Tag Archive: NOAA


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Sea lions

(NaturalNews) The Marine Mammal Center rescued over a hundred sea lions in a 10-day period off the West Coast of California in the winter of 2015. The influx of stranded sea lions is a sign that the health of the ocean is deteriorating. From January 1 to February 12, 2015, National Geographic counted nearly 500 rescued sea lions, an amount that is alarming scientists. Something has gone awry in the West Coast waters.

The sea lions are not finding food, they are losing strength, and many are starting to wash ashore. The startling trend didn’t start in 2015. The number of stranded sea lions began rising in the winter of 2013, when scientists started noticing waves of sea lion pups washing ashore. Scientists believe the ocean’s temperatures have shifted. Warmer currents may be affecting food sources that the sea lions depend on. Others see problems in ocean water acidity. The animals are being forced to go on longer quests to find food. Many of the pups are being left behind, stranded, while their parents search for food.

One-third of sea lions born last summer wiped out

The death of this sentinel species is an indication of changes in ocean climate and ecosystem. Sea lion prey, which include sardines and crayfish, are reportedly disappearing in numbers as well, forcing the starving sea lions to go on longer quests in search of food. Scientists are concerned about ocean pH and rising acidity of the waters. According to San Jose Mercury News, marine biologists warn that, if the trend continues, an entire generation of California sea lions could be wiped out.

When speaking to NBC News, Sea World San Diego senior veterinarian Hendrick Nollens reported, “We had rescued 19 California sea lions in January [2013]. This year we already rescued 87 pups in that same month. So this event seems to be much larger.”

According to the Daily Breeze, the “unusual mortality event” wiped out two-thirds of the sea lion pup population off the West Coast in 2013.

Rehabilitation centers are taking several hundred pups in this year to save the species from total extinction.

NOAA wildlife biologist Sharon Melin confirmed that most pups captured in the wild in 2013 were only half their weight. After they are released back into the wild, they are expected to maintain their weight. When Melin went on a research trip in September 2013, she reported that the weight of the pups was still low. She brought back the bad news: “We’ve told the centers to prepare for the worst.”

The U-T San Diego concurred, reporting that pups in the Channel Island rookeries continued to struggle despite rehabilitation efforts. On average, pups were 19% below their average weight, even after rehabilitation.

Jim Milbury of NOAA Fisheries says that West Coast sea lions have a birth rate of about 50,000 a year, and San Diego 6 reported on Jan. 28, 2015, that nearly 1 of 3 pups born the previous summer have already died.

If 33% of pups born in 2014 have already died, then based on the average birth rate, over 15,000 have passed away in that short time frame.

Ocean water acidity on the rise, subjecting aquatic life to disease

According to Jennifer Palma of Global News, ocean health is deteriorating, indicated by a die off of scallops and oysters. “Getting pacific oysters and scallops is next to impossible; the industry is in crisis. … So what’s killing the Pacific oysters and scallops? A possible combination of factors including warmer oceans, decreasing acidity levels and potentially disease,” she said in a report.

University of British Columbia marine microbiology professor Curtis Suttle is concerned about changes in the pH of ocean waters. “The hypothesis — there’s a working hypothesis –w is that these changes, these excursions in pH, are making the shellfish vulnerable to infection by diseases that they would normally be resistant to.”

Sources for this article include:

http://enenews.com

http://enenews.com

http://enenews.com

http://www.dailybreeze.com

 

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Hawaii marine biologists celebrate extremely rare footage of the giant Whiplash squid as it glides through the darkest depths of the Pacific

  • The majestic squid is called ‘Taningia Danae’ or ‘whiplash squid’ 
  • Experts say that the whiplash squid has rarely been seen alive 
  • The squid can travel between two and two-and-a-half miles per hour 
  • It attached itself onto a remotely operated underwater vehicle
  • Scientists will study the footage to learn more about the squid

This is the magical moment that National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists captured footage of a rare deep sea squid.

The majestic sea creature, which is around one to two meters long, is called ‘Taningia Danae’ or ‘whiplash squid.’

As it descended to the sea floor of the Pacific Ocean in Hawaii on September 19, 2015 a remotely operated underwater vehicle caught it on camera.

This is the magical moment that NOAA scientists captured footage of a rare deep sea squid

This is the magical moment that NOAA scientists captured footage of a rare deep sea squid

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Inu - Guadalupe Fur Seal
Guadalupe fur seal
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October 2, 2015
The threatened Guadalupe fur seal could be the latest victim of the unusually warm waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean.
Oct 1, 2015
Taylor Hill
is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.

The threatened Guadalupe fur seal is getting stranded on California’s coastline in record numbers, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Total number of Guadalupe fur seal strandings in California. (Chart: Courtesy NOAA)

The marine mammals typically spend their time off Mexico’s coast, but at least 80 of the pinnipeds have ended up on California’s shore emaciated, dehydrated, or dead. That’s a rate eight times higher than what’s documented in a typical year.

Of the 80 fur seals, 42 were found dead, and only 16 of the 38 found alive survived.

The unprecedented occurrence has led NOAA to declare an unusual mortality event for the seals, meaning its scientists will devote more time to studying the species, and more samples from rescued animals will be evaluated.

The fur seal’s struggles come during the same year that a record 3,500 California sea lions have washed ashore along California’s coast.

 

Read More Here

Universe Today

by Ken Kremer on February 13, 2014

This visible image of the winter storm over the U.S. south and East Coast was taken by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 13 at 1455 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST. Snow covered ground can be seen over the Great Lakes region and Ohio Valley. Image Credit:  NASA/NOAA GOES Project

This visible image of the winter storm over the U.S. south and East Coast was taken by NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 13 at 1455 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST. Snow covered ground can be seen over the Great Lakes region and Ohio Valley. Image Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

A deadly monster storm is battering virtually the entire US Eastern seaboard today, Thursday, Feb. 13, as it moves from the Southeast to the Northeast and into the New England states, wreaking havoc and causing miserable weather conditions for over 100 million Americas.

This afternoon, NASA and NOAA published a new image taken by a GOES satellite that showed the extent of the clouds associated with the massive winter storm over the US East Coast – see above and below.

Blizzard, white out and slippery conditions have already caused more than 18 deaths.

The killer storm has brought relentless waves of snow, sleet and ice over the past two days covering a vast swath stretching from inland to coastal areas as it moved up from the southern to northern states.

More than a foot of snow has already fallen in many areas today stretching from the Mid-Atlantic into the entire Northeast region.

Several states have declared states of emergency.

This is the season’s 12th snow storm. In many Northeast localities, the accumulated snowfall totals are three times the normal average. As a result many municipalities are running out of road salt.

And to add insult to injury, much more icy snow is falling overnight into Friday on top of the massive existing mounds and piles of frozen ice and snow that’s accumulated over the past few weeks of subfreezing temperatures.

There are also predictions for patches of “thunder snow” — which is a snow storm mixed with thunder and lightning!

Read More Here

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DAHBOO77

Published on Jan 9, 2014

These are the latest quake updates for the US!

http://spaceweather.com/

http://quakes.globalincidentmap.com/

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Spaceweather.com

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

GROWING QUIET?

Giant sunspot AR1944 has not unleashed a significant flare in more than 48 hours. The growing quiet could be the calm between storms. AR1944 has an unstable ‘beta-gamma-delta’ magnetic field that harbors energy for X-class flares.  

CME IMPACT:

As predicted, a CME hit Earth’s magnetic field on Jan. 9th (20:00 UT). The impact was weaker than expected, however, and it failed to produce widespread geomagnetic storms. Nevertheless, some beautiful auroras appeared around the Arctic Circle. Harald Albrigtsen sends this picture from Tromsø, Norway:

It was dark in Norway when the CME arrived, so observers there witnessed a nice display. By the time night fell over North America, however, the lights had faded. US observers saw nothing remarkable.

More auroras are possible on Jan. 10th as Earth passes through the magnetic wake of the CME. NOAA forecasters estimate a 85% chance of polar geomagnetic storms before the day is over.

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Massive Solar storm strikes Earth following monster flare

Newsnation6 Newsnation6

Published on Jan 10, 2014

A large coronal mass ejection has reached Earth — days after the Sun sent a massive burst of solar wind and electromagnetic radiation towards our planet. While causing no major geomagnetic storm, it has produced spectacular auroras in northern Europe.

The coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived near Earth at 2:32pm EST (7:32pm GMT) on Thursday, with its effects expected to continue throughout Friday, according to US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center has issued a warning of a geomagnetic storm with “minor disruptions to communications and GPS.”

While the world’s economies braced for possible blackouts in high-frequency airline and military communications, disruptions to GPS signals and power grids, enthusiasts in the northern hemisphere rushed outdoors in the hope of viewing the stunning aurora borealis as far south as Colorado.

However, American aurora spotters have been disappointed, as, according to spaceweather.com, the CME’s impact was “weaker than expected” and failed to produce widespread storms. Some frustrated Twitter users also blamed cloudy skies for not being able to see the northern lights.

Observers were luckier around the Arctic Circle in Norway, where a dark and clear night at the time of impact, as well as more favorable latitude, put an aurora on display.

NOAA forecasters still estimated an 85 percent chance of polar geomagnetic storms before the end of Friday, and media cheered the sky watchers by saying there remains a chance of some clear aurora sightings Friday night.

The CME that stroke the Earth has been associated with the large X1.2-class solar flare that was unleashed from a giant sunspot AR1944 on January 7. The flare has been described as the most powerful this year so far, with X-class denoting the most severe intensity.

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Solar storm strikes Earth following monster flare (VIDEO)

 

 

This January 7, 2014 handout image captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory shows a false-color composite image from a blast of activity originating from an active sunspot region at the center of the sun's disk (AFP Photo)

This January 7, 2014 handout image captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows a false-color composite image from a blast of activity originating from an active sunspot region at the center of the sun’s disk (AFP Photo)

 

A large coronal mass ejection has reached Earth – days after the Sun sent a massive burst of solar wind and electromagnetic radiation towards our planet. While causing no major geomagnetic storm, it has produced spectacular auroras in northern Europe.

The coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived near Earth at 2:32pm EST (7:32pm GMT) on Thursday, with its effects expected to continue throughout Friday, according to US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center has issued a warning of a geomagnetic storm with “minor disruptions to communications and GPS.”

While the world’s economies braced for possible blackouts in high-frequency airline and military communications, disruptions to GPS signals and power grids, enthusiasts in the northern hemisphere rushed outdoors in the hope of viewing the stunning aurora borealis as far south as Colorado.

However, American aurora spotters have been disappointed, as, according to spaceweather.com, the CME’s impact was “weaker than expected” and failed to produce widespread storms. Some frustrated Twitter users also blamed cloudy skies for not being able to see the northern lights.

Observers were luckier around the Arctic Circle in Norway, where a dark and clear night at the time of impact, as well as more favorable latitude, put an aurora on display.

NOAA forecasters still estimated an 85 percent chance of polar geomagnetic storms before the end of Friday, and media cheered the sky watchers by saying there remains a chance of some clear aurora sightings Friday night.

The CME that stroke the Earth has been associated with the large X1.2-class solar flare that was unleashed from a giant sunspot AR1944 on January 7. The flare has been described as the most powerful this year so far, with X-class denoting the most severe intensity.

 

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M 5.1 – 24km NNW of Corralillo, Cuba

 2014-01-09 20:57:43 UTC

Earthquake location 23.189°N, 80.677°W

Event Time

  1. 2014-01-09 20:57:43 UTC
  2. 2014-01-09 15:57:43 UTC-05:00 at epicenter
  3. 2014-01-09 14:57:43 UTC-06:00 system time

Location

23.189°N 80.677°W depth=10.0km (6.2mi)

Nearby Cities

  1. 24km (15mi) NNW of Corralillo, Cuba
  2. 36km (22mi) NE of Marti, Cuba
  3. 51km (32mi) N of Los Arabos, Cuba
  4. 56km (35mi) ENE of Cardenas, Cuba
  5. 174km (108mi) E of Havana, Cuba

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Tectonic Summary

The January 9, 2014 M5.1 earthquake in the Gulf of Mexico occurred along the northern coast of west-central Cuba at shallow crustal depths, ~28km from Corralillo, Cuba and ~172 km east of Havana, Cuba.

The island of Cuba lies within the North American plate and is bounded by the Bahamas Platform and Florida Straits to the north and the North America-Caribbean plate boundary to the south. The plate boundary, a left-lateral transform, defines the southeast coast of the island and causes uplift of the Sierra Maestra. In the vicinity of the January 9 earthquake, a former plate boundary suture and several faults, collectively termed the Nortecubana Fault system, bound the northern coast of Cuba. Additionally, several smaller crustal faults, including the left-lateral Hicacos Fault and Las Villas fault are located in the general vicinity of the January 9 earthquake. The region of the January 9 earthquake is relatively quiet seismically. Only 6 documented events ranging from M3.0-5.6 occurred over the past 75 years within 200 km of the epicenter. The M5.6 event, which occurred in 1939, also took place along the northern coast of Cuba in the vicinity of the Nortecubana Fault system. The January 9 event occurred 686 km ESE of the September 2006 M5.8 Gulf of Mexico earthquake.

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Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

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BPEarthWatch BPEarthWatch

 

Published on Jan 4, 2014

Giant Sunspot 1944 is turning earth facing. Draconid meteor shower.
Solar,Quake and Weather Links, http://www.bpearthwatch.com

 

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 Spaceweather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

GIANT SUNSPOT:

Sunspot AR1944, which appeared on January 1st, is one of the largest sunspots of the current solar cycle. It’s so big, people are noticing it as a naked-eye blemish on the solar disk. Daisuke Tomiyasu sends this picture from Higashinada-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan:

“Sunspot 1944 was visible at sunrise on January 4th,” says Tomiyasu. “I combined three exposures of 1/15sec, 1/100sec, and 1/640sec to create this HDR (high dynamic range) image.”

Aside: Look carefully at the full-sized picture. There is a red fringe on the bottom of the sun and a green fringe on top. That’s real. The colorful fringes are caused by refraction in Earth’s atmosphere. The effect is explained here.

Although the sunspot has been relatively quiet and stable since it first appeared on New Year’s Day, a region of this size has the potential to produce significant activity. Indeed, NOAA forecasters, who say they are keeping a close eye on this behemoth, estimate a 75% chance of M-flares and a 30% chance of X-flares on Jan. 4th.  

 

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 Spaceweather

by Dr. Tony Phillips.

GREEN VORTEX OVER SWEDEN:

For the second day in a row, a solar wind stream is buffeting Earth’s magnetic field, sparking intermittant geomagnetic storms and auroras around the Arctic Circle. Last night, Northern Lights tour guide Chad Blakley photographed a luminous green vortex over Sweden’s Abisko National Park:

“Tonight was one of those nights that makes being an aurora photographer the best job in the world,” says Blakley. “The lights started around 5:00 PM and continued well into the night. I had the pleasure of spending the evening with Peter Richards, a representative of National Geographic student photography expeditions. At one point during our night under the stars I heard him say that the display was the most amazing thing he had ever seen in his life – I couldn’t agree more!”

NOAA forecasters estimate a 20% chance of more polar geomagnetic storms on Jan. 4th as the solar wind continues to blow. 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

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  Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Humberto (AL09) Atlantic Ocean 08.09.2013 14.09.2013 Tropical Depression 275 ° 65 km/h 83 km/h 4.88 m NOAA NHC Details

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 photo HurricaneHumberto-AltlanticOceanSeptember14th2013_zps122d3c38.jpg

  Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Humberto (AL09)
Area: Atlantic Ocean
Start up location: N 13° 6.000, W 20° 42.000
Start up: 09th September 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 1,192.02 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
14th Sep 2013 14:22:50 N 25° 0.000, W 34° 0.000 15 65 83 Tropical Depression 275 ° 16 1003 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
16th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 28° 12.000, W 41° 6.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 30° 18.000, W 43° 42.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 32° 36.000, W 45° 6.000 Tropical Depression 93 111 NOAA NHC
19th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 36° 30.000, W 43° 30.000 Hurricane I 120 148 NOAA NHC

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LiveScience

Humberto Becomes Season’s First Hurricane, Misses Record

 
Hurricane Humberto
Hurricane Humberto appears as a characteristic swirl in the Eastern Atlantic on the morning of Sept. 11, 2013. Humberto was the first hurricane of the 2013 season and narrowly missed being the latest-forming hurricane on record (a title held by 2002’s Hurricane Gustav, which formed three hours later than Humberto on Sept. 11 of that year).
Credit: Meteosat/EUMETSAT

As expected, what was Tropical Storm Humberto became the first hurricane of the 2013 season early this morning (Sept. 11), narrowly missing out on becoming the latest-forming first hurricane in the modern record.

Humberto was upgraded to a hurricane at 5 a.m. EDT today, and is currently sporting maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 km/h), just above the 74-mph threshold between tropical storms and hurricanes. The hurricane could strengthen more today before weakening on Thursday, according to the latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

Humberto’s transition into a hurricane occurred on the same day as Hurricane Gustav in 2002, but happened three hours earlier, according to University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy, which meant Humberto just missed out on snagging the record for latest hurricane to form in a season in the era of aircraft reconnaissance and satellites (since about 1944). [Image Gallery: Hurricane Season 2013]

Read More  and  Watch Video Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

 

 photo TropicalDepression06WJune28th2013_zpsb484ab54.jpg

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  Active tropical storm system(s)
06W Pacific Ocean 27.06.2013 28.06.2013 Tropical Depression 280 ° 46 km/h 65 km/h 3.05 m JTWC Details
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details

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Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: 06W
Area: Pacific Ocean
Start up location: N 9° 18.000, E 129° 12.000
Start up: 28th June 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 0.00 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
28th Jun 2013 05:29:10 N 9° 18.000, E 129° 12.000 19 46 65 Tropical Depression 280 ° 10 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 11° 36.000, E 125° 42.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC
29th Jun 2013 12:00:00 N 13° 30.000, E 123° 36.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC
30th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 15° 12.000, E 121° 24.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC
01st Jul 2013 00:00:00 N 19° 6.000, E 116° 0.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 JTWC
02nd Jul 2013 00:00:00 N 22° 30.000, E 113° 54.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC
03rd Jul 2013 00:00:00 N 26° 18.000, E 112° 36.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 JTWC

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

Hurricane COSME NHC 5-Day Cone

Hurricane COSME
NHC 5-Day Cone

Tropical Storm 03E (COSME) JTWC ATCF Track

Hurricane 03E (COSME)
JTWC ATCF Track

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  Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Cosme (03E) Pacific Ocean – East 22.06.2013 27.06.2013 Tropical Depression 285 ° 65 km/h 83 km/h 4.27 m NOAA NHC Details

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 photo TropicalDepressionCosme03EJune28th2013_zps4f3fba52.jpg
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 Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Cosme (03E)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 11° 48.000, W 103° 48.000
Start up: 23rd June 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 1,277.96 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
24th Jun 2013 07:12:49 N 12° 36.000, W 104° 24.000 11 56 74 Tropical Depression 315 12 1005 MB NOAA NHC
25th Jun 2013 04:45:47 N 15° 54.000, W 107° 54.000 22 102 120 Tropical Storm 305 12 994 MB NOAA NHC
26th Jun 2013 04:54:45 N 17° 54.000, W 113° 18.000 22 139 167 Hurricane I. 290 12 981 MB NOAA NHC
27th Jun 2013 05:19:35 N 19° 36.000, W 117° 36.000 22 83 102 Tropical Storm 295 12 998 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
27th Jun 2013 17:23:33 N 20° 24.000, W 120° 54.000 26 65 83 Tropical Depression 285 ° 14 1003 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
29th Jun 2013 06:00:00 N 21° 48.000, W 130° 0.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
30th Jun 2013 06:00:00 N 21° 48.000, W 134° 30.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC
01st Jul 2013 06:00:00 N 22° 0.000, W 139° 0.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

Tropical Storm COSME NHC 5-Day Cone Tropical Storm 03E (COSME) JTWC ATCF Track
Tropical Storm COSME
NHC 5-Day Cone
Tropical Storm
03E (COSME)
JTWC ATCF Track

Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Cosme (03E) Pacific Ocean – East 22.06.2013 25.06.2013 Tropical Depression 305 ° 102 km/h 120 km/h 3.66 m NOAA NHC Details


 photo TropicalDepressionCosme03EJune24th2013_zps961f0caa.jpg

 Tropical Storm data

Share:
Storm name: Cosme (03E)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 11° 48.000, W 103° 48.000
Start up: 23rd June 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 394.64 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
24th Jun 2013 07:12:49 N 12° 36.000, W 104° 24.000 11 56 74 Tropical Depression 315 12 1005 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
25th Jun 2013 04:45:47 N 15° 54.000, W 107° 54.000 22 102 120 Hurricane I 305 ° 12 994 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
26th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 17° 24.000, W 112° 6.000 Hurricane II 139 167 NOAA NHC
26th Jun 2013 12:00:00 N 18° 0.000, W 114° 30.000 Hurricane II 130 157 NOAA NHC
27th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 18° 42.000, W 116° 54.000 Hurricane I 111 139 NOAA NHC
28th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 20° 0.000, W 122° 0.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
29th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 20° 30.000, W 127° 0.000 Tropical Depression 46 65 NOAA NHC
30th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 20° 30.000, W 132° 0.000 Tropical Depression 46 65 NOAA NHC