Tag Archive: District attorney


 

Los Angeles Times

 

San Bernardino city hall

Two San Bernardino city councilmen face criminal charges in unrelated cases. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times / June 5, 2012)

 

 

Two San Bernardino city councilmen face criminal charges in separate cases, authorities said Thursday.

 

Councilman Robert Jenkins, 33, has been charged in Riverside County with 18 felonies and 12 misdemeanor crimes related to identity theft and stalking, according to a statement from the Riverside County district attorney’s office.

 

Councilman Chas Kelley, a 44-year-old running in the Nov. 5 election for mayor, faces a perjury charge for allegedly signing off on campaign finance documents he knew had false information, according to the criminal complaint filed by the San Bernardino County district attorney’s office.

 

Prosecutors allege Kelley misrepresented the contributions received and the expenditures made by the Friends of Chas Kelley committee. Prosecutors began examining Kelley’s financial records after receiving a complaint in October 2011, and the charge stems from a review of records obtained last year, according to the complaint.

 

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Prosecutor to Gosnell: ‘Are You Human?’

April 30, 2013
gosnell

The Women’s Medical Society abortion clinic at 3801-05 Lancaster Avenue, Philadelphia, PA. (Grand Jury Report)

(CNSNews.com) – “Are you human?” Assistant District Attorney Ed Cameron asked Kermit Gosnell during closing arguments in the abortionist’s trial on Monday.

Cameron noted that during the six-week trial, “Mr. McMahon (the defense attorney) kept asking the witnesses, are you human?” That question really should be asked of Gosnell, Cameron said, turning to look directly at the defendant: “Are you human?” he asked.

Gosnell stared right back and laughed.

“To med these women up, to stick scissors in babies necks — he’s the one in this case that doesn’t deserve to be called human,” Cameron said.

The trial of Gosnell entered its final phase on Monday, after lengthy closing arguments from defense attorney Jack McMahon and from prosecutor Cameron. Gosnell is charged with four counts of first-degree murder, for allegedly killing babies born alive during abortions by snipping their spinal cords with surgical scissors.

Cameron ended his closing argument with a plea to the jury to reach a guilty verdict. He quoted Steve Massof, an unlicensed medical graduate who worked at Gosnell’s clinic, the Women’s Medical Society in West Philadelphia:

“I felt like a fireman in hell,” Massof testified about the time he spent doing abortions late at night before Gosnell would arrive. “It was raining fetuses.”

“[Gosnell’s] the captain of that hell,” Cameron told the court. “It’s time for us to extinguish the hell he created.”

Cameron asked the jurors to “use their common sense” in determining whether the babies were born alive. Gosnell’s defense spent the morning arguing there was reasonable doubt that the four babies alleged to have been murdered were born alive.

“Why do you think there’s a hole in its head?” Cameron said.  “It was because that it was an added step to make sure that baby was dead.”

Cameron recalled clinic janitor Jim Johnson’s testimony that the clinic’s toilet was constantly clogged up.  “You all know what that’s from, that’s from babies in the toilet,” he said.

“Maybe you’ve been desensitized by this case, but just the thought of using a plunger and having an arm and a leg come up,” Cameron told the jury.  He said Gosnell had no respect for the dead, putting fetal remains in the garbage disposal, the toilet, and the freezer.

Cameron also relayed the testimony of Shanice Manning, who was only 14 or 15 years old when her mother brought her into Gosnell’s clinic for an abortion.  She did not receive the required counseling before an abortion under Pennsylvania law, nor was the 24-hour waiting period applied.

Manning had to go to the hospital after complications, and that’s where the baby was stillborn.

“What she said in the hospital when the baby was stillborn was, ‘Can I see the baby?  Can I hold it?’” Cameron said.

“That is why you have to have counseling,” he said.  “To this day she regrets what happened.”

While still at the clinic, Manning had asked Gosnell what the sex of the baby was.  “Well, if you’re a good girl, maybe I’ll tell you,” Gosnell was quoted as saying.

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Defense Attorney: Prosecution of Gosnell Is ‘Elitist, Racist’

April 29, 2013


gosnell

Dr. Kermit Gosnell, charged with 4 counts of first-degree murder, killing babies reportedly born alive at his abortion office in West Philadelphia, Pa. (AP)

(Warning: Some of the photos in this story are graphic.)

(CNSNews.com) – Defense lawyer Jack McMahon delivered his closing argument on behalf of abortionist Kermit Gosnell on Monday, accusing  prosecutors of “manipulating” the case to engage in an essentially “racist” prosecution of the man charged with four counts of first-degree murder, killing babies born alive during abortions by snipping their spinal cords with surgical scissors.

“Never have I seen the presumption of innocence so trampled on, stomped on,” said McMahon in court today, adding that the Philadelphia district attorney’s office “tried to manipulate everybody” and was pursuing an “elitist, racist prosecution.”

“Dr. Gosnell is not the only one doing abortions in Philadelphia,” McMahon said, “but he was an African American singled out for prosecution.”

“We know why he was targeted,” he said.  “If you can’t see that reality, you’re living in some sort of la-la land.”

Speaking for nearly two hours before the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, McMahon painted Gosnell as a doctor who cared for his community “providing a service” to vulnerable young girls.

Gosnell “provided a service to the community,” where people would “pay what they could” and often give paper IOU’s, McMahon said.

baby boy b

Baby Boy B, with slit neck, discovered by police at the abortion office of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, the Women’s Medical Society in West Philadelphia, Pa. (Photo: Grand Jury Report.)

“He knew what he was doing, he was giving this community health care they might not have otherwise had,” he said.

“He never turned away a desperate, troubled young lady because they didn’t have enough money,” McMahon said.

He talked about 13-  and 14-year-old “desperate young girls.”

“And who comes to help them?” McMahon asked.  “Dr. Gosnell.”

“He gave them a solution to their problem,” he said.  “They went in for a service and Dr. Gosnell got it done.”

Gosnell, 72, is facing four counts of first-degree murder for the killing of babies born alive after abortions, and a third-degree murder charge in the anesthesia-overdose death of a mother, Karnamaya Mongar, at his clinic the Women’s Medical Society in West Philadelphia.

He is also charged with infanticide, conspiracy, abortion at 24 or more weeks, theft, corruption of minors, solicitation and other related offenses.

The grand jury report presented in the case asserted that Gosnell killed “hundreds” of babies over the years, by cutting their spinal cords with scissors after they survived late-term abortions.

 

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Published on Mar 31, 2013

The Texas prosecutor who was gunned down with his wife at their home on Saturday had carried a gun to protect himself following the killing of a fellow prosecutor in his office two months ago. (March 31)

Politics, Legislation and Economy News

 

 

 

Economic News :  Global Economy –  Corruption – Elitist  Privilege

 

 

 

Published on Sep 22, 2012 by

In this episode, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss tuning in, dropping out and the modern day opting out. They also talk about ‘high value’ customers being fast tracked at Heathrow in the name of expediency; while in the US poor people are fast tracked into a private debt collectors’ kickback scheme with the help of district attorneys. In the second half of the show, Max Keiser talks to Richard Stallman about Anonymous protests outside virtual doorways, corporate tyrannies and free software.

Sheriff’s Deputy threatened for speaking out against federal power grabs

By J. D. Heyes,

(NaturalNews) It’s not supposed to be against the law to speak your mind and what’s more, Americans depend on the nation’s lawmakers and law enforcement officers to uphold the Constitution’s protections. But what about when a law enforcement agency is denying one of its own the right to speak his mind about, say, the intrusion of the federal government into state and local business?

In some parts of the country, exercising that right is apparently not allowed. Enter Trinity County, Calif., where the sheriff – Bruce Haney – has found himself embroiled in a civil rights lawsuit filed by one of his deputies, Mark Potts, for allegedly punishing Potts over comments he made about the federal Leviathan in a series of editorials in the local newspaper.

Potts, who filed his complaint in U.S. District Court in Sacramento, said in court papers he was seeking to “vindicate” his “free speech rights” under “federal and state constitutional and statutory law.”

“Defendant officers of the Trinity County Sheriff’s Office have reprimanded Mr. Potts for engaging in expressive political speech and have prohibited him from speaking as a citizen on important matters of public concern,” the complaint reads.

“This action seeks declaratory and injunctive relief to redress the violation of Mr. Potts’ rights under the United States Constitution, the California Constitution, and the Public Safety Officers’ Procedural Bill of Rights Act (POBRA).”

According to the complaint, Potts said he began writing politically themed letters to the editor of the The Trinity Journal newspaper “several years ago.”

No disruption in the work place

“These letters, authored and signed by Mr. Potts in his capacity as a private citizen, addressed a variety of topics of public concern, including the wisdom and constitutionality of various laws, and the appropriate scope of federal governmental authority,” the complaint said.

The complaint went onto say that Potts was not in uniform nor did he use public/county resources when writing his editorials.

His “letters have never caused a disruption of the workplace, affected the performance of his job duties, or otherwise interfered with the operations of the Sheriff’s Office,” said the complaint, adding that during the course of his official duties, he “consistently received positive performance reviews.”

Prior to Haney’s 2010 election as Trinity County Sheriff, the complaint says, the county district attorney asked then-Sheriff Lorrac Craig to force Potts to discontinue writing his letters, a request that Craig refused to carry out.

After Haney assumed his office in January 2011, he and “Undersheriff Ken Langton called Mr. Potts in for a meeting to discuss his letters to the editor,” says the complaint. “Sheriff Haney stated that the District Attorney had threatened not to prosecute any cases that Mr. Potts investigated if he continued to write letters to the editor, and that Mr. Potts needed to stop writing letters to the editor.”

Some months later, in August of last year, the complaint says Potts was once more warned to stop writing his letters by sheriff’s deputy Sgt. Ray Hurlbert, who allegedly said Potts’ letters were a “problem” for the department.

“Mr. Potts asked for guidance on the scope of the prohibition of his written expression but was never provided with guidance on what topics would be deemed by the Sheriff’s Office to be acceptable or unacceptable,” said the complaint. “Unable to obtain any clarification from the Sheriff’s Office about the scope of any prohibition, Mr. Potts understood the Office either to be imposing a blanket ban on all letters to the editor, or to be requiring Mr. Potts to draw his own line between” what he felt was and was not appropriate.

Sought guidance but a reprimand instead

The complaint said Potts published four more letters to the editor in the local paper between October and November 2011 on topics ranging from “drug policy, including drug legalization, and the right to carry concealed weapons.”

“On December 5, 2011, Sgt. Hurlburt provided Mr. Potts with written notice of an administrative investigation into his expressive letter-writing activities,” said the complaint. “The notice letter cited six provisions of the Trinity County Sheriff’s Office Policy Manual and explained that Mr. Potts was being investigated for possible violations of these provisions. Mr. Potts was ordered to appear for an interrogation concerning the potential violations.”

Two weeks later, the department conducted “an investigatory interrogation” of Potts, in which he objected “on the grounds that his free speech rights were being violated.”

In February, the department issued Potts a formal reprimand for his conduct, saying that by writing his letters he was in violation of a number of departmental policies. Potts stopped writing letters following his reprimand.

In March, Potts; through his attorneys, asked Trinity County to expunge the reprimand from his work record, a request that was denied a month later.

There is an old saying in the military that goes, “We’re here to defend democracy, not practice it.” It sounds like that’s the case in Trinity County, Calif. as well.

Sources:

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/07/09/FirstAmend.pdf

www.naturalnews.com/free_speech.html

www.naturalnewsradio.com/Archive-HealthRangerReport.asp