Tag Archive: Greenville


Soldier and the mysterious photo that was found in his collar
February 22, 2014

According to Friday’s ABC News, Soldier, the pit bull who was found with an old, black and white photo tucked into his collar has a new home with a woman who lives in Dryden, Va.in Greenville, S.C., has found a home.

Soldier was picked up as a stray in mid-January, and the mysterious photo discovered in his collar, which showed a man who appeared to be in a military uniform, generated a great deal of intrigue and interest. Thanks to that intrigue, his story quickly spread nationwide.

The initial hope was that Soldier’s true owner would be found and that the pair would be reunited, but that never happened.

Instead, Soldier has a new home with a woman who lives in Dryden, Va., who has experience with pit bulls. Soldier’s new guardian, Julie Hensley, a 50-year-old attorney, dog rescuer and “pit bull enthusiast.”

Read More Here

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Earth Watch Report  –  Earthquakes

 photo California-101EQsMay18th-29th2013_zpsba621e69.jpg

California – 101 EQs May 18th – 29th 2013 Map of Seismic Activirty last 30 days

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  1. M3.1 – 6km WNW of Isla Vista, California

    2013-05-29 22:19:02-05:00 10.3 km deep

  2. M2.8 – 3km W of Ridgemark, California

    2013-05-29 16:13:36-05:00 12.5 km deep

  3. M2.5 – 7km W of Isla Vista, California

    2013-05-29 14:05:12-05:00 9.3 km deep

  4. M2.7 – 20km SE of Downieville, California

     2013-05-29 11:24:05-05:00 0.5 km deep

  5. M2.6 – 8km W of Isla Vista, California

     2013-05-29 10:38:40-05:00 10.3 km deep

  6. M2.6 – 6km WNW of Isla Vista, California

    2013-05-29 09:50:02-05:00 9.5 km deep

  7. M4.8 – 5km W of Isla Vista, California

     2013-05-29 09:38:03-05:00 8.0 km deep

  8. M2.5 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-27 20:49:20-05:00 0.9 km deep

  9. M2.5 – 3km NNE of San Ramon, California

    2013-05-27 13:41:54-05:00 18.9 km deep

  10. M2.6 – 15km SW of Westwood, California

    2013-05-27 10:44:38-05:00 1.3 km deep

  11. M2.6 – 6km W of Greenville, California

    2013-05-27 06:20:22-05:00 0.0 km deep

  12. M2.5 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-27 03:16:07-05:00 1.1 km deep

  13. M2.6 – 11km W of Greenville, California

     2013-05-27 01:11:15-05:00 6.8 km deep

  14. M2.6 – 11km W of Greenville, California

    2013-05-27 00:41:11-05:00 0.0 km deep

  15. M3.0 – 10km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-26 19:44:46-05:00 6.3 km deep

  16. M2.5 – 15km SE of Chester, California

     2013-05-26 15:54:06-05:00 2.7 km deep

  17. M3.3 – 9km NW of Avenal, California

     2013-05-26 09:01:08-05:00 10.1 km deep

  18. M2.6 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-26 04:24:31-05:00 0.0 km deep

  19. M2.6 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-26 03:46:58-05:00 0.0 km deep

  20. M3.3 – 11km W of Greenville, California

    2013-05-26 03:03:23-05:00 0.0 km deep

  21. M3.0 – 12km W of Greenville, California

     2013-05-26 02:56:20-05:00 0.0 km deep

  22. M2.7 – 14km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-26 02:07:05-05:00 0.1 km deep

  23. M2.8 – 13km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-26 01:25:49-05:00 6.3 km deep

  24. M3.3 – 18km SW of Fort Irwin, California

    2013-05-25 20:58:30-05:00 1.8 km deep

  25. M2.7 – 1km NNW of The Geysers, California

     2013-05-25 19:29:01-05:00 2.2 km deep

  26. M3.4 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-25 17:27:39-05:00 11.5 km deep

  27. M3.5 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-25 13:43:03-05:00 7.9 km deep

  28. M2.9 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-25 12:35:12-05:00 2.7 km deep

  29. M2.6 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-25 10:04:09-05:00 0.1 km deep

  30. M2.6 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-25 09:48:10-05:00 0.0 km deep

  31. M2.7 – 10km SSE of San Juan Bautista, California

    2013-05-25 05:12:59-05:00 10.4 km deep

  32. M3.3 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 21:27:04-05:00 0.1 km deep

  33. M3.0 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 21:23:44-05:00 0.0 km deep

  34. M2.5 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 21:18:05-05:00 1.3 km deep

  35. M2.7 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 18:29:07-05:00 0.0 km deep

  36. M2.6 – 11km SW of Westwood, California

     2013-05-24 18:27:35-05:00 1.3 km deep

  37. M2.7 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 16:32:58-05:00 4.5 km deep

  38. M3.2 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 13:58:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  39. M3.2 – 13km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 13:48:31-05:00 0.1 km deep

  40. M2.8 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 13:43:19-05:00 7.9 km deep

  41. M2.9 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 13:22:06-05:00 4.8 km deep

  42. M2.6 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 13:16:58-05:00 0.0 km deep

  43. M2.7 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 12:36:46-05:00 8.1 km deep

  44. M2.5 – 7km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 11:29:53-05:00 0.0 km deep

  45. M2.6 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 11:29:10-05:00 0.0 km deep

  46. M3.9 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 10:26:21-05:00 9.8 km deep

  47. M2.9 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 08:18:54-05:00 6.3 km deep

  48. M2.5 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 07:36:14-05:00 1.0 km deep

  49. M2.8 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 06:59:08-05:00 0.0 km deep

  50. M3.8 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 06:40:15-05:00 3.1 km deep

  51. M3.6 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 06:40:04-05:00 5.5 km deep

  52. M2.8 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 06:21:38-05:00 4.7 km deep

  53. M2.8 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 06:12:41-05:00 4.0 km deep

  54. M3.6 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 04:52:19-05:00 5.9 km deep

  55. M4.0 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 04:42:52-05:00 5.9 km deep

  56. M3.1 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 03:23:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  57. M2.7 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 03:15:17-05:00 6.5 km deep

  58. M4.9 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 03:02:19-05:00 5.2 km deep

  59. M3.7 – 14km SW of Westwood, California

    2013-05-24 02:46:08-05:00 7.2 km deep

  60. M2.6 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 02:38:43-05:00 7.6 km deep

  61. M2.5 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 02:22:19-05:00 2.8 km deep

  62. M2.7 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 02:20:21-05:00 6.2 km deep

  63. M2.5 – 13km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 02:19:20-05:00 7.3 km deep

  64. M3.0 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-24 02:10:03-05:00 0.0 km deep

  65. M2.6 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 02:04:14-05:00 0.0 km deep

  66. M2.7 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 01:58:51-05:00 0.1 km deep

  67. M3.4 – 13km SSW of Westwood, California

     2013-05-24 01:44:58-05:00 0.0 km deep

  68. M2.8 – 12km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 01:37:28-05:00 1.3 km deep

  69. M3.0 – 10km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 01:31:06-05:00 0.0 km deep

  70. M2.7 – 8km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 01:12:52-05:00 3.4 km deep

  71. M2.8 – 9km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:57:27-05:00 5.0 km deep

  72. M3.0 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:46:56-05:00 0.0 km deep

  73. M2.9 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:39:43-05:00 0.0 km deep

  74. M3.0 – 13km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:24:42-05:00 8.5 km deep

  75. M2.8 – 8km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:18:23-05:00 0.2 km deep

  76. M2.7 – 7km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:13:46-05:00 2.5 km deep

  77. M2.9 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:09:13-05:00 0.1 km deep

  78. M2.7 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:06:15-05:00 0.2 km deep

  79. M3.4 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-24 00:01:56-05:00 6.6 km deep

  80. M3.4 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 23:58:58-05:00 4.9 km deep

  81. M3.4 – 9km NW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-23 23:58:08-05:00 0.0 km deep

  82. M2.7 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 23:44:43-05:00 8.1 km deep

  83. M2.7 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-23 23:40:30-05:00 9.0 km deep

  84. M2.5 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 23:25:19-05:00 0.1 km deep

  85. M2.5 – 10km SSW of Westwood, California

     2013-05-23 23:23:39-05:00 5.7 km deep

  86. M2.8 – 9km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 23:09:15-05:00 2.7 km deep

  87. M3.1 – 14km SW of Westwood, California

     2013-05-23 23:08:21-05:00 6.6 km deep

  88. M2.5 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     California 2013-05-23 23:04:09-05:00 9.3 km deep

  89. M3.4 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 22:55:56-05:00 10.3 km deep

  90. M3.4 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-23 22:55:31-05:00 6.1 km deep

  91. M3.3 – 11km NW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 22:51:20-05:00 11.2 km deep

  92. M4.2 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-23 22:50:28-05:00 11.4 km deep

  93. M4.6 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

     2013-05-23 22:48:57-05:00 14.0 km deep

  94. M5.7 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

    2013-05-23 22:47:08-05:00 11.0 km deep

  95. M2.7 – 33km SW of Rio Dell, California

    2013-05-22 16:26:44-05:00 22.6 km deep

  96. M2.8 – 4km SW of Niland, California

    2013-05-19 10:44:43-05:00 2.1 km deep

  97. M2.8 – 31km SSW of Ferndale, California

    2013-05-19 01:04:49-05:00 22.1 km deep

  98. M3.8 – 23km SW of Ferndale, California

    2013-05-18 10:54:04-05:00 25.1 km deep

  99. M2.6 – 24km SW of Ferndale, California

    2013-05-18 09:02:31-05:00 26.6 km deep

  100. M4.3 – 29km SW of Rio Dell, California

    2013-05-18 08:46:08-05:00 23.6 km deep

  101. M3.2 – 16km S of Rancho Palos Verdes, California

    2013-05-18 04:41:02-05:00 0.3 km deep

 

 

….’

M3.1 – 6km WNW of Isla Vista, California

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M4.8 – 5km W of Isla Vista, California

 

…..

 photo California-M48-5kmWofIslaVistaMay29th2013Tsunamiwarning_zpsc6e164b6.jpg

 

California – M4.8 – 5km W of Isla Vista May 29th 2013 Tsunami warning

 

 

….

M3.4 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.5 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.9 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.8 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.6 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M4.0 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M4.9 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.7 – 14km SW of Westwood, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M3.4 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

 

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

….

M3.4 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

 

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

….

M3.4 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M4.2 – 9km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M4.6 – 10km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

M5.7 – 11km WNW of Greenville, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

 

 

,,,,

 photo California-57mag-11kmWNWofGreenvilleMay23rd2013_zps1bf50fbd.jpg

California- 5.7mag – 11km WNW of Greenville May 23rd 2013 Tsunami warning

 

 

….

M3.8 – 23km SW of Ferndale, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

 

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M4.3 – 29km SW of Rio Dell, California

Contributed by Northern California Seismic Network, UC Berkeley & USGS Menlo Park

Instrumental Intensity

ShakeMap Intensity Image

 

….

Environmental

New study sheds light on debate over organic vs. conventional

by Staff Writers
Montreal, Canada (SPX) May 01, 2012


illustration only

Can organic agriculture feed the world? Although organic techniques may not be able to do the job alone, they do have an important role to play in feeding a growing global population while minimizing environmental damage, according to researchers at McGill University and the University of Minnesota.

A new study published in Nature concludes that crop yields from organic farming are generally lower than from conventional agriculture. That is particularly true for cereals, which are staples of the human diet – yet the yield gap is much less significant for certain crops, and under certain growing conditions, according to the researchers.

The study, which represents a comprehensive analysis of the current scientific literature on organic-to-conventional yield comparisons, aims to shed light on the often heated debate over organic versus conventional farming. Some people point to conventional agriculture as a big environmental threat that undercuts biodiversity and water resources, while releasing greenhouse gases. Others argue that large-scale organic farming would take up more land and make food unaffordable for most of the world’s poor and hungry.

“To achieve sustainable food security we will likely need many different techniques – including organic, conventional, and possible ‘hybrid’ systems – to produce more food at affordable prices, ensure livelihoods to farmers, and reduce the environmental costs of agriculture,” the researchers conclude.

Overall, organic yields are 25% lower than conventional, the study finds. The difference varies widely across crop types and species, however. Yields of legumes and perennials (such as soybeans and fruits), for example, are much closer to those of conventional crops, according to the study, conducted by doctoral student Verena Seufert and Geography professor Navin Ramankutty of McGill and Prof. Jonathan Foley of the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment.

What’s more, when best management practices are used for organic crops, overall yields are just 13% lower than conventional levels.

“These results suggest that today’s organic systems may nearly rival conventional yields in some cases – with particular crop types, growing conditions and management practices – but often they do not,” the researchers write. Improvements in organic management techniques, or adoption of organic agriculture under environmental conditions where it performs best, may help close the yield gap, they indicate.

“Our study indicates that organically fertilized systems might require higher nitrogen inputs to achieve high yields as organic nitrogen is less readily available to crops. In some cases, organic farmers may therefore benefit by making limited use of chemical fertilizers instead of relying only on manure to supply nitrogen to their crops,” Seufert says.

“At the same time, conventional agriculture can learn from successful organic systems and implement practices that have shown environmental benefits, such as increased crop diversity and use of crop residues.”

Yields are only part of a set of economic, social and environmental factors that should be considered when gauging the benefits of different farming systems, the researchers note.

“Maybe people are asking the wrong question,” Prof Ramankutty says. “Instead of asking if food is organically grown, maybe we should be asking if it’s sustainably grown.”

The results point to a need to get beyond the black-and-white, ideological debates that often pit advocates of organic and local foods against proponents of conventional agriculture, Prof. Foley adds. “By combining organic and conventional practices in a way that maximizes food production and social good while minimizing adverse environmental impact, we can create a truly sustainable food system.”

Related Links
McGill University
Farming Today – Suppliers and Technology

 

 

Pesticide exposure linked to brain changes: study

by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) April 30, 2012

When pregnant women are exposed to moderate levels of a common pesticide, their children may experience lasting changes in brain structure linked to lower intelligence, a US study said Monday.

The study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences examined New York City pregnant mothers who were tested for exposure to chlorpyrifos, or CPF, which is widely used for pest control in farms and public spaces.

The women in the study, which included 369 subjects total, took part prior to 2001 when CPF was banned from household use in the United States, though the chemical continues to be used worldwide in agriculture.

Researchers compared 20 children — age five to 11 — whose mothers tested highest for levels of CPF and found “significant abnormalities” in brain structure compared to 20 children whose mothers showed lower exposures.

However, all the women in the study were exposed at routine levels below the US established thresholds for acute exposure, indicating that even low to moderate exposure could pose hefty risks to a child’s brain development.

“The present study provides evidence that the prenatal period is a vulnerable time for the developing child,” said lead author, Virginia Rauh, professor at the Mailman School of Public Health and Deputy Director of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health.

“Toxic exposure during this critical period can have far-reaching effects on brain development and behavioral functioning.”

Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the children’s brains, which showed structural changes — some areas abnormally larger than usual, and some typical male-female differences in brain structure that were eliminated or reversed in the high pesticide group.

More study is needed to determine the long-term effects of the changes, which are “consistent with the IQ deficits previously reported in the children with high exposure levels of chlorpyrifos,” according to the research.

The study was the first to use MRI scans to confirm previous findings of brain structure changes in animals exposed to pesticide, the authors said.

“By combining brain imaging and community-based research, we now have much stronger evidence linking exposure to chlorpyrifos with neurodevelopmental problems,” said senior author Bradley Peterson, chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Researchers said previous studies have shown that urban levels of the chemical have dropped since the 2001 US restrictions were added, but that risks remain because it continues to be used in food and feed crops, wood treatments, and public spaces such as golf courses, parks and highway medians.

Related Links
Farming Today – Suppliers and Technology

 

 

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Cyber Space

 

Google Cozies up to Regulators

Published on May 1, 2012 by

After a lengthy investigation into Google’s harvesting of Americans’ e-mails, passwords, and all kinds of other sensitive information that was gathered through their Street View project, the FCC found that Google hadn’t violated any laws, but did obstruct the inquiry, and would have to pay a fine of $25,000. But Google is now fighting back. CNET’s Declan McCullagh joins the show.

 

 

Microsoft denies softening of CISPA support

By Brendan Sasso

Microsoft released a statement on Monday reaffirming its support for a controversial cybersecurity bill that cleared the House last week.

“Microsoft’s position remains unchanged,” Christina Pearson, a Microsoft spokeswoman, said in a statement to The Hill. “We supported the work done to pass cybersecurity bills last week in the House of Representatives and look forward to continuing to work with all stakeholders as the Senate takes up cybersecurity legislation.”

The statement shoots down reports that the technology company was wavering in its support of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA).

Microsoft was one of the earliest supports of CISPA. The company applauded Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) when they first introduced the bill last year.

“This bill is an important first step towards addressing significant problems in cyber security,” the company said at the time.

The goal of CISPA is to help companies beef up their defenses against hackers who steal business secrets, rob customers’ financial information and wreak havoc on computer systems. The bill would remove legal barriers that discourage companies from sharing information about cyber threats.

Read Full Article Here

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Community

Bus 52 Presents: The Generous Garden Project

Uploaded by on Feb 16, 2012

Behind a small health food store in Greenville, SC lies a large unused plot of land. That is, it was unoccupied until Bo Cable’s desire to help his community resulted in the creation of The Generous Garden Project. Now it is the site of a flurry of activity and a very successful vegetable garden.

After a life spent in the publishing industry, Bo started The Generous Garden Project after a simple idea he wrote down just would not go away. After being drawn to Greenville because of its high level of volunteerism and community involvement, Bo spent a lot of time thinking how he might be able to give back to his community.

Although he’d never thought of himself as a ‘green thumb,’ Bo’s childhood on the farm gave him the experience and work ethic that helped him make The Generous Garden Project what it is today.

The Generous Garden is not a community garden in the traditional sense. While volunteers and community members grow and nurture the garden’s herbs and vegetables – such as kale, broccoli, and zucchini – they are not the ones who will be enjoying them. All of the 100% organic produce goes to local food banks, shelters and single-parent families.

Bo saw from volunteering at shelters that most of the vegetables were frozen or canned. Very few shelters are able to offer fresh food and instead have to rely mostly on canned goods. The Generous Garden’s fresh, organic vegetables not only add color, but also nutrition to shelter meals across the Greenville area.

The project occupies a sizable plot with its own compost heap with which they fertilize their crops and a worm farm to add nutrients into the soil. A generous donor provided two greenhouses, one of which is fervently being built to provide shelter for the next crop’s seedlings.

The area that is currently planted is just a fraction of the land they rent. Bo is planning ahead to the time when they will have cleared and prepared even more of the fields to grow on.

There is more to Bo’s plan however. As well as growing vegetables and herbs for people who are not able to afford such fresh, organic fare, he wants to teach people the art of gardening. By inviting school groups as well as adults to the garden, he hopes to instill in them both the ability and the desire to grow food themselves. ‘Even if someone only has a window box, I can show them how to grow vegetables,’ he says.

Bo started the project thinking that it would be an excellent weekend activity. His plan of spending a leisurely few hours in the garden on Saturdays and Sundays has turned into a full-time job. Although he owns a web-development and marketing company, he now goes to the garden every day of the week, for several hours each day.

The Generous Garden Project started in April 2011 and in its first year, it grew and distributed 32,000 lbs of produce, the equivalent of over 21,000 meals. Bo’s plans are to continue expanding their yield while not compromising the quality of their produce. His hope is that the concept could be taken to other cities across the country, bringing the benefits of fresh produce and a communal love of gardening to communities just like Greenville.

For more information on The Generous Garden Project, and to find out how to volunteer for the project or to donate gardening supplies, visit their website and their Facebook page.

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Survival / Sustainability

Week 6 of 52: Evacuation Preparedness

Tess Pennington
Ready Nutrition

This week, we will concentrate on the evacuation aspect of preparedness.  Many who have first hand accounts of mass evacuations from Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita will tell you that it is not fun.   When we think of evacuations, we typically think of the mass exodus we witnessed on television with the aforementioned storms.  Depending on the area you live in, there are times when evacuations are more localized and require you to leave your community or town.  Being that I live in Houston, I not only have to worry about hurricane season, but I also have to worry about chemical leaks from the refineries in this area.  If a refinery emergency were to occur, I would have to leave immediately, thus giving my family only a few minutes to evacuate our home.

Having a pre-assembled bag with basic survival needs in place will expedite the evacuation process, as well as keep things running smoothly.  The main goal of having a 72-hour bag is to be equipped to survive for three days.  Therefore, keep your basic survival needs in mind: food, water, shelter, clothing, sanitation, medications/prescriptions.  In addition, I would also pack some extra emergency money or a credit card with enough money for gas and lodging  in case you run into a monetary issue.  Click here to get more details on preparing a 72 hour bag.

Preparing a bag for evacuations takes more time than one would think.  Taking survival needs into account  is one thing, but trying to collect prescriptions, children’s special items, and personal documents can be frustrating if you were under time constraints.  Preparing ahead of time for evacuations will cut down on the headaches, and keep you one step ahead.

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Are You Ready Series: Earthquake Preparedness

Tess Pennington
Ready Nutrition

The sudden strike of an earthquake can catch many off guard.  For those that live in earthquake prone areas, preparing ahead of time will keep a person as safe as possible during the turmoil that the earthquake brings.

Develop an Emergency Plan

When an unexpected event happens, many are confused and do not know what to do. Having a set disaster plan in place can help members of the family get to safety.

 Do research on local emergency management (American Red Cross, City Disaster Services, etc) systems and know what their disaster protocols are. 

Teach children about the different communication sources  available such as 9-1-1, and how to work a battery operated radio in order to listen for emergency information.  Additionally, all family members should know how to turn off the home utilities (emergency, gas and water).

Have an emergency plan in place.  This will help family members know exactly where to go and what to do.  The emergency plan should have a meeting place designated in the event that family members are separated.  Additionally, having a central contact outside of the disaster area that can relay messages can help a family stay in touch if separated.

Look for any hazards in the home.  Do as much preparation as possible to the home in order to secure the area as much as possible.

  • Place heavy or bulkier items on lower shelves.
  • Cabinets and pantries where breakable items are stores should have latches on them.  Additionally, any poisonous material, such as fertilizers or pesticides should be stored in a locked area as well.
  • Secure shelves to walls.
  • Brace overhead light fixtures.
  • Repair any defective electrical wiring or leaking gas connections. If there are damages done to the ceiling or foundation, get an expert opinion about any structural defects.
  • Secure the water heater by strapping it to wall studs.
  • Avoid hanging pictures and heavy mirrors over beds, couches or where people tend to sit.

Disaster Food Supplies

Water and Food

Store 3-days worth of potable water in plastic containers.   Potable water is water safe for human consumption.  It is free of disease causing microorganisms, poisonous substances, minerals, organic matter, chemical, biological and radioactive substances.  Another method is to freeze water in plastic soda containers.  FEMA recommends that a person should have 1-gallon of water per person for at least 3 days.

Stockpile a 3 day supply of non-perishable items such as canned goods, dehydrated foods, high energy foods such as granola bars, power bars, trail mix and cereals.  Try and find foods that does not require much water to prepare them.  Enure that certain foods are stored away for family members with special needs.

Medical Supplies

Keeping a well stocked medical supply can come in handy if someone has a injury.  First aid kits can be assembled at home and include all of the basic first aid items that may be needed.  A list of complete first aid items can be seen here.

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Food Storage Powdered Milk Recipe: Magic Mix

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Use this mix to make perfect white sauces every time! You make it from dry powdered milk…for more tips for using magic and your food storage everyday, visit http://everydayfoodstorage.net/about-food-storage/magic-mix

 

 

 
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Activism

Hunger Strikes, Marches and More as Los Angeles Service Workers Make Their Presence Felt on May Day

L.A. janitors and airport workers have been building momentum for a possible strike for weeks — and they have big plans for May Day.
May 1, 2012  |

Photo Credit: Melissa Chadburn
 If you ask Mike Garcia, president of SEIU, United Service Workers West, he will tell you, “We have a jobs crisis, not a budget crisis. We have a crisis of the right-wing conscience.”

He gave this speech atop a stage at Pershing Square, in the financial hub of Los Angeles, the afternoon of tax day, April 17, 2012–a day when 2,000 janitors and workers took to the streets to let the large corporations know we would not stand for their corporate tax dodging. He went on, “The janitors are here ready to march for justice, not just for janitors, but for all workers in this country. They tell us there’s no money for healthcare in this economic recession, for wage increases, there’s no language to give us justice as immigrants in this country! We say no. We don’t believe it. There is not a scarcity of money, but there is a scarcity of justice.”

This was part of a build-up for a larger action: on May 1, International Worker’s Day, thousands of working people, their families and allies will gather from every corner of Los Angeles to tell these employers we mean business.

Los Angeles’ streets have been overcome with janitors, security workers, airport service workers, and other property service workers, and they are chanting “Strike! Strike! Strike! Huelga! Huelga! Huelga!” The janitors are sick and tired of cleaning up after the 1 percent. The Building Owners Managers Association (BOMA), happens to be made up of some of America’s biggest land barons. They are currently in negotiations with Los Angeles janitors, as it is time for them to renew their contracts. Yet some of the members of BOMA are threatening to cut back on their healthcare benefits. The janitors have let these building owners know they’re prepared to put up a fight. This slow rumble could progress to a startling halt in work if these large corporate employers don’t start to clean up their act.

It would have been announced on midnight, May 1, whether or not the janitors would go on strike. On April 25 they received the full support from the LA County Federation of Labor should they strike. JP Morgan called police to escort the bargaining committee from the Century Plaza Towers after they returned from a break from negotiations to join janitors in a rally through Century City.

The chant was that janitors are being treated like the garbage they throw out every night. Enough is enough!

If this sounds familiar it’s because it is. On April 3, 1990 there was an official strike of the Justice for Janitors campaign that went on for three weeks. The janitors in Los Angeles stayed on strike until April 22. By that time, they had reached a contract that guaranteed them at least a 22 percent raise over the next three years. The Los Angeles strike was significant to the future of Justice for Janitors, as it spurred a nationwide campaign involving over 100,000 SEIU janitors in 2000. The campaign sought to raise wages for all janitors as well as improve overall working conditions.

Read Full Article Here

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Psy – Ops

Class Warfare Is Being Used To Divide America – And It Is Working

At a time when America desperately needs to come together, we are becoming more divided than ever.  The mainstream media and most of our politicians love to pit us against one another in dozens of different ways, and right now class warfare has become one of their favorite tools for getting us to hate one another.  If you are struggling in this economy, you are being told that “the wealthy” are the cause of your problems.  If you have money, you are being told that the poor hate you and want to tax you into oblivion.  Class warfare has already become a dominant theme in the 2012 race for the White House, and there will certainly be endless speeches given along these lines by politicians from both major political parties all the way up to election day.  Class warfare will be used by both sides as a way to divide America and get votes.  And the frightening thing is that it is clearly working.  There is more hatred between the poor and the wealthy in America today than at any other time that I can remember.  But hating people because of how much money they have or don’t have is not going to solve anything.  Instead, it is just going to cause more problems.

The other day, Yale economics professor Robert Shiller told CNBC that the globe is already in a state of “late Great Depression“.  The United States is heading into unprecedented economic and financial problems and we desperately need to pull together as a country and solve these problems.

But instead, our leaders are tapping into the politics of division in a desperate attempt to get elected in the fall.

Rather than focus on real issues and real solutions, our politicians attempt to make “the wealthy” or “welfare recipients” the focus of our debates.

Well, you know what?

Most people that are rich and most people that are poor are not purposely trying to abuse the system.  Most of them are hard working people that are trying to do the best that they can in a world that is increasingly going crazy.

These days, the Occupy Wall Street crowd loves to talk about how evil the “1 percent” is.  But most of the “1 percent” are people that have worked really hard and that have been fortunate enough to get some really good breaks in life.

Yes, there are some among the “1 percent” that do some really bad things.  The too big to fail banks and the big money managers on Wall Street should be held accountable for the crimes that they have committed.

But most wealthy Americans are not trying to oppress the poor.  Most of them are just trying to do the best that they can for themselves and their families.

Neither are most poor people trying to abuse the system either.

Yes, without a doubt there are some that do not want to work and that want to live on government benefits indefinitely.

But that is a minority.

Most Americans that are receiving government benefits today would rather be working good jobs that would enable them to provide for their families.

Most Americans understand that government handouts can never provide dignity and hope for a better future.

Read Full Article Here

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Articles of Interest

Public Schools Use GPS Uniforms to Track Students! (Nanny of the Month, April 2012)

Published on May 1, 2012 by

We’ve got Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal demanding clean urine in exchange for welfare benefits (a bad idea that also doesn’t work as advertised, but hey, at least the boozers are safe!), North Carolina regulators busting a blogger for praising the paleo diet (an offense that can get you tossed in the clink!), but this month the freakiest controllers come to us from a Brazilian city where public schools have begun tracking thousands of 4-to-14-year-olds with GPS-embedded uniforms. (At least they’re not tagging the kiddos’ ears!)

Presenting Reason.tv’s Nanny of the Month for April 2012: The City of Vitoria da Conquista!

Approximately 80 seconds.

“Nanny of the Month” is written and produced by Ted Balaker. Opening animation by Meredith Bragg.

To watch previous “Nanny of the Month” episodes, go here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2DD00E99B83A258A

Visit http://reason.tv for links and downloadable versions of this video and subscribe to Reason.tv’s YouTube channel to receive automatic notification when new content is posted.

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