Advertisements

Tag Archive: London Heathrow Airport


Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

File:MERS coronavirus.jpg

Transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Wikimedia .org

…..

Biological Hazard United Kingdom Capital City, London [Heathrow Airport] Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in United Kingdom on Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 12:10 (12:10 PM) UTC.

Description
A second passenger who travelled through Heathrow Airport been diagnosed with a potentially fatal Sars-style virus. The latest case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, MERS-CoV, involves a person flying from Jeddah to America via London. The passenger, who travelled on Saudi Airlines flight 113 on Thursday, May 1, tested positive for the virus after arriving in the US. It follows a similar case involving a passenger who travelled from Riyadh to Chicago and transferred in London on Thursday, April 24. Checks on other passengers on the flight have proved negative, according to Public Health England. Tourists travelling to the Middle East, especially those with chronic medical conditions, are being urged to avoid contact with camels as experts believe they may help to transmit the virus. PHE say the incubation period is around 14 days, but stress the risk of transmission is extremely low. The new type of coronavirus was first identified in a Middle Eastern patient in 2012. According to World Health Organisation figures, 111 people have tested positive in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia in the last two years – resulting in 31 deaths. Worldwide the number of cases is thought to be 401, with 93 fatalities. Three people have died in the UK as a result of the infection. PHE said the last case to be detected was in February 2013. Other cases have also been reported in France, Germany, Italy and Greece, across the Middle East in Egypt, Jordan, Qatar, Kuwait and Oman and in other countries such as Malaysia, Philippines and Tunisia. Professor Nick Phin, head of respiratory diseases for Public Health England, said: “As with the incident earlier this month, the risk is very low. “We will be following up with any UK passengers who were sitting in the vicinity of the passenger with MERS-CoV, as a precautionary measure. “Any UK-based travellers who become unwell with a fever, cough or shortness of breath within 14 days of being in the Middle East, should make sure they call their doctor and tell them where they have travelled. “Although the source of MERS-CoV is unknown, there is growing evidence of the possible role of camels in transmitting it to humans. “We advise travellers, particularly those with underlying or chronic medical conditions, to avoid contact with camels in the Middle East. “All travellers should practise good hand and respiratory hygiene to reduce the risk of respiratory illness.”
Biohazard name: MERS-COv (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS))
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Second MERS case detected in passenger flying through London

The deadly MERS virus has been diagnosed in two air passengers passed through London in transit in a matter of weeks

A worker wears a mask next to camels in Saudi Arabia.

A worker wears a mask next to camels in Saudi Arabia. There is growing evidence of the possible role of camels in transmitting MERS-CoV to humans Photo: AFP/GETTY

A second case of the deadly MERS virus has been diagnosed on a flight through London.

The passenger was flying from Jeddah to the USA and transiting through Heathrow exactly one week after a person flying from Riyadh to Chicago who stopped at the London airport was found to have the new deadly respiratory virus that has spread through the Middle East.

The risk to anyone on the Saudi Airlines flight 113 on May 1 is thought to be low, but Public Health England warn anyone who has have since become unwell or experienced respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, to seek medical advice.

No other passenger on the April 24 British Airways flight 262 from Riyadh to London was found to have contracted Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

Experts say the risk to fellow travellers is low as although the mortality rate from the disease is high, it is not easily spread between humans.

 

Read More Here

…..

 

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

UK says Snowden leaks hurt its national security, could expose spies

Copies of the Guardian newspaper are displayed at a news agent in London August 21 2013. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

LONDON | Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:46am EDT

(Reuters) – Leaks by a fugitive U.S. intelligence contractor have damaged Britain’s national security, and the data he gave journalists includes information that might expose the identities of British spies, a government official told the High Court in London.

The official said Brazilian David Miranda, the partner of a Guardian newspaper journalist, was carrying a computer hard-drive containing 58,000 highly classified intelligence documents when he was detained at Heathrow airport earlier this month.

Miranda’s partner Glenn Greenwald has led the Guardian’s coverage of leaks from Edward Snowden, a former contractor at the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), about U.S. and British surveillance of phone and Internet users.

In a written statement to the court at Friday’s hearing, Oliver Robbins, Britain’s Deputy National Security Adviser for Intelligence, Security and Resilience, said media stories about the documents seized from Miranda had already caused harm.

“It is worth reiterating the point that real damage has in fact already been done to UK national security by media revelations,” he said.

“A particular concern for HMG (the British government) is the possibility that the identity of a UK intelligence officer might be revealed. It is known that contained in the seized material is personal information that would allow staff to be identified, including those deployed overseas.”

He also said that Miranda and others had shown “very poor judgment in their security arrangements” by making passwords to the material easily accessible.

Miranda’s lawyer, Gwendolen Morgan, accused UK authorities of making “sweeping and vague assertions about national security.”

Read More Here

****************************************************

David Miranda was carrying password for secret files on piece of paper

A journalist’s partner who was detained carrying thousands of British intelligence documents through Heathrow airport was also holding the password to an encrypted file written on a piece of paper, the government has disclosed.

A senior Cabinet Office security adviser said Glenn Greenwald, left, and David Miranda had 'demonstrated very poor judgement in their security arrangements'

A senior Cabinet Office security adviser said Glenn Greenwald, left, and David Miranda had ‘demonstrated very poor judgement in their security arrangements’ Photo: RICARDO MORAES/REUTERS

In a written statement handed to the High Court in London, a senior Cabinet Office security adviser said it showed “very poor judgment” by David Miranda and other people associated with him.

Senior judges agreed to issue a court order which allows Scotland Yard to continue to examine data from nine electronic devices seized from Mr Miranda on August 18.

But the terms of the order were widened so police have specific permission to analyse whether Mr Miranda, and others, have breached the Official Secrets Acts or a section of the Terrorism Act 2000 which make it an offence to possess information which may be useful to terrorists.

Mr Miranda is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, a journalist with the Guardian newspaper who has made a series of controversial disclosures on US and British spying capabilities based on information from the former US intelligence employee Edward Snowden.

Scotland Yard announced last week they had launched a criminal investigation.

The government’s statement claims possession of the documents by Mr Miranda, Mr Greenwald and the Guardian posed a threat to national security, particularly because Mr Miranda was carrying a password alongside a range of electronic devices on which classified documents were stored.

Keeping passwords separate from the computer files or accounts to which they relate is a basic security step.

Oliver Robbins, the deputy national security adviser for intelligence, security and resilience in the Cabinet Office, said in his 13-page submission: “The information that has been accessed consists entirely of misappropriated material in the form of approximately 58,000 highly classified UK intelligence documents.

“I can confirm that the disclosure of this information would cause harm to UK national security.

“Much of the material is encrypted. However, among the unencrypted documents … was a piece of paper that included the password for decrypting one of the encypted files on the external hard drive recovered from the claimant.

“The fact that … the claimant was carrying on his person a handwritten piece of paper containing the password for one of the encrypted files … is a sign of very poor information security practice.”

He added: “Even if the claimant were to undertake not to publish or disclose the information that has been detained, the claimant and his associates have demonstrated very poor judgement in their security arrangements with respect to the material rendering the appropriation of the material, or at least access to it by other, non-State actors, a real possibility.”

Read More Here

****************************************************

Enhanced by Zemanta

High Court rules seized data can be used to investigate links to ‘terrorism’ but not ‘criminal’ charges

– Sarah Lazare, staff writer

David Miranda and Glenn Greenwald (Photo: Channel 4 News)David Miranda won a limited court victory against the UK when the High Court issued a ruling Thursday that prohibits the government and police from “inspecting, copying or sharing” the data that was forcefully taken from him while he was passing through Heathrow airport on Sunday, except for where it is used to ‘protect’ national security and/or determine whether the claimant is connected with terrorism.

The ruling means that the data can be used to investigate alleged links to terrorism—which free press advocates charge would be a preposterous move aimed at intimidating and silencing journalists—but cannot be used for a criminal investigation.

The Metropolitan police had previously launched a criminal investigation against Miranda, the Guardian reports, but did not give details of the case.

Miranda, a Brazilian citizen and partner of journalist Glenn Greenwald who exposed secret surveillance programs of the US and UK governments, had filed court proceedings against the government to retrieve items that were seized during his 9-hour detention at Heathrow airport, including his cell phone, computer, memory sticks, smart watch, DVDs and games consoles.

Miranda’s detention on Sunday, in which Miranda says he was subject to “frightening, stressful and intimidating” interrogation and threats of imprisonment, has sparked outrage over the UK’s abuse of Schedule 7, part of the UK’s Terrorism Act 2000.

Miranda had been returning from a visit with film-maker Laura Poitras, who helped break the spying revelations stories.

_____________________

Enhanced by Zemanta
Glenn Greenwald and his partner David Miranda

Glenn Greenwald (right) and his partner David Miranda, who was held by UK authorities at Heathrow airport. Photograph: Janine Gibson

The partner of the Guardian journalist who has written a series of stories revealing mass surveillance programmes by the US National Security Agency was held for almost nine hours on Sunday by UK authorities as he passed through London‘s Heathrow airport on his way home to Rio de Janeiro.

David Miranda, who lives with Glenn Greenwald, was returning from a trip to Berlin when he was stopped by officers at 8.05am and informed that he was to be questioned under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The controversial law, which applies only at airports, ports and border areas, allows officers to stop, search, question and detain individuals.

The 28-year-old was held for nine hours, the maximum the law allows before officers must release or formally arrest the individual. According to official figures, most examinations under schedule 7 – over 97% – last less than an hour, and only one in 2,000 people detained are kept for more than six hours.

Miranda was released, but officials confiscated electronics equipment including his mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles.

Since 5 June, Greenwald has written a series of stories revealing the NSA‘s electronic surveillance programmes, detailed in thousands of files passed to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The Guardian has also published a number of stories about blanket electronic surveillance by Britain’s GCHQ, also based on documents from Snowden.

While in Berlin, Miranda had visited Laura Poitras, the US film-maker who has also been working on the Snowden files with Greenwald and the Guardian. The Guardian paid for Miranda’s flights.

“This is a profound attack on press freedoms and the news gathering process,” Greenwald said. “To detain my partner for a full nine hours while denying him a lawyer, and then seize large amounts of his possessions, is clearly intended to send a message of intimidation to those of us who have been reporting on the NSA and GCHQ. The actions of the UK pose a serious threat to journalists everywhere.

“But the last thing it will do is intimidate or deter us in any way from doing our job as journalists. Quite the contrary: it will only embolden us more to continue to report aggressively.”

A spokesperson for the Guardian said: “We were dismayed that the partner of a Guardian journalist who has been writing about the security services was detained for nearly nine hours while passing through Heathrow airport. We are urgently seeking clarification from the British authorities.”

Read More Here

**************************************************************

Glenn Greenwald: detaining my partner was a failed attempt at intimidation

The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended

At 6:30 am this morning my time – 5:30 am on the East Coast of the US – I received a telephone call from someone who identified himself as a “security official at Heathrow airport.” He told me that my partner, David Miranda, had been “detained” at the London airport “under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act of 2000.”

David had spent the last week in Berlin, where he stayed with Laura Poitras, the US filmmaker who has worked with me extensively on the NSA stories. A Brazilian citizen, he was returning to our home in Rio de Janeiro this morning on British Airways, flying first to London and then on to Rio. When he arrived in London this morning, he was detained.

At the time the “security official” called me, David had been detained for 3 hours. The security official told me that they had the right to detain him for up to 9 hours in order to question him, at which point they could either arrest and charge him or ask a court to extend the question time. The official – who refused to give his name but would only identify himself by his number: 203654 – said David was not allowed to have a lawyer present, nor would they allow me to talk to him.

I immediately contacted the Guardian, which sent lawyers to the airport, as well various Brazilian officials I know. Within the hour, several senior Brazilian officials were engaged and expressing indignation over what was being done. The Guardian has the full story here.

Despite all that, five more hours went by and neither the Guardian’s lawyers nor Brazilian officials, including the Ambassador to the UK in London, were able to obtain any information about David. We spent most of that time contemplating the charges he would likely face once the 9-hour period elapsed.

According to a document published by the UK government about Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act, “fewer than 3 people in every 10,000 are examined as they pass through UK borders” (David was not entering the UK but only transiting through to Rio). Moreover, “most examinations, over 97%, last under an hour.” An appendix to that document states that only .06% of all people detained are kept for more than 6 hours.

The stated purpose of this law, as the name suggests, is to question people about terrorism. The detention power, claims the UK government, is used “to determine whether that person is or has been involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism.”

Read More Here

**************************************************************

Enhanced by Zemanta

Politics, Legislation and Economy News

 

 

 

Economic News :  Global Economy –  Corruption – Elitist  Privilege

 

 

 

Published on Sep 22, 2012 by

In this episode, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss tuning in, dropping out and the modern day opting out. They also talk about ‘high value’ customers being fast tracked at Heathrow in the name of expediency; while in the US poor people are fast tracked into a private debt collectors’ kickback scheme with the help of district attorneys. In the second half of the show, Max Keiser talks to Richard Stallman about Anonymous protests outside virtual doorways, corporate tyrannies and free software.