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Tag Archive: Lyon


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Waking Times

By December 14, 2015

Court Finds Monsanto Responsible for Poisoning French Farmer

monsanto failAlex Pietrowski, Staff.
Waking Times

 

The court of appeals in Lyon, France, has found agribusiness giant Monsanto guilty of poisoning a man named Paul François. François is a farmer who claimed that he suffered a multitude of ailments, including headaches, memory loss, neurological problems and stammering, after he unintentionally inhaled Monsanto’s herbicide, Lasso.

François used Lasso for over 15 years, and in 2004 accidentally inhaled the product. After the incident, the farmer began getting severe headaches and experienced moments of mental absence and an inability to speak.

The chemical’s effects on François were so severe that he fainted, was hospitalized and fell into a coma. François was diagnosed with monochlorobenzene poisoning by his doctors, who found that the chemical permanently damaged his brain. Monochlorobenzene makes up 50% of the herbicide Lasso.

It is worth noting that the herbicide was prohibited in France and the rest of the European Union in 2007, and at the time of the incident, it was already banned in Canada (since 1985), Great Britain and Belgium (since 1992).

During the court hearing, Monsanto’s attorneys repeatedly claimed that the herbicide Lasso was not dangerous. François claimed that the company was aware of the toxic nature of the herbicide but failed to adequately warn about the potential health risks.

 

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Why didn’t CNN’s international arm air its own documentary on Bahrain’s Arab Spring repression?

A former CNN correspondent defies threats from her former employer to speak out about self-censorship at the network

A Bahraini protester

A Bahraini protester in Manama. Photograph: Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty Images

In late March 2011, as the Arab Spring was spreading, CNN sent a four-person crew to Bahrain to produce a one-hour documentary on the use of internet technologies and social media by democracy activists in the region. Featuring on-air investigative correspondent Amber Lyon, the CNN team had a very eventful eight-day stay in that small, US-backed kingdom.

By the time the CNN crew arrived, many of the sources who had agreed to speak to them were either in hiding or had disappeared. Regime opponents whom they interviewed suffered recriminations, as did ordinary citizens who worked with them as fixers. Leading human rights activist Nabeel Rajab was charged with crimes shortly after speaking to the CNN team. A doctor who gave the crew a tour of his village and arranged meetings with government opponents, Saeed Ayyad, had his house burned to the ground shortly after. Their local fixer was fired ten days after working with them.

The CNN crew itself was violently detained by regime agents in front of Rajab’s house. As they described it after returning to the US, “20 heavily-armed men”, whose faces were “covered with black ski masks”, “jumped from military vehicles”, and then “pointed machine guns at” the journalists, forcing them to the ground. The regime’s security forces seized their cameras and deleted their photos and video footage, and then detained and interrogated them for the next six hours.

Lyon’s experience both shocked and emboldened her. The morning after her detention, newspapers in Bahrain prominently featured articles about the incident containing what she said were “outright fabrications” from the government. “It made clear just how willing the regime is to lie,” she told me in a phone interview last week.

But she also resolved to expose just how abusive and thuggish the regime had become in attempting to snuff out the burgeoning democracy movement, along with any negative coverage of the government.

“I realized there was a correlation between the amount of media attention activists receive and the regime’s ability to harm them, so I felt an obligation to show the world what our sources, who risked their lives to talk to us, were facing.”

CNN’s total cost for the documentary, ultimately titled “iRevolution: Online Warriors of the Arab Spring”, was in excess of $100,000, an unusually high amount for a one-hour program of this type. The portion Lyon and her team produced on Bahrain ended up as a 13-minute segment in the documentary. That segment, which as of now is available on YouTube, is a hard-hitting and unflinching piece of reporting that depicts the regime in a very negative light.

Amber Lyon, former CNN report

Amber Lyon on CNN, commenting on the March 2011 repression in Bahrain

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Amber Lyon’s iRevolution documentaries Egypt, Bahrain, Tunisia, …

Dictators Sponsor CNN | Interview with Amber Lyon

Published on Oct 3, 2012

Abby Interviews former CNN Investigative Journalist, Amber Lyon, about CNN’s corrupt media empire, calling into question a media establishment where censorship can be bought.

Former CNN Reporter (Amber Lyon) threatened & silenced by CNN reveals CNN Lies & War Propaganda

Published on Oct 9, 2012

‘Real Arab Spring in Bahrain which West ignores’

Published on Aug 16, 2012

Bahraini Human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been sentenced to three years in jail for “participation in an illegal assembly” and “calling for a march without prior notification.” – READ MORE http://on.rt.com/y95tqy

Patrick Henningsen, who’s a geopolitical analyst, believes human rights chaos in Bahrain is beneficial for Western states.

Bahrain uprising anniversary: Worst clashes in months

Published on Feb 14, 2013

http://www.euronews.com/ Two years after their Arab Spring uprising against Bahrain’s ruling family, protesters have been back on the streets in what they said was a day of civil disobedience.

Security forces fired warning shots to try to disperse a crowd of youths gathered in a village near the capital Manama.

They killed a teenager and several others were injured during the most violent clashes in months.

Thousands of people were arrested during the first uprising in early 2011. Dozens of political prisoners are still in jail.

Of those originally detained, seven prisoners have been interviewed by Amnesty International at Bahrain’s Jaw prison.

All of them say they’ve been jailed on false charges or under laws that repress basic rights. Many were allegedly tortured in the first weeks of their arrests.

Human rights groups also claim security forces used excessive force two years ago.

Bahrain Shouting in the dark البحرين تصرخ في الظلام

Uploaded on Aug 4, 2011

Bahrain: An island kingdom in the Arabian Gulf where the Shia Muslim majority are ruled by a family from the Sunni minority. Where people fighting for democratic rights broke the barriers of fear, only to find themselves alone and crushed.

This is their story and Al Jazeera is their witness – the only TV journalists who remained to follow their journey of hope to the carnage that followed.

This is the Arab revolution that was abandoned by the Arabs, forsaken by the West and forgotten by the world.

Shouting in the dark can be seen from Thursday, August 4, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

Arabic Translated:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyARJP…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaTKDM…
AlJazeeraEnglish

Interpol issues notice for arrest of Sea Shepherd founder

WHALES AHOY

by Staff Writers
Lyon, France (AFP)

 

Interpol has issued an international notice for the arrest of fugitive eco-warrior Paul Watson, famed for his high-seas clashes with Japanese whalers, after he skipped bail in Germany.

Watson’s Sea Shepherd organisation denounced the move as part of a “politically motivated” campaign led by Japan to put an end to his efforts against whaling.

Watson, a 61-year-old Canadian, was arrested in May in Frankfurt on a warrant from Costa Rica, where he is wanted on charges stemming from a high-seas confrontation over shark finning in 2002.

“Following confirmation from German authorities that Paul Watson had failed to satisfy the bail conditions established by the German courts and had fled the country, Costa Rican authorities renewed their request… to issue a Red Notice seeking his detention or arrest with a view to extradition,” Interpol said in a statement posted on its website.

“Based on Mr Watson’s failure to satisfy the bail conditions set by the German court, and the additional information provided by Costa Rica concerning the underlying charges, it was concluded that a Red Notice could be issued,” it said.

Lyon-based Interpol does not have the power to issue international arrest warrants but can request member countries make arrests based on foreign warrants through a “Red Notice”.

Watson was detained in Germany for a week in May before being released on bail after paying 250,000 euros ($310,000) and being ordered to appear before police twice a day. But he skipped bail on July 22 and fled the country.

Watson, known to his supporters as “The Captain”, is a veteran campaigner whose Sea Shepherd organisation is known for its muscular attacks on Japanese whalers.

Without revealing Watson’s location, the organisation denounced Interpol’s notice as part of an effort by Costa Rica on Japan’s behalf.

“Today’s elevation of the attack against our organisation and our founder, Captain Watson, is not unexpected,” Sea Shepherd’s administrative director, Susan Hartland, said.

“Japan is driving this effort in retaliation for our successful campaigns to stop them from whaling in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary,” she said.

“We’ve cost them millions of dollars and exposed their shame to the world because of their refusal to stop the slaughter of whales in an established sanctuary under the lie and loophole of ‘research.'”

The group described as “bogus” Costa Rica’s charges of “causing a danger of drowning or of an air disaster”, which stem from the use of a water cannon against shark-finners.

In a statement last week, Watson accused Japan of conspiring with Germany and Costa Rica to hunt him down in revenge for his attacks on its whaling operations.

Watson said Costa Rica and Germany had been “pawns in the Japanese quest to silence Sea Shepherd”, which has for years clashed with harpoon ships in the Southern Ocean.

He also did not reveal his location in the message.

“I am presently in a place on this planet where I feel comfortable, a safe place far away from the scheming nations who have turned a blind eye to the exploitation of our oceans,” he said.

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