Earth Watch  Report – Biological / Epidemic Hazards

    

,,,

06.04.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces] Damage level Details

,,,

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Friday, 05 April, 2013 at 03:13 UTC
Description
The reporter learned from the Shanghai Municipal Population and Family Planning Commission at 21:00 on Thu 4 Apr 2013 that 3 more cases of H7N9 avian influenza infection were reported in Shanghai. To date, total 6 cases including 4 deaths have been reported in the city. One of the cases is a 4-year-old child who is recovering now. On Wed 3 Apr 2013, 2 patients admitted in Tongji Hospital and Huashan Hospital died even after emergency treatments. Two of them were confirmed to have H7N9 avian influenza infection on Thu 4 Apr 2013. Another reporter also learned from Shanghai Municipal Population and Family Planning Commission that the National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory has identified H7N9 avian influenza virus in specimens from a dove [pigeon] at the Shanghai Huai agricultural products wholesale market in Songjiang District. The genetic sequence analysis showed that the strains of low pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates were highly homologous with the H7N9 avian flu virus. The Shanghai Agriculture Commission is taking appropriate prevention and control measures rapidly as per guidance from the Ministry of Agriculture.

,,,

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Friday, 05 April, 2013 at 04:36 UTC
Description
H7N9 Human Cases 2013
———————–
Date of Report: 3/8/13
Name: Li Family Father 2 Sons
Ages: 55 69 (below)- 55(M) Son of 87(M)
Adm: yes between Feb 14-24 w/pneumonia
Confirmation: no
DOD: 2/28
Note: Cause of death under investigation.- 69(M) Eldest son of 87(M)
Adm: Between Feb 14-24 w/pneumonia
Confirmation: no
Note: Recovered and discharged.

Shanghai
———-
Date of Report 3/31/13
Name: Lee 87(M) Father of 2 above
From: Minhang District, Shanghai
Admitted: 2/24 (?)Shanghai No. 5 People’s Hospital
Onset: 2/19
Notes: No mutual infections among the 3 cases. 88 contacts are fine. H7N9 has never been contracted by humans before. Virus shows no signs of being
highly contagious. All symptoms were fever, cough developing into severe pneumonia difficulty breathing in later stage.
Confirmation: 3/30/13
DOD: 3/4

Shanghai
———-
Date of Report: 3/31/13
Name: Wu 27(M) Pork Dealer in wet market
From: Minhang District, Shanghai
Onset: 2/27
Adm: Small clinic
Adm: 3/3 Shanghai No. 5 People’s Hospital, diagnosis: pneumonia
3/6: ICU, critical condition.
Notes: Sane as case above.
Confirmation: 3/30/13
DOD: 3/10

Anhui Province
—————-
Date of Report: 3/31/13
Name: Mr. Han 35(F)
From: Chuzhou City, Anhui Province
Onset: 3/9
3/14 fever 39. 3/15 Community Clinic.
Then another Clinic, fever 40. No relief.
Adm: 3/19 Chinese Western Medicine, Chuzhou
Adm: 3/20 First People’s Hospital, Chuzhou City
Adm: 3/20 Afternoon – Nanjing Zhongshan University Hospital, Jiangsu, ICU
Notes: Critical Condition 3/31. Contact with birds 5 days before onset, purchased live chickens. Cut chicken up, made soup. No mutual infections
among the 3 cases. 88 contacts are fine.
Confirmation: 3/30/13

Jiangsu Province
——————
Date of Report: 4/2/13
Name: Xu – 45(F)
From: Jiangning District, Jiangsu Province
Onset: 3/19, dizzy, fever, aches, fatigue
Adm: 3/27, ICU Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital
Confirmed: 3/30 Prov. Ctr for Disease Detection
Confirmed: 4/2 China CDC
Notes: Critical Condition. 49 contacts being monitored. Worked as poultry butcher at local market.

Jiangsu Province
——————
Date of Report: 4/2/13
Name: Female (48)
From: Suqian Shuyang, Jiangsu Province
Onset: 3/19, fever, dizzy, cough
Adm: 3/30, Nanjing Hospital ICU
Confirmed: 3/30 Jiangsu Provinial Center for Disease Detection
Confirmed: 4/2 China CDC
Notes: Critical Condition. 60 contacts monitored.

Jiangsu Province
——————
Date of Report: 4/2/13
Name: Shen 83(M)
From: Suzhou Wujiang District, Jiangsu Province
Onset: 3/20, fever, cough, sputum production
Adm: 3/29 Transferred Expert Group Wujiang
Confirmed: 4/1 Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Detection
Notes: Critical Condition. 15 contacts monitored.

Jiangsu Province
——————
Date of Report: 4/2/13
Name: Zhang 32(F)
From: Wuxi City, unemployed, Jiangsu Province
Onset: 3/21
Adm: 3/28 Wuxi ICU
Confirmed: 3/31 Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Detection
Confirmed: 4/2 China CDC
Notes: Critical Condition. 43 contacts monitored. Lives alone, rural area. No large-scale farms or farmer’s markets, but habit of backyard poultry livestock in rural areas.

Zhejiang Province
——————-
Date of Report: 4/3/13
Name: Hung (38) Cook, worked in Taicang City, Jiangsu Province
From: Hangzhou Jiande, Zhejiang Province
Onset: 3/7
Adm: 3/18
DOD: 3/27
Confirmed: 4/1 Zhejiang Province CDC
Confirmed: 4/3 China CDC
Notes: 125 contacts monitored.

Zhejiang Province
——————-
Date of Report: 4/3/13
Name: Yang (67)M, Retired, unemployed
From: Hangzhou, Zhejiang Prov.
Adm: 3/25 Hangzhou Hospital
Adm: 4/2 Zhejiang Univ. School of Med Hospital
Confirmed: 4/2 Zhejiang Province CDC
Confirmed: 4/3 China CDC
Notes: Critical Condition. 58 contacts monitored

Zhejiang Province
——————-
Date of Report 4/4/13
Name: Zhang 64(M) Farmer
From: Wuxing district, Huzhou City
Onset: 3/29
Adm: 3/31 Huzhou
Confirmed: 4/3
Notes: 55 contacts monitored
DOD: 4/4/13

Shanghai
———-
Date of Report: 4/4/13
Name: Chu 48(M) Transported chickens ducks
From: Rugao (could be road?)
Onset: 3/28 cough, sputum, fever
Adm: 4/1 private clinic
Adm: 4/3 Tongji Hospital (deteriorated sharply)
Confirmed: 4/4 Shanghai CDC
Note: Died 3 hours after admission. 8 contacts monitored.
DOD: 4/3/13

Shanghai
———-
Date of Report: 4/4/13
Name: 52(F)
From: Shanghai
Adm: Huashan Hospital
DOD: 4/3/13
Confirmed: 4/4/13
Note: Close contact developed fever and runny nose.

Shanghai
———-
Date of Report: 4/4/13
Name: 4(M)
From: Shanghai
Confirmed: yes
Note: Recovering from mild illness. Satisfactory.

Shanghai 6th case
Date of Report: 4/4/13
Name: 67(F)
From: Shanghai
Confirmed: Yes
Note: Critical Condition

Special thanks to ProMed!

,,,

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Friday, 05 April, 2013 at 06:30 UTC
Description
A sixth person in eastern China has died from an unusual strain of bird flu, Chinese health authorities said Friday, as researchers in the United States work on developing a vaccine for the virus. No cases of human-to-human transmission of the H7N9 virus have been confirmed so far, but Shanghai authorities said late Thursday that a person who had close contact with a patient who died of the virus was being treated in quarantine after showing symptoms of fever, runny nose and itchy throat. A 64-year-old man died Thursday night in Huzhou, Zhejiang province, the provincial health bureau said Friday. He died hours after doctors had confirmed he had been infected with the H7N9 virus, it said. He is one of the 14 human cases of H7N9 reported so far — all of them in eastern China. The H7N9 strain of bird flu had not been detected in humans before the recent Chinese cases, which authorities began reporting on Sunday. Four of the deaths happened in Shanghai, the two others in Zhejiang. The CDC, based in Atlanta, is working closely with Chinese authorities trying to find the source of the human infections, Bresee said.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Friday, 05 April, 2013 at 11:40 UTC
Description
Chinese authorities have killed more than 20,000 birds from a live-poultry trading zone in Shanghai after an unusual strain of bird flu that has so far killed six people in the country was found in pigeons on sale in the city, state-run media Xinhua reported Friday. Details of the slaughter of chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons come as the city prepares to temporarily close all its live poultry markets. It wasn’t clear how long the market closures — announced Friday on the Shanghai Municipal Government press office’s microblog account — would last. By Friday morning, authorities in Shanghai had already closed the Huhai agricultural market, where the H7N9 avian flu virus had been found in pigeons.The virus had not previously been found in humans until a series of cases were reported in China this week. The cull at the Shanghai poultry trading zone came as researchers in the United States said they had started work on developing a vaccine for H7N9. The Chinese Minister of Agriculture said Thursday an analysis showed a strong genetic overlap between the strain found in the Huhai market pigeons and the one detected in infected humans. At the Huhai market, Shanghai authorities were disinfecting the area and objects that came into contact with the birds. Officials are trying to track where the infected pigeons came from.

A 64-year-old man died Thursday night in Huzhou, Zhejiang province, the provincial health bureau said Friday. He died hours after doctors had confirmed he had been infected with the H7N9 virus, it said. He is one of the 14 human cases of H7N9 reported so far — all of them in the coastal area of eastern China. Authorities there began reporting the first cases on Sunday. Four of the deaths happened in Shanghai, the two others in Zhejiang. The ages of those infected have ranged from a 4-year-old child, who was reported to be recovering, to an 83-year-old man. No cases of human-to-human transmission of the H7N9 virus have been confirmed so far. A person in Shanghai who developed flu symptoms after coming into close contact with a patient who died of the virus tested negative for H7N9, city authorities said.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Saturday, 06 April, 2013 at 04:44 UTC
Description
Chinese public health officials have reported 14 cases of human infection with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus from four different provinces in China. All patients were hospitalized with severe respiratory illness, and six persons have died. These are the first human infections identified with an avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection. Six cases are from Shanghai, one is from Anhui Province, four are from Jiangsu Province, and three are from Zhejiang Province. Thirteen cases are in adults aged 27 through 87 years, and one case is in a child aged 4 years; all cases had illness onset from February 19 through March 31, 2013. No person-to-person transmission or epidemiologic link between any of the cases has been identified. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says it is aware of reports of possible sources of infection but these have not been confirmed. It is investigating and will provide further information when it is available. Preliminary functional data of the isolated viruses from the first three cases suggest that they are likely susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors, according to the CDC. Investigations by Chinese public health officials are ongoing.

HANThis is an official

CDC HEALTH ADVISORY

Distributed via the CDC Health Alert Network
April 5, 2013, 10:00 a.m. ET
CDCHAN-00344

Human Infections with Novel Influenza A (H7N9) Viruses

Summary and Background

As of April 4, 2013, Chinese public health officials have reported 14 cases of human infection with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus from four different provinces in China. All patients were hospitalized with severe respiratory illness, and six persons have died. These are the first human infections identified with an avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection. Six cases are from Shanghai, one is from Anhui Province, four are from Jiangsu Province, and three are from Zhejiang Province. Thirteen cases are in adults aged 27 through 87 years, and one case is in a child aged 4 years; all cases had illness onset from February 19 through March 31, 2013. No person-to-person transmission or epidemiologic link between any of the cases has been identified. We are aware of reports of possible sources of infection but these have not been confirmed. We are investigating and will provide that information when it is available.
Preliminary functional data of the isolated viruses from the first 3 cases suggest that they are likely susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors. Investigations by Chinese public health officials are ongoing. These cases are a reminder that novel A influenza viruses can infect and cause severe respiratory illness in humans. Novel influenza A viruses are influenza viruses that are different from currently circulating human influenza A virus subtypes and include influenza viruses from predominantly avian and swine origin. In recent years, human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in several Asian countries and Egypt, highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus in Mexico, and variant influenza A (H3N2)v viruses in the United States have been reported (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6136a4.htm, http://www.who.int/influenza/human_animal_interface/EN_GIP_20130312CumulativeNumberH5N1cases.pdf, http://emergency.cdc.gov/HAN/han00325.asp). The clinical presentation of human infection with avian influenza A viruses varies considerably–from mild illness, including conjunctivitis, fever, and cough, to severe illness, including fulminant pneumonia leading to death in cases of H5N1 and in these recent cases of H7N9 virus infections. To date there has been no evidence of person-to-person transmission of influenza A (H7N9) viruses.

At this time, no cases of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) viruses have been detected in the United States. Rapid detection and characterization of novel influenza viruses remain a critical component of national efforts to prevent further cases, evaluate clinical illness associated with them, and assess any ability for these viruses to spread among humans. As a result, clinicians are reminded to consider influenza as a possible diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute respiratory illnesses, including pneumonia, even outside of the typical influenza season.

Clinicians should consider the possibility of novel influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in persons with respiratory illness and an appropriate travel or exposure history. Although the majority of novel influenza A (H7N9) cases have resulted in severe respiratory illness in adults, infection with this virus may cause mild illness in some and may cause illness in children as well. When performing influenza diagnostic testing in patients with respiratory illness for whom an etiology has not been confirmed, clinicians may identify human cases of avian influenza A virus infection or new cases of variant influenza in the United States. Patients with novel influenza A (H7N9) virus infections should have a positive test result for influenza A virus via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing but be unsubtypeable.

Suspected infections with novel influenza A (H7N9) viruses in the United States should be reported to CDC within 24 hours of initial detection, and state health departments should notify CDC promptly of all patients under investigation for possible novel influenza A virus infection.

Read  Full  Release Here

,,,,

ECDC logo  European Center for Disease Prevention and Control

Six new confirmed cases of novel influenza A virus, A(H7N9) in China

03 Apr 2013

ECDC

Following the announcement of three patients presenting with a novel influenza A virus on 31 March 2013,  the health bureau of Jiangsu province of China confirmed four more cases of influenza A(H7N9) from different cities in the province on 2 April 2012. Jiangsu province is bordering Shanghai province and Anhui province, where the three initial cases were reported.

All four new cases are reported to be in critical condition. Three of the four new cases are female, aged 45, 48 and 32 years, and the fourth is an 83-year-old male. One of the female cases has been exposed to poultry in her workplace while no information on poultry exposure is known regarding the other cases.

On 3 April 2013, the Zhejiang Provincial Health Department notified two additional cases from their province, which is bordering Anhui and Shanghai provinces. One of them, a 38-year-old male cook, who was working in Jiangsu Taicang, fell ill on 7 March and was reported to have died 20 days later. The other case, a 67-year-old retired male from Hangzhou was admitted to hospital on 25 March.

The onset of symptoms of these six newly reported cases was between 7 and 21 March 2013 and the date of hospitalisation between 25 and 30 March 2013. There is no epidemiological link between the cases. 350 close contacts of the new cases from are being followed-up and all are reported to be asymptomatic to date.

With these six newly reported cases, there are now nine confirmed cases including three deaths from avian influenza virus A(H7N9) reported in Eastern China.

There is currently no evidence of human-to-human transmission of the influenza A(H7N9) virus.
ECDC continues to monitor the situation. More cases are expected to be reported.

This epidemiological update does not change the conclusions and recommendations of ECDC’s Rapid Risk Assessment of 2 April 2013.

External links:
WHO: question and answers on human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus, China (updated 3 April 2013)

Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention: question and answers about human infection with A(H7N9) avian influenza virus (published 31 March 2013)