Tag Archive: Jiangxi


Beijing still not releasing soil pollution data: Xinhua

  • Xinhua
Technical staff examine soil contaminated by heavy metal pollution. (File photo/Huang Chih-liang)

Technical staff examine soil contaminated by heavy metal pollution. (File photo/Huang Chih-liang)

China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection will not issue data related to soil pollution for the time being but will discuss the situation after an in-depth investigation, the ministry confirmed on Thursday. The ministry said it will be difficult to investigate soil pollution nationwide, adding that it will conduct further investigations in heavily polluted areas.

In January, Beijing lawyer Dong Zhengwei sent an application to the ministry asking it to issue soil pollution data, as well as create detailed measures to handle it.

The ministry said in February that the data is a state secret and refused to issue it. Dong was not satisfied and sent a second request. In response the ministry said soil pollution is still being investigated and related data remains a state secret, adding that data will be released after further evaluation. After news of Dong’s requests spread online, many people began to wonder just how polluted the country’s soil is.

Ma Jun, head of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, said in an interview with the Legal Daily that polluted soil may affect public health via food, crops and underground water.

“Soil pollution is related to public health. Therefore, the public should have the right to be informed about the situation,” Ma said.

 

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FARM NEWS

China says massive area of its soil polluted


by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) April 17, 2014


More dead pigs found in China river: report
Beijing (AFP) April 17, 2014 – At least 170 dead pigs have been found in a Chinese river, state media reported Thursday — the latest in a string of similar incidents that have raised fears over food safety.
The animals were found floating in a tributary of China’s second-longest waterway, the Yellow River, in northwestern Qinghai province, the official Xinhua news agency said.The grim discovery follows a series of scandals involving dead pigs in Chinese rivers. Last year 16,000 carcasses were found drifting through the main waterway of the commercial hub of Shanghai.In Qinghai — the furthest west such an incident has been reported — “the source of the dead pigs is still under investigation,” Xinhua said, citing local authorities.Industry analysts say sick pigs are sometimes dumped in rivers by farmers hoping to avoid paying the costs of disposing of the animals by other means.Around 500 dead pigs are recovered every month from a Chinese reservoir in the southwestern province of Sichuan, state-run media reported in March.

Authorities also found 157 dead pigs last month in a river in central Jiangxi province.

China is a major producer of pork, which surveys have found to be the country’s most popular meat.

 

A huge area of China’s soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

Of about 6.3 million square kilometres (2.4 million square miles) of soil surveyed — roughly two thirds of China’s total area — 16.1 percent is thought to be polluted, the environmental protection ministry said in a report.

The study, which appeared on its website, blamed mining and farming practices among other causes.

“The national soil pollution situation is not positive,” the ministry said, adding that more than 19 percent of the farmland which was surveyed is polluted.

The ministry last year described the results of its soil pollution survey as a state secret and refused to release the results, a move which incensed environmental campaigners.

The government has come under increasing pressure in recent years to take action to improve the environment, with large parts of the country repeatedly blanketed in thick smog and waterways and land polluted.

 

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The American Interest

Filth to Table

Relentless Pollution is Poisoning China’s Food, Soil

© Getty Images

In many parts of China, officials are caught between two competing priorities: industrial development and food production. Most often, officials’ prime concern is industrial development—characterized by factories and mining, usually—since it is the bigger driver of economic growth. But, predictably, unfettered industrial development results in extremely poor conditions for food production. And it’s getting worse. Much worse. An article in yesterday’s New York Times has some sobering statistics.

An alarming glimpse of official findings came on Monday, when a vice minister of land and resources, Wang Shiyuan, said at a news conference in Beijing that eight million acres of China’s farmland, equal to the size of Maryland, had become so polluted that planting crops on it “should not be allowed.” […]

One-sixth of China’s arable land — nearly 50 million acres — suffers from soil pollution, according to a book published this year by the Ministry of Environmental Protection. The book, “Soil Pollution and Physical Health,” said that more than 13 million tons of crops harvested each year were contaminated with heavy metals, and that 22 million acres of farmland were affected by pesticides.

The result of farming on polluted land is unsurprising: poisoned food. 155 batches of rice collected from markets and restaurants in Guangdong Province in May were found to have excess levels of cadmium.

 

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New strain of ‘deadly’ bird flu

Avian influenza Experts are concerned that the virus could mutate to spread far and wide

Experts are concerned about the spread of a new strain of bird flu that has already killed one woman in China.

The 73-year-old from Nanchang City caught the H10N8 virus after visiting a live poultry market, although it is not known for sure if this was the source of infection.

A second person has since become infected in China’s Jiangxi province.

Scientists told The Lancet the potential for it to become a pandemic “should not be underestimated”.

Previously we did not think that H7N9 infections might be so lethal. Now we also must consider H10N8 infections as well”

Dr John McCauley Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Influenza

This particular strain of influenza A virus has not been seen before.

In recent months, China has already been coping with an outbreak of a similar influenza virus called H7N9, which has killed around a quarter of those infected.

Pandemic risk

Scientists who have studied the new H10N8 virus say it has evolved some genetic characteristics that may allow it to replicate efficiently in humans.

The concern is that it could ultimately be able to spread from person to person, although experts stress that there is no evidence of this yet.

Dr Mingbin Liu from Nanchang City Centre for Disease Control and Prevention said: “A second case of H10N8 was identified in Jiangxi province, China, on 26 January 2014. This is of great concern because it reveals that the H10N8 virus has continued to circulate and may cause more human infections in future.”

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birdflu

(Ella Mullins, CC BY 2.0)  A new, virulent strain of the bird flu virus in China killed a woman in December, and now scientists better understand how.

Scientists in China have now revealed the specific genetic makeup of a new bird flu virus strain that killed one woman last December, a new report shows. The H10N8 strain carries several genes that equip it for greater virulence and the ability to adapt to bodily resistance.

Various strains of avian flu have floated around China, and even North America, in recent months. While the cases have remained contained to individual victims, or at worst several dozen, researchers consistently express concern over the threat of pandemic — perhaps for good reason, too, as each strain’s origin and particular virulence profile keeps experts uncertain whether they can contain it. The current strain of H10N8 (JX346) was found through tracheal swabs to contain six internal genes derived from avian H9N2 viruses currently awash in China.

“A genetic analysis of the H10N8 virus shows a virus that is distinct from previously reported H10N8 viruses having evolved some genetic characteristics that may allow it to replicate efficiently in humans,” explained study author Dr. Yuelong Shu, from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Beijing, in a statement. “Notably, H9N2 virus provided the internal genes not only for the H10N8 virus, but also for H7N9 and H5N1 viruses.”

All three strains have surfaced in recent months, most notably the H7N9 strain, which claimed the lives of 150 people. Only days before that, the first death was recorded in North America as a result of the H5N1 strain — a Canadian man who had recently vacationed in Beijing. It was last December, in fact, when the current H10N8 strain killed a 73-year-old woman in the city of Nanchang in Jiangxi Province, marking the first time that strain had resulted in human death. Now researchers believe they have the specific genetic makeup of the virus, which made it so lethal, killing the woman within nine days.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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18.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level
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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Saturday, 18 May, 2013 at 05:07 UTC
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Four more people have died from a new strain of bird flu in China, bringing the death toll from the H7N9 virus to 36 from 131 confirmed cases, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said. The United Nations health agency said a written statement on Friday that the four deaths were from cases that had already been identified in laboratories. It said here had been no new cases of infection with H7N9 Since May 8. The WHO reiterated that there was no evidence that the new strain of bird flu, which was first detected in patients in China in March, was passing easily from human to human. If such a feature emerged it could spark a pandemic. But it said: “Until the source of infection has been identified and controlled, it is expected that there will be further cases of human infection with the virus.” The WHO said that Chinese health authorities had continued with enhanced surveillance, epidemiological investigations, close contact tracing, clinical management, laboratory testing and sharing of samples as well as prevention and control measures. The number of new cases has dwindled in some provinces and operations.

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China reports 4 more bird flu deaths

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Four more people in China have died from a new strain of bird flu, bringing the number of deaths from the mysterious H7N9 virus to 31, with the number of infections rising by two to 129, according to Chinese health authorities.

Among the deaths, two occurred in the eastern province of Jiangsu; one was from eastern Zhejiang; while another was from central Anhui, based on a Reuters analysis of the data provided by Chinese health authorities on Monday.

The government did not provide more details of the victims.

Chinese health authorities said two new infections were reported in the eastern coastal province of Fujian. The virus, which was mostly concentrated in the region around the commercial capital of Shanghai, spread to Fujian in late April.

The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) has said it has no evidence that the new strain of bird flu, which was first detected in patients in China in March, is easily transmissible between humans.

Chinese scientists have confirmed that the H7N9 strain has been transmitted to humans from chickens. But the WHO has said 40 percent of people infected with H7N9 appear to have had no contact with poultry.

The head of the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention said the current strain of bird flu cannot spark a pandemic in its current form – but he added that there is no guarantee it will not mutate and cause a serious pandemic.

Voice of Russia, Reuters

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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64 15.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level
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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Tuesday, 14 May, 2013 at 03:09 UTC
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The death toll due to the deadly new strain of bird flu in China has climbed to 35 with one more death due to H7N9 infection, even as a fresh outbreak of the older strain H5N1 was reported in remote region of Tibet. Newly detected H7N9 virus has claimed 35 lives so far, while 57 infected patients have recovered, National Health and Family Planning Commission said. Meanwhile, Tibet reported an outbreak of the highly contagious older strain of the bird flu virus among chickens, the Ministry of Agriculture announced today. Thirty-five chickens at a farm in a village in Mainling County of Nyingchi Prefecture showed symptoms of avian flu and died last Tuesday, according to the ministry. The National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory today confirmed that the virus was H5N1, after testing samples collected at the farm. Local authorities have sealed off and sterilised the infected area, where a total of 372 chickens have been culled and safely disposed of in order to prevent the disease from spreading, the MOA said. Since the first H7N9 infections was reported in late March, China has confirmed a total of 130 cases. China, along with World Health Organisation has commissioned research teams to find a way to treat the deadly disease, as well as to develop a vaccine.

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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Wednesday, 15 May, 2013 at 10:14 UTC
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The H7N9 bird flu has killed one person in central China’s Hunan Province, local health authorities said Wednesday. A 64-year-old woman surnamed Guan died Tuesday morning at a hospital in the city of Shaoyang some 20 days after her infection was confirmed, the Hunan Provincial Health and Family Planning Commission said. She was the first person in Hunan diagnosed with the virus. Another three patients were confirmed afterward. One of the three died earlier this month, one has recovered and the other is still in critical condition, according to the commission. The first human infection was reported in China in late March. Authorities have recorded 130 confirmed cases thus far. Previously the National Health and Family Planning Commission said the virus had killed 35 people on the mainland, while 57 of those infected had recovered as of May 13.

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H7N9 bird flu kills one in Central China

Updated: 2013-05-15 15:28

( Xinhua)

CHANGSHA – The H7N9 bird flu has killed one person in Central China’s Hunan province, local health authorities said Wednesday.

A 64-year-old woman surnamed Guan died Tuesday morning at a hospital in the city of Shaoyang some 20 days after her infection was confirmed, the Hunan Provincial Health and Family Planning Commission said.

She was the first person in Hunan diagnosed with the virus. Another three patients were confirmed afterward. One of the three died earlier this month, one has recovered and the other is still in critical condition, according to the commission.

The first human infection was reported in China in late March. Authorities have recorded 130 confirmed cases thus far.

Previously the National Health and Family Planning Commission said the virus had killed 35 people on the mainland, while 57 of those infected had recovered as of May 13.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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62 12.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level   Details

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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Sunday, 12 May, 2013 at 03:42 UTC
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The toll due to the H7N9 avian influenza in China has risen to 33, with the death of an 83-year-old woman in Shanghai, officials said Saturday. The woman surnamed Jiang died Friday evening at a hospital in Shanghai, a month after her infection was confirmed, Xinhua cited the Shanghai Municipal Health and Family Planning Commission as saying. Till Saturday, Shanghai confirmed 33 H7N9 infection cases. Four of them are being treated in hospital, 15 have recovered and 14 died. China has so far reported 130 confirmed H7N9 cases, that includes the 33 deaths.

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News Analysis: China’s poultry prices to rise as H7N9 wanes

 

English.news.cn      2013-05-13 20:33:27

 

BEIJING, May 13 (Xinhua) — Prices of poultry products in China could rise sharply as early as next month as the waning H7N9 virus helps consumers regain confidence in poultry meat and eggs, experts said.Since late March, authorities have closed many poultry markets in eastern China to curb the spread of the virus and many consumers have stayed away from poultry products due to fears of being infected by the deadly virus.Since the beginning of May the number of new infections has been decreasing, according to health authorities.The new strain of bird flu, which has killed 33 people among 130 confirmed cases nationwide, has led to huge losses for the country’s poultry industry and driven many farms out of business.Due to the H7N9 virus, the country’s poultry industry has suffered losses worth more than 40 billion yuan (6.5 billion U.S. dollars), according to the China Animal Agriculture Association.”Many breeders in Shandong, a major poultry production province in eastern China, have reduced or killed all their breeding stocks in response to losses,” said Cui Zhizhong, a professor at Shandong Agricultural University.”In a couple of production cycles, poultry prices could go up sharply and this could affect the market order nationwide,” said Cui.He estimated that prices could go up in June or July.Qin Fu, director of the research institute of agricultural economics and development under the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, shared this viewpoint. “As consumer confidence regains, the ensuing shortfall in supply of poultry meat and eggs will trigger big rises in prices,” he said.”The whole industry was severely hit over the six weeks after the first H7N9 human infections were reported,” said Qin

 

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News Analysis: China’s poultry prices to rise as H7N9 wanes
English.news.cn   2013-05-13 20:33:27

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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61 10.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level
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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Thursday, 02 May, 2013 at 18:28 UTC
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A 55-year-old man in central China has died from a new strain of bird flu, bringing to 27 the number of deaths from the mysterious H7N9 virus. The H7N9 virus, which has infected 127 people in China, is a threat to world health and should be taken seriously, scientists said on Wednesday. The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) has described it as “one of the most lethal” flu viruses but said there is as yet no evidence of human-to-human transmission of this virus. The latest victim, a native of southeastern Jiangxi province surnamed Jiao, died in Hunan province. The man sold braised pork and was diagnosed with the H7N9 virus on April 26, the Hunan Health Bureau said on its website. A 69-year-old farmer, also from Hunan, was the latest person to be infected with the virus, state media said. So far, 26 people have recovered after contracting the virus. Chinese scientists have confirmed for the first time that the H7N9 strain has been transmitted to humans from chickens. Last week a man in Taiwan became the first case of the flu outside mainland China. He caught the flu while traveling in China.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Saturday, 04 May, 2013 at 09:56 UTC
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The mortality rate in the H7N9 avian influenza outbreak has reached 20%, according to the latest figures from the World Health Organization. With 128 laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection as of May 2, there have also been 26 deaths, or 20.3%. At the same time, 26 people have recovered from the novel illness, according to the China Center for Disease Control and Prevention. “The cases are going up daily – about 20% have died, 20% have recovered and the rest are still sick,” commented John McCauley, PhD, director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Influenza in the United Kingdom. “The WHO considers this a serious threat,” McCauley told the Guardian newspaper. “We’re on an alert and we’re developing diagnostics and vaccines specifically against the virus.” While the mortality is high, it is, so far, lower than that seen in cases of infection with the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu, which approaches 50%. As of April 26, the WHO is reporting a total of 628 laboratory-confirmed cases of H5N1 in humans, with 374 deaths. The highly pathogenic H5N1 flu causes severe illness in both birds and people, but is easily transmitted only among fowl. In contrast, the H7N9 virus appears to cause disease – so far – only in people; infected birds do not show signs of illness, making the virus difficult to track. Fortunately, there is little evidence so far of human-to-human transmission of the virus, but exactly how it is spreading remains unclear, although suspicion centers on domestic fowl and perhaps wild birds. But in many cases, there is no obvious link between patients and birds.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Monday, 06 May, 2013 at 02:44 UTC
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The News Office of the Ministry of Agriculture announced on 5 May 2013 that the National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory found that 3 environmental samples among 412 collected from Shandong tested positive for H7N9 avian influenza. The samples were from Xingfu Road Market in Shizhong District of Zaozhuang City, Shandong. Jiangxi Animal Disease Control Center sent 4 samples for review by the National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory and 1 was found positive for H7N9 avian influenza. The sample came from a chicken in a commercial site in Xiangtang Town of Nanchang County in Nanchang City, Jiangxi. The Guangdong Animal Disease Control Center sent one sample which was confirmed positive for H7N9 avian influenza. It was from a chicken in Dongcheng Sanniao Wholesale Market of Dongguan, Guangdong.

A man who contracted H7N9 bird flu was discharged from hospital in east China’s Zhejiang Province on Friday after facing death for days. The 38 year old is the first H7N9 patient with severe symptoms to recover. He was treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University in the city of Hangzhou. “I must thank the medics. They pulled me back from the verge of death. They let me live again,” the patient said while leaving the hospital in which he had stayed for 22 days. The medics, advised by an expert panel consisting of more than 20 top doctors, decided to treat Cao with life-support systems that replaced the functions of his liver and lungs, as no H7N9 patients with symptoms as severe as his had been saved. Nine other H7N9 patients were also discharged on Friday from the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Tuesday, 07 May, 2013 at 05:11 UTC
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Four more people in China have died from a new strain of bird flu, bringing to 31 the number of deaths from the mysterious H7N9 virus, with the number of infections rising by two to 129, according to Chinese health authorities. Among the deaths, two occurred in the eastern province of Jiangsu; one was from eastern Zhejiang; while another was from central Anhui, based on a Reuters analysis of the data provided by Chinese health authorities on Monday. The government did not provide more details of the victims. Chinese health authorities said two new infections were reported in the eastern coastal province of Fujian. The virus, which was mostly concentrated in the region around the commercial capital of Shanghai, spread to Fujian in late April. The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) has said it has no evidence that the new strain of bird flu, which was first detected in patients in China in March, is easily transmissible between humans. Chinese scientists have confirmed that the H7N9 strain has been transmitted to humans from chickens. But the WHO has said 40 percent of people infected with H7N9 appear to have had no contact with poultry. The head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the current strain of bird flu cannot spark a pandemic in its current form – but he added that there is no guarantee it will not mutate and cause a serious pandemic.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Thursday, 09 May, 2013 at 13:05 UTC
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China reported one more death from a new strain of bird flu on Thursday, bringing the death toll to 32, with the number of infections staying at 129. A 56-year-old man died in the central province of Henan, two weeks after his infection was confirmed, said a statement from the local health bureau. The man had no direct contact with birds, but there were birdcages hanging in the corridor of the building he lived in, the report said. The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) has said it has no evidence that the new strain of bird flu, first detected in patients in China in March, is easily transmissible between humans. Chinese scientists have confirmed that the H7N9 strain has been transmitted to humans from chickens. But the WHO has said 40 percent of people infected with H7N9 appear to have had no contact with poultry.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Friday, 10 May, 2013 at 02:46 UTC
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As of 8 May 2013 (11:00 CET), the National Health and Family Planning Commission, China notified WHO of an additional laboratory-confirmed case of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. The patient is a 79-year-old woman from Jiangxi province who became ill on 3 May 2013. Additionally, a patient earlier reported has died. To date, a total of 131 laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus including 32 deaths have been reported to WHO. Contacts of the confirmed cases are being closely monitored. The authorities in the affected locations continue to implement prevention and control measures. Investigations into the possible sources of infection and reservoirs of the virus are ongoing. Until the source of infection has been identified and controlled, it is expected that there will be further cases of human infection with the virus. So far, there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission. WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event, nor does it recommend that any travel or trade restrictions be applied.

Earth Watch Report  –   Extreme  Weather

Tornado uprooted trees in Caojia town in Xinhua County, Loudi city in central China’s Hunan Province on Wednesday, May 8, 2013. A torrential rainstorm started on Tuesday, injuring 24 people, affecting 18,400 people, toppling 262 houses, forcing the relocation of 276 people, and damaging 6758 mu (450.5 hectares) of crops in Caojia. Rescue work is underway, according to the local government. [Photo: Xinhua]

A man is walks through the water-logged Chaisang Road, in Jiujiang city, in southeast China’s Jiangxi Province on Wednesday, May 8, 2013. Rainstorms battered Jiujiang Wednesday and left millions of local residents affected. [Photo: Xinhua]

Vehicles move through the flooded Chaisang Road, Jiujiang city, in southeast China’s Jiangxi Province on Wednesday, May 8, 2013. [Photo: Xinhua]

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09.05.2013 Extreme Weather China Province of Hunan, [Hunan-wide] Damage level Details

Extreme Weather in China on Thursday, 09 May, 2013 at 04:48 (04:48 AM) UTC.

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Heavy rain started to lash 24 cities and counties in Hunan on Tuesday, killing three people and leaving 165,000 more affected, the provincial civil affairs bureau said in a statement. The rain also toppled 300 houses, forced the relocation of 1,600 people and damaged 14,000 hectares of crops. In Changsha, capital city of Hunan, rainstorms inundated roads and houses in low-lying areas and crippled traffic on Wednesday night. Rainstorms are forecast for Wednesday night and Thursday, while they will abate on Friday, according to provincial meteorological authorities. The weather is expected to clear up over the weekend.

Rainstorms continue to batter Chinese provinces

CHANGSHA/GUANGZHOU, May 9 (Xinhua) –Heavy rain in central and south China killed at least six people and left tens of thousands of people affected and much cropland damaged.

Rain-triggered floods killed three workers who were working at around 8:40 p.m. Wednesday in a sewage pipe near a bus station in Xiangtan City, Hunan Province, local authorities said, adding that the bodies of the workers were retrieved at around 10:40 p.m.

Rain started to lash 24 cities and counties in Hunan on Tuesday, killing three people in landslides Tuesday, affecting 165,000 people, toppling 300 houses, forcing the relocation of 1,600 people and damaging 14,000 hectares of crops, the provincial government said.

In Changsha, capital of Hunan, rainstorms inundated roads and houses in low-lying areas and crippled traffic on Wednesday night.

Rainstorms were forecast for Wednesday night and Thursday, while they will abate on Friday, meteorologists said. The weather is expected to clear up over the weekend.

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Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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55 01.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level
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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 04:10 UTC
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Health authorities in east China’s Jiangxi Province late on Thursday confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 69-year-old man surnamed Xiong, a local retiree in the provincial capital of Nanchang, showed symptoms of high fever, tight chest and diarrhea, and was admitted to the No. 3 Hospital in Nanchang, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department. Xiong is in critical condition, said the statement. He had not left the city recently, nor had any contact with dead birds, but lives near a live poultry market, the statement said. The city’s disease control authority has quarantined 14 people who have had close contact with the patient. None of them have exhibited any abnormal symptoms. Three more new cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Thursday, two in Zhejiang Province and one in Henan Province. The National Health and Family Planning Commission said in its Wednesday update that the total number of H7N9 cases reported in the mainland stood at 110, including 23 cases that have ended in death. Most of the cases were reported in east China’s Shanghai Municipality and the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 15:14 UTC
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Six more cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Friday in the Chinese provinces of Fujian, Jiangsu, Jiangxi and Zhejiang. Health authorities in southeast China’s Fujian Province confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 65-year-old man surnamed Luo, a local resident from Gaopo township, Yongding County, Longyan City, showed symptoms of repeated coughing, low fever and a tight chest on April 18. He tested positive for the H7N9 virus at 11 a.m. on Friday by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Thirty-seven people who have been in close contact with Luo have not shown any abnormal symptoms so far. Also, three men, aged 36, 49 and 60, from three different cities, were confirmed to have caught H7N9 bird flu in Jiangsu Province, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department.

Two of them were in serious condition, said the statement. In neighboring Zhejiang Province, a 38-year-old farmer surnamed Li was confirmed to have contracted the H7N9 bird flu virus. Li, who is also in serious condition, is receiving treatment in hospital. In Jiangxi Province, health authorities confirmed the province’s second H7N9 bird flu case, a 76-year-old woman surnamed Xiong. She is in critical condition, according to a Jiangxi provincial health department statement. The case has no family or epidemiological connection with the province’s first case, a 69-year-old man also surnamed Xiong. Health experts found some of the chicken and ducks the woman, a farmer, raised had died, which may be connected with her infection of the virus.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Sunday, 28 April, 2013 at 04:07 UTC
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China’s deadly H7N9 bird flu outbreak has spread to the central province of Hunan, local health authorities say, the third announcement in three days of a case in a new location. A 64-year-old woman in Shaoyang City, who developed a fever four days after coming into contact with poultry, was confirmed to have the virus, the Xinhua state news agency reported on Saturday. It follows the first confirmed cases in the eastern province of Jiangxi on Thursday and the southeastern province of Fujian on Friday. More than 110 people in mainland China have been confirmed with H7N9, with 23 deaths, since the government announced on March 31 that the virus had been found in humans. Most cases have been confined to eastern China, while the island of Taiwan has also reported one case. A Chinese expert earlier this week warned of the possibility of more cases in a wider geographical area. “Until the source of H7N9 avian influenza is … brought under effective control, sporadic cases might continue to appear,” said Liang Wannian of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission. Poultry has been confirmed as the source of the H7N9 flu among humans but experts fear the prospect of such a virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, which could then have the potential to trigger a pandemic.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Monday, 29 April, 2013 at 02:10 UTC
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The number of confirmed H7N9 bird flu cases in mainland China stood at 120 as of yesterday at 7 p.m. Beijing time, according to China National Radio. The number of dead was 23. The latest case of the deadly new flu includes the first illness in Hunan Province. Cases continued to rise after World Health Organization officials this week concluded a trip to China and lauded the country’s efforts to control the deadly new flu. Consumers have been wary of chicken, even though the government says cooked meat is safe. Yum!, the U.S. operator of the KFC fried chicken chain that has relied on China for much of its growth in recent years, has been hit with a decline in KFC sales in the country. The disease has continued to spread from the eastern China area where it was first discovered. Taiwan also reported its first case this week. China’s government claims sovereignty over Taiwan, and mainland media have combined Taiwan with the mainland’s H7N9 total number of cases.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Tuesday, 30 April, 2013 at 02:58 UTC
Description
The deadly H7N9 bird flu strain claimed a new victim yesterday when a hospital patient died in China, state media reported, bringing the death toll from the recently identified virus to 24. A patient surnamed Chen died in the eastern city of Shanghai after 12 days of medical treatment failed, Xinhua news agency said. China has recorded more than 120 cases of H7N9 infection so far. Most cases since the new strain was first identified in late March have been confined to eastern China, and the only one reported outside mainland China has been in Taiwan. The Taiwanese victim was infected in China. But experts fear the possibility of the virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, with the potential to trigger a pandemic. The World Health Organization has said there has been no evidence so far of human-to-human transmission but warned that H7N9 was “one of the most lethal” influenza viruses ever seen. Chinese researchers, reporting in The Lancet recently, said they had confirmed poultry as a source of the virus among humans. Chinese health officials have acknowledged so-called “family clusters,” where members of a single family have become infected, but have not established any confirmed instances of human-to-human transmission.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

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Updated: Tuesday, 30 April, 2013 at 16:37 UTC
Description
The Chinese National Health and Family Planning Commission has notified the World Health Organization (WHO) of addition confirmed human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9), according to a WHO update April 29. With the addition of the new cases, the WHO says there is now a total of 126 laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus including 24 deaths. The two new fatalities are from previously reported positive patients from Jiangsu province. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, who visited the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),urged health officials to remain vigilant against the lethal virus. “We cannot afford to take it easy or relax, as we are facing a new virus,” he said Sunday. “We should be prepared for any possible development.”

Li said the government will continue to cooperate with international organizations, release information openly and improve public awareness of the virus. A new development on the bird flu front is that Chinese scientists have confirmed that the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus has been transmitted to humans from chickens. In a newly published study in The Lancet, researchers say that chickens in poultry markets were a source of human infections meant that controlling the disease in these places and in these birds should be a priority. Lead researcher, Kwok-Yung Yuen of the University of Hong Kong said, “The evidence suggests it is a pure poultry-to-human transmission and that controlling (infections in people) will therefore depend on controlling the epidemic in poultry.”

 

 

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

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27.04.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Capital city, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Jiangxi provinces and Taiwan] Damage level
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Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

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Updated: Friday, 26 April, 2013 at 04:37 UTC
Description
The H7N9 strain responsible for the bird flu outbreak in China is unlike any that has previously been seen in this type of virus. So far, 110 cases have been reported, including one in Taiwan, and 23 people have died. Here are some things to know about this virus: No evidence of human-to-human transmission to date. So far, authorities said, there is no evidence that this virus can pass from person to person. That doesn’t mean it can’t happen later. “If limited person-to-person transmission is demonstrated in the future, this really will not be surprising,” Keiji Fukuda, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general for health, security and the environment, told a news conference Wednesday in Beijing. The virus appears to be transmitted more easily from poultry to humans than H5N1, Fukuda said, referring to the strain responsible for the outbreak between 2004 and 2007, which claimed 332 lives. “This is definitely one of the most lethal influenza viruses that we have seen so far,” he said. The H7N9 strain was never known to infect people until March. Before then, it was only found in birds. If the virus does start to spread easily between people, it could trigger a pandemic. “This is a serious public health situation and it’s possible that a pandemic could start if this virus were to change to spread easily between people,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on its website. “CDC is preparing for that possibility.”

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

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Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 04:10 UTC
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Health authorities in east China’s Jiangxi Province late on Thursday confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 69-year-old man surnamed Xiong, a local retiree in the provincial capital of Nanchang, showed symptoms of high fever, tight chest and diarrhea, and was admitted to the No. 3 Hospital in Nanchang, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department. Xiong is in critical condition, said the statement. He had not left the city recently, nor had any contact with dead birds, but lives near a live poultry market, the statement said. The city’s disease control authority has quarantined 14 people who have had close contact with the patient. None of them have exhibited any abnormal symptoms. Three more new cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Thursday, two in Zhejiang Province and one in Henan Province. The National Health and Family Planning Commission said in its Wednesday update that the total number of H7N9 cases reported in the mainland stood at 110, including 23 cases that have ended in death. Most of the cases were reported in east China’s Shanghai Municipality and the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

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Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 15:14 UTC
Description
Six more cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Friday in the Chinese provinces of Fujian, Jiangsu, Jiangxi and Zhejiang. Health authorities in southeast China’s Fujian Province confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 65-year-old man surnamed Luo, a local resident from Gaopo township, Yongding County, Longyan City, showed symptoms of repeated coughing, low fever and a tight chest on April 18. He tested positive for the H7N9 virus at 11 a.m. on Friday by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Thirty-seven people who have been in close contact with Luo have not shown any abnormal symptoms so far. Also, three men, aged 36, 49 and 60, from three different cities, were confirmed to have caught H7N9 bird flu in Jiangsu Province, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department.

Two of them were in serious condition, said the statement. In neighboring Zhejiang Province, a 38-year-old farmer surnamed Li was confirmed to have contracted the H7N9 bird flu virus. Li, who is also in serious condition, is receiving treatment in hospital. In Jiangxi Province, health authorities confirmed the province’s second H7N9 bird flu case, a 76-year-old woman surnamed Xiong. She is in critical condition, according to a Jiangxi provincial health department statement. The case has no family or epidemiological connection with the province’s first case, a 69-year-old man also surnamed Xiong. Health experts found some of the chicken and ducks the woman, a farmer, raised had died, which may be connected with her infection of the virus.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

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Updated: Sunday, 28 April, 2013 at 04:07 UTC
Description
China’s deadly H7N9 bird flu outbreak has spread to the central province of Hunan, local health authorities say, the third announcement in three days of a case in a new location. A 64-year-old woman in Shaoyang City, who developed a fever four days after coming into contact with poultry, was confirmed to have the virus, the Xinhua state news agency reported on Saturday. It follows the first confirmed cases in the eastern province of Jiangxi on Thursday and the southeastern province of Fujian on Friday. More than 110 people in mainland China have been confirmed with H7N9, with 23 deaths, since the government announced on March 31 that the virus had been found in humans. Most cases have been confined to eastern China, while the island of Taiwan has also reported one case. A Chinese expert earlier this week warned of the possibility of more cases in a wider geographical area. “Until the source of H7N9 avian influenza is … brought under effective control, sporadic cases might continue to appear,” said Liang Wannian of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission. Poultry has been confirmed as the source of the H7N9 flu among humans but experts fear the prospect of such a virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, which could then have the potential to trigger a pandemic.