Tag Archive: Iraqi security forces


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Thu Dec 03, 2015 3:26

Popular Forces’ Commanders: Ramadi Liberation Operation Blocked by US

Popular Forces' Commanders: Ramadi Liberation Operation Blocked by US

TEHRAN (FNA)- Commanders of Iraq’s popular forces complain that the US is hindering the start of final phase of the operation to free Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province, from ISIL control.

“The US bargains and pressures on the Baghdad government have prevented accomplishment of Ramadi liberation operation,” Abu Yousef al-Khazali, a commander of Seyed al-Shohada battalion, told FNA on Thursday.

“The US has long been seeking to force the government to stop using the popular forces in military operations against ISIL, specially in the liberation operations conducted in different Iraqi regions,” he added.

Also, Karim al-Nouri, the spokesman of Iraq’s popular forces, told FNA that the “the Americans’ interference has distorted plans to free Ramadi”.

He added that “the Americans are not serious about bringing the battles to an end”.

A commander of Iraq’s volunteer forces (Hashd al-Shaabi) complained in similar remarks that the US meddling in the fight against the ISIL has impeded their victory over the Takfiri terrorist group and prevented them from winning back the strategic cities of Ramadi and Fallujah.

“The US meddling prevents the Iraqi army and popular forces from concluding their battles against the ISIL in Ramadi and Fallujah cities,” Commander of Imam Khamenei Battalion Haidar al-Hosseini al-Ardavi told FNA on Sunday.

He noted that the US is doing its best to prevent mop-up operations by the popular forces in Anbar province.

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Washington’s Double Life? Iraqis Accuse US of Being in Cahoots With Daesh

© Sputnik/ Grigoriy Sysoev

World

15:06 03.12.2015(updated 15:07 03.12.2015) 

Suspicion that the US is collaborating with Daesh (also known as ISIL/The Islamic State), instead of fighting the military group, is spreading among Iraqis, primarily due to the country’s minimalist approach toward the crisis.

To Americans, accusations that the US government is helping Daesh may seem ludicrous. However, many Iraqi fighters and civilians claim they have seen evidence of collusion between the US and the notorious terrorist group citing, for instance, videos allegedly showing US helicopters airdropping weapons to the militants, The Washington Post reported.

The idea that the US is supporting Daesh is being persistently promoted via social media and voiced in parliament by Shiite politicians in Iraq, US military officials claim. In one popular video, recently released on a Shiite militia group’s Facebook page, a lawmaker with the country’s biggest militia group, the Badr Organization, waves seemingly new US military MREs (meals ready to eat), allegedly found at a recently seized Daesh base in Baiji, saying it is proof that the US supports terrorists.The US military’s Baghdad-based spokesman Colonel Steve Warren said the charges are “beyond ridiculous.”

“The Iranians and the Iranian-backed Shiite militias are really pushing this line of propaganda, that the United States is supporting ISIL,” he said. “There’s clearly no one in the West who buys it, but unfortunately, this is something that a segment of the Iraqi population believes.”

FILE: Protesters throw stones at Iraqi security forces during an anti-government demonstration in Falluja, Iraq, January 25, 2013.
FILE: Protesters throw stones at Iraqi security forces during an anti-government demonstration in Falluja, Iraq, January 25, 2013.

Reports Saturday say the Iraqi government has lost control of Fallujah to al-Qaida militants after days of fighting.

A senior security official told the French news agency that Fallujah is under the control of ISIS – a reference to the al-Qaida-linked group, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

Witnesses says there are no signs of government forces inside the Anbar province city, which is only 60 kilometers west of Baghdad.

On Friday, al-Qaida militants raised their flag over government buildings in Fallujah and declared an independent Islamic state.

Witnesses said the militants cut power lines in the city late Friday and ordered residents not to use backup generators.

A local journalist who asked for anonymity out of fear of retribution told The Washington Post that police and other government-aligned forces had abandoned the city and that al-Qaida had burned all Iraqi national flags.

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Wars and Rumors of War :  War on terror   /   Blow back

Published on Sep 9, 2012 by

At least 30 people have been killed in a series of attacks in Iraq. Violence in the country has been escalating in recent months.

Insurgents have killed at least 39 people in a wave of attacks against Iraqi security forces, officials say
Insurgents have killed at least 64 people in a wave of attacks against Iraqi security forces.

They gunned down soldiers at an army post and bombed police recruits waiting in line to apply for jobs, officials said.

The violence, which struck at least a dozen cities and wounded 285 people, highlighted militant attempts to sow havoc in the country and undermine the government.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attacks, but security forces are a frequent target of al-Qaida’s Iraq branch, which has vowed to reassert itself and take back areas it was forced from before US troops withdrew from the country last year.

In Sunday’s deadliest attack, gunmen stormed a small Iraqi Army outpost in the town of Dujail before dawn, killing at least 10 soldiers and wounding eight more.

Hours later, a car bomb struck a group of police recruits waiting in line to apply for jobs with the state-run Northern Oil Co outside the northern city of Kirkuk. Seven recruits were killed and 17 wounded. All the recruits were Sunni Muslims.

The carnage stretched into the country’s south, where bombs stuck to two parked cars exploded in the Shiite-dominated city of Nasiriyah, southeast of Baghdad. A local official said two people were killed and three were wounded at the hotel, and one Iraqi policeman was wounded at the French consulate.

A string of smaller attacks also struck nine other cities, including Baghdad. Roadside bombs killed 17 people in Baghdad, including security forces, in four separate strikes. Also, gunmen killed three security officers and wounded a fourth at a checkpoint in the town of Abu Ghraib. Two gunmen were killed in the firefight, and a third was captured.

The rest of the attacks were car bombs that hit cities stretching from the southern port city of Basra, Iraq’s second largest, to the city of Tal Afar northwest of Baghdad, near the Syrian border.

A statement by Iraq’s Interior Ministry blamed al Qaida for the onslaught. “The attacks today on the markets and mosques are to provoke sectarian and political tensions,” the statement said. “Our war against terrorism is continuing, and we are ready.”