mantle, and is shadowed by an extended zone of crustal seismicity in the overlying South America plate. Although the South America plate exhibits a chain of active volcanism resulting from the subduction and partial melting of the Nazca oceanic lithosphere along most of the arc, these regions of inferred shallow subduction correlate with an absence of volcanic activity.

More information on regional seismicity and tectonics

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image


 photo Peru-70MagEQ9252013_zps539e543e.jpg

Tsunami warning after 7.0 earthquake off Peru coast

Published time: September 25, 2013 18:00
Edited time: September 25, 2013 20:09

A picture released by the Peruvian Andina agency shows people gathering in an open space in front of an office complex in Lima, during an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 which struck off Peru's southern coast (AFP Photo)

A picture released by the Peruvian Andina agency shows people gathering in an open space in front of an office complex in Lima, during an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 which struck off Peru’s southern coast (AFP Photo)

Some homes crumbled and a tsunami warning was issued after a 7.0 earthquake struck just off Peru’s southern coast. The impact caused buildings in the Peruvian capital, Lima, to shake, despite the city being 480 kilometers away.

Earthquakes of this size sometimes generate local tsunamis that can be destructive along coasts located within 100 kilometers of the earthquake epicenters,” the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said in a statement. The center advised authorities to act appropriately.

The quake struck just 80 kilometers from the nearest Peruvian city, Acari, according to the US Geological Survey, with its epicenter at a depth of 33 kilometers. The quake had originally been measured at a magnitude of 6.8.

While no deaths or injuries were immediately reported, homes in the province of Caraveli in Arequipa crumbled in the shock.

Read More Here

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

….

Today Biological Hazard Peru Departmento de Callao, [The area was not defined.] Damage level
Details

….

Biological Hazard in Peru on Monday, 15 July, 2013 at 03:00 (03:00 AM) UTC.

 

Description
One person has died and a total of 46 people have been infected with the AH1N1 swine flu virus in Peru this year, a Health Ministry official said. “At this time, we do not have an increase in AH1N1 cases” even though a man died at a hospital in Callao province, outside Lima, from the disease, Health Ministry director of epidemiology Martin Yagui said in a press conference on Saturday. The man, who suffered from diabetes, asthma and cirrhosis, was considered to be in a high-risk group and died on July 9, Yagui said. Peru has registered swine flu cases every year since 2009, when the disease first appeared in the South American country, Yagui said. “There were 141 cases last year, 135 in 2011 and 46 so far this year. The majority (of the cases) were reported in Lima,” Yagui said. People in high-risk groups, including adults over the age of 60 and children younger than 5, should be vaccinated “against AH1N1 influenza … because it could mean the difference between life and death,” the health official said.
Biohazard name: AH1N1
Biohazard level: 2/4 Medium
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that cause only mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis A, B, and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, salmonella, mumps, measles, scrapie, dengue fever, and HIV. “Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures. Research work (including co-cultivation, virus replication studies, or manipulations involving concentrated virus) can be done in a BSL-2 (P2) facility, using BSL-3 practices and procedures. Virus production activities, including virus concentrations, require a BSL-3 (P3) facility and use of BSL-3 practices and procedures”, see Recommended Biosafety Levels for Infectious Agents.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

….

Peru reports first death from swine flu

Placard

Lima, Jul 14 (EFE).- One person has died and a total of 46 people have been infected with the AH1N1 swine flu virus in Peru this year, a Health Ministry official said.

“At this time, we do not have an increase in AH1N1 cases” even though a man died at a hospital in Callao province, outside Lima, from the disease, Health Ministry director of epidemiology Martin Yagui said in a press conference on Saturday.

The man, who suffered from diabetes, asthma and cirrhosis, was considered to be in a high-risk group and died on July 9, Yagui said.

 

Read More Here

….

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo Peru-3modEQsMay12th-13th-14th2013_zps5da9e55f.jpg

….

M4.9 – 71km SSW of Pacasmayo, Peru 2013-05-13 13:54:07 UTC

Earthquake location 7.949°S, 79.913°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-13 13:54:07 UTC
  2. 2013-05-13 08:54:07 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-13 08:54:07 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

7.949°S 79.913°W depth=55.6km (34.5mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 71km (44mi) SSW of Pacasmayo, Peru
  2. 71km (44mi) WSW of Paijan, Peru
  3. 72km (45mi) SW of San Pedro de Lloc, Peru
  4. 74km (46mi) W of Santiago de Cao, Peru
  5. 552km (343mi) NW of Lima, Peru

 

….

M5.7 – 93km WSW of Orcopampa, Peru 2013-05-14 23:39:17 UTC

Earthquake location 15.613°S, 73.132°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-14 23:39:17 UTC
  2. 2013-05-14 18:39:17 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-14 18:39:17 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

15.613°S 73.132°W depth=112.0km (69.6mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 93km (58mi) WSW of Orcopampa, Peru
  2. 120km (75mi) NNW of Camana, Peru
  3. 147km (91mi) SE of Puquio, Peru
  4. 191km (119mi) WNW of Arequipa, Peru
  5. 541km (336mi) W of La Paz, Bolivia

 

….

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

 

….

M4.3 – 98km S of Ilo, Peru 2013-05-15 16:31:23 UTC

Earthquake location 18.527°S, 71.402°W

Event Time

  1. 2013-05-15 16:31:23 UTC
  2. 2013-05-15 11:31:23 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2013-05-15 11:31:23 UTC-05:00 system time

Location

18.527°S 71.402°W depth=59.3km (36.8mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 98km (61mi) S of Ilo, Peru
  2. 116km (72mi) W of Arica, Chile
  3. 134km (83mi) WSW of Tacna, Peru
  4. 155km (96mi) SSW of Moquegua, Peru
  5. 411km (255mi) WSW of La Paz, Bolivia

 

….

Tectonic Summary

Seismotectonics of South America (Nazca Plate Region)

The South American arc extends over 7,000 km, from the Chilean margin triple junction offshore of southern Chile to its intersection with the Panama fracture zone, offshore of the southern coast of Panama in Central America. It marks the plate boundary between the subducting Nazca plate and the South America plate, where the oceanic crust and lithosphere of the Nazca plate begin their descent into the mantle beneath South America. The convergence associated with this subduction process is responsible for the uplift of the Andes Mountains, and for the active volcanic chain present along much of this deformation front. Relative to a fixed South America plate, the Nazca plate moves slightly north of eastwards at a rate varying from approximately 80 mm/yr in the south to approximately 65 mm/yr in the north. Although the rate of subduction varies little along the entire arc, there are complex changes in the geologic processes along the subduction zone that dramatically influence volcanic activity, crustal deformation, earthquake generation and occurrence all along the western edge of South America.

Most of the large earthquakes in South America are constrained to shallow depths of 0 to 70 km resulting from both crustal and interplate deformation. Crustal earthquakes result from deformation and mountain building in the overriding South America plate and generate earthquakes as deep as approximately 50 km. Interplate earthquakes occur due to slip along the dipping interface between the Nazca and the South American plates. Interplate earthquakes in this region are frequent and often large, and occur between the depths of approximately 10 and 60 km. Since 1900, numerous magnitude 8 or larger earthquakes have occurred on this subduction zone interface that were followed by devastating tsunamis, including the 1960 M9.5 earthquake in southern Chile, the largest instrumentally recorded earthquake in the world. Other notable shallow tsunami-generating earthquakes include the 1906 M8.5 earthquake near Esmeraldas, Ecuador, the 1922 M8.5 earthquake near Coquimbo, Chile, the 2001 M8.4 Arequipa, Peru earthquake, the 2007 M8.0 earthquake near Pisco, Peru, and the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake located just north of the 1960 event.

Large intermediate-depth earthquakes (those occurring between depths of approximately 70 and 300 km) are relatively limited in size and spatial extent in South America, and occur within the Nazca plate as a result of internal deformation within the subducting plate. These earthquakes generally cluster beneath northern Chile and southwestern Bolivia, and to a lesser extent beneath northern Peru and southern Ecuador, with depths between 110 and 130 km. Most of these earthquakes occur adjacent to the bend in the coastline between Peru and Chile. The most recent large intermediate-depth earthquake in this region was the 2005 M7.8 Tarapaca, Chile earthquake.

 

 

….