Tag Archive: National Hurricane Center


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Hurricane Patricia

Author: Kara GilmourBy:
Staff Reporter
Oct, 23, 2015 | 9:22 PM

Hurricane Patricia 2015, the strongest storm ever, grew into a Category 5 on Mexico’s central Pacific Coast late Thursday for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding, according to Bloomberg.

Steady rain began to fall after dark in Manzanillo, one of the country’s principal ports, ahead of an expected landfall Friday. Luis Felipe Puente, Mexico’s civil defense coordinator, said schools would be closed in Colima state, which is home to Manzanillo.

“We are calm,” said Gabriel Lopez, a worker at Las Hadas Hotel in the city. “We don’t know what direction (the storm) will take, but apparently it’s headed this way. … If there is an emergency we will take care of the people. There are rooms that are not exposed to wind or glass.”

Hurricane Patricia to be devastating, according to National Hurricane Center.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami warned that preparations should be rushed to completion, saying Hurricane Patricia could cause coastal flooding, destructive waves and flash floods.

“This is an extremely dangerous, potentially catastrophic hurricane,” center meteorologist Dennis Feltgen said.

 

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NBC News
Oct 23 2015, 5:54 pm ET

Hurricane Patricia: Strongest Storm Ever Measured to Hit Mexico

 

Category 5 EPAC hurricane was just sampled by (@NOAA P3). This is the eye radar img 10/23/2015

What Makes a Hurricane Category 5?1:08

Hurricane Patricia became the strongest storm ever measured on the planet early Friday, with experts warning it could trigger 40-foot waves along southwestern Mexico and “life-threatening” flash flooding.

More than 7 million residents — and an estimated tens of thousands of U.S. citizens visiting or living there — were told to prepare for the “worst-case scenario” as the ferocious storm was expected to race ashore on Mexico’s Pacific coast between 6 to 10 p.m. ET Friday.

At 5 p.m. ET, Patricia was about 60 miles west of Manzanillo, and about 110 miles south-southeast of Cabo Corrientes.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Patricia was expected to make landfall “in the next several hours.” A hurricane warning was in place for San Blas to Punta San Telmo.

The tourist magnets of Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo were directly in the Category 5 storm’s projected path, and Puerto Vallarta’s airport was closed Friday out of precaution as some stranded vacationers described their inability to fly out of a “nightmare.”

By 5 p.m. winds had weakened slightly to 190 mph, the Hurricane Center said. Winds of 200 mph were measured earlier, and the Hurricane Center labeled Patricia as the “strongest hurricane on record” in the Atlantic and eastern North Pacific Basins.

Mexico has not formally requested help from the U.S., but State Department spokesman Mark Toner told reporters Friday that America “stands up to offer any assistance that we can in the aftermath of what at least appears to be a pretty epic event in terms of the intensity and size of the storm.”

 

 

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BREAKING
NBC News
Oct 23 2015, 9:21 pm ET

‘Extraordinarily Dangerous’ Category 5 Hurricane Patricia Makes Landfall in Mexico

An “extraordinarily dangerous” category 5 hurricane slammed into southwestern Mexico Friday night, bringing lashing winds and rainfall that has the potential to create life-threatening flash floods.

Hurricane Patricia made landfall near Cuixmala, west-northwest of Manzanillo, carrying 165 mph winds at 6:15 p.m. local time (7:15 p.m. ET), according to the National Hurricane Center. Palm trees bent and rain whipped in sideways as the storm made its first appearance on land.

Patricia’s “potentially catastrophic landfall” would affect a stretch of coast between the popular tourist destinations of Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo, the World Meteorological Organization said. Hurricane force winds covered 35 miles, while tropical storm force winds extended 175 miles, according to the NHC.

More than 7 million people were in the storm’s path.

Rainfall amounts of up to a foot in a short span of time between Friday night and Saturday over the Mexican states of Nayarit, Jalisco, Colima, Michoacán and Guerrero could trigger “life-threatening flash floods and mud slides,” according to the National Hurricane Center.

Jalisco was already seeing destruction from the storm Friday afternoon, according to state police. The state, which encompasses Puerto Vallarta and the Guadalajara metro area, had 1,075 shelters set up, according to the Ministry of Communications and Transportation.

About 3,500 people were evacuated from the region ahead of the storm, and airlifts were prepared to rescue people from the region on Saturday.

 

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New York Times

MEXICO CITY — The strongest hurricane to ever assault the Western Hemisphere slammed into Mexico’s southwest Pacific Coast on Friday evening, transforming hotels into makeshift shelters, shuttering schools, closing airports and sending inhabitants racing to bus stations to flee inland.

The storm, named Hurricane Patricia, was packing winds of about 165 miles per hour as it struck land, having slowed considerably from earlier speeds of about 200 miles per hour as it spun toward a coastline dotted with tiny fishing villages and five-star resorts in cities like Puerto Vallarta.

As the outer wall of the hurricane swept over the coast at 6:15 p.m., the authorities reported trees being knocked down and landslides taking place along the road between the city of Colima and the port city of Manzanillo. Light poles were quickly toppled and roofs torn off.

Less than an hour later, the National Hurricane Center said the hurricane was barreling inland over southwestern Mexico with maximum sustained wind speeds of 160 m.p.h. and remained “extremely dangerous.”

Photo

An employee boarded up a store in the Pacific coastal resort of Puerto Vallarta on Friday. The rapid strengthening of the storm caught many people off guard. Credit Henry Romero/Reuters

The government of Mexico had already declared a state of emergency in dozens of municipalities in the states of Colima, Nayarit and Jalisco. Residents had stacked sandbags around properties and rushed to grocery stores to stock up on supplies.

By noon, there were no more bus tickets to buy or gas to pump in order to evacuate, some residents said. Lines at neighborhood grocery stores, hours long earlier in the day, suddenly disappeared. Those who made it out were long gone. The rest were stuck to weather out the monster storm.

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jstaletovich@miamiherald.com

October 2, 2015 Updated 5 hours ago

Hurricane Joaquin continued hammering the Bahamas early Friday but began turning toward the north, taking a track that should steer clear of the U.S. coast.

At 2 p.m. Friday, the National Hurricane Center said the extremely dangerous Category 4 storm would likely batter the Bahamas through the day. New computer models aim the storm further east, away from the Carolinas and the heavily populated New Jersey-New York area, which had been devastated by Superstorm Sandy. The latest track takes the storm closer to Bermuda, keeping hurricane winds well offshore of the East Coast as it slowly weakens to a Category 1 by Sunday, then tropical storm by midweek.

 

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Joaquin Pounds Bahamas, Unlikely To Threaten East Coast

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hurricane Joaquin pounded the Bahamas for a second day with powerful winds and waves on Friday, but it was not expected to be a major threat to the U.S. East Coast, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

An easterly shift in the forecast track of the slow-moving Joaquin spared the Carolinas, New York and New Jersey, where Superstorm Sandy killed more than 120 people and caused $70 billion of property damage in October 2012.

“The forecast models continue to indicate a track farther away from the United States East Coast and the threat of direct impacts from Joaquin in the Carolinas and mid-Atlantic states appears to be decreasing,” the NHC said.

 

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Miami Herald

Coast Guard searches for missing ship as Joaquin pounds Bahamas

Cargo ship and 33 crew members reported missing near Crooked Island

Latest track continues to shift away from East Coast

Storm, still a major hurricane, could clear Bahamas later tonight

SHAKE AND BLOW

by Staff Writers Mexico City (AFP) Oct 13, 2013

Tropical Storm Octave formed off Mexico’s Pacific Coast south of the Baja California peninsula on Sunday, US and Mexican weather services said.

Located about 565 kilometers (350 miles) south of the tip of the peninsula, the storm was traveling north-northwestward at 23 kilometers per hour, the Miami-based US National Hurricane Center said.

Octave had top winds of 80 kilometers per hour that could begin to weaken gradually starting Monday, it added. There were no hazards affecting land.

Mexico’s National Weather Service said Octave would trigger rains in the northwestern part of the country, noting that heavy downpours could cause flooding in urban areas.

 

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MEXICO CITY | Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:14pm EDT

(Reuters) – Tropical Storm Octave drew closer to Mexico’s Baja California peninsula on Monday, weakening slightly on its approach.

The storm, about 175 miles south of the town of Cabo San Lazaro on the peninsula’s western coast, was traveling north at about 13 miles per hour, Miami’s National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest advisory.

Octave had maximum sustained wind speeds of up to 60 miles per hour, down slightly from Sunday night, and the storm was expected to approach the peninsula’s west coast sometime on Tuesday, the NHC said.

Mexico’s government has issued a tropical storm warning for the southwestern coast of Baja California, from the town of Santa Fe north to Punta Abreojos.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details

Ingrid (AL10) Gulf of Mexico 12.09.2013 14.09.2013 Tropical Depression 15 ° 93 km/h 111 km/h 2.74 m NOAA NHC Details


 photo TropicalDepressionIngrid-GulfofMexicoSeptember14th2013_zps03150d98.jpg

 Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Ingrid (AL10)
Area: Gulf of Mexico
Start up location: N 19° 42.000, W 94° 0.000
Start up: 13th September 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 82.88 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
14th Sep 2013 14:23:21 N 19° 48.000, W 95° 0.000 6 93 111 Tropical Depression 15 ° 9 991 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
16th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 22° 18.000, W 97° 30.000 Hurricane II 130 157 NOAA NHC
17th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 22° 24.000, W 99° 6.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC
18th Sep 2013 00:00:00 N 22° 0.000, W 100° 0.000 Tropical Depression 37 56 NOAA NHC

(Photo: National Hurricane Center)

Story Highlights

    • Could become a hurricane shortly before hitting land near Tampico sometime late Sunday or early Monday
    • Tropical Storm Ingrid lashed Mexico’s Gulf Coast with heavy rains on Friday
    • State officials imposed an orange alert, the highest possible, in parts of southern Veracruz

Tropical Storm Ingrid, which formed in the southern Gulf of Mexico on Friday morning, is bringing heavy rains and flooding to Mexico’s Gulf Coast.

Ingrid could become a hurricane shortly before hitting land near the Gulf coast port city of Tampico sometime late Sunday or early Monday, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

It is the ninth named storm of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season. So far, eight of the nine named storms have been tropical storms, with only one hurricane (Humberto).

Early Friday, Ingrid had winds of 60 mph and entered about 60 miles east of Veracruz, Mexico. The storm was stationary.

The greatest impacts from Ingrid will likely be heavy rainfall, flash flooding and mudslides in eastern Mexico, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

A wide swath of eastern Mexico near and inland of the Gulf Coast has the potential to pick up 10 to 15 inches of rainfall, with isolated amounts over 25 inches, AP reported.

The flooding could be “life-threatening,” according to the hurricane center. State officials imposed an orange alert, the highest possible, in parts of southern Veracruz.

At least three major rivers in the eastern state of Veracruz were flooding or close to overflowing their banks and hundreds of people were evacuating low-lying areas, AP reported.

The storm could also bring needed rainfall farther north along the Mexico coast and perhaps as far north as South Texas, depending on its track, AccuWeather reports. “Any reasonable rainfall will be welcomed by many residential and agricultural interests over the Rio Grande Valley,” Sosnowski says.

There are now three active, named systems in the Atlantic basin. Ingrid joins Tropical Storm Humberto and Tropical Depression Gabrielle, which are both spinning in the open Atlantic Ocean and are expected to continue to weaken on Friday.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

(NOAA)

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 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Andrea (AL01) Carib Sea 05.06.2013 06.06.2013 Tropical Depression 35 ° 93 km/h 111 km/h 3.05 m NOAA NHC Details

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 photo TropicalDepressionAndreaJune6th2013_zpsa4f5193a.jpg

Tropical Depression Andrea -AL01-Carib Sea June 6th 2013

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Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Andrea (AL01)
Area: Carib Sea
Start up location: N 25° 18.000, W 86° 30.000
Start up: 06th June 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 426.52 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
06th Jun 2013 03:56:52 N 25° 18.000, W 86° 30.000 6 65 83 Tropical Storm 360 6 1002 MB NOAA NHC
06th Jun 2013 06:25:13 N 26° 0.000, W 86° 18.000 9 65 83 Tropical Storm 10 10 1002 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
07th Jun 2013 08:10:53 N 30° 18.000, W 82° 24.000 24 74 93 Tropical Depression 45 ° 0 993 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
08th Jun 2013 12:00:00 N 41° 0.000, W 70° 42.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
08th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 36° 48.000, W 76° 18.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
09th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 44° 42.000, W 63° 18.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC
10th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 45° 30.000, W 46° 0.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC
11th Jun 2013 00:00:00 N 45° 30.000, W 24° 0.000 Tropical Depression 65 83 NOAA NHC

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Tropical Storm Andrea to make landfall within hours-forecaster

June 6 | Thu Jun 6, 2013 11:39pm IST

(Reuters) – The center of Tropical Storm Andrea will reach the northern part of Florida in the next few hours, then will move in a northeasterly direction near the east coast of the United States through Saturday, U.S. government forecasters said on Thursday.

Andrea, the first tropical storm of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season, was swirling about 35 miles (55 km) west- southwest of Cedar Key, Florida, and packing maximum sustained winds of 60 miles per hour (95 kph), the Miami-based National Hurricane Center said.

A tornado threat continued for much of the Florida peninsula, the NHC said.

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Tropical Storm Andrea Pounds Parts of Florida

The storm has brought rain, heavy winds and tornadoes

Updated Friday, June 7, 2013, 3:36 a.m.

(NOAA)

MIAMI (AP) – The first named storm of the Atlantic season hammered Florida with rain, heavy winds, and tornadoes Thursday as it moved toward the coast of Georgia and the Carolinas, promising sloppy commutes and waterlogged vacation getaways through the beginning of the weekend.

Tropical Storm Andrea was losing intensity late Thursday and not expected to strengthen into a hurricane but forecasters warned it could cause isolated flooding and storm surge over the next two days.

Tropical storm warnings were in effect late Thursday for the East Coast from Flagler Beach, Fla., to Cape Charles Light in Virginia, the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds and the lower Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere inside the warning area within a day and a half. A warning for Florida’s west coast was lifted late Thursday, but forecasters advised that heavy rains were continuing well away from the storm’s center.

As of 11 p.m. EDT Thursday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Andrea was about 40 miles (64 kilometers) west of Jacksonville, having made landfall hours earlier in Florida’s Big Bend area. Andrea’smaximum sustained winds had fallen to 45 mph (72 kph) and it was moving northeast at 15 mph (24 kph).

RELATED ON SKYE: The Most Devastating Hurricanes in U.S. History
Hurricane AndrewRains and winds from the storm were forecast to sweep northward along the Southeastern U.S. coast Thursday night and Friday. The storm was expected to lose tropical characteristics Friday night as it moves through the eastern United States.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said earlier Thursday that one of the biggest risks associated with the storm for Florida was the chance of tornadoes, eight of which had been confirmed across the state. Scott urged residents to remain vigilant.

“This one fortunately is a fast-moving storm,” he said. Slower-moving storms can pose a greater flood risk because they have more time to linger and dump rain.

In The Acreage, a part of Palm Beach County, Fla., pre-kindergarten teacher Maria Cristina Arias choked back tears and clutched valuable personal papers as she surveyed the damage done by a tornado to her five-bedroom home when she was away. Windows were smashed and a neighbor’s shed had crashed into her bedroom.

“It’s all destroyed,” she told The Palm Beach Post. “This is unbelievable. I don’t know what we’re going to do.”

Her 19-year-old son, Christian, was sleeping when he heard a loud noise.

“It was really scary,” said the teen, who wasn’t hurt. “It sounded like something exploded. I didn’t know what was going on.”

Another threat to Florida’s coast was storm surge, said Eric Blake, a specialist at the Hurricane Center. The center said coastal areas from Tampa Bay north to the Aucilla River could see storm surge of 2 to 4 feet, if the peak surge coincides with high tide.

Gulf Islands National Seashore closed its campgrounds and the road that runs through the popular beach-front park Wednesday. The national seashore abuts Pensacola Beach and the park road frequently floods during heavy rains.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

Tropical Storm ANDREA NHC 5-Day Cone Tropical Storm ANDREA (01L) FWC-N ATCF Track
Tropical Storm ANDREA
NHC 5-Day Cone
Tropical Storm
ANDREA (01L)
FWC-N ATCF Track

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 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Andrea (AL01) Carib Sea 05.06.2013 06.06.2013 Tropical Depression 10 ° 65 km/h 83 km/h 3.05 m NOAA NHC Details

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Tropical Depression Andrea  June 6th  2013 photo TropicalDepressionAndreaJune6th2013_zps2e41a9eb.jpg

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Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Andrea (AL01)
Area: Carib Sea
Start up location: N 25° 18.000, W 86° 30.000
Start up: 06th June 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 0.00 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
06th Jun 2013 06:25:13 N 26° 0.000, W 86° 18.000 9 65 83 Tropical Depression 10 ° 10 1002 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
07th Jun 2013 18:00:00 N 34° 30.000, W 78° 30.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
07th Jun 2013 06:00:00 N 31° 0.000, W 82° 0.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
08th Jun 2013 18:00:00 N 43° 0.000, W 67° 30.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
09th Jun 2013 18:00:00 N 45° 0.000, W 48° 0.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC
10th Jun 2013 18:00:00 N 47° 0.000, W 25° 0.000 Tropical Depression 74 93 NOAA NHC

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

 photo TropicalStormBarbaraEP02PacificOcean-EastMay29th2013_zpseee423d2.jpg

 

Tropical Storm Barbara (EP02) Pacific Ocean – East May 29th 2013

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30.05.2013 Tropical Storm Mexico State of Oaxaca, [Coastal region] Damage level
Details

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Tropical Storm in Mexico on Thursday, 30 May, 2013 at 06:32 (06:32 AM) UTC.

 

Description
Hurricane Barbara has hit Mexico’s southern Pacific coast, flooding roads, toppling trees and killing two men as it pounded the area with heavy rain near the country’s biggest oil refinery. The US National Hurricane Center said the hurricane was 130km east of the port of Salina Cruz in Oaxaca state. Winds were blowing at a maximum 120km/h. The hurricane was churning north-northeast at around 14 km/h and should start to weaken quickly Wednesday night. “We are seeing very, very strong winds and intense rainfall,” said Manuel Maza, director of emergency services in Oaxaca. He said power outages also were reported. Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex said earlier on Wednesday operations were normal at its biggest refinery, which as the capacity to process 330,000 barrels per day of crude and is on the coast in Salina Cruz. Local emergency services said a 61-year-old US man surfing off the beach at Salina Cruz had drowned during the storm. A 26-year-old Mexican man was killed as he tried to cross a river. Ports for small vessels in the area have been closed and emergency services in Oaxaca said they were starting to evacuate residents from some areas as a precaution, including the immediate vicinity of the refinery. The NHC issued a hurricane warning from Oaxaca’s Puerto Angel to Barra de Tonala, and a tropical storm warning from Barra de Tonala to Boca de Pijijiapan in Chiapas state. Between 10 to 20 cm of rain is expected over eastern Oaxaca through western Chiapas, along with a storm surge of 1 to 1.5m above normal tide levels, the NHC said.

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  Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Barbara (EP02) Pacific Ocean – East 28.05.2013 30.05.2013 Tropical Depression 310 ° 46 km/h 65 km/h 0.00 m NOAA NHC Details

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Remnants of BARBARA NHC 5-Day Cone Tropical Depression 02E (BARBARA) JTWC ATCF Track
Remnants of BARBARA
NHC 5-Day Cone
(final advisory)
Tropical Depression 02E (BARBARA)
JTWC ATCF Track
(final warning)

 

 

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Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Barbara (EP02)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 14° 30.000, W 95° 42.000
Start up: 29th May 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 219.55 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
29th May 2013 04:46:00 N 14° 30.000, W 95° 42.000 6 74 93 Tropical Storm 30 8 1001 MB NOAA NHC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
30th May 2013 16:45:08 N 18° 30.000, W 95° 0.000 6 46 65 Tropical Depression 310 ° 0 1005 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source

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UPDATE 4-Barbara hits southern Mexico, killing at least two

 

 

 

Thu May 30, 2013 2:54am BST

By Jose Cortes

May 29 (Reuters) – Hurricane Barbara hit Mexico’s southern Pacific coast on Wednesday, flooding roads, toppling trees and killing two men before weakening to a tropical storm as it moved inland.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Barbara, which had earlier moved close to the country’s biggest oil refinery, was 50 miles (80 km) west of the city of Tuxtla Gutierrez in Chiapas state. Winds were blowing at up to 60 miles per hour (95 kph).

The hurricane was churning north-northeast at about 9 mph (15 kph) and should weaken rapidly overnight, the NHC said.

According to media reports, 14 fishermen disappeared in the state of Oaxaca during the storm. Local emergency services said they could not confirm that information.

Manuel Maza, director of emergency services in Oaxaca state, said that very strong winds and intense rainfall had hit the region and that power outages were reported.

Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex said earlier on Wednesday that operations were normal at its biggest refinery, located in the port of Salina Cruz. The plant has the capacity to process 330,000 barrels of crude per day.

Local emergency services said a 61-year-old U.S. man surfing off the beach at Salina Cruz drowned during the storm. A 26-year-old Mexican man was killed as he tried to cross a river.

Ports for small vessels in the area have been closed and emergency services in Oaxaca said they evacuated residents from some areas as a precaution, including the immediate vicinity of the refinery.

A tropical storm warning is in effect from Salina Cruz in Oaxaca to Pijijiapan in Chiapas state.

Between 6 and 10 inches (10 to 20 cm) of rain is expected over eastern Oaxaca through western Chiapas, along with a storm surge of 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 meters) above normal tide levels, the NHC said.

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WATCHING THE WORLD EVOLVE AND TRANSFORM

Alvin had strengthened to a Tropical Storm on May 15, 2013 and now has weakened and is considered a Post-Tropical Cyclone. With the excessive wind shear and cooler water, the storm has dissipated into just a weak low pressure.

According to Tropical Weather Outlook by US National Hurricane Center, an area of low pressure associated with the remnants of Alvin is located about 800 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. The system continues to produce a large area of disorganized shower and thunderstorm activity.

See Full Report  Here

Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

Tropical Storm ALVIN NHC 5-Day Cone Tropical Storm 01E (ALVIN) JTWC ATCF Track
Tropical Storm
ALVIN
NHC 5-Day Cone
Tropical Storm
01E (ALVIN)
JTWC ATCF Track

Active tropical storm system(s)
Alvin (01E) Pacific Ocean – East 14.05.2013 16.05.2013 Tropical Depression 290 ° 74 km/h 93 km/h 3.05 m NOAA NHC Details
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details

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Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Alvin (01E)
Area: Pacific Ocean – East
Start up location: N 8° 12.000, W 103° 36.000
Start up: 15th May 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 166.53 km
Top category.:
Report by: NOAA NHC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
16th May 2013 04:45:41 N 9° 0.000, W 105° 54.000 19 74 93 Tropical Depression 290 ° 10 1004 MB NOAA NHC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
17th May 2013 00:00:00 N 9° 30.000, W 108° 54.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC
17th May 2013 12:00:00 N 10° 0.000, W 110° 24.000 Hurricane I 120 148 NOAA NHC
18th May 2013 12:00:00 N 11° 30.000, W 113° 0.000 Hurricane II 130 157 NOAA NHC
19th May 2013 12:00:00 N 13° 0.000, W 115° 30.000 Hurricane I 120 148 NOAA NHC
20th May 2013 12:00:00 N 15° 30.000, W 117° 0.000 Hurricane I 102 120 NOAA NHC

 

Tropical Storm Alvin strengthens in eastern Pacific

By Ed Payne and Greg Botelho, CNN
updated 12:46 AM EDT, Thu May 16, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Tropical Storm Alvin is centered about 700 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico
  • It’s the first named storm of Eastern Pacific season, which opened Wednesday
  • It had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph
  • Alvin should strengthen and “is expected become a hurricane,” the hurricane center reports

(CNN) — The hurricane season opened Wednesday with a flourish, and more specifically, with the debut of its first named storm, Tropical Storm Alvin.

Tropical Depression 1-E was upgraded and named a tropical storm Wednesday, which happens to be the first day of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially starts on June 1, and both seasons end November 30.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Storms

 

Tropical Cyclone 01B (ONE) JTWC ATCF Track

Tropical Cyclone
01B (MAHASEN)
JTWC ATCF Track

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 Active tropical storm system(s)
Name of storm system Location Formed Last update Last category Course Wind Speed Gust Wave Source Details
Mahasen (01B) Indian Ocean 09.05.2013 13.05.2013 Tropical Depression 310 ° 93 km/h 120 km/h 6.40 m JTWC Details

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Tropical Storm data

Storm name: Mahasen (01B)
Area: Indian Ocean
Start up location: N 4° 48.000, E 93° 36.000
Start up: 10th May 2013
Status: Active
Track long: 660.36 km
Top category.:
Report by: JTWC
Useful links:

Past track
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave Pressure Source
11th May 2013 05:24:03 N 7° 0.000, E 91° 0.000 24 74 93 Tropical Storm 315 12 JTWC
13th May 2013 05:22:18 N 11° 30.000, E 86° 42.000 15 93 120 Tropical Storm 355 18 JTWC
Current position
Date Time Position Speed
km/h
Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Category Course Wave
feet
Pressure Source
13th May 2013 16:11:52 N 12° 24.000, E 85° 42.000 17 93 120 Cyclone I 310 ° 21 JTWC
Forecast track
Date Time Position Category Wind
km/h
Gust
km/h
Source
15th May 2013 12:00:00 N 17° 24.000, E 87° 54.000 Cyclone I 120 148 JTWC
15th May 2013 00:00:00 N 16° 6.000, E 86° 54.000 Cyclone I 111 139 JTWC
16th May 2013 12:00:00 N 20° 0.000, E 90° 0.000 Cyclone II 130 157 JTWC
17th May 2013 12:00:00 N 23° 0.000, E 92° 54.000 Cyclone I 93 120 JTWC
18th May 2013 12:00:00 N 26° 0.000, E 99° 54.000 Tropical Depression 56 74 JTWC

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Storm Mahasen targets Bangladesh, Myanmar

Agence France-Presse
Posted on 05/14/2013 7:35 AM  | Updated 05/14/2013 7:35 AM

GIANT STORM. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this visible image of a well-rounded Tropical Cyclone Mahasen in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 15 at 07:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EDT). Mahasen is northeast of Sri Lanka and moving northward. NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response TeamGIANT STORM. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this visible image of a well-rounded Tropical Cyclone Mahasen in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 15 at 07:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EDT). Mahasen is northeast of Sri Lanka and moving northward. NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response TeamCHITTAGONG, Bangladesh – Bangladesh warned millions of people Monday, May 13, that a cyclone could barrel into their coastal homes later this week as authorities in Myanmar began moving potential victims to higher ground.

The Bangladesh Meteorological Department said that while it was too soon to predict where cyclonic storm Mahasen would hit, it raised its alert to four, meaning “there are increased chances that the cyclone will hit the coast”.

The department’s deputy head Shamsuddin Ahmed said Mahasen was currently in the Bay of Bengal, 1,355 kilometers (840 miles) south west of Chittagong, and could make landfall in the southeast of the country on Thursday.

“Mahasen is still a cyclonic storm. It has not gathered enough strength to become a severe cyclone. But it is likely to intensify further,” he told AFP.

The government has made preparations for the cyclone, but will wait until it has firmer information as to where it would make landfall before issuing any evacuation order, Chittagong provincial administrator Muhammad Abdullah said.

“We’ve alerted the people living in coastal areas, but have not evacuated any of them because we still don’t know where the cyclone will hit. But we’re fully prepared to face any situation,” he told AFP.

He said authorities have set up logistics support and kept cyclone preparedness volunteers, doctors and officials ready for the cyclone.

Around 30 million of Bangladesh’s population of 153 million live along the coast, and Chittagong is the country’s second largest city.

Monday’s warning from Bangladesh echoed a similar alert from Myanmar’s Department of Meteorology and Hydrology at the weekend.

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Tropical Cyclone Mahasen (Northern Indian Ocean)
05.13.13

MODIS image of Tropical Cyclone Mahasen

› Larger image


NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this visible image of a well-rounded Tropical Cyclone Mahasen in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 15 at 07:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EDT). Mahasen is northeast of Sri Lanka and moving northward. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees a Strengthening Tropical Cyclone Mahasen

The first tropical cyclone in the Northern Indian Ocean this season has been getting better organized as seen in NASA satellite imagery. Tropical Cyclone Mahasen is projected to track north through the Bay of Bengal and make landfall later this week.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Mahasen in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 15 at 07:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EDT). The image was created by NASA’s MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and showed Mahasen had consolidated over the last two days. Mahasen appeared rounded and its strongest thunderstorms appeared to be surrounding the center of circulation. The center also appears to be topped with a large dense overcast. The image showed Mahasen’s center was northeast of Sri Lanka, although a band of strong thunderstorms south of the storm’s center were affecting the island nation at the time of the image.

 

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