Tag Archive: Maya civilization


NASA: THE TRUTH about the END OF THE WORLD on 21 Dec

 

Boffins tackle Mayan Prophecy

By Anna Leach

 

The astroboffins dismissed claims that a rogue planet called Nibiru will smash into the earth in three weeks time, killing us all. The planetary smash-up just before Christmas 2012 was allegedly predicted by the Mayans.

A wave of letters and emails from worried Americans has prompted NASA to pull together some of its top brass in a Google Hangout and make them answer questions from the public.

Doomsday, one possible scenario for 21 December 2012

“This is just manufactured fantasy,” said David Morrison, an astrobiologist from NASA’s Ames Research Center, “but the truth is that many people are worried about it and many of those people do write to NASA.”

In particular I’m concerned about the young people who write to me and say they are terribly afraid, they say they can’t sleep, they can’t eat. Some of them have said they are contemplating suicide.

So while it’s a joke to many people and a mystery to others, there is a core of people who are truly concerned.

NASA has tried to dampen fears about December 2012 several times over the past few years, in 2009 and in 2011, for example, it quelled suggestions the earth would be destroyed by a mega volcano in the last few weeks of 2012.

The brainiacs answered a range of questions from the public, including “Is NASA predicting a total blackout of the earth from the 21st – 23rd December?”

No, said Mitzi Adams, a solar/archaeoastronomer from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. She elaborated:

There’s nothing we know of physically that would allow the Sun to switch off for three days and then switch back on.

As for Nibiru – the legendary planet which the Mayans believed had a “3,600-year-long orbit of the Sun” – smashing us to bits in three weeks’ time, David Morrison of the Ames Centre said:

It makes no sense, because if it was there we could see it. We’d have been tracking it for a decade or so. And by now, it would be the brightest object in the sky after the Sun and Moon. You can dispel this rumour yourself, just go out and look at the sky.

There’s an information page if you need a few more facts. ®

Published on Nov 12, 2012 by

Ac Tah, of the Mayan people, gave a talk in Santa Monica last month. In this exert he speaks about what is happening around December 21st 2012 and it’s significance to the world. His heritage is authentic. Check out his website for lots more information and to see the work Ac Tah and a lot of other dedicated people are doing…. http://www.actah2012.com

English: National Museum of Anthropology in Me...

English: National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Maya mask. Stucco frieze from Placeres, Campeche. Deutsch: National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Maya-Maske. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Maya demand an end to doomsday myth

(AFP)

GUATEMALA CITY — Guatemala’s Mayan people accused the government and tour groups on Wednesday of perpetuating the myth that their calendar foresees the imminent end of the world for monetary gain.

“We are speaking out against deceit, lies and twisting of the truth, and turning us into folklore-for-profit. They are not telling the truth about time cycles,” charged Felipe Gomez, leader of the Maya alliance Oxlaljuj Ajpop.

Several films and documentaries have promoted the idea that the ancient Mayan calendar predicts that doomsday is less than two months away, on December 21, 2012.

The Culture Ministry is hosting a massive event in Guatemala City — which as many as 90,000 people are expected to attend — just in case the world actually does end, while tour groups are promoting doomsday-themed getaways.

Maya leader Gomez urged the Tourism Institute to rethink the doomsday celebration, which he criticized as a “show” that was disrespectful to Mayan culture.

Experts say that for the Maya, all that ends in 2012 is one of their calendar cycles, not the world.

Gomez’s group issued a statement saying that the new Maya time cycle simply “means there will be big changes on the personal, family and community level, so that there is harmony and balance between mankind and nature.”

Oxlajuj Ajpop is holding events it considers sacred in five cities to mark the event and Gomez said the Culture Ministry would be wise to throw its support behind their real celebrations.

More than half of Guatemala’s population of nearly 15 million are from indigenous groups of Mayan descent.

The Mayan calendar has 18 months of 20 days each plus a sacred month, “Wayeb,” of five days. “B’aktun” is the larget unit in the time cycle system, and is about 400 years. The broader era spans 13 B’aktun, or about 5,200 years.

The Mayan culture enjoyed a golden age between 250 AD and 900 AD.

Stop The 2012 Doomsday Myth! – Maya People Say

MessageToEagle.com – What will happen on December 21 this year?

What kind of answer you receive depends on who you ask. There will undoubtedly be those who say the world will come to an end. There will also be those who think the world will undergo some kind of transformation and of course, many people will lean back and just watch everything with a smile, confident this is just another ordinary day.

Several movie producers and authors are making big money on the Maya 2012 doomsday scenario. Maya leaders are also accusing the government in Guatemala and tour groups are perpetuating the myth that their calendar foresees the imminent end of the world for monetary gain. Several tourism groups are organizing “doomsday tours” .

Now, the people of Guatemala say they had enough of this nonsense and demand an end to this faked doomsday myth.

“We are speaking out against deceit, lies and twisting of the truth, and turning us into folklore-for-profit. They are not telling the truth about time cycles,” charged Felipe Gomez, leader of the Maya alliance Oxlaljuj Ajpop.

The ancient Maya calendar is being misinterpreted, Maya leaders say.
The Culture Ministry has announced there will be a massive event in the Guatemala City, just in case the world actually does end. Maya leader Gomez considers the doomsday celebration to be a “show” that is very disrespectful to the Maya culture and urges the Tourism Institute to rethink their position.

The Maya are saying that their ancient as well as modern calendars are being misinterpreted.

In a statement released by Oxlaljuj Ajpop, the end of the cycle simply “means there will be big changes on the personal, family and community level, so that there is harmony and balance between mankind and nature.”

In other words, all that ends in 2012 is one of Maya calendar cycles, not the world.

© MessageToEagle.com

See also:
2012 Maya Monument Discovered By Archaeologists

Mystery Deepens – Oldest Maya Calendars And Skeletal Remains Found At Site

Ancient Tomb Of Holy Snake Lord Discovered – Great Maya Queen K’abel

Crossroads News : Changes In The World Around Us And Our Place In It

 

 

Anthropology & Climate Change

 

 

Wynne Parry, LiveScience Senior Writer

 

A temple in Tikal, one of the Mayan city states.

A temple in Tikal, one of the Mayan city states.
CREDIT: Zap Ichigo, Shutterstock

The city states of the ancient Mayan empire flourished in southern Mexico and northern Central America for about six centuries. Then, around A.D. 900 Mayan civilization disintegrated.

Two new studies examine the reasons for the collapse of the Mayan culture, finding the Mayans themselves contributed to the downfall of the empire.

Scientists have found that drought played a key role, but the Mayans appear to have exacerbated the problem by cutting down the jungle canopy to make way for cities and crops, according to researchers who used climate-model simulations to see how much deforestation aggravated the drought.

“We’re not saying deforestation explains the entire drought, but it does explain a substantial portion of the overall drying that is thought to have occurred,” said the study’s lead author Benjamin Cook, a climate modeler at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, in a statement. [Dry and Dying: Images of Drought]

Using climate-model simulations, he and his colleagues examined how much the switch from forest to crops, such as corn, would alter climate. Their results, detailed online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, suggested that when deforestation was at its maximum, it could account for up to 60 percent of the drying. (The switch from trees to corn reduces the amount of water transferred from the soil to the atmosphere, which reduces rainfall.)

Other recent research takes a more holistic view.

“The ninth-century collapse and abandonment of the Central Maya Lowlands in the Yucatán peninsular region were the result of complex human–environment interactions,” writes this team in a study published Monday (Aug 20) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The team, led by B.L. Turner, a social scientist at Arizona State University, concurs that by clearing the forest, the Mayans may have aggravated a natural drought, which spiked about the time the empire came to an end and population declined dramatically.

But this is just one contributing factor to their demise, Turner and colleagues write, pointing out that the reconfiguration of the landscape may also have led to soil degradation. Other archaeological evidence points to a landscape under stress, for instance, the wood of the sapodilla tree, favored as construction beams, was no longer used at the Tikal and Calakmul sites beginning in A.D. 741. Larger mammals, such as white-tailed deer, appear to have declined at the end of empire.

Social and economic dynamics also contributed. Trade routes shifted from land transit across the Yucatán Peninsula to sea-born ships. This change may have weakened the city states, which were contending with environmental changes. Faced with mounting challenges, the ruling elites, a very small portion of the population, were no longer capable of delivering what was expected of them, and conflict increased.

“The old political and economic structure dominated by semidivine rulers decayed,” the team writes. “Peasants, artisan – craftsmen, and others apparently abandoned their homes and cities to find better economic opportunities elsewhere in the Maya area.”

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