Tag Archive: Fujian


China reports four more bird flu deaths, toll rises to 31

BEIJING (Reuters) – Four more people in China have died from a new strain of bird flu, bringing to 31 the number of deaths from the mysterious H7N9 virus, with the number of infections rising by two to 129, according to Chinese health authorities.

Among the deaths, two occurred in the eastern province of Jiangsu; one was from eastern Zhejiang; while another was from central Anhui, based on a Reuters analysis of the data provided by Chinese health authorities on Monday.

A man holds a pigeon at a pigeon farm, which according to the owner has not been affected by the H7N9 bird flu strain, in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, May 6, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer
A man holds a pigeon at a pigeon farm, which according to the owner has not been affected by the H7N9 bird flu strain, in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, May 6, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

 

The government did not provide more details of the victims.

Chinese health authorities said two new infections were reported in the eastern coastal province of Fujian. The virus, which was mostly concentrated in the region around the commercial capital of Shanghai, spread to Fujian in late April.

 

Read Full Article Here

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

Image Source

Image Source

 

55 01.05.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Provinces of Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Fujian and Capital City region] Damage level
Details

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 04:10 UTC
Description
Health authorities in east China’s Jiangxi Province late on Thursday confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 69-year-old man surnamed Xiong, a local retiree in the provincial capital of Nanchang, showed symptoms of high fever, tight chest and diarrhea, and was admitted to the No. 3 Hospital in Nanchang, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department. Xiong is in critical condition, said the statement. He had not left the city recently, nor had any contact with dead birds, but lives near a live poultry market, the statement said. The city’s disease control authority has quarantined 14 people who have had close contact with the patient. None of them have exhibited any abnormal symptoms. Three more new cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Thursday, two in Zhejiang Province and one in Henan Province. The National Health and Family Planning Commission said in its Wednesday update that the total number of H7N9 cases reported in the mainland stood at 110, including 23 cases that have ended in death. Most of the cases were reported in east China’s Shanghai Municipality and the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 15:14 UTC
Description
Six more cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Friday in the Chinese provinces of Fujian, Jiangsu, Jiangxi and Zhejiang. Health authorities in southeast China’s Fujian Province confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 65-year-old man surnamed Luo, a local resident from Gaopo township, Yongding County, Longyan City, showed symptoms of repeated coughing, low fever and a tight chest on April 18. He tested positive for the H7N9 virus at 11 a.m. on Friday by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Thirty-seven people who have been in close contact with Luo have not shown any abnormal symptoms so far. Also, three men, aged 36, 49 and 60, from three different cities, were confirmed to have caught H7N9 bird flu in Jiangsu Province, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department.

Two of them were in serious condition, said the statement. In neighboring Zhejiang Province, a 38-year-old farmer surnamed Li was confirmed to have contracted the H7N9 bird flu virus. Li, who is also in serious condition, is receiving treatment in hospital. In Jiangxi Province, health authorities confirmed the province’s second H7N9 bird flu case, a 76-year-old woman surnamed Xiong. She is in critical condition, according to a Jiangxi provincial health department statement. The case has no family or epidemiological connection with the province’s first case, a 69-year-old man also surnamed Xiong. Health experts found some of the chicken and ducks the woman, a farmer, raised had died, which may be connected with her infection of the virus.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Sunday, 28 April, 2013 at 04:07 UTC
Description
China’s deadly H7N9 bird flu outbreak has spread to the central province of Hunan, local health authorities say, the third announcement in three days of a case in a new location. A 64-year-old woman in Shaoyang City, who developed a fever four days after coming into contact with poultry, was confirmed to have the virus, the Xinhua state news agency reported on Saturday. It follows the first confirmed cases in the eastern province of Jiangxi on Thursday and the southeastern province of Fujian on Friday. More than 110 people in mainland China have been confirmed with H7N9, with 23 deaths, since the government announced on March 31 that the virus had been found in humans. Most cases have been confined to eastern China, while the island of Taiwan has also reported one case. A Chinese expert earlier this week warned of the possibility of more cases in a wider geographical area. “Until the source of H7N9 avian influenza is … brought under effective control, sporadic cases might continue to appear,” said Liang Wannian of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission. Poultry has been confirmed as the source of the H7N9 flu among humans but experts fear the prospect of such a virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, which could then have the potential to trigger a pandemic.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Monday, 29 April, 2013 at 02:10 UTC
Description
The number of confirmed H7N9 bird flu cases in mainland China stood at 120 as of yesterday at 7 p.m. Beijing time, according to China National Radio. The number of dead was 23. The latest case of the deadly new flu includes the first illness in Hunan Province. Cases continued to rise after World Health Organization officials this week concluded a trip to China and lauded the country’s efforts to control the deadly new flu. Consumers have been wary of chicken, even though the government says cooked meat is safe. Yum!, the U.S. operator of the KFC fried chicken chain that has relied on China for much of its growth in recent years, has been hit with a decline in KFC sales in the country. The disease has continued to spread from the eastern China area where it was first discovered. Taiwan also reported its first case this week. China’s government claims sovereignty over Taiwan, and mainland media have combined Taiwan with the mainland’s H7N9 total number of cases.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Tuesday, 30 April, 2013 at 02:58 UTC
Description
The deadly H7N9 bird flu strain claimed a new victim yesterday when a hospital patient died in China, state media reported, bringing the death toll from the recently identified virus to 24. A patient surnamed Chen died in the eastern city of Shanghai after 12 days of medical treatment failed, Xinhua news agency said. China has recorded more than 120 cases of H7N9 infection so far. Most cases since the new strain was first identified in late March have been confined to eastern China, and the only one reported outside mainland China has been in Taiwan. The Taiwanese victim was infected in China. But experts fear the possibility of the virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, with the potential to trigger a pandemic. The World Health Organization has said there has been no evidence so far of human-to-human transmission but warned that H7N9 was “one of the most lethal” influenza viruses ever seen. Chinese researchers, reporting in The Lancet recently, said they had confirmed poultry as a source of the virus among humans. Chinese health officials have acknowledged so-called “family clusters,” where members of a single family have become infected, but have not established any confirmed instances of human-to-human transmission.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Tuesday, 30 April, 2013 at 16:37 UTC
Description
The Chinese National Health and Family Planning Commission has notified the World Health Organization (WHO) of addition confirmed human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9), according to a WHO update April 29. With the addition of the new cases, the WHO says there is now a total of 126 laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus including 24 deaths. The two new fatalities are from previously reported positive patients from Jiangsu province. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, who visited the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),urged health officials to remain vigilant against the lethal virus. “We cannot afford to take it easy or relax, as we are facing a new virus,” he said Sunday. “We should be prepared for any possible development.”

Li said the government will continue to cooperate with international organizations, release information openly and improve public awareness of the virus. A new development on the bird flu front is that Chinese scientists have confirmed that the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus has been transmitted to humans from chickens. In a newly published study in The Lancet, researchers say that chickens in poultry markets were a source of human infections meant that controlling the disease in these places and in these birds should be a priority. Lead researcher, Kwok-Yung Yuen of the University of Hong Kong said, “The evidence suggests it is a pure poultry-to-human transmission and that controlling (infections in people) will therefore depend on controlling the epidemic in poultry.”

 

 

H7N9 may mutate 8 times faster than regular flu

Wednesday, 10 April, 2013, 12:24pm

The new bird flu could be mutating up to eight times faster than an average flu virus around a protein that binds it to humans, a team of research scientists in Shenzhen says.

Dr He Jiankui, an associate professor at South University of Science and Technology of China, said yesterday that the authorities should be alarmed by the results of their research and step up monitoring and control efforts to prevent a possible pandemic.

With genetic code of the virus obtained from mainland authorities, the team scrutinised haemagglutinin, a protein that plays a crucial rule in the process of infection. The protein binds the virus to an animal cell, such as respiratory cells in humans, and bores a hole in the cell’s membrane to allow entry by the virus.

The researchers found dramatic mutation of haemagglutinin in one of the four flu strains released for study by the central government. Nine of the protein’s 560 amino acids had changed. In a typical flu virus, only one or two amino acids could change in such a short period of time, He said.

“It happened in just one or two weeks. The speed may not have caught up with the HIV, but it’s quite unusual for a flu.”

****************************************************************************************************

Health officers examine a pigeon for H7N9 at a poultry market in Changsha, Hunan province April 7, 2013. REUTERS-China Daily

 

Health officers examine a pigeon for H7N9 at a poultry market in Changsha, Hunan province April 7, 2013.
REUTERS/China Daily

……………………………………………………

Hong Kong tightens bird flu defenses

UPDATED 3:07 AM EDT Apr 29, 2013

HONG KONG (CNN) —Officials wielding infrared thermometers are becoming more difficult to avoid at entry points from mainland China as Hong Kong strengthens its defenses against the H7N9 strain of bird flu.

Extra measures are being taken this week during an expected surge in visitors across the border for the three-day Labor Day break from Monday to Wednesday.

Up to 600 officials will be stationed at border crossings during the holiday, including more than 100 volunteers in addition to government staff, according to Hong Kong’s food and health secretary, Ko Wing-man.

“There will also be promotion and education work done at the borders reminding visitors to stay home or visit a doctor if they are not feeling well,” he added, in response to reporters’ questions on Sunday.

Along with extra screening at entry points, tour operators are also being asked to keep an eye on travelers who may be showing symptoms of what the World Health Organization calls “one of the most lethal influenza viruses” it has ever seen.

As of Sunday, the number of bird flu infections had risen to 124, based on provincial Ministry of Health websites. The figure includes one case in Taiwan, which remains the only recorded infection beyond mainland China.

Read Full Article Here

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

Image Source

27.04.2013 Biological Hazard China Multiple areas, [Capital city, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Jiangxi provinces and Taiwan] Damage level
Details

 

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

Back

 

Updated: Friday, 26 April, 2013 at 04:37 UTC
Description
The H7N9 strain responsible for the bird flu outbreak in China is unlike any that has previously been seen in this type of virus. So far, 110 cases have been reported, including one in Taiwan, and 23 people have died. Here are some things to know about this virus: No evidence of human-to-human transmission to date. So far, authorities said, there is no evidence that this virus can pass from person to person. That doesn’t mean it can’t happen later. “If limited person-to-person transmission is demonstrated in the future, this really will not be surprising,” Keiji Fukuda, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general for health, security and the environment, told a news conference Wednesday in Beijing. The virus appears to be transmitted more easily from poultry to humans than H5N1, Fukuda said, referring to the strain responsible for the outbreak between 2004 and 2007, which claimed 332 lives. “This is definitely one of the most lethal influenza viruses that we have seen so far,” he said. The H7N9 strain was never known to infect people until March. Before then, it was only found in birds. If the virus does start to spread easily between people, it could trigger a pandemic. “This is a serious public health situation and it’s possible that a pandemic could start if this virus were to change to spread easily between people,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on its website. “CDC is preparing for that possibility.”

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

Back

 

Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 04:10 UTC
Description
Health authorities in east China’s Jiangxi Province late on Thursday confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 69-year-old man surnamed Xiong, a local retiree in the provincial capital of Nanchang, showed symptoms of high fever, tight chest and diarrhea, and was admitted to the No. 3 Hospital in Nanchang, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department. Xiong is in critical condition, said the statement. He had not left the city recently, nor had any contact with dead birds, but lives near a live poultry market, the statement said. The city’s disease control authority has quarantined 14 people who have had close contact with the patient. None of them have exhibited any abnormal symptoms. Three more new cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Thursday, two in Zhejiang Province and one in Henan Province. The National Health and Family Planning Commission said in its Wednesday update that the total number of H7N9 cases reported in the mainland stood at 110, including 23 cases that have ended in death. Most of the cases were reported in east China’s Shanghai Municipality and the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

Back

 

Updated: Saturday, 27 April, 2013 at 15:14 UTC
Description
Six more cases of H7N9 bird flu were reported on Friday in the Chinese provinces of Fujian, Jiangsu, Jiangxi and Zhejiang. Health authorities in southeast China’s Fujian Province confirmed the province’s first human case of H7N9 avian influenza. A 65-year-old man surnamed Luo, a local resident from Gaopo township, Yongding County, Longyan City, showed symptoms of repeated coughing, low fever and a tight chest on April 18. He tested positive for the H7N9 virus at 11 a.m. on Friday by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Thirty-seven people who have been in close contact with Luo have not shown any abnormal symptoms so far. Also, three men, aged 36, 49 and 60, from three different cities, were confirmed to have caught H7N9 bird flu in Jiangsu Province, according to a statement issued by the provincial health department.

Two of them were in serious condition, said the statement. In neighboring Zhejiang Province, a 38-year-old farmer surnamed Li was confirmed to have contracted the H7N9 bird flu virus. Li, who is also in serious condition, is receiving treatment in hospital. In Jiangxi Province, health authorities confirmed the province’s second H7N9 bird flu case, a 76-year-old woman surnamed Xiong. She is in critical condition, according to a Jiangxi provincial health department statement. The case has no family or epidemiological connection with the province’s first case, a 69-year-old man also surnamed Xiong. Health experts found some of the chicken and ducks the woman, a farmer, raised had died, which may be connected with her infection of the virus.

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 31 March, 2013 at 13:02 (01:02 PM) UTC.

 

Back

 

Updated: Sunday, 28 April, 2013 at 04:07 UTC
Description
China’s deadly H7N9 bird flu outbreak has spread to the central province of Hunan, local health authorities say, the third announcement in three days of a case in a new location. A 64-year-old woman in Shaoyang City, who developed a fever four days after coming into contact with poultry, was confirmed to have the virus, the Xinhua state news agency reported on Saturday. It follows the first confirmed cases in the eastern province of Jiangxi on Thursday and the southeastern province of Fujian on Friday. More than 110 people in mainland China have been confirmed with H7N9, with 23 deaths, since the government announced on March 31 that the virus had been found in humans. Most cases have been confined to eastern China, while the island of Taiwan has also reported one case. A Chinese expert earlier this week warned of the possibility of more cases in a wider geographical area. “Until the source of H7N9 avian influenza is … brought under effective control, sporadic cases might continue to appear,” said Liang Wannian of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission. Poultry has been confirmed as the source of the H7N9 flu among humans but experts fear the prospect of such a virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, which could then have the potential to trigger a pandemic.