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Tag Archive: Health


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There are numerous benefits of licorice root that people have taken advantage of for centuries. Licorice or liquorice comes from the Glycyrrhiza plant species and is valued for its rich flavor. Used for centuries to sweeten drinks, licorice extract is still widely used today in candies, gum, soft drinks and herbal teas.

8 Amazing Health Benefits Of Licorice Root

Immune system
Licorice root to stimulate the immune system, and it is very helpful for people who have auto immune diseases such as Lupus, scleroderma or rheumatoid arthritis.

Healthy hair and skin
Licorice root extract is often used in natural soaps, shampoos, body washes, and deodorants to ward off dandruff, athlete’s foot, skin rash, psoriasis and hyperpigmentation.

Menopause
The phytoestrogenic and antioxidant activity of Licorice Root is believed to be helpful for hormonal disorders such as fatigue, mood swings, and hot flashes in menopausal women.

Protects Your Liver
Licorice also helps treat liver disorders, such as jaundice, hepatitis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Its natural antioxidant property protects the liver from damage due to free radicals and toxic materials.

Fights Arthritis
This herb has anti-inflammatory properties that can help treat chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
It has an aspirin-like action that can help soothe pain and swelling, two common symptoms of arthritis. It reduces free-radical damage that causes inflammation and pain.

Gastric Disorders
Liquorice is used in a number of ways to cure various gastrointestinal and stomach conditions. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, it is used to treat colic, heartburn, and chronic gastris (inflammation of the lining of the stomach).

Hepatitis
The anti-inflammatory properties of liquorice cure hepatitis-associated liver inflammation. Liquorice is also said to fight the hepatitis C virus and supplies valuable antioxidant compounds that help maintain the overall health of the liver.

Obesity
Licorice extracts may also be effective in preventing obesity. The anti-obesity action of licorice flavonoid oil indicated a significant reduction in the presence of abdominal adipose tissues and triglycerides levels of the body.

Ginger Licorice Tea Recipe

Ingredients:

2 quarts water
¼ cup licorice root
1 finger’s length fresh ginger, sliced

Instructions:

Fill a pot with 2 quarts of water
Add the licorice root and fresh ginger
Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes
Pour tea through a small mesh strainer piping hot into mugs and serve.

Reference and sources:

http://www.top10homeremedies.com/kitchen-ingredients/top-10-health-benefits-of-licorice-root-mulethi.html

http://www.yummly.com/recipe/external/Ginger-licorice-tea-345640

http://www.naturalalternativeremedy.com/nine-health-benefits-of-licorice-root/

http://www.hugatreewithme.com/health-benefits-of-licorice-root/

 

About NaturalNews

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network is owned and operated by Truth Publishing International, Ltd., a Taiwan corporation. It is not recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit in the United States, but it operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books other than reimbursement for items purchased in order to conduct product reviews.

The vast majority of our content is freely given away at no charge. We offer thousands of articles and dozens of downloadable reports and guides (like the Honest Food Guide) that are designed to educate and empower individuals, families and communities so that they may experience improved health, awareness and life fulfillment.

Learn More About Natural News Here

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Prevent Disease

 

May 6, 2014 by MARCO TORRES

 

You don’t need milk or yogurt to benefit from highly bioavailable sources of calcium. In fact, contrary to popular belief, most dairy products do not possess any type of calcium that is easily absorbed in the body. Here are some of the best foods you can eat with both high nutrient density and high bioavailable calcium.

The pasteurization process involved in the manufacture of most dairy products creates calcium carbonate, which has absolutely no way of entering the cells without a chelating agent. When we drink milk, the body pulls the calcium from the bones and other tissues in order to buffer the calcium carbonate in the blood. This process weakens gradually weakens bones, not make them stronger. It’s one of the reasons we have such high rates of osteoporosis in the United States.

Milk also has little to no nutrient density because pasteurization destroys enzymes, diminishes vitamin content, denatures fragile milk proteins, destroys vitamins C, B12 and B6, and kills beneficial bacteria. It’s the main reason pasteurized milk promotes pathogens and is associated with allergies, increased tooth decay, colic in infants, growth problems in children, osteoporosis, arthritis, heart disease and cancer.

Many natural food sources have high bioavailable calcium, meaning they are absorbed and becomes available for the body to utilize physiologically after consumption. Nutrient density is the ratio of nutrient content to the total energy content. Thus, nutrient-dense foods are those foods that provide substantial amounts of vitamins and minerals and relatively few calories.

Many natural food sources have high bioavailable calcium, meaning they are absorbed and becomes available for the body to utilize physiologically after consumption. Nutrient density is the ratio of nutrient content to the total energy content. Thus, nutrient-dense foods are those foods that provide substantial amounts of vitamins and minerals and relatively few calories.

Eating a combination of these 20 foods will give you all the calcium and nutrient density you’ll ever need.

In order of highest calcium:

1) Dried Herbs (Dried Basil, Thyme, Marjoram, Rosemary, Dill)
2113mg per 100 grams

2) Sesame Seeds
975mg per 100 grams

3) Chia Seeds (Dried)
631mg per 100 grams

4) Fireweed Leaves
429mg per 100 grams

5) Sardines
382mg per 100 grams

6) Grape Leaves
289mg per 100 grams

7) Chili Powder
278mg per 100 grams

8) Almonds
264mg per 100 grams

9) Flaxseeds
255mg per 100 grams

10) Collards Raw
232mg per 100 grams

11) Natto
217mg per 100 grams

12) Amaranth Greens (Chinese Spinach, Hinn Choy, Yin Tsoi, Rajgira, Bayam, Kulitis, Callaloo)
215mg per 100 grams

13) Garlic
181mg per 100 grams

14) Kelp (Seaweed)
168mg per 100 grams

15) Lotus Seeds
163mg per 100 grams

16) Brazil Nuts

160mg per 100 grams

17) Parsley
138mg per 100 grams

18) Dark Green Leafy Vegetables (Spinach, Swiss Chard, Beet Greens, Kale)
99mg per 100 grams Raw

19) Rhubarb
86mg per 100 grams

20) Fish (Herring, Pike, Bass, Perch, Rainbow Trout, Pollock)
74mg per 100 grams cooked

Marco Torres is a research specialist, writer and consumer advocate for healthy lifestyles. He holds degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science and is a professional speaker on topics such as disease prevention, environmental toxins and health policy.

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Prevent Disease

 

April 29, 2014 by MARTINO CANDIOSO

High-Protein Breakfasts Help Maintain Glucose and Insulin Control

Eating breakfast is a valuable strategy to control appetite and regulate food intake. Your choice of foods can either increase or decrease your appetite throughout the day. Researchers have found that when women consume high-protein breakfasts, they maintain better glucose and insulin control than they did with lower-protein or no-protein meals.

Compared to breakfast skipping, a protein breakfast leads to increased fullness and reductions in hunger throughout morning. fMRI results have shown that brain activation in regions controlling food motivation and reward was reduced prior to lunch time when breakfast was consumed in the morning. Additionally, the higher protein breakfast led to even greater changes in appetite, satiety and reward-driven eating behavior compared to the normal protein breakfast.

In healthy individuals, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases after eating. When glucose increases, levels of insulin increase to carry the glucose to the rest of the body. Previous research has shown that extreme increases in glucose and insulin in the blood can lead to poor glucose control and increase an individual’s risk of developing diabetes over time. The University of Missouri research has found that when women consumed high-protein breakfasts, they maintained better glucose and insulin control than they did with lower-protein or no-protein meals.

Breakfast skipping has been strongly associated with unhealthy snacking, overeating (especially at night), weight gain and obesity. Approximately 60 percent of adolescents skip breakfast on a daily basis.

Health experts at the University of Ulster said memory and attention tests found boys did better when they were a little hungry while girls were best after a satisfying morning meal.

“For women, eating more protein in the morning can beneficially affect their glucose and insulin levels,” said Heather Leidy, an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology. “If you eat healthy now and consume foods that help you control your glucose levels, you may be protecting yourself from developing diabetes in the future.”

Consuming 30 grams of protein at breakfast can increases the rate of muscle protein synthesis by 50 percent in young and older adults.

Kevin Maki, of Biofortis Clinical Research, completed the study in collaboration with Leidy. They studied women aged 18-55 years old who consumed one of three different meals or only water on four consecutive days. The tested meals were less than 300 calories per serving and had similar fat and fiber contents. However, the meals varied in amount of protein: a pancake meal with three grams of protein; a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 30 grams of protein; or a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 39 grams protein. Researchers monitored the amount of glucose and insulin in the participants’ blood for four hours after they ate breakfast. The point was not to assess the health of the meals but rather the protein content.

Although levels of fats and sugars have been shown to influence the desire to eat, protein molecules regulate appetite.

“Both protein-rich breakfasts led to lower spikes in glucose and insulin after meals compared to the low-protein, high-carb breakfast,” Maki said. “Additionally, the higher-protein breakfast containing 39 grams of protein led to lower post-meal spikes compared to the high-protein breakfast with 30 grams of protein.”

These findings suggest that, for healthy women, the consumption of protein-rich breakfasts leads to better glucose control throughout the morning than the consumption of low-protein options, Leidy said.

“Since most American women consume only about 10-15 grams of protein during breakfast, the 30-39 grams might seem like a challenging dietary change,” Leidy said. “However, one potential strategy to assist with this change might include the incorporation of prepared convenience meals, such as those included in this study.”

“Incorporating a healthy breakfast containing protein-rich foods can be a simple strategy for people to stay satisfied longer, and therefore, be less prone to snacking,” Leidy said. “People reach for convenient snack foods to satisfy their hunger between meals, but these foods are almost always high in sugar and fat and add a substantial amount of calories to the diet. These findings suggest that a protein-rich breakfast might be an effective strategy to improve appetite control and prevent overeating in young people.”

Leidy said the study provides a good model to initially examine the effect of higher-protein breakfasts on glucose and insulin responses since only healthy, non-diabetic women with appropriate glucose control were included in the study. Based on the study’s findings, the researchers are hopeful that the consumption of protein-rich breakfasts also would benefit individuals with pre-diabetes, although future research is needed to confirm.

The research, “Acute Effects of Higher Protein, Sausage and Egg-based Convenience Breakfast Meals on Postprandial Glucose Homeostasis in Healthy, Premenopausal Women,” will be presented at the 2014 Experimental Biology meeting this week in San Diego, Calif.

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In my video Alkaline Diets, Animal Protein, and Calcium Loss I presented evidence challenging the notion that our body is buffering the acid formed from our diet with calcium from our bones. How then is our body neutralizing the acid? Maybe with our muscles! Our blood gets more acidic as we age and our kidney function declines, and this may be a reason we lose muscle mass as we get older. As a pair of researchers note: “The modern Western diet based on animal products generates an acid load that may cause a lifespan state of unnoticed and growing metabolic acidosis.” This chronic low-level diet-dependent metabolic acidosis might contribute to the progressive shrinking of our muscle mass as we age.

Muscle wasting appears to be an adaptive response to acidosis. When our muscles break down, amino acids are released into the bloodstream. Our liver can then take these amino acids and make something called glutamine, which our kidneys can use to get rid of excess acid. And indeed, in a three year study I profile in the above video, those over age 65 eating alkaline diets were better able to preserve their muscle mass, which the researchers think may be because the alkaline-producing fruits and vegetables helped relieve the mild acidosis that occurs with the ingestion of the standard American diet.

So what should we think about the latest review’s question, “Does an alkaline diet benefit health?” If the question is “Does a diet low in meat, eggs, and dairy—all acid-producing—and high in fruits and vegetables with lots of dark green leafies benefit health?” then of course the answer is yes, an alkaline diet benefits health. But if the question is “Does it matter what our “peeH” is (whether our urine is acid or alkaline) regardless of what actually goes into your mouth?” then the answer is… still yes, but the accepted benefits of having alkaline urine appear limited to two areas: lower risk of kidney stones and better uric acid clearance.

Read More Here

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Lucas Camacho

Even a $1 donation will help make a difference.  Help make a difference Today.

Lucas Camacho Personal Image

Join me in my efforts to support Jump Rope For Heart or Hoops For Heart! Even the smallest of donations make a big difference.

Earned Badges

I need your support!Hi,

We only have one heart! I want to take care of mine and help you take care of yours too! This year, I have set a personal goal to raise money for the American Heart Association at my school.
Heart Disease can happen to anyone so it’s really important to be physically active and eat healthy. Did you know that heart disease is our nation’s number one killer? Help me become a lifesaver!
Will you make a donation to help me reach my goal? It’s fast and easy to do on my personal webpage. Just use the link below to support me today!
Your contribution will support the American Heart Association’s work to:
– Put up-to-the-minute research into doctors’ hands so they can better prevent and treat heart disease among patients.
– Fund groundbreaking pediatric heart and stroke research.
– Train more than 9 million health professionals and others each year in emergency cardiovascular care.
Please support me in my efforts – together we can save lives! Thank you very much!

Follow This Link to visit my personal web page and help me in my efforts to support YM-GSA

…..

I’m joining millions of others to help save lives with the American Heart Association!

At my school, I’m learning how I can help make a difference by raising lifesaving donations to help kids with heart disease. I’m also learning about my own heart, and how to keep it healthy. And I’m getting active!

I’m excited about raising money for other kids – kids with hearts that don’t exactly work right and to help fund new medicines and treatments to be discovered.

Please help me make a difference! Thank you!

Welcome to the Donation Page of

Lucas Camacho

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Tess Pennington
Ready Nutrition

Being well-nourished during a disaster can mean the difference between powering through the event with strength, stamina and energy or plodding through the situation barely able to put one foot in front of the other.

One often overlooked component of the prepper’s pantry is protein.  This vital nutrient:

  • Helps with the repair and building of muscle tissue
  • Helps the body heal from injuries
  • Provides long-lasting stamina
  • Helps boost the immune system

Protein is stored throughout the body. It can be found in muscles, bones, hemoglobin, myoglobin, hormones, antibodies, and enzymes. In fact, protein makes up nearly 45% of the human body. Without a steady supply, body functions will cease to operate effectively.

Protein is often thought of as one of the more challenging items to stockpile for an extended period of time. Most people think of a freezer full of juicy steaks and roasts when they contemplate protein. They feel that the next resort is tins of highly processed meat pieces.  The good news is, there are many ways to add muscle-building nutrients to your long term food storage without resorting to a sodium laden closet full of Spam.

To see a breakdown of protein amounts in food sources, click here.

Although pantry basics such as dry non-fat milk powder and powdered cheeses offer protein for the diet, there are other food sources to consider. Here are the top 5 healthy (and tasty) protein sources to add to your stockpile:

Beans

Beans are more than just a vegetarian staple.  While beans can stand on their own as a delicious protein source, adding beans to a dish that contains meat can stretch your budget by providing lots of protein while using less meat.

Due to their high fiber content, beans prevent blood sugar levels from rising too rapidly after a meal, making this food source an excellent choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. Having a high fiber food source also helps to slow the rate of absorption of carbohydrate thus making it a more energy efficient food source.

Dried beans provide the most bang for your food storage buck. They are one of the most low cost food sources on the market. The canned variety will prove to be more fuel efficient. Canned beans can often be purchased on sale. Plain canned beans and beans in barbecue sauce can provide instant nutrition in the event of a power outage.  If you don’t want to eat beans that have been processed, it’s easy to can your own.  Click here for directions on preserving homemade pork and beans.

Store dried beans in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers, then placed the sealed bags inside large plastic food grade buckets for added protection.  Click here for details.

Chia Seeds

The Chia seed is a tiny little powerhouse that can add a lot of benefits to your long-term food storage while only taking up a small amount of space. The word “Chia” is actually the Mayan word for strength. In ancient cultures, they are considered the food of the warrior because of their nutrient density and ability to sustain running messengers for long durations without other food.

Chia seeds have double the amount of protein found in other seeds, as well as many other nutritional benefits.

  • 2x the protein of other seeds
  • 5x the calcium of milk
  • 2x the potassium of bananas
  • 3x the antioxidants of blueberries
  • 3x the iron of spinach

Chia seeds can be sprinkled dry on top of other foods, they can be sprouted or they can be soaked to create a tasteless gel to stir into soups or sauces.

Chia seeds can be stored for 2-4 years in a cool, dry place. They can be stored in large glass jars or Mylar bags.

Click here to learn more about the nutritional value and uses of Chia seeds.

Read More Here

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DrBones NurseAmy DrBones NurseAmy

Published on Jan 15, 2014

Are Preppers normal? Dr Bones answers the question that 97% of the population is asking. http://www.DoomandBloom.Net for more articles and information about medical preparedness.

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I Am Happier, Heavier

Posted: 01/06/2014 10:08 am

 

Rachel Oh Uiginn Estapa

It’s not insane to believe that once you lose weight, life gets better.

For years, I heard stories from those who have shed pounds, recharged their lives, never felt better, and speak so confidently that once the weight was gone, they became the person they were meant to be: a thin and happy one.

I do not doubt their happiness when they share their story, but I also don’t believe that by losing weight, they have some superior knowledge about happiness that us heavier-folk don’t. How do I know this? I’ve been fat and thinner. And I’ve been at my happiest, heavier.

End of high school and into college, I was BIG and used to decline attending parties because I didn’t remotely have anything cute to wear, so I hid behind sarcasm and baggy shirts. And dating-wise… wait, WHAT dating life?

Midway through my freshman year of college I joined Weight Watchers and the gym, becoming obsessed with both. Within seven months, I lost 55 pounds, fit into a size ten and even felt sexy for about fifteen minutes!

But as the scale dipped lower and the compliments on my weight-loss wore off, something else emerged: I felt exhausted, disappointed and still unhappy.

“Ugh, I just can’t keep this up…” I recall saying to myself after a Weight Watchers meeting, of which was my lowest weigh-in ever. I felt defeated and broken that after all my effort, not much beyond the scale changed.

 

Read More Here

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NHK Documentary: “The Origins Of Disease” Episode 2: Stroke

missingsky102 missingsky102

 

Published on Dec 12, 2013

This episode focuses on the origin of stroke which is occurring in one person every two minutes in Japan.

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Medical Marijuana

Published by Jan

Bell’s Palsy-

Bell’s palsy, or idiopathic facial paralysis, is a form of facial paralysis resulting from dysfunction cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve) that results in the inability to control facial muscles on the affected side.  Several conditions can cause facial paralysis, e.g., brain tumor, stroke, and Lyme disease.  However, if no specific cause can be identified, the condition is known as Bell’s palsy.  Named after Scottish anatomist Charles Bell, who first described it.  Bell’s palsy is the most common acutemononeuropathy (disease involving only one nerve) and is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis.
Bell’s palsy is defined as an idiopathic unilateral facial nerve paralysis, usually self-limiting.  The hallmark of this condition is a rapid onset of partial or complete palsy that often occurs overnight.  In rare cases (1%), it can occur bilaterally resulting in total facial paralysis.
It is thought that an inflammatory condition leads to swelling of the facial nerve.  The nerve travels through the skull in a narrow bone canal beneath the ear. Nerve swelling and compression in the narrow bone canal are thought to lead to nerve inhibition, damage or death.  No readily identifiable cause for Bell’s palsy has been found.
Corticosteroids have been found to improve outcomes while anti-viral drugs have not.   Early treatment is necessary for steroids to be effective.  Most people recover spontaneously and achieve near-normal to normal functions.  Many show signs of improvement as early as 10 days after the onset, even without treatment.
Often the eye in the affected side cannot be closed.  The eye must be protected from drying up, or the cornea may be permanently damaged resulting in impaired vision. Causes, incidence, and risk factors
Bell’s palsy affects about 30,000 – 40,000 people a year in the United States.
Bell’s palsy involves damage to the seventh cranial (facial) nerve. This nerve controls the movement of the muscles of the face.
Bell’s palsy is thought to be due to swelling (inflammation) of this nerve in the area where it travels through the bones of the skull.
The cause is often not clear.  A type of herpes infection called herpes zoster might be involved.  Other conditions that may cause Bell’s palsy include:
? HIV infection
? Lyme disease
? Middle ear infection
? Sarcoidosis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

.
Symptoms

Sometimes you may have a cold shortly before the symptoms of Bell’s palsy begin.
Symptoms most often start suddenly, but may take 2 – 3 days to show up.  They do not become more severe after that.  Sudden weakness or paralysis on one side of the face that causes it to droop.
Symptoms are almost always on one side only.  They may range from mild to severe.
The face will feel stiff or pulled to one side, and may look different.  Other symptoms can include:
? Difficulty eating and drinking; food falls out of one side of the mouth
? Drooling due to lack of control over the muscles of the face
? Drooping of the face, such as the eyelid or corner of the mouth
? Hard to close one eye
? Problems smiling, grimacing, or making facial expressions
? Twitching or weakness of the muscles in the face
Other symptoms that may occur:
? Dry eye or mouth
? Headache
? Loss of sense of taste
? Sound that is louder in one ear (hyperacusis)
? Twitching in face

Treatment

Often, no treatment is needed.  Symptoms often begin to improve right away.  However, it may take weeks or even months for the muscles to get stronger, and this may be frustrating.
Your health care provider may give you lubricating eye drops or eye ointments to keep the surface of the eye moist if you cannot close it completely.  You may need to wear an eye patch while you sleep.
Sometimes medicines may be used, but it is not clear how much they help.  If medicines are used, they should be started right away.
• Corticosteroids may reduce swelling around the facial nerve
• Medications can fight the virus that may be causing Bell’s palsy
Surgery to relieve pressure on the nerve (decompression surgery) is controversial and has not been shown to routinely benefit people with Bell’s palsy.
The goal of the treatment is to eliminate the source of the nerve damage.  Patients with less nerve damage have better chances of recovery.
Medications are often used as part of the treatment:

• If  infection is the cause, then an antibiotic to fight bacteria (as in middle ear infections) or antiviral agents (to fight syndromes caused by viruses like Ramsay Hunt) may be used.

• If swelling is believed to be responsible for the facial nerve disorder, steroids are often prescribed.

• In certain circumstances, surgical removal of the bone around the nerve (decompression surgery) may be appropriate.

Physiotherapy
Physiotherapy can be beneficial to some individuals with Bell’s palsy as it helps to maintain muscle tone of the affected facial muscles and stimulate the facial nerve.   It is important that muscle re-education exercises and soft tissue techniques be implemented prior to recovery in order to help prevent permanent contractures of the paralyzed facial muscles.   Muscle re-education exercises are also useful in restoring normal movement.   To reduce pain, heat can be applied to the affected side of the face.   In individuals with unresolved facial nerve paralysis, transcutaneous electrical stimulation can be an effective treatment strategy(TENS).

• Exercise the facial muscles in front of a mirror.
• Massage the face.
• Apply gentle heat to reduce pain.
• Using a finger, regularly close the eye to keep it moist.
• Tape the eye closed for sleeping.
• Use protective glasses or clear eye patches to keep the eye moist and to keep foreign materials
from entering the eye.
• Use doctor-recommended artificial tears or an ointment to keep the eye moist.

Read More Here

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Medical Marijuana – Cerebral Palsy (Jacqueline Patterson)

Luke Slisz Luke Slisz

Published on Jul 2, 2011

Cerebal Palsy is an umbrella term encompassing a group of non-progressive, non-contagious motor conditions that cause physical disability in human development, chiefly in the various areas of body movement – Wikipedia

At some point very early in life, either while a baby is still growing in the womb, during birth or shortly after, something happens to interfere with the normal development of the brain or to injure the brain tissues. This abnormal development or injury disrupts the nerve signals between the brain and the muscles, leading to problems with movement, posture and coordination as the child grows up. While some people are severely affected, others have only minor disruption, depending on which parts of the brain are not functioning properly. It’s estimated that as many as 1 in every 400 children may have cerebral palsy. – BBC Health

After Jacqueline was reported for cannabis possession, she moved to California after succeeding in a court case that the consumption was strictly for medicinal purposes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y–pjK…

These clips are taken from the documentary ‘In Pot We Trust’ which displays a range of medical, social and political views and the medical purposes of marijuana in relation to Glaucoma, Leukaemia, Multiple Sclerosis, Multiple Exostoses and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qTsS6…

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Dr Sanjay Gupta Apologizes For ‘Systematically Misleading Americans’ About Marijuana Cannabis

MrCensorMe3

Published on Aug 7, 2013
Aired May ,2013

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In Pot We Trust – Marijuana Cannabis

thepotroast thepotroast

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