Tag Archive: Food Safety and Inspection Service


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Food Poisoning Bulletin

Woodland’s Pork Mountain Ham Recalled for lack of Inspection

Recall SignThe Cure House of Louisville, Ky.  is recalling an undetermined amount of cured pork products that were produced without the benefit of federal inspection, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. Consumers who have purchased this product should not eat it.

The recalled cured ham items were produced from 2009 thru Dec. 19, 2015. They were sold in various weights, individually wrapped labelled “Woodland’s Pork Mountain Ham.”  The code  “Est. 44888” inside the USDA mark of inspection. They were shipped to distributors in Kentucky and New Jersey.

 

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The Curehouse

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Curehouse and Woodlands Pork products can be obtained through our distributors, Fossil Farms, in all E. Coast destinations, and by mail order http://www.fossilfarms.com

Exotic meats and organic meat available online from Fossil Farms. Our online meat store offers the best in organic, exotic meats and game, including ostrich…
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Retial stores that sold ground beef linked to an E.coli Outbreak in MI, OH, MA and MO.A partial list of stores involved in the 1.8 million pound ground beef recall linked to an E.coli outbreak that has sickened at least 11 people in four states has been published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA FSIS). It’s a small list for a big recall, but the agency is not permitted to list restaurants, only retail stores, and the list may not yet include all locations.

So far, here are the retail locations that are part of the recall. Gordon Food Service Marketplace Stores in FL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, and WI.; Surf N Turf Market in Sebring, Florida; Giorgio’s Italian Deli in Stuart, Florida;  M Sixty Six General Store in Orleans, Michigan and Buchtel Food Mart on Buchtel, Ohio.

 

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Boston.com

Confirmed E. Coli Case in Mass Prompts National Beef Recall

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health on Monday confirmed that a Western Massachusetts resident has E. coli, according to MassLive. That case, along with others across the country, has prompted Wolverine Packing Company and the US Department of Agriculture to recall 1.8 million pounds of beef.

From MassLive:

The beef produced between March 31 and April 18 and distributed for use in restaurants in Ohio, Michigan, Missouri and Massachusetts. The recall notice notes that none of the beef in question was distributed to the Department of Defense, the National School Lunch Program or for catalog or internet sales. 

Products that are subject to are marked with the number “EST. 2574B” and will have a production date code in the format “Packing Nos: MM DD 14” between “03 31 14” and “04 18 14.”

 

The recall was ordered after the Massachusetts resident, along with five Michiganders, four Ohioans and a Missourian became ill with E. coli

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Food Safety News

Meat imported from Canada is being recalled for lacking full USDA inspection, the Food Safety and Inspection Service announced late Saturday.

The meat products are from the Ontario-based Santa Maria Foods Corporation. About 8,895 pounds of various meat products are included in the Class II recall with a remote possibility of adverse human health consequences.  Included in the recall are:

  • 11.1-oz. “Sopressata Salami” bearing package code “2014AL30”
  • 5.1-lbs. “MASTRO Milano Salami” bearing package code “2014JN17”
  • 5.3-lbs. “MASTRO Calabrese Salami Hot” bearing package code “2014JL08” or “2014JN17”
  • 8.4-lbs. “MASTRO Sopressata Round” bearing package code “2014JL22”
  • 2.6-lbs. “MASTRO Sopressata Salami” bearing package code “2014JL09”……..

 

 

 

 

 

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Food Poisoning Bulletin

Raw-Chicken-BreastThe first of two Salmonella outbreaks linked to Foster Farms chicken during 2013 was announced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) one year ago this weekend. The outbreak sickened 134 people in 13 states, 33 people were hospitalized.

Most of those sickened, 71 percent, told health investigators that they had eaten Foster Farms chicken before they developing symptoms of Salmonella poisoning which include abdominal cramps, nausea and diarrhea.  Shopper card records showed nine case patients purchased Foster Farms chicken before illness onset.

 

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Costco recalls 40,000 pounds of rotisserie chicken for salmonella risk

A Costco wholesale store in South San Francisco, Calif., is recalling nearly 40,000 pounds of rotisserie chicken products because the food may be linked to an outbreak of salmonella poisoning that now has sickened more than 300 people in 20 states, federal health officials said early Saturday.

The Costco store at 1600 El Camino Real is recalling 8,730 Kirkland Signature Foster Farms rotisserie chickens and 313 units of Kirkland Farm rotisserie chicken soup, rotisserie chicken leg quarters and rotisserie chicken salad, according to a notice issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. The products were sold directly to consumers between Sept. 11 and Sept. 23.

The rotisserie chickens may have been contaminated with a type of Salmonella heidelberg rarely found in the United States, FSIS officials said. The strain is linked to an ongoing food poisoning outbreak associated with three Foster Farms poultry plants in Fresno and Livingston, Calif. The USDA issued a public health alert for products from the plant on Monday, but on Thursday agreed that the facilities could remain open if the company made promised food safety fixes.

At least 317 people in 20 states have been sickened by the outbreak since March, according to an updated notice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most of the cases have been in California, where 232 people have been reported ill. It is the second outbreak of salmonella Heidelberg tied to Foster Farms in less than a year. A previous outbreak sickened 134 people in 13 states.

Some of the seven strains of salmonella detected in the outbreak are drug-resistant, which has created hard-to-treat infections in some patients. About 42 percent of victims in the outbreak have been hospitalized, twice the typical rate for salmonella infections.

The rotisserie chicken recall is limited to the single store, Craig Wilson, Costco’s vice president for food safety, told NBC News on Saturday. One cooked bird tested positive for the rare salmonella strain, Wilson said.

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By Associated Press Reporter

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A Northern California company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased animals without a full federal inspection.

That’s a whole year’s worth of meat processed by Petaluma-based Rancho Feeding Corp.

The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service said Saturday that without the full inspection, the recalled products are unfit for human consumption.

Tainted: Rancho Feeding Corp. is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased animals without a full federal inspection

Tainted: Rancho Feeding Corp. is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased animals without a full federal inspection

They were processed from Jan. 1, 2013, through Jan. 7, 2014, and shipped to distribution centers and retail stores in California, Florida, Illinois and Texas.

They include beef carcasses, oxtail, liver, cheeks, tripe and tongue.

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Colorado Meat Company Recalls 90,000 Pounds Of Meat

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

DENVER (AP/CBS4) – A Windsor meat company has recalled some 90,000 pounds of various meat and poultry products that were produced under unsanitary conditions.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced the recalls Monday. Yauk’s Specialty Meats of Windsor, Colo., recalled:

— “Colorado Best Beef” brand various fresh, smoked and shelf-stable meat products.

— “James Ranch” brand jerky and summer sausage.

— “Rocky Plains Meats” brand hams, bacon, raw and smoked sausage, jerky and raw poultry.

— “John Long Farms” brand fresh and smoked pork products.

— “Horned Beef” brand jerky.

— “Mile High Hungarian Sausage” brand fresh and smoked bacon and sausage.

The products were produced between April 1, 2013, and Dec. 5, 2013 and can be identified by four-digit Julian dates ranging between 3091 and 3339. The products were sold in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

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15,000 Pounds of Wraps Recalled for Listeria

Reichel Foods, a Rochester, Minnesota establishment, is recalling approximately 15,880 pounds of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Sunday.

The products subject to recall include:

-5.6 oz. packages of “Armour Active Packs Turkey & Cheese Wrap” Package Code 1026090112 or Case Code 27815-17994

-5.6 oz. packages of “Armour Active Packs Ham & Cheese Wrap” Package Code 1026090112 or Case Code 27815-17995

All the products were produced between July 23, 2012, and July 26, 2012, and have a “sell by” date through Sept. 1, 2012. The packages bear the establishment number “P-19941” or “Est. 19941” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The products were shipped to distribution centers in Indiana, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

The problem was discovered by the establishment, through microbiological testing by a third party.

FSIS and the company have not received reports of illnesses due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a healthcare provider.

 

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Confidential Settlements Reached in Salmonella Pine Nut Litigation

By News Desk

PRESS RELEASE —  Food safety law firm Marler Clark, which underwrites Food Safety News, announced the settlement of 12 claims involving five families affected by Salmonella Enteritidis illnesses in 2011.The OutbreakIn late October 2011 the Centers for Disease Control and… Read more >>

USDA Ready to Inspect Horse Slaughter By Year End

Food Safety News
Equine inspections will be back on the menu at USDA by the end of the year, according to Al Almanza, administrator of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).
On Saturday, Almanza told the Texas-based Southwest Meat Association, meeting in San Antonio, that USDA will be ready to inspect plants that slaughter horses for human consumption by the end of the year.
The San Antonio Express-News quoted Almanza as saying FSIS had two applications for equine inspection at slaughter plants that “wanted to get started as soon as possible.”
Valley Meat Co. in Roswell, NM and Unified Equine, which has sought locations in Missouri and Oklahoma, are probably the two applicants Almanza was referring to in his remarks.
USDA’s inspection services were prohibited for about five years from making any expenditures to inspect horses slaughtered for human consumption. President Obama and Congress lifted that prohibition in a budget deal made a year ago.
Unified Equine, headed by Wyoming State Rep. Sue Wallis, has not been able to acquire a closed beef processing plant at Rockville, MO as quickly as planned because the current owner does not have a clear title to the property due to ongoing litigation. Unified Equine now has plans for an Oklahoma plant.
It’s possible that before either group can get an inspected horse meat slaughter operation up and running, Congress will reimpose the ban on USDA’s services. The U.S. House’s proposed budget already contains such a provision.

© Food Safety News

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Food Safety

 

 

FDA May Ban BPA from Infant Formula Containers

New strategy succeeds in BPA ban where others have failed

 

After scientific evidence failed to convince the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to outlaw BPA in food packaging, a lawmaker has spotted another way to get the agency to regulate the substance.
Ever since 2008, when new research suggested that bisphenol A – used in packaging to make plastic harder or protect metal can linings – could be harmful to humans, consumer advocates have been pushing for an all-out federal ban on containers carrying the chemical. So far this push has been successful only in the court of public opinion, where the public’s fear of BPA has caused many manufacturers to phase it out of products.
FDA has consistently said that evidence supporting the dangers of BPA is currently too weak to justify banning the substance.

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Now a lawmaker has found another way to get this chemical off the market – or at least out of infant formula containers.
In March, Congressman Ed Markey (D-MA) petitioned FDA to remove regulatory approval for BPA in three items: baby and toddler food packaging, small reusable household containers and canned food packaging. Markey argued that manufacturers “have abandoned the use of BPA” in these products. Legally, FDA can remove approval for the use of an additive if that use has since been abandoned.
Markey’s petition essentially asked FDA to withdraw approval for BPA in these three products on the grounds that this use is no longer practiced and therefore no longer needs approval.
On Wednesday, FDA accepted Markey’s petition to disallow the use of BPA in infant formula containers, but denied the petition as it related to small reusable containers and canned food packaging.

 

 

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Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Dog Food Has Sickened 22 in 13 States

Twenty two people in 13 states have now been infected with Salmonella Infantis linked to contaminated dog food, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Multiple brands of dry dog food produced by Diamond Pet Foods at a South Carolina facility have been linked to some of the Salmonella infections, which would likely have been acquired via cross contamination from feeding a pet or from contact with a sick pet.

The five new cases are from: Alabama (1), California (1), Illinois (1), New York (1), and South Carolina (1). Two others have been reported in Canada.

Of the cases CDC has detailed information about, illnesses began between October 2011 and May 11, 2012, and ages range from less than one-year-old to 82, but the median age is 46.5. Sixty-eight percent of patients are female. Of the 17 patients CDC has information about, 6, or 35 percent, were hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Public health officials noted that any illness that may have occurred after May 11 might not be reported yet.

Anyone who thinks they might have become ill after contact with dry pet food or with an animal that has eaten dry pet food should consult a health care provider.

 

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Two Applications in For Horse Slaughter; Opposition Gears Up

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) won’t admit it has received either request, but the agency now has two formal applications for inspection of horse meat-for-export processing facilities.
As Food Safety News reported earlier, Valley Meat Co. in Roswell, NM previously filed the first application for equine inspection services with FSIS. The agency has now received a second application for horse slaughter from Unified Equine Missouri for an equine processing plant at Rockville, MO, according to the company.
While FSIS will neither confirm nor deny that the two applications exist, suggesting that the only way get information about them would be to file a Freedom of Information Act request to the agency, one of the most experienced animal protection attorneys in the country is already marshaling the opposition.

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Both applications follow the deal by President Obama and Congress to end the 2007 ban on the slaughter of horses for human consumption in the United States.  The deal clears the way for FSIS to make its continuous inspection services available for equine production.
Unified Equine’s Chief Executive Officer Sue Wallis told Food Safety News that her company is in the process of acquiring the Rockville processing plant, previously used for beef, and making necessary changes to the facility required before FSIS will conduct a walk-through inspection.
Wallis, who also serves in the Wyoming House of Representatives, says Unified Equine wanted FSIS’s input in advance, but the agency declined for legal reasons. “So we are proceeding with our plans to renovate the existing facility, which was USDA certified for beef, and to install our humane handling system designed for the unique characteristics of horses, ” Wallis said.  “Once that work is completed we will be moving forward with our grant of inspection request.”
FSIS officials, according to Wallis, have told the company that the agency is in the process of reestablishing equine inspector training and drug residue plans for horses. Congress cut spending for inspecting horse slaughter about a year before the last three equine operations closed in 2007.

McCain Takes Aim at ‘Senseless’ Catfish Inspection Program

catfishwide.jpgSenator and former presidential contender John McCain (R-AZ) is at war against “senseless” measures in the farm bill and the pending catfish inspection program is on his list of top targets.

On the floor Thursday, Sen. McCain mocked a variety of farm bill programs, including a $15 million grant program to improve the sheep industry, a $200 million overseas ag marketing program, and a $25 million initiative to study the health benefits of peas, lentils, and garbanzo beans.

“Mothers all over America that have advocated for their children to eat their peas will be pleased to know there’s a study…” joked the senior senator.

McCain also mocked a mohair subsidy, “which has been fleecing the American people since 1954.” (The subsidy was repealed in the 1990s, but was reinstated in the 2002 farm bill).

“The mohair program, which costs taxpayers about $1 million a year, may not be particularly expensive compared to most farm programs,” said McCain. “I suppose where some of my colleagues see a minor government pittance for wool socks, I see a disgraceful example of how special interests can embed themselves in a Farm Bill for generations.”

One item that seems to have McCain particularly fired up is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s pending catfish inspection program, something that was added to the 2008 Farm Bill — under the guise of food safety — to help protect southern catfish farmers from the influx of import competition.

With support from both sides of the aisle — including Sens. John Kerry (D-MA), Tom Coburn (R-OK), and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) — McCain has filed an amendment (#2199) to the 2012 farm bill to repeal the new catfish inspection program.

“As my colleagues know, USDA inspects meat, eggs, and poultry, but not seafood,” said McCain in remarks released by his office. “Thus, a whole new government office is being developed at USDA just to inspect catfish. Catfish farmers have tried to argue that we need a Catfish Inspection Office to ensure Americans are eating safe and healthy catfish. I wholeheartedly agree that catfish should be safe for consumers.”

“The problem is FDA already inspects catfish – just like it does ALL seafood – screening it for biological and chemical hazards,” added McCain. “If there were legitimate food safety reasons for having USDA inspect catfish, we wouldn’t be having this discussion.”

US Bans Korean Shellfish After FDA Finds Fecal Matter, Norovirus In Growing Areas

Korean shellfish is not safe to eat and Korea has been removed from the U.S. list of approved  shellfish shippers after officials from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) discovered unsanitary conditions  that exposed molluscan growing areas to human fecal matter, norovirus and pollution, the agency announced yesterday.

Previously, the FDA had issued a recall of Korean shellfish imported to the U.S. after  May 1, 2012. But now the FDA says no shellfish from Korea is safe to eat. Whether they are fresh, frozen or canned; mussels, scallops and oysters from Korea may have been exposed to human fecal matter, may also be contaminated with norovirus and are not safe to eat at this time, according to the advisory.

 

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California Soup Makers Say Recall Was Only A Technical Foul

The Botulism warning that went out about two companies selling canned soap at California farmers markets really only amounts to a technical foul not dangerous canning practices.
That’s the push-back argument being made by Malibu-based One Gun Ranch and Santa Barbara-based Organic Soup Kitchen four days after the California Department of Health warned the public about products from the two businesses.

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One Gun Ranch’s Jennifer Hozer told Food Safety News “there are no incidents or indications that any of our food products are contaminated, whatsoever.”   She said the Health Department’s public health warning and subsequent mandatory recall of the canned products was over licensing requirements by local health agencies required by state regulations.
“It was not a result of contaminated food or improper preparation of our jarred food products,” Hozer said.   She said One Gun products are prepared in commercial kitchens, which “adhere to the highest standards of operation and regulation required by CDHP.”
In addition to Hozer calling the botulism scare “a paperwork issue,” Organic Soup Kitchen’s founder Anthony Carroccio told the LA Weekly his company has fed 50,000 homeless and low-income people in the last three years “without incident.”

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Recalls

 

 

 

Raw Stuffed Chicken Breast Recalled for Undeclared Allergens

A California-based firm is voluntarily recalling 3,534 pounds of a raw stuffed chicken product because it may contain known allergens that are not declared on the label.
Antonelli’s and Sons of South San Francisco is recalling the product because it is made with milk, soy and monosodium glutamate (MSG), all known allergens that are not listed as ingredients on packaging.
The product subject to recall comes in an approximately 1 pound tray labeled “TRADER JOE’S CRANBERRY APPLE STUFFED CHICKEN BREAST,” with a Use By date of 06/13/12 through 6/23/12, located on a sticker in the upper right corner of the package.

Navy Beans Recalled For Undeclared Soy

Anyone with an allergy or severe sensitivity to soy should avoid eating Premium Navy Beans manufactured by Truitt Bros., Inc.
The Salem, OR based food manufacturer has recalled its Premium Navy Beans in 15 ounce cans for undeclared soy.   The June 15 recall notice said no illnesses had yet been reported in connection with the problem.
Truitt distributed the product with its undeclared soy in Oregon and Northern California to retail stores from Dec. 1, 2011 to June 15, 2012.  The company described the product as follows:

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Articles of Interest

 

 

 

 

‘Domino Effect’ Key To Unlocking Shigella Mysteries

Diarrheal diseases are the second leading cause of death, after lower respiratory tract infections, for children under age 5. Of these deaths, a full 75 percent are from shigellosis.
Yet Shigella, the Gram-negative bacterium transmitted via contaminated food or water, does not seem to get the attention it’s due for the worldwide devastation it causes.
According to the World Health Organization, Shigellosis is responsible for 90 million illnesses and 108,000 deaths annually. And while viewed as a Third World disease, WHO says there are half a million cases each year involving military personnel and travelers from industrialized countries.
The United States sees about 14,000 shigellosis cases each year, but the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta says the actual number is probably 20 times higher, as most cases go unreported and are self-treated at home.
Now a team of researchers from three American universities, led by Dr. Erin Murphy, assistant professor of bacteriology at the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, is shedding new light on this old plague.

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“Our work furthers the understanding of how Shigella responds to the environmental conditions encountered within the human body to control the production of bacterial factors that increase the ability of the bacteria to cause the disease,” Murphy told Food Safety News.
“Understanding how bacteria control the production of such ‘virulence factors’ may, one day, lead to therapeutics that specifically disrupt these processes, ” she continued.  “Our work is the basic science that may support future applied studies by others.”

Animal Rights Groups Argue Against Egg Bill

On top of the infighting among animal agriculture groups over a proposed bill to set national welfare standards for egg production — which has pitted the egg industry against pork, beef, and poultry — there is some conflict among animal rights groups as well.

The Humane Farming Association, a California based anti-factory farming group, is trying to convince lawmakers to vote against what it calls the “rotten egg bill,” which has been proposed in both chambers, most recently as an amendment to the 2012 Farm Bill in the Senate.

As the Senate began debate on the Farm Bill Wednesday, the group ran a quarter-page advertisement in the Washington Post calling the egg bill a price-fixing scheme that would “deprive states of the right to enforce anti-cruelty laws which prohibit battery cages.”

The legislation to slowly phase in “enriched colony housing” for laying hens, which would double the space for each bird, was the result of a landmark deal struck between the United Egg Producers and the Humane Society of the United States, two groups who had been fighting bitterly over state egg initiatives for years. The compromise seeks to give egg producers regulatory certainty, while fulfilling HSUS’ goal of giving hens more space.

But HFA and other local groups are angry that standards might preempt state laws that seek to go above and beyond the welfare standards in the HSUS-UEP deal.

New Group will Rate Congress with a Food Policy Scorecard

A new group will rate Congress with a food policy scorecard, according to the Environmental Working Group. The new group, a 501c(4) nonprofit organization, will consist of food and agriculture policy leaders.

This will be the first time an organization has rated politicians on their votes and stance on issues such as food safety, farm subsidies, farm animal welfare, organic and local food, nutrition assistance, fisheries management, and farm and food worker justice.

 

 

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Two Applications in For Horse Slaughter; Opposition Gears Up

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) won’t admit it has received either request, but the agency now has two formal applications for inspection of horse meat-for-export processing facilities.
As Food Safety News reported earlier, Valley Meat Co. in Roswell, NM previously filed the first application for equine inspection services with FSIS. The agency has now received a second application for horse slaughter from Unified Equine Missouri for an equine processing plant at Rockville, MO, according to the company.
While FSIS will neither confirm nor deny that the two applications exist, suggesting that the only way get information about them would be to file a Freedom of Information Act request to the agency, one of the most experienced animal protection attorneys in the country is already marshaling the opposition.

BHorses_0380.jpg

Both applications follow the deal by President Obama and Congress to end the 2007 ban on the slaughter of horses for human consumption in the United States.  The deal clears the way for FSIS to make its continuous inspection services available for equine production.
Unified Equine’s Chief Executive Officer Sue Wallis told Food Safety News that her company is in the process of acquiring the Rockville processing plant, previously used for beef, and making necessary changes to the facility required before FSIS will conduct a walk-through inspection.
Wallis, who also serves in the Wyoming House of Representatives, says Unified Equine wanted FSIS’s input in advance, but the agency declined for legal reasons. “So we are proceeding with our plans to renovate the existing facility, which was USDA certified for beef, and to install our humane handling system designed for the unique characteristics of horses, ” Wallis said.  “Once that work is completed we will be moving forward with our grant of inspection request.”
FSIS officials, according to Wallis, have told the company that the agency is in the process of reestablishing equine inspector training and drug residue plans for horses. Congress cut spending for inspecting horse slaughter about a year before the last three equine operations closed in 2007.
Wallis, who is also U.S. chair for the International Equine Business Association, says international protocols have not changed much since the U.S. got out the business. That goes for European Union regulations, which remain virtually the same as in 2007. Unified Equine Missouri plans to be an all-export operation.
Horse exports from the U.S. to Canada and Mexico since the ban have increased so much that 74 percent of the horses processed north of the border last year originated in the states, Wallis says. She thinks that percentage is probably higher for Mexico.
While the two plants work on their applications, attorney Bruce A. Wagman with the San Francisco office of Schiff Hardin LLP is working to make sure neither plant ever begins slaughtering horses.
Wagman, who represents the Humane Society of the United States and Colorado-based Front Range Equine Rescue, has filed 90-page petitions with both USDA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the rules and regulations that will govern horse slaughter in the U.S. if and when it resumes.
To supplement his petitions, Wagman has already submitted a 29-page document listing 115 “banned and dangerous substances commonly given to horses sent to slaughter” to illustrate that U.S. horsemeat is uniquely unsuited for human consumption.
Until settling in Rockville, Unified Equine was mostly shopping Missouri for the right existing facility in a welcoming community after the company got a chilly reception in Mountain Grove.
New Mexico’s Valley Meats is an entirely different story.
Everyone from New Mexico’s Governor Susana Martinez on down has gone on record opposing the Roswell horse slaughter proposal. And a pile of an estimated 400 tons of dead cattle outside the former beef processing plant is not helping make the case for owner Rick De Los Santos, who could not be reached for comment.
FSIS’s Ron Nelson in January 2010 notified state officials about the pile of old dairy cows.  “He calls it ‘composting’ but by all appearances rotting would be more accurate,” Nelson wrote.  “I am told that during fly season the pile literally moves due to the maggots.”
Nelson guessed the pile was about 15 feet high and “full of bones and animals parts.”
Front Range Equine Rescue has called upon the State of New Mexico to fine Valley Meat Co. for waste disposal violations.  However, New Mexico’s solid waste chief said the pile had composted since January 2010 became a certified compost facility.
For her part, Wallis promises that Unified Equine will follow standards established by the International Equine Business Association, including video surveillance and fail-safe testing and traceability protocols.
Horses have been exported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter since the U.S. ban, raising concern about inhumane transportation and disposal practices.