Tag Archive: Johannesburg.


Eva and Stanley. © Charlotte Boitiaux/FRANCE 24
© Charlotte Boitiaux/FRANCE 24

Despite protests elsewhere, many locals in the township of Soweto have been looking forward to the arrival of Barack Obama, who was due to visit the nearby University of Johannesburg on Saturday to meet with South African students and entrepreneurs.

By Catherine VIETTE (video)
Charlotte BOITIAUX , reporting from South Africa (text)

The noise is deafening, the smell of burnt food overpowering. It is 10 am on Saturday, June 29, and already Bara, Soweto township’s largest market, is in full swing.

Just a few hundred metres away lies the Soweto campus of the University of Johannesburg, where US President Barack Obama is expected to make an appearance later in the day as part of his first ever visit to South Africa.

The voice of James Blunt rings out from an old CD player sitting on the pavement and resonates around the market stalls.

“An American singer for the arrival of an American,” says the CD player’s owner, Edward, though Blunt is actually British.

“I know that the US president comes to us today, I’m happy,” he says as he sits cross-legged in front of a pile of clothes which he sells for 20 rand (1.50 euros) apiece.

‘He is an African’

Edward is just one of many locals looking forward to Obama’s arrival and the economic rewards it could bring for the region.

“If you see him, tell him to come here with even more business,” says Stanley, a 78-year-old South African wearing a black cap to shield himself from the sun as the day begins to warm up.Standing next to him, his friend Eva is also looking forward to the President’s visit.”We need jobs, and that’s something he can provide,” she says with a laugh.

There is also a sense of pride among some South Africans at welcoming the first ever black US president to their country.

“He is an African” says Petruce enthusiastically, speaking in Zulu while handing out flyers for his stall where he sells DVDs at 10 rand (75 cents) each.

“I think he treats people well, he is a man of peace like Mandela. Economics is fine, but respect for human beings is better,” he adds.

Mandela has spent the past three weeks in a Pretoria hospital where his health is said to be in a critical condition. But for both Petruce and Eva, there is no sense that the timing of Obama’s visit is in any way disrespectful.

“Life must go on,” says Eva, “I do not think Mandela would have wanted us not to give him a warm welcome, he wouldn’t have liked that.”

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Barack Obama to face protests in South Africa after years of laissez-faire

Trade unions, students and Muslim groups are among those determined to give the US president a bumpy landing

Barack Obama meets Desmond Tutu during a visit to South Africa in 2006

Barack Obama, then a rising Democrat senator, meets Desmond Tutu during a visit to South Africa in 2006. Photograph: Obed Zilwa/AP

Symbolism will hang heavy this weekend when Barack Obama visits Soweto, the cradle of South Africa’s black liberation struggle, and Robben Island, the prison where Nelson Mandela, who remained in critical condition in hospital last night, languished for years, plotting his nation’s rebirth.

Obama should not expect red-carpet treatment from all South Africans, despite the historic affinity between the civil rights and anti-apartheid movements. Workers, students and Muslim groups are among those determined to give Obama a bumpy landing when he descends on Africa‘s biggest economy.

“NObama” is the cry from the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the South African Communist party, which have called for “all workers” to join mass protests including a march on the US embassy in Pretoria on Friday.

Academics and students have vowed to boycott the University of Johannesburg’s award of an honorary law doctorate to Obama. The Muslim Lawyers’ Association has called for the president to be arrested as a war criminal.

While these may appear fringe group stunts that US presidents face all over the world, South Africa is an unusual case. Cosatu and the Communist party form a “tripartite alliance” with the governing African National Congress (ANC) and expect to be heard. Cosatu in particular, with 2.2 million members, is central to the ANC’s election machinery and well rehearsed in mobilising demonstrations that have been known to turn violent. The secretary general of the Communist party, Blade Nzimande, doubles as the country’s higher education minister and the ANC has plenty of self-professed communists and Marxists with a flair for anti-western rhetoric.

Obama is a target for those who prefer to blame South Africa’s malaise of inequality and joblessness on global capitalism rather than the ruling ANC.

Bongani Masuku, Cosatu’s international relations secretary, said: “Obama is perpetuating American foreign policy. The US is an empire run on behalf of multinational companies and the ruling class of America. US foreign policy is militarising international relations to sponsor and make their own weapons.”

Many in Africa had impossibly high hopes for Obama, the son of a Kenyan. But Masuku added: “I’m not disappointed because I didn’t expect anything. It’s not about the individual; it’s not about the race he came from. It’s about the class he represents. It’s like he’s the gatekeeper for white monopoly capital. He promised things we knew he wouldn’t be able to do.”

Guantánamo

That view is not confined to militant union organisers but extends to some members of the revered struggle generation. Denis Goldberg, who stood trial with Mandela in 1963-64 and was sentenced to life in prison by the apartheid regime, said: “I don’t like the idea of Guantánamo Bay; I think this is reprehensible.

“The unending assumption of depending on Chinese credits to finance your wars elsewhere – I think it’s outrageous what’s going on. I don’t have final answers but we need to ask questions of the big powers – all of them.”

Such is Cosatu’s influence on the ANC that its attacks on the US – from Palestine and Guantánamo Bay to the “ruthless and savage looting of our natural resources” – have sparked warnings of a diplomatic rift.

Ian Davidson, shadow international relations minister for the opposition Democratic Alliance, said: “This is President Obama’s first state visit to South Africa and is a significant event for the country to further our relations with the United States. It should not be blighted by Cosatu’s cheap political-point scoring. This move by Cosatu is an embarrassment to South Africa.”

On the surface, US-South African relations are cordial and have improved since the presidencies of George Bush and Thabo Mbeki, though Washington’s intervention in Libya alienated many here. But while many young South Africans were caught up in “Obama-mania” five years ago, those with longer memories bitterly recall Ronald Reagan’s failure to oppose apartheid.

Tom Wheeler, a former South African diplomat who began work in Washington just before the Kennedy assassination 50 years ago, said: “There’s a gut anti-Americanism and anti-westernism that lurks in some of the communities. It may be a hangover from the days when a lot of ANC people travelled to the Soviet Union, and America was regarded as the great colonialist.”

A demonstration is planned for the University of Johannesburg’s Soweto campus on Saturday, where the president will meet young African leaders in a “town hall” event.

With first lady Michelle and their daughters, he will then travel to Cape Town to visit Robben Island and meet retired archbishop Desmond Tutu, never shy of speaking his mind on western warmongering.

Mandela

Perhaps the only living South African more famous than Tutu is Mandela. Obama has met him once, in a Washington hotel in 2005. The prospect of the first black US and South African presidents coming face to face is a spin doctor’s dream, but could backfire if the ailing Mandela is seen to be exploited.

Goldberg, 80, said: “I think it would be such an intrusion on an old man who’s ill. We exploit Nelson Mandela and I object to that. We need to respect this great man’s privacy because people go to see Nelson Mandela not to support Nelson but to gain support for themselves, and this is exploitation.”

Speaking from Washington, Ben Rhodes, the White House deputy national security adviser for strategic communications, said: “While we’re in South Africa, we are going to be very deferential to the Mandela family in terms of any interaction that the president may have with the Mandela family or with Nelson Mandela.

“Ultimately, we want whatever is in the best interest of his health and the peace of mind of the Mandela family. And so we’ll be driven by their own determinations in that regard.

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DETROIT FREE  PRESS

Anti-Obama protests dispersed by South Africa police

An Anti Obama March Is Held Ahead Of The President

Anti-American demonstrators march through the streets while protesting against the official visit of U.S. President Barack Obama June 28, 2013 in Pretoria, South Africa. Organized by the Congress of South African Trade Unions, about 800 people marched through Pretoria to voice their opposition to Obama and U.S. policy in South Africa and around the world. / Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Anti-American demonstrators march through the streets while protesting against the official visit of President Barack Obama June 28, 2013 in Pretoria, South Africa. / Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

JOHANNESBURG — Police fired rubber bullets and a stun grenade into a crowd of hundreds of protesters waiting for President Obama to arrive at the University of Johannesburg on Saturday.

The crowd quickly scattered as police officers walked up the street pushing protesters away with shot guns.

“I feel my rights are being infringed,” said 24-year-old Bilaal Qibr, who was at the protest. “We can’t protest anymore. Personally, I feel like this is an extension of the U.S.”

Protests have been planned at the university over Obama’s visit and the news that he is expected to receive an honorary doctorate when he speaks later Saturday.

“They don’t believe Obama deserves that award. The U.S. position and its relationship with Israel has created a problem,” said Levy Masete, president of the Student Representative Council. “The students say, ‘Stop the oppression in Palestine,’ and you want to honor this man who is making this oppression possible.”

“He’s here for our African resources,” said Nomagugu Hloma, 19, a student at what she called the “sell out” university. “Hands off our gold, oil, diamonds and land,” she said.

South Africa’s biggest trade union, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) also said they would be protesting, while the Muslim Lawyers Association called for the president’s arrest for war crimes.

“I’m disappointed with President Obama,” said Putase Tseki, the COSATU chairman of Gauteng province in Johannesburg. “He promised he would (change) his foreign policy, he was going to resolve Palestine and close Guantanamo. I would say I was positive four years ago, but now I don’t know.”

The “feeling of being let down” helped stem the protests, says William Beinart, an African studies professor at Britain’s University of Oxford.

Anti-American demonstrators dance and sing before marching through the streets to protest against the official visit of U.S. President Barack Obama June 28, 2013 in Pretoria, South Africa. Organized by the Congress of South African Trade Unions, about 800 people marched through Pretoria to voice their opposition to Obama and U.S. policy in South Africa and around the world. / Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Fresh footage casts doubts on police claims taxi driver assaulted officer and tried to take his gun before incident

    WARNING: Viewers may find this footage distressing Link to video: South African police officers suspended as van death investigated

    South Africa has suspended eight police officers after the death of a man they tied to the back of a police van and dragged along the road while bystanders looked on.

    Video footage showing the treatment of Mido Macia, in Daveyton, east of Johannesburg, has once more focused attention on South Africa‘s police force, already dogged by allegations of brutality, corruption and incompetence.

    In the amateur video footage (warning: contains images that some may find distressing), published by South African newspaper, the Daily Sun, Macia’s hands are tied to the rear of a police van behind his head before it moves off. Just over two hours later he was found dead in a local police cell, according to the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID). A postmortem gave the cause of death as head injuries with internal bleeding.

    The video provoked outrage with President Jacob Zuma labelling it “horrific, disturbing and unacceptable. No human being should be treated in that manner.” He has instructed the minister of police to investigate the matter.

    Police chief Riah Phiyega said the eight officers involved had been suspended and the station commander would be removed from his duties. “We would like to assure the country and the world that what is in the video is not how the South African police service in a democratic South Africa goes about its work,” she said.

    The IPID responded by launching an inquiry and giving details of the police version of events. The police account alleged that Macia, 27, a taxi driver from Mozambique, assaulted an officer and took his firearm after officers asked him to move his taxi because it was obstructing traffic. They admitted only that there was a “struggle” to get the taxi driver into the police van.

    Environmental  –  Animal Advocacy  –  Poaching

    FLORA AND FAUNA

    S. Africa jails Thai rhino horn trader for 40 years

    by Staff Writers
    Johannesburg (AFP)

    Chumlong Lemtongthai received the unusually harsh sentence from a Johannesburg magistrate court, amid a record number of rhino killings this year.

    Lemtongthai admitted to paying prostitutes to pose as hunters, in order to harvest horns, which were then sold on Asia’s lucrative traditional medicine market.

    The group is thought to have netted around 26 rhino horns.

    In a statement, Minister of Justice Jeff Radebe told AFP the magistrate’s decision was “an appropriate sentence that fits the crime.”

    In handing down the jail term, magistrate Prince Manyathi said: “I do not want to see a situation where my grandchildren will only be able to see rhino in a picture,” according to EyeWitness News.

    South Africa is home to around 80 percent of the world’s rhinos, with more than 18,000 white rhinos in the country and around 1,600 critically endangered black rhinos.

    The population forms a linchpin of the country’s famed “Big Five” biodiversity and of its lucrative safari industry.

    But a dizzying spike in rhino killings has put the future of the animals in doubt.

    South African officials say 528 rhinos have been killed already this year, shattering previous annual records.

    Most of the rhinos are killed in the world-famous Kruger National Park and their horns turn up in Vietnam, China and other east Asian nations.

    The animals’ distinctive horns are used to produce a fingernail-like substance that is falsely believed to have powerful healing properties.

    While Lemtongthai was not accused of poaching, his case exposed deep flaws in South Africa’s system of granting legal hunting permits.

    The Thai national was sentenced after pleading guilty on Monday and apologising to the country where anti-poaching sentiment runs high.

    “I humbly apologise to the court and to the people of South Africa for my role in this matter,” he said in a statement to the court.

    Government prosecutors had called for Lemtongthai to receive a 260 year sentence for abusing the system, which has since been reformed.

    Hunters are now allowed to kill only one white rhino a year, and officials must consider whether an applicant’s home country has enough legislation to counter illicit trophy trade.

    National Prosecuting Authority spokeswoman Phindi Louw welcomed Friday’s ruling.

    “It will send a strong message that as South Africans, we will do everything in our power to preserve our heritage,” she told AFP.

    “We believe it’s an appropriate sentence that will be able to send a message that as a country we will never tolerate people who come in our country, unlawfully so, with the purpose of destroying our wildlife.”

    Conservationists also welcomed the decision.

    “We think it’s fantastic news. It’s the harshest sentence handed out for a wildlife crime in South Africa to date,” said Jo Shaw, WWF South Africa’s rhino coordinator.

    However Shaw criticised the decision to drop charges against Lemtongthai’s South African co-accused.

    “We are disappointed that South Africa doesn’t seem to be sending a similarly strong message about the involvement of its own citizens and we do very much hope to see those charges reinstated.”

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    Darwin Today At TerraDaily.com

    Politics, Legislation and Economy News

     

     

     

    Government  Overreach / Police Brutality :  Protesters / Human Rights / Working  Conditions

     

     

    Published on Sep 3, 2012 by

    Greg Marinovich is a veteran photo-journalist and editor-at-large for the South African publication, The Daily Maverick.

    He was at Lonmin’s Marikana mine after the violence that killed 34 people on August 16.

    He speaks to Al Jazeera from Johannesburg.

     

     

     

    South African miners charged with murder of colleagues shot by police

    The 270 miners arrested over this month’s violent strikes in South Africa have been charged with the murder of their 34 colleagues who were shot dead by police.

    South African miners charged with murder of colleagues shot by police

    Supporters of arrested mine workers pray outside the court in Ga Rankuwa, near Pretoria Photo: REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
    Aislinn Laing

    By , Johannesburg

    The bizarre twist came as the men appeared in court close to the Lonmin platinum mine charged with public violence over the clashes on August 16.

    The murder charge – and associated charges for attempted murder of 78 miners who were injured in the shooting – was brought by the state under little-known “common purpose” legislation previously used by the apartheid government.

    Frank Lesenyego, spokesman for South Africa’s National Prosecuting Authority, said the “technical” charge placed responsibility for any fatal confrontation with armed police on whoever challenged them.

    It was brought despite the fact that Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega has confirmed that the 34 slain miners died after police shot at them with live ammunition at the mine owned by Lonmin, which is listed on the London Stock Exchange.

    “This is under common law, where people are charged with common purpose in a situation where there are suspects with guns or any weapons and they confront or attack the police and a shooting takes place and there are fatalities,” Mr Lesenyego said.

    The state also persuaded the magistrate hearing the high-profile case to delay a bail hearing for the miners until September 6. Until then, they will remain in cramped custody in three police stations in the area.

    No police officers have yet been charged by the shooting – Mr Lesenyego said their actions would be investigated by the judicial commission set up by President Jacob Zuma to probe the tragedy which has been instructed to report back in four months.

    The decision to bring murder charges was met with outcry across South Africa yesterday. It coincided with a sensational report which claimed that many of the miners killed on August 16 were shot at close range or run over by police vehicles rather than dying when officers initially opened fire as they were charged by the strikers.

    Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Greg Marinovich, who became a national hero in South Africa for his work during apartheid, claimed to have evidence and eyewitness testimony that miners who had hidden from police in a rocky outcrop after the shooting were tracked and murdered by officers.

    Concerns have also been raised about the treatment of the detained miners in police custody – at least 150 have laid claims with the Independent Police Investigative Directorate that they have been tortured and assaulted by officers since their arrest.

    Pierre de Vos, a South African legal expert, said the decision to bring murder charges was “frankly bizarre”.

    “I have never heard of this kind of thing before, even during the apartheid years when police frequently tried to blame protesters for violence meted out to them,” he said.

    “It obviously has the potential to further inflame the emotions of the miners but also to create more sympathy for their plight among ordinary South Africans who have previously been quite sympathetic to the police.”

    Mthunzi Mhaga, a spokesman for South Africa’s justice minister, said he had not been consulted about the decision. “It’s a procedural decision that we cannot get involved in,” he said.

    According to the legalbrief.co.za website, State Prosecutor Nigel Carpenter also argued in court that the suspects were liable for the effects that the bloody violence at Marikana mine had had on the economy. “There were reports in the morning that the rand fell by 12 per cent,” he told the court.

     

    Environmental

     

     

    New Herbicide Could Kill Weeds, Crops, Monsanto

    22Apr2012

    By

    By Motley Fool

    Monsanto (NYSE: MON  ) and Dow AgroSciences, a unit of Dow Chemical (NYSE: DOW  ) , could be facing a serious challenge to their crop chemical development plans. A remarkably nonrabid, diverse coalition of farmers and major food companies is pursuing legal action aimed at forcing the EPA and USDA to analyze potential risks associated with new weed killers in the pipeline. If they prevail, it could spell trouble for our heroes.

    The Save Our Crops Coalition, or SOCC, comprises 2,000 farmers and other food interests, including Ball Corp. (NYSE: BLL  ) — maker of those canning jars and other food packaging — and Seneca Foods (Nasdaq: SENEA  ) , maker of Libby’s brand foods. Its members represent both conventional and organic farming interests, and range from specialty growers to major agronomic crop producers. This isn’t your usual band of fringe groups making noise that no one hears. Someone might actually pay attention to them.

     

    Read Full Article Here

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    Cyber Space

    Mobile Malware Incidents on Rise, Says Smartphone Survey

    By John E Dunn, techworld.com    Apr 22, 2012 7:00 am

    The cost-saving culture of ‘bring your own device’ smartphones is tempting enterprises into taking risks they would not contemplate for conventional computing devices, a survey by Goode Intelligence has suggested.

    The Third mSecurity Survey (summary PDF) confirmed that Apple’s iPhone is currently the dominant device, present in 77 percent of in the surveyed businesses, ahead of BlackBerry on 70 percent and the rapidly rising Android on 65 percent.

    When asked whether their organisation allowed BYOD smartphone use, 71 percent said they did with 47 percent agreeing that company data was being stored on these devices.

    Many of these smartphones were not being managed as secure devices, with fewer than one in five adding anti-malware and only half employing data encryption

    Read Full Article Here

    Hidden Dangers of CISPA

    Want to stop private companies from sharing your personal information with Uncle Sam? Better hope the U.S. Congress doesn’t OK this ill-conceived legislation.

    By Dan Tynan, ITworld    Apr 22, 2012 10:19 am

    Have you heard of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act? If not, you’re in for a crash course. Leading privacy and civil rights groups have declared last week Stop Cyber Spying Weekin an effort to get the word out about CISPA – yet another meaningless acronym that threatens to redefine the Internet as we know it.

    CISPA could be the most important piece of digital legislation since the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. And like the DMCA, which was written to thwart file sharers and DVD rippers but ended up being used to enforce copyrights on garage door openers and shut down blogs critical of corporations, it has at least as much potential for abuse.

    Read Full Article Here

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    Survival / Sustainability

    Eat The Weeds: Episode 01: Why Learn About Wild Foods

    Uploaded by on Jan 15, 2008

    http://www.eattheweeds.com/foraging/

    Eat Green. You can learn how to eat the weeds. Green Deane’s foraging techniques for wild food are usable anywhere. http://www.EatTheWeeds.com. The introduction is edited to fit the time slot.

    Are You Ready Series: Storing Medical Supplies To Be Ready

    Tess Pennington
    Ready Nutrition

    Storing medical supplies in the home for a possible disaster could save some one’s life if they need immediate medical assistance.  In the event of a major disaster, such as a hurricane or earthquake, if someone in the home is injured, emergency responders cannot always get to the injured victims in time.  Experts suggest having a well stocked arsenal of  medical supplies in this instance.

    Suggested Home Medical Supplies

    The idea of having medical supplies in the home is to be prepared for any given situation that could arise.   In the long run, if supplies are adequately organized and ready to go, the person administering medical assistance will have everything in place and be ready to act.  Making an inventory list of everything that is needed for all family members (include children’s needs as well as family members with special needs) as well as items that have already been purchased can help with organizing the supplies for storage.

    • Antacids
    • Anti-diarrheal
    • pain reliever
    • Children’s pain reliever
    • First aid book
    • Prescription medications (keep copies for records)
    • Cold/flu medicines
    • Vitamins
    • Blood clotting
    • Sterile gauze
    • Dressing bandages
    • Dressing rolls
    • Medical tape
    • Bandages of all sizes
    • Alcohol wipes
    • Hydrogen peroxide
    • Eye flushing solution
    • Anesthetic solution
    • Hypodermic needles (for the antiseptic solution)
    • Electrolyte tablets
    • Benadryl
    • Scissors
    • Tweezers
    • Cold Packs
    • Warm Blankets
    • Antibiotic ointment
    • Thermometers
    • Skin irritation creams
    • Gloves
    • Mask
    • Suture needles/string
    • List of medical contact phone numbers
    • Medical history file (if needed)

    Read Full Article Here

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    Whistle Blowers

    Whistleblower bill addresses reports of sexual abuse of a minor by a co-worker

    Published: Saturday, April 21, 2012, 8:30 PM

    A bill aimed at preventing a repeat of the Penn State University sex abuse scandal is heading for final passage in the Louisiana House. Senate Bill 158, which has already been approved by the Senate, was easily approved by the House Labor and Industrial Relations Committee on Thursday.

    jpmorrell.jpgFile photoSen. J.P. Morrell

    Sponsored by Sen. J.P. Morrell, D-New Orleans, the bill would extend whistleblower protections to employees who report the sexual abuse of a minor by a co-worker. The bill was inspired by the case of assistant Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky, who has been accused of molesting children for years. Officials at the school are accused of covering up for him.

    Another Morrell bill inspired by the Penn State scandal, SB 4, would increase requirements for reporting the sexual abuse of a minor. That bill has already passed the Senate and is headed to the House Criminal Justice Committee.

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    Activism

    South African society through lens of youth

    Published on Apr 21, 2012 by

    Young activists in South Africa are using cameras to document social and economic problems in their communities.

    The photo club is designed to create awareness and get young people more involved. Their plan is to also spread the intiative to schools across the country.

    Haru Mutasa reports from Johannesburg.

    US ‘intelligence war’ triggers ‘Occupy spy base’ in UK

    Published on Apr 22, 2012 by

    Menwith Hill, the largest intelligence gathering and surveillance center outside the US, in the heart of the UK’s Yorkshire Dales, is surrounded by protesters demonstrating against America’s planned missile defense system. The local residents, often camping outside, have been joined by members of the global Occupy movement, supporting ongoing local efforts. To keep up with new types of warfare, billions of dollars has been invested in Menwith Hill over the last decade. It has enabled the base to remain a vital component of the global US surveillance network.

    Greek Town Develops Bartering System

    Published on Apr 18, 2012 by

    http://thevictoryreport.org/
    Greek town develops bartering system without euro. As Greece wonders whether its debt crisis will eventually spell its exit from the euro, one town in the centre of the country, Volos, has formed an alternative local currency. It works through a bartering system or exchange of goods.

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    Articles of Interest

    Mass Dolphin Death Mystery In Peru, Authorities Blame It On Viral Infection

    By Sreeja VN | Apr 22, 2012 08:14 AM EDT

    Investigations are on into the deaths of hundreds of dolphins that washed up on the northern coast of Peru. Around 877 carcasses of dolphins and porpoises were found on Peruvian beaches in two and half months. Peruvian officials and environmentalists are trying to unravel the mystery behind the phenomenon.

    No concrete reasons have been figured out yet but the authorities believe that it could possibly be a viral infection that may have killed the dolphins in huge numbers. While environmental groups in the country blame the seismic oil exploration work carried out by BPZ Energy Company for the dolphin deaths.

    Read Full Article Here

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