Tag Archive: Cyprus Region


Earthquakes

EMSC     Tonga Region
Apr 25 23:43 PM
5.0     33.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga Region
Apr 25 23:43 PM
4.7     92.0     MAP

GEOFON     Tonga Islands Region
Apr 25 23:43 PM
5.4     10.0     MAP

USGS     Virgin Islands Region
Apr 25 23:19 PM
2.7     42.8     MAP

GEOFON     Southern Xinjiang, China
Apr 25 22:50 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Xinjiang, China
Apr 25 22:49 PM
4.5     13.8     MAP

EMSC     Southern Xinjiang, China
Apr 25 22:49 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Italy
Apr 25 22:42 PM
2.6     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Italy
Apr 25 22:38 PM
2.8     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 25 22:18 PM
2.9     2.0     MAP

USGS     Near The East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 25 22:11 PM
4.6     44.1     MAP

EMSC     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 25 22:11 PM
4.5     60.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 22:06 PM
2.9     5.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 25 21:04 PM
4.4     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 25 21:04 PM
4.4     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 25 21:04 PM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     France
Apr 25 21:02 PM
2.7     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 25 20:45 PM
4.7     100.0     MAP

GEOFON     Near East Coast Of Honshu, Japan
Apr 25 20:45 PM
4.6     88.0     MAP

EMSC     Ionian Sea
Apr 25 20:29 PM
2.9     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     New Britain Region, P.n.g.
Apr 25 20:17 PM
4.7     262.0     MAP

EMSC     New Britain Region, P.n.g.
Apr 25 20:17 PM
4.8     256.0     MAP

USGS     Virgin Islands Region
Apr 25 18:17 PM
2.5     46.1     MAP

EMSC     Cyprus Region
Apr 25 18:16 PM
3.4     20.0     MAP

EMSC     Cyprus Region
Apr 25 17:52 PM
3.6     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Apr 25 17:40 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 17:33 PM
2.5     24.0     MAP

USGS     Baja California, Mexico
Apr 25 16:54 PM
2.8     1.8     MAP

EMSC     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 16:31 PM
5.1     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 16:31 PM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 16:30 PM
5.1     22.7     MAP

USGS     Southern Alaska
Apr 25 16:19 PM
2.8     141.3     MAP

GEOFON     Southern Peru
Apr 25 16:19 PM
4.8     93.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Peru
Apr 25 16:19 PM
4.6     109.6     MAP

EMSC     Southern Peru
Apr 25 16:19 PM
4.6     110.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 16:18 PM
3.2     7.0     MAP

EMSC     Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 25 16:17 PM
4.1     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 25 16:17 PM
4.1     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Galapagos Islands Region
Apr 25 16:00 PM
4.4     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Galapagos Islands Region
Apr 25 16:00 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     Galapagos Islands, Ecuador Region
Apr 25 16:00 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Galapagos Islands Region
Apr 25 15:44 PM
5.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Galapagos Islands Region
Apr 25 15:44 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Galapagos Islands, Ecuador Region
Apr 25 15:44 PM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 15:16 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 25 14:37 PM
3.6     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 25 14:21 PM
2.4     16.0     MAP

EMSC     Bosnia And Herzegovina
Apr 25 14:13 PM
2.9     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 14:07 PM
3.0     7.0     MAP

EMSC     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 25 13:39 PM
3.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 25 13:27 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Southern Mid Atlantic Ridge
Apr 25 13:27 PM
5.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Mid-atlantic Ridge
Apr 25 13:27 PM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 25 13:01 PM
3.1     400.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 12:58 PM
2.8     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Azores-cape St. Vincent Ridge
Apr 25 12:42 PM
2.4     27.0     MAP

USGS     Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
Apr 25 12:31 PM
2.5     0.2     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 12:07 PM
2.7     10.0     MAP

GEONET     Whanganui
Apr 25 11:54 AM
2.9     33.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 11:49 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

USGS     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 11:30 AM
4.5     9.7     MAP

EMSC     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 11:30 AM
4.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 10:45 AM
2.8     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Greece
Apr 25 10:34 AM
4.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     Greece
Apr 25 10:34 AM
4.5     10.2     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 10:34 AM
4.4     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 25 10:25 AM
2.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Greenland Sea
Apr 25 10:09 AM
4.5     2.0     MAP

USGS     Norwegian Sea
Apr 25 10:09 AM
4.6     9.8     MAP

GEOFON     Greenland Sea
Apr 25 10:09 AM
4.2     10.0     MAP

USGS     Aegean Sea
Apr 25 10:07 AM
4.2     9.2     MAP

GEOFON     Aegean Sea
Apr 25 10:07 AM
4.4     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 25 10:07 AM
4.1     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 25 08:52 AM
2.5     20.0     MAP

USGS     Dominican Republic Region
Apr 25 08:23 AM
3.7     76.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 08:16 AM
2.6     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:53 AM
5.2     50.0     MAP

GEOFON     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:53 AM
5.1     10.0     MAP

USGS     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:53 AM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 25 07:49 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 07:48 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:42 AM
5.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:42 AM
5.7     13.8     MAP

GEOFON     Nicobar Islands, India Region
Apr 25 07:42 AM
5.8     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Democratic Republic Of Congo
Apr 25 07:24 AM
4.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 07:22 AM
3.3     3.0     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico
Apr 25 07:00 AM
2.7     63.5     MAP

USGS     Samar, Philippines
Apr 25 06:55 AM
5.0     122.8     MAP

GEOFON     Samar, Philippines
Apr 25 06:55 AM
4.8     99.0     MAP

EMSC     Samar, Philippines
Apr 25 06:55 AM
5.0     100.0     MAP

EMSC     Near The Coast Of Western Turkey
Apr 25 06:51 AM
2.8     14.0     MAP

EMSC     Vancouver Island, Canada Region
Apr 25 06:24 AM
3.9     28.0     MAP

USGS     Vancouver Island, Canada Region
Apr 25 06:24 AM
3.9     27.8     MAP

EMSC     Crete, Greece
Apr 25 05:42 AM
3.4     5.0     MAP

USGS     Gulf Of Santa Catalina, California
Apr 25 05:29 AM
3.0     13.3     MAP

EMSC     Cyprus Region
Apr 25 05:23 AM
3.1     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off Coast Of Southern Chile
Apr 25 05:02 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Off The Coast Of Aisen, Chile
Apr 25 05:01 AM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Off Coast Of Aisen, Chile
Apr 25 05:01 AM
4.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Northern Alaska
Apr 25 04:47 AM
2.8     11.1     MAP

GEOFON     South Of Mariana Islands
Apr 25 04:46 AM
4.7     226.0     MAP

USGS     Guam Region
Apr 25 04:45 AM
4.8     214.5     MAP

EMSC     Guam Region
Apr 25 04:45 AM
4.8     216.0     MAP

EMSC     Caucasus Region, Russia
Apr 25 04:17 AM
3.4     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     North Indian Ocean
Apr 25 03:45 AM
4.5     10.0     MAP
EMSC     Crete, Greece
Apr 25 03:26 AM
2.5     19.0     MAP

EMSC     Tonga
Apr 25 03:23 AM
5.0     156.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga
Apr 25 03:23 AM
4.8     159.7     MAP

GEOFON     Tonga Islands
Apr 25 03:23 AM
5.3     134.0     MAP

EMSC     Ionian Sea
Apr 25 03:21 AM
2.8     153.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Mediterranean Sea
Apr 25 03:19 AM
2.9     11.0     MAP

USGS     Northern Algeria
Apr 25 03:18 AM
4.7     9.6     MAP

GEOFON     Northern Algeria
Apr 25 03:18 AM
4.7     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Northern Algeria
Apr 25 03:18 AM
4.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 02:37 AM
3.0     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Crete, Greece
Apr 25 02:08 AM
2.4     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 25 01:26 AM
2.6     12.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 25 00:55 AM
2.6     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Sicily, Italy
Apr 25 00:42 AM
3.4     16.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 25 00:04 AM
2.6     5.0     MAP

 

sources : USGSEMSCGFZGEONET

 

 

Quake rocks Andaman Nicobar Islands

The Hindu

PTI

A tremor with moderate intensity shook parts of Andaman and Nicobar Islands on Wednesday.

No injury or casualty has been reported.

The epicentre of the tremor measuring 5.7 on the Richter Scale was between Little Andaman and Car Nicobar, said disaster management director Ashok Sharma.

The earthquake occurred at 1.12 PM and originated at a depth of 10 km, he said.

It may be recalled following a massive earthquake off Sumatra coast on April 11, a tsunami alert had been sounded in the islands.

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Volcanic Activity

Volcano Watch: Heavy Breathing in Santorini

Analysis by Sarah Simpson
Wed Apr 25, 2012 07:27 AM ET

SantoriniCliffsThe iconic white roofs of the Greek isles of Santorini may not stay that way forever. Those buildings are perched, after all, on the rim of a massive underwater volcano blamed for destroying the Minoan civilization of Crete. And it’s restless.

ANALYSIS: White Roofs Help Volcanoes Chill Out

About 3600 years ago, at the height of Minoan civilization, Santorini let loose with one of the largest volcanic eruptions in history. The explosion blanketed nearby islands with piles of ash hundreds of feet thick and sent out a gigantic tsunami that devastated Crete, about 68 miles to the south.

Smaller eruptions across the ensuing millennia ended abruptly in 1950. Then, after 60 years of calm, the caldera reawakened early last year with an escalating swarm of earthquakes. When geologists took a closer look, they could see the ground was swelling as well, as though the sleeping giant were yawning.

Read Full Article Here

Lava from Puu Oo spreads over coastal plain

By Star-Advertiser staff

POSTED: 03:35 p.m. HST, Apr 25, 2012
LAST UPDATED: 08:12 p.m. HST, Apr 25, 2012

COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
The flows active on the coastal plain for the last month and a half have entered Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in this Monday photo. These flows were just 80 f eet within the Park boundary, and 0.6 miles from the ocean.

Lava flows from Puu Oo vent are spreading over the coastal plain in Kalapana and over the weekend entered the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. But the flows are still about a half-mile from the ocean.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory released new lava photos taken Monday that show slow-moving breakouts of pahoehoe lava, with the characteristic look of bunched up rope as it cools.

Other photos released in the last month show how the lava has been spreading on the plain, rather than moving directly to the south, toward the ocean.

The plain is below the Pulama Pali and the Royal Gardens subdivision.

The observatory also released video and thermal images showing the summit lava lake rising at Halemaumau Crater.

A glow from the lava lake illuminates the gas plume coming from the vent at night. The lava level rises and falls as the volcano goes through inflation and deflation cycles. The lake level is about 230 feet below the floor of Halemaumau Crater

Current Emergencies

14 26.04.2012 Volcano Activity Mexico State of Puebla, [Popocatepetl Volcano] Damage level

  Short Time Event(s)

  25.04.2012 Volcano Eruption Ecuador Cordillera Oriental , [Tungurahua Volcano] Damage level Details

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

Hard Freeze Warning

GRAND FORKS ND

Rare Weather Phenomenon Hit Part of Twin Lakes Area this Morning

By: KTLO
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2012

National Weather Service Meteorologist B. J. Simpson says a rare weather phenomenon occurred this morning at the Twin Lakes Area. Between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. the temperature in Mountain Home rose some 18 degrees going from 64 to 82 degrees before dropping back into the upper 60’s just before 7 a.m. Local weather observer Chuck Beall at Mallard Point
reported about a 20 degree rise in a 90-minute span this morning before it dropped back.
Simpson on the phenomenon.

National Weather Service meteorologist B. J. Simpson on this mornings “heat burst” that saw the temperature rise some 18 degrees between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m.

Listen to the  Broadcast Here

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Storms, Flooding

Current Emergencies
Upd. Date (UTC) Event Country Location Level Details
  Today Flash Flood MultiCountries [Haiti and Dominican Republic] Damage level Details
1 19.04.2012 Biological Hazard China Ningxia Autonomous region, [Touying township] Damage level Details
3 24.04.2012 Epidemic Hazard Vietnam Province of Quang Ngai, [Son Ky Commune] Damage level Details
  Short Time Event(s)
Upd. Date (UTC) Event Country Location Level Details
  Today Vehicle Accident Indonesia Province of East Kalimantan, [Island of Borneo] Damage level Details
  Today Extreme Weather China Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, [Southern regions] Damage level Details
  Today Nuclear Event USA State of California, [Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant] Damage level Details
  Today Heat Wave USA State of Texas, San Angelo Damage level Details
  Today Epidemic Hazard India State of Maharastra, Mumbai (Bombay) [Girgaum] Damage level Details
  Today Flood Canada Province of British Columbia, [Princeton and Kimberley] Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 Vehicle Incident India State of West Bengal, Salar Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 HAZMAT USA State of South Carolina, Columbia [Columbia Nuclear Fuel plant. Westinghouse Ltd] Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 Vehicle Accident USA State of Florida, Deerfield Beach Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 Forest / Wild Fire New Zealand Northland, [Manawatu Region] Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 Flash Flood Afghanistan Province of Balkh, [Kushandi and Shulgara districts] Damage level Details
  25.04.2012 Biological Hazard Australia State of Queensland, [Gordonbrook Dam] Damage level Details
1 25.04.2012 Epidemic Hazard Taiwan Changhua County, [Fangyuan Township] Damage level Details
3 25.04.2012 Event into space USA States of Nevada and California, [Reno-Sparks area, Carson City, Minden, South Lake Tahoe, Placerville and Truckee] Damage level Details

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

LOUISVILLE KY
PADUCAH KY

Severe Thunderstorm Watch

LOUISVILLE KY
 NORMAN OK

Severe Weather Statement

LOUISVILLE KY
PADUCAH KY

Gale Warning

MARQUETTE MI
BALTIMORE CANYON TO HATTERAS CANYON
HATTERAS CANYON TO CAPE FEAR
CHICAGO IL
 ANCHORAGE ALASKA
GEORGES BANK...FROM THE NORTHEAST CHANNEL TO THE GREAT SOUTH
CHANNEL INCLUDING WATERS EAST OF CAPE COD...TO THE HAGUE LINE

Flood Warning

MISSOULA MT
PENDLETON OR
LAKE CHARLES LA
SPOKANE, WA
POCATELLO ID

Flash Flood Warning

JACKSON KY

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Solar Activity

3MIN News Apr25: Solar Watch/Magnetic Storm Watch

Published on Apr 25, 2012 by

Solar X-rays:Geomagnetic Field: >

Status
Status

From n3kl.org
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Solar System

NASA releases photo of meteor blazing across Nevada skies

Lisa Warren / NASA-JPL via AP

An image provided by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows a meteor over Reno, Nevada on April 22, 2012.

By David R Arnott, msnbc.com

NASA has released a photograph of a flaming meteor that unleashed a powerful sonic boom Sunday morning, rattling houses in California and Nevada when its disintegration released energy equivalent to a 5-kiloton explosion.

The former space rock entered Earth’s atmosphere around 8 a.m. PT on April 22 and exploded over California’s Central Valley, according to NASA, which pinpointed the location in a map posted on its website.

According to space.com, several witnesses initially thought they had experienced an earthquake.

“An event of this size might happen about once a year,” said Don Yeomans of NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program Office. “But most of them occur over the ocean or an uninhabited area, so getting to see one is something special.”

Hunt is on for pieces of van-sized California meteor

Wanted: fragments of a minivan-sized meteor that exploded over northern California and Nevada on Sunday morning and may well have survived to strike Earth.

Meteorites – meteors that make landfall – can provide crucial information about the chemical composition of the early solar system. “It’s like getting sample return without having to go there,” says Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office at the Marshall Space Flight Centre in Huntsville, Alabama.

However, meteorites are rare. Though meteors frequently streak across the sky, they tend to burn up before reaching the ground or they land in the sea. There’s reason to think the recent meteor is different.

Apart from exploding over land, it created a sonic boom, so it must have stayed intact for long enough for it to get down into the denser air low in the atmosphere – just 16 kilometres above the Earth’s surface, Cooke reckons – raising the chance that some of it hit the dirt.

Read Full Article Here

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Mysterious Booms / Rumblings

Minor temblor in Appling confirmed

Staff Writer

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 4:03 PM

Last updated 8:23 PM

A mysterious boom that shook portions of Appling late Monday was confirmed Tuesday as a minor earthquake, according to Columbia County authorities.

The event, which registered a 2.1 magnitude on the Richter scale, occurred at 9:26 p.m. and was located near Columbia and Appling-Harlem roads, Emergency Services Director Pam Tucker said.

The temblor was not listed on national earthquake monitors, but was confirmed by a seismologist at Savannah River Site, she said.

“This would explain the loud boom and shaking that many residents felt,” she said.

Earthquakes occur periodically in the area, which lies along the fall line, where the Coastal Plains and Piedmont regions meet.

For decades, scientists have monitored the region around the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ earth-and-concrete Thurmond Dam for seismic activity, which has included dozens of small quakes.

According to the National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo., Thurmond Lake is one of the major earthquake centers in Georgia and South Carolina, where pressure changes caused by water in reservoirs can promote seismic movement.

The largest recent quake in the lake area occurred in Lincoln County on Aug. 2, 1974, and registered 4.2. Three other quakes were recorded in nearby Edgefield County, S.C., in 1996, measuring 2.5, 2.3 and 2.2.

Experts say Augusta is unlikely to experience a serious quake.

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Articles of Interest

 Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

by Staff Writers
San Francisco CA (SPX) Apr 25, 2012


This figure shows the study area in Greece (Thermaikos Gulf). Red stars indicate drilling sites, where researchers have found high-energy layers, which are interpreted a of a tsunami origin. Credit: Klaus Reicherter, RWTH Aachen University.

In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village.

New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues.

The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and its modern counterpart, Nea Potidea) is located.

The sediment cores show signs of “high-energy” marine events like significant waves, and excavations in the suburbs of the nearby ancient city of Mende have uncovered a high-energy level dated to the 5th century B.C. The Mende layer contains much older marine seashells that were probably scoured from the ocean bed and deposited during a tsunami.

Earthquake forecast modeling in the North Aegean Basin near the peninsula suggests that future earthquakes in the area could produce significant tsunami waves, although the area is not included currently in the ten “tsunami” prone regions of Greece.

However, Reicherter and colleagues say their new findings suggest the Thermaikos Gulf where the peninsula is located should be included in tsunami hazard calculations, especially since the area is densely populated and home to many holiday resorts.

Reicherter will present his findings at the Annual Meeting of the Seismological Society of America (SSA) on April 19 in San Diego.

Related Links
Seismological Society of America
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest

New CU-NOAA monitoring system clarifies murky atmospheric questions

by Staff Writers
Boulder CO (SPX) Apr 25, 2012


A new technique to measure CO2 and trace gas emissions may be of help in monitoring greenhouse gases. Credit: National Park Service.

A University of Colorado Boulder-led team has developed a new monitoring system to analyze and compare emissions from man-made fossil fuels and trace gases in the atmosphere, a technique that likely could be used to monitor the effectiveness of measures regulating greenhouse gases.

The research team looked at atmospheric gas measurements taken every two weeks from aircraft over a six-year period over the northeast United States to collect samples of CO2 and other environmentally important gases. Their method allowed them to separate CO2 derived from fossil fuels from CO2 being emitted by biological sources like plant respiration, said CU-Boulder Senior Research Associate Scott Lehman, who led the study with CU-Boulder Research Associate John Miller.

The separation was made possible by the fact that CO2 released from the burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas has no carbon-14, since the half-life of that carbon radio isotope is about 5,700 years – far less than the age of fossil fuels, which are millions of years old.

In contrast, CO2 emitted from biological sources on Earth like plants is relatively rich in carbon-14 and the difference can be pinpointed by atmospheric scientists, said Lehman of CU’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research.

The team also measured concentrations of 22 other atmospheric gases tied to human activities as part of the study, said Miller of the CU-headquartered Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. The diverse set of gases impact climate change, air quality and the recovery of the ozone layer, but their emissions are poorly understood.

The authors used the ratio between the concentration level of each gas in the atmosphere and that of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to estimate the emission rates of the individual gases, said Miller.

In the long run, measuring carbon-14 in the atmosphere offers the possibility to directly measure country and state emissions of fossil fuel CO2, said Miller. The technique would be an improvement over traditional, “accounting-based” methods of estimating emission rates of CO2 and other gases, which generally rely on reports from particular countries or regions regarding the use of coal, oil and natural gas, he said.

“While the accounting-based approach is probably accurate at global scales, the uncertainties rise for smaller-scale regions,” said Miller, also a scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder. “And as CO2 emissions targets become more widespread, there may be a greater temptation to underreport. But we’ll be able to see through that.”

A paper on the subject was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, published by the American Geophysical Union. Co-authors include Stephen Montzka and Ed Dlugokencky of NOAA, Colm Sweeney, Benjamin Miller, Anna Karion, Jocelyn Turnbull and Pieter Tans of NOAA and CIRES, Chad Wolak of CU’s INSTAAR and John Southton of the University of California, Irvine.

One surprise in the study was that the researchers detected continued emissions of methyl chloroform and several other gases banned from production in the United States. Such observations emphasize the importance of independent monitoring, since the detection of such emissions could be overlooked by the widely used accounting-based estimation techniques, said Montzka.

The atmospheric air samples were taken every two weeks for six years by aircraft off the coastlines of Cape May, N.J., and Portsmouth, N.H.

Fossil fuel emissions have driven Earth’s atmospheric CO2 from concentrations of about 280 parts per million in the early 1800s to about 390 parts per million today, said Miller. The vast majority of climate scientists believe higher concentrations of the greenhouse gas CO2 in Earth’s atmosphere are directly leading to rising temperatures on the planet.

“We think the approach offered by this study can increase the accuracy of emissions detection and verification for fossil fuel combustion and a host of other man-made gases,” said Lehman. He said the approach of using carbon-14 has been supported by the National Academy of Sciences and could be an invaluable tool for monitoring greenhouse gases by federal agencies like NOAA.

Unfortunately, NOAA’s greenhouse gas monitoring program has been cut back by Congress in recent years, said Lehman. “Even if we lack the will to regulate emissions, the public has a right to know what is happening to our atmosphere. Sticking our heads in the sand is not a sound strategy,” he said.

Related Links
University of Colorado at Boulder
The Air We Breathe at TerraDaily.com

How humans have transformed Earth: Incredible video illuminates every road, shipping route and flight path

  • Three per cent of the planet’s land surface is under tarmac – an area the size of India

By Rob Waugh and Ted Thornhill
UPDATED: 10:26 EST, 25 April 2012

From space Earth looks completely untouched.

However, it’s deceptive, as a new video shows in mesmerising fashion.

‘Anthropocene’ demonstrates just how much the planet has been transformed by humans by illuminating every road, shipping route and flight path.

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO

Illuminating: Anthropocene is a three-minute rollercoaster ride through the latest chapter in the story of how one species has transformed a planetIlluminating: Anthropocene is a three-minute rollercoaster ride through the latest chapter in the story of how one species has transformed a planet

*************************************************************************************************************

[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquakes

EMSC     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 23:57 PM
3.6     14.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 23:47 PM
3.7     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 23:42 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 23:37 PM
2.5     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Albania
Apr 23 23:22 PM
2.4     7.0     MAP

GEONET     Canterbury
Apr 23 23:18 PM
3.0     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 23:00 PM
4.8     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 23:00 PM
4.5     10.0     MAP

USGS     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 23:00 PM
4.8     9.9     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 23 22:47 PM
3.0     56.0     MAP

USGS     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 22:40 PM
5.6     29.4     MAP

EMSC     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 22:40 PM
5.6     46.0     MAP

GEOFON     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 22:40 PM
5.6     31.0     MAP

USGS     Crete, Greece
Apr 23 22:15 PM
4.7     47.2     MAP

GEOFON     Crete, Greece
Apr 23 22:15 PM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Crete, Greece
Apr 23 22:15 PM
4.8     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 23 21:59 PM
2.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 21:34 PM
2.7     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Off West Coast Of Northern Sumatra
Apr 23 21:25 PM
4.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 21:24 PM
2.8     5.0     MAP

USGS     Molucca Sea
Apr 23 21:21 PM
5.7     42.6     MAP

EMSC     Molucca Sea
Apr 23 21:21 PM
5.7     60.0     MAP

GEOFON     Northern Molucca Sea
Apr 23 21:21 PM
5.6     68.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 23 21:19 PM
2.8     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Greece
Apr 23 21:11 PM
2.9     10.0     MAP

USGS     Kodiak Island Region, Alaska
Apr 23 21:03 PM
2.7     38.8     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 23 21:02 PM
3.2     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Poland
Apr 23 21:02 PM
3.8     10.0     MAP

USGS     Utah
Apr 23 20:55 PM
2.6     6.3     MAP

EMSC     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 20:53 PM
4.9     89.0     MAP

GEOFON     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 20:53 PM
5.0     93.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 20:14 PM
2.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 19:50 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 19:39 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 19:27 PM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Mediterranean Sea
Apr 23 19:15 PM
3.2     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 23 19:15 PM
2.5     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 18:52 PM
3.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 18:38 PM
2.5     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 23 18:20 PM
2.9     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 18:09 PM
2.6     8.0     MAP

EMSC     Southern Xinjiang, China
Apr 23 17:58 PM
4.5     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 17:55 PM
2.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 17:51 PM
2.7     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 17:47 PM
3.8     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Ionian Sea
Apr 23 17:42 PM
2.6     5.0     MAP

USGS     Greater Los Angeles Area, California
Apr 23 17:37 PM
3.9     13.1     MAP

USGS     Kermadec Islands Region
Apr 23 17:36 PM
5.8     116.7     MAP

EMSC     Kermadec Islands Region
Apr 23 17:36 PM
5.8     100.0     MAP

GEOFON     Kermadec Islands Region
Apr 23 17:36 PM
5.9     107.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 23 17:34 PM
3.7     26.0     MAP

USGS     Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii
Apr 23 16:53 PM
2.5     38.5     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:53 PM
2.6     6.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:50 PM
2.6     3.0     MAP

GEOFON     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 16:43 PM
4.2     98.0     MAP

EMSC     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 16:43 PM
4.4     15.0     MAP

USGS     Iran-iraq Border Region
Apr 23 16:43 PM
4.5     15.3     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:41 PM
2.7     5.0     MAP

USGS     Central California
Apr 23 16:36 PM
2.7     9.2     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 16:36 PM
3.2     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:33 PM
2.7     3.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:27 PM
3.2     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:22 PM
2.4     4.0     MAP

EMSC     Jujuy, Argentina
Apr 23 16:22 PM
4.4     211.0     MAP

USGS     Jujuy, Argentina
Apr 23 16:22 PM
4.4     211.2     MAP

GEOFON     Turkey
Apr 23 16:14 PM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:14 PM
4.3     2.0     MAP

USGS     Western Turkey
Apr 23 16:14 PM
4.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Georgia (sak’art’velo)
Apr 23 15:50 PM
4.1     5.0     MAP

USGS     Georgia (sak’art’velo)
Apr 23 15:50 PM
4.1     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Central Mediterranean Sea
Apr 23 15:23 PM
4.1     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Mediterranean Sea
Apr 23 15:23 PM
4.1     2.0     MAP

EMSC     Kepulauan Babar, Indonesia
Apr 23 14:54 PM
5.2     117.0     MAP

GEOFON     Banda Sea
Apr 23 14:54 PM
5.1     140.0     MAP

USGS     Kepulauan Babar, Indonesia
Apr 23 14:54 PM
5.2     129.7     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 14:40 PM
2.7     8.0     MAP

USGS     Southern Alaska
Apr 23 14:39 PM
2.6     18.5     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 23 14:32 PM
2.4     17.0     MAP

USGS     Central California
Apr 23 14:19 PM
2.7     9.1     MAP

GEONET     Canterbury
Apr 23 14:15 PM
3.5     5.0     MAP

USGS     Hindu Kush Region, Afghanistan
Apr 23 14:00 PM
4.0     39.4     MAP

EMSC     Hindu Kush Region, Afghanistan
Apr 23 14:00 PM
4.0     39.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 13:57 PM
2.5     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 23 13:42 PM
2.6     10.0     MAP

USGS     Dominican Republic Region
Apr 23 13:39 PM
3.2     89.6     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 12:59 PM
2.5     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 12:47 PM
2.6     9.0     MAP

USGS     Alaska Peninsula
Apr 23 12:38 PM
3.1     0.1     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 11:07 AM
2.8     7.0     MAP

EMSC     Corsica, France
Apr 23 11:00 AM
2.8     17.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 10:58 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga Region
Apr 23 10:57 AM
5.0     15.3     MAP

EMSC     Tonga Region
Apr 23 10:57 AM
5.1     16.0     MAP

GEOFON     South Of Tonga Islands
Apr 23 10:57 AM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 10:43 AM
2.5     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Romania
Apr 23 10:41 AM
2.9     119.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 23 09:53 AM
2.4     5.0     MAP

GEONET     Manawatu
Apr 23 09:52 AM
3.4     50.0     MAP

USGS     Southern California
Apr 23 09:00 AM
2.6     11.7     MAP

GEONET     Hawke’s Bay
Apr 23 08:15 AM
3.3     25.0     MAP

GEOFON     Jujuy Province, Argentina
Apr 23 07:45 AM
4.6     172.0     MAP

EMSC     Jujuy, Argentina
Apr 23 07:45 AM
4.4     182.0     MAP

USGS     Jujuy, Argentina
Apr 23 07:45 AM
4.3     176.9     MAP

USGS     Tonga Region
Apr 23 07:21 AM
4.8     42.9     MAP

EMSC     Tonga Region
Apr 23 07:21 AM
4.8     43.0     MAP

GEOFON     South Of Tonga Islands
Apr 23 07:21 AM
5.0     10.0     MAP

USGS     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 07:18 AM
4.6     50.3     MAP

EMSC     Kuril Islands
Apr 23 07:18 AM
4.6     44.0     MAP

EMSC     Romania
Apr 23 06:57 AM
3.0     138.0     MAP

EMSC     Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 23 06:33 AM
2.4     14.0     MAP

GEOFON     Carlsberg Ridge
Apr 23 06:32 AM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 06:29 AM
3.1     7.0     MAP

GEOFON     Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 23 06:28 AM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Dodecanese Islands, Greece
Apr 23 06:28 AM
4.1     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Tajikistan
Apr 23 06:27 AM
4.6     125.0     MAP

GEOFON     Tajikistan-xinjiang Border Region
Apr 23 06:27 AM
4.8     117.0     MAP

USGS     Tajikistan
Apr 23 06:27 AM
4.5     129.8     MAP

EMSC     Pyrenees
Apr 23 06:17 AM
2.9     1.0     MAP

EMSC     Greece
Apr 23 06:06 AM
2.8     7.0     MAP

GEOFON     Sumbawa Region, Indonesia
Apr 23 05:37 AM
4.6     71.0     MAP

EMSC     Sumbawa Region, Indonesia
Apr 23 05:37 AM
4.6     71.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 05:31 AM
2.9     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 05:19 AM
2.7     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Western Turkey
Apr 23 05:13 AM
2.7     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Ionian Sea
Apr 23 03:56 AM
2.9     5.0     MAP

EMSC     Ionian Sea
Apr 23 03:51 AM
3.8     2.0     MAP

GEOFON     Tonga Islands
Apr 23 03:08 AM
4.8     238.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga
Apr 23 03:08 AM
5.0     192.4     MAP

EMSC     Tonga
Apr 23 03:08 AM
5.0     200.0     MAP

USGS     Puerto Rico Region
Apr 23 03:04 AM
2.9     9.8     MAP

GEOFON     South Sandwich Islands Region
Apr 23 02:57 AM
4.9     10.0     MAP

USGS     South Sandwich Islands Region
Apr 23 02:57 AM
4.9     18.6     MAP

EMSC     South Sandwich Islands Region
Apr 23 02:57 AM
4.9     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 02:46 AM
2.4     9.0     MAP

EMSC     Aegean Sea
Apr 23 02:38 AM
2.6     5.0     MAP

EMSC     South Of Tonga
Apr 23 02:14 AM
5.1     42.0     MAP

USGS     Tonga Region
Apr 23 02:14 AM
5.1     42.8     MAP

GEOFON     South Of Tonga Islands
Apr 23 02:14 AM
5.2     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Poland
Apr 23 02:01 AM
2.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Albania
Apr 23 02:00 AM
2.8     80.0     MAP

EMSC     Cyprus Region
Apr 23 01:40 AM
3.2     2.0     MAP

USGS     Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 23 01:31 AM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 23 01:31 AM
4.3     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Apr 23 01:27 AM
3.3     10.0     MAP

GEOFON     Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 23 01:13 AM
4.4     13.0     MAP

EMSC     Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 23 01:13 AM
4.7     10.0     MAP

USGS     Oaxaca, Mexico
Apr 23 01:13 AM
4.6     10.0     MAP

EMSC     Central Turkey
Apr 23 01:00 AM
2.4     7.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 00:40 AM
2.5     11.0     MAP

EMSC     Eastern Turkey
Apr 23 00:35 AM
2.5     6.0     MAP

 

 

Sources:  USGSEMSCGFZGEONET

**********************************************************************************************************

Volcanic Activity

 

 

  Current Emergencies
Upd. Date (UTC) Event Country Location Level Details
1 19.04.2012 Biological Hazard China Ningxia Autonomous region, [Touying township] Damage level
Details
3 24.04.2012 Epidemic Hazard Vietnam Province of Quang Ngai, [Son Ky Commune] Damage level
Details
12 23.04.2012 Volcano Activity Mexico State of Puebla, [Popocatepetl Volcano] Damage level Photo available! Details

 Short Time Event(s)
Upd. Date (UTC) Event Country Location Level Details
  Today Biological Hazard Australia State of Queensland, [Gordonbrook Dam] Damage level
Details
  Today Landslide Colombia Departmento de Caquetá, [Malvinas section, Florencia region] Damage level
Details
  Today Enviroment Pollution USA State of Washington, [Coastal area] Damage level
Details
  Today Epidemic Hazard USA Capital city, Washington D.C. Damage level
Details
  Today Volcano Activity Indonesia North Sulawesi, [Mt Lokon Volcano] Damage level
Details
  23.04.2012 Volcano Eruption Ecuador Cordillera Oriental , [Tungurahua Volcano] Damage level
Details
  23.04.2012 Explosion Norway Ostfold, Fredrikstad Damage level
Details
  23.04.2012 Heat Wave USA State of Nevada, Las Vegas Damage level
Details
  23.04.2012 Enviroment Pollution Russia [Asia] Nenets Autonomous Okrug, [Trebs oil field, Timan-Pechora Basin] Damage level
Details
  23.04.2012 Flash Flood Kenya State of Rift Valley, [Hells Gate National Park] Damage level
Details
1 24.04.2012 Epidemic Hazard Taiwan Changhua County, [Fangyuan Township] Damage level
Details
3 24.04.2012 Event into space USA States of Nevada and California, [Reno-Sparks area, Carson City, Minden, South Lake Tahoe, Placerville and Truckee]

 

 

 

 

Tungurahua Erupts Launching Gravel to Nearby Town

Tungurahua Erupts Launching Gravel to Nearby TownPhoto: Tungurahua’s recent eruption makes gravel fall on local town.

Click Here to Enlarge Photo

Over the weekend, the Tungurahua’s volcanic eruption had a strong explosion that caused gravel to fall down in the nearby town of Pillate, Ecuador.

The explosion, characterized by its loud “cannon ball shot”, was immediately detected by locals and scientists observing the volcano’s progress. The explosion was later followed by a slight tremor and a constant pulsation of “high energy” said reports.

The constant cloud coverage surrounding the volcano has caused scientists, from the Geophysical Institute branch of the National Polytechnic School to have trouble determining its current state. Most of the direct observations are conducted in the Guadalupe Observatory, the closest in the vicinity.

Tungurahua, located in the Andes Mountains in Ecuador, is 5,016 meters high and its eruptions began in 1999. Since then, the volcano has transitioned from times of high activity and those of calm.

However, Tungurahua is not the only volcano causing extreme damage and concern in the Hispanic world. Popocatépetl, located in Mexico City, has also been under close watch due to its recent activity which included ash blasts.

 

 

Residents evacuated over eruption fears

The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Tue, 04/24/2012 7:31 AM

Local residents around Mount Lokon in Tomohon, North Sulawesi, have been asked to evacuate the area, following the mountain’s steady increase of activity since 4 p.m. Monday.

“We are on alert status [Level 3],” National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said on Monday.

“We ask that local disaster mitigation agencies follow the technical recommendations we have given them. There should be no community activity within a 2.5 kilometer radius of the volcano’s crater.”

Mt Lokon is located on the outskirts of Tomohon. It is 1,580 meters high and is located 20 kilometers west from Manado, North Sulawesi.

According to the Volcanic and Geological Disaster Mitigation Center (PVMBG), Mt Lokon last erupted on June 14, 2011, sending ash and debris 1,500 meters into the sky.

The following day, another eruption threw volcanic material 600 meters into the air. Two residents died as a result of the eruptions.

Other eruptions occurred in 1991 and 2001, with the earlier one causing Rp 1 billion (US$108,000) in damage, as well as the death of Swiss tourist Vivian Clavel.

The 2001 eruption covered Manado in ash and debris. The dust coming from the mountain formed a 400 meter plume. (png)

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Extreme Temperatures/ Weather

Late snow storm sucker-punches US northeast

by Staff Writers
New York (AFP) April 23, 2012

Just as the US northeast was easing from a mild winter into a historically warm spring, a storm left thousands without power and prematurely leafy trees sagging under snow.

The spring storm that started Sunday and moved slowly through on Monday left tens of thousands of people without electricity, including nearly 25,000 in New York state, Governor Andrew Cuomo said.

“Outage numbers are likely to continue to climb,” his office said.

The hard-hit areas ranged from upstate New York and Pennsylvania to West Virginia and Maryland.

Flood watches were in place in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, the national weather service said, while on higher ground, the rain turned to heavy snow.

An inch (2.5 centimeter) an hour of snow was expected, with 14 inches (35 centimeter) already recorded in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, weather.com reported.

“Winds will combine with heavy snow to reduce visibilities, leading to hazardous driving conditions through Monday night from western New York to northern West Virginia,” the weather site said.

Trees could collapse under the weight of early leaves and wet snow.

This will “likely lead to downed trees and powerlines, leading to power outages, possibly for several days,” weather.com said. “These downed trees may make roads impassable in some areas.”

The region saw record warm spring temperatures after an unusually mild winter.

Related Links
It’s A White Out at TerraDaily.com

 

 

 

Freeze Warning

BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
BLACKSBURG VA
CHARLESTON WV
 MORRISTOWN TN
MOUNT HOLLY NJ
GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG SC



Red Flag Warning

JACKSONVILLE FL
GRAND JUNCTION CO
CHEYENNE WY
 TALLAHASSEE FL

***********************************************************************************************************

Storms, Flooding

By , Senior Meteorologist
Apr 23, 2012; 3:14 PM ET

A small tornado has been caught on video on the ground in the Netherlands.

The twister was stirring up dust over tilled land in southeastern Netherlands, near the Germany border, late last Friday, local time.

Although the video did not clearly show a funnel, it did reveal dark cloud bases, confirming that it was more than a mere “dust devil.”

Weather observations from nearby Maastricht, seen by meteorologists at AccuWeather.com, indicated that a thunderstorm was in the area at the reported time of the tornado.

Even so, temperature and dew point, key markers used in forecasting tornadoes, were relatively low, suggesting that the phenomenon was an example of a “cold air funnel.”

Dutch-language text accompanying the video seemed to indicate that it showed a “confirmed” EF0-rated tornado.

Tornadoes are not unheard-of in western Europe. For instance, “weak” tornadoes are occasionally sighted in the United Kingdom.

 

 

 

Winter Storm Warning

 

BUFFALO NY



Flood Warning

 

SPOKANE, WA
PENDLETON OR
LAKE CHARLES LA





 


 


************************************************************************************************************

 

Climate Change

CU research shows warming climate threatens ecology at mountain research site west of Boulder

by Staff Writers
Boulder CO (SPX) Apr 24, 2012


Climate warming is affecting high mountain ecological systems at NSF-funded site west of Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado.

A series of papers published this month on ecological changes at 26 global research sites – including one administered by the University of Colorado Boulder in the high mountains west of the city – indicates that ecosystems dependent on seasonal snow and ice are the most sensitive to changes in climate.

The six papers appeared in the April issue of the journal BioScience. The papers were tied to data gathered at sites in North America, Puerto Rico, the island of Moorea near Tahiti, and Antarctica, which are known as Long-Term Ecological Research, or LTER, sites and are funded by the National Science Foundation.

CU-Boulder’s Niwot Ridge site, one of the five original LTER sites designated by NSF in 1980, encompasses several thousand acres of subalpine forest, tundra, talus slopes, glacial lakes and wetlands stretching up to more than 13,000 feet on top of the Continental Divide.

As part of the new reports, LTER scientists in association with NSF have come up with a new evaluation system of the research sites that brings in the “human dimension,” said CU-Boulder Professor Mark Williams, the principal investigator on CU’s Niwot Ridge LTER site.

“In the past we tried to look at pristine ecosystems, but those are essentially gone,” said Williams. “So we’ve come up with an approach that integrates human activities with our ecological research.”

One of the six papers, “Long-Term Studies Detect Effects of Disappearing Ice and Snow,” was led by Portland State University Professor Andrew Fountain and co-authored by several others, including Williams, a geography professor and a fellow at CU-Boulder’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. According to the authors, there are big changes occurring in temperate areas beyond the poles, where warming temperatures have triggered declines in polar bear and penguin populations.

Key measurements at the Niwot Ridge site – which has climate records going back more than 60 years thanks to pioneering work by CU biology Professor John Marr in the 1950s – are temperature and precipitation logs from two stations, one at 12,700 feet in elevation and a second at 10,000 feet.

Although the climate at the higher meteorological station – by far the highest long-term climate station in the United States – has been getting slightly wetter and cooler in recent decades, the station at 10,000 feet in a subalpine forest is getting significantly warmer and drier.

Williams said warming at 10,000 feet and lower may be causing enhanced surface water evaporation and transport that moves westward and higher in the mountains, with the water vapor being converted to snow that falls atop the Continental Divide.

Snow cover increases reflectivity of incoming sunlight, further cooling the alpine area and overriding the overall warming signal in the West, which is believed to be a 2 or 3 degree Fahrenheit rise over the past decade due to rising greenhouse gases.

“These two Niwot Ridge stations are less than five miles away from each other – you can see one from the other – but there are totally different trends occurring,” he said. In many places in the mountainous West, only a small increase in temperature can cause the climate to cross a “threshold” that triggers earlier and more intense snow melting, said Williams, principal investigator on a 2011 grant of $5.9 million from NSF to CU to continue long-term ecological studies at Niwot Ridge.

With snowpack roughly half of normal in 2012 and snow melting in the high country that began more than three months earlier than last year, the outlook is not good for montane and subalpine forests in Colorado and other parts of the West, he said.

Low snowpack and early melt invariably have a huge impact on the Colorado economy, said Williams. Despite near record snowfall in 2010-11, warming temperatures have caused less snow and shorter winters in recent years and affected the ski industry – one of Colorado’s largest economic drivers, said Williams.

As for the future of flora and fauna in subalpine and alpine regions like Niwot Ridge, there will be “winners and losers” as the climate warms, said Williams. Animals like American pikas, potato-sized denizens of alpine talus slopes in the West, need heavy snowpack to insulate them from cold winters as they huddle in hay piles beneath the rocks. In lower, more isolated mountain ranges in Nevada, researchers are already seeing a marked decline in American pika populations.

The predictions of the study authors are that microbes, plants and animals that depend on snow and ice will decrease if they are unable to move higher into areas of snow and ice. But shallower snow could cause big game like deer and elk to move higher in altitude to browse, according to the authors.

A big concern in temperate mountains like Colorado is the heath and welfare of coniferous trees as the climate changes, said Williams. “Trees in Colorado’s mountains are under a tremendous amount of stress due to drought and pine beetle outbreaks. And the fire danger, at least now, is through the roof,” he said.

“If some of these forested areas disappear, I think the chances of them coming back are pretty low,” Williams said. “The climate they grew up in doesn’t exist anymore. As we lose trees to drought, beetles and wildfires, we are likely to see an invasion of grasses and shrubs in areas where we have never seen them, causing a complete restructuring of our forest community.”

As snowline moves up due to warming temperatures, so will parts of alpine tundra in the West, Williams said. “The tundra may be able to function reasonably well for several decades – it will be awhile before warming climate change pushes the tundra off the tops of mountains. But that is the direction we are heading.”

Williams co-authored three of the six BioScience studies, including the main LTER overview paper and a paper on ecosystem and human influences on stream flow in response to climate change at LTER sites. CU-Boulder Professor Tim Seastedt was a co-author on another of the papers, a study on the past, present and future roles of long-term experiments in the LTER network.

Related Links
University of Colorado at Boulder
Climate Science News – Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation

Warming set to make corn prices pop

by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) April 22, 2012

Climate change will more than quadruple US corn prices in years of peak volatility, environmental scientists said on Sunday.

In a study of the factors that drive up prices in the world’s key market for corn, more frequent heatwaves, predicted as a result of global warming, proved far more important than government policies to promote biofuels or than higher oil prices.

“Severe heat is the big hammer,” said Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford University in California.

“Even one or two degrees of global warming is likely to substantially increase heatwaves that lead to low-yield years and more price volatility.”

The study found that climate change would increase year-on-year corn price volatility by a factor of 4.1.

The fluctuations were based on a projection for 2020-40 compared to volatility in recent history.

The study, published in Nature Climate Change, used a computer scenario based on warming that ultimately reaches 2.0 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over pre-industrial times.

Many climate scientists say 2 C (3.6 F), enshrined as a goal by the UN, is an under-estimate.

Current trends of carbon emissions are placing Earth on a track for warming of 3 C (5.4 F) or more, according to some estimates. This figure is the overall global average, so it disguises big regional variations, including seasonal bouts of extreme weather.

Before the results of the study became clear, it was not obvious to Diffenaugh that climate change would be a more important factor than higher oil prices or government policies to promote biofuels.

“Frankly, I was surprised that climate had the largest effect of these three influences. These are substantial changes in price volatility that come from relatively moderate global warming,” Diffenaugh noted.

The researchers found that climate’s yo-yo effect was accentuated by government support for biofuels.

By growing corn for fuel, this removed a buffer of surplus grain, making the market more inelastic.

“Our results suggest that energy policy decisions are likely to interact with climate change to affect corn price volatility, and that the market effect of a binding biofuel mandate is likely to intensify as the climate warms,” said Diffenbaugh.

Unless corn farmers increase their crops’ heat tolerance by as much as 3.3 C (6 F), areas of high production will have to move north from the current US corn belt, the researchers said in a press release.

“By the time today’s elementary schoolers graduate from colleage, the US corn belt could be forced to move to the Canadian border to escape devastating heat waves brought on by rising global temperatures,” it said.

Related Links
Farming Today – Suppliers and Technology

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Solar Activity

2MIN News Apr23: CME Impact, Full Updates, Quake Watch Extended

 

 

Reports of SeaGulls Moving Inland/US & China and Solar Update

Published on Apr 23, 2012 by

Also a Solar Update.
Links @ http://www.mrcometwatch.com

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Space

Space Weather News for April 23, 2012
http://spaceweather.com

SIERRA FIREBALL DECODED:

An explosion over California that rattled homes across at least two states on Sunday, April 22nd, has been analyzed by NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office:  It was a natural meteoroid the size of a mini-van. Analysts say the space rock exploded in the atmosphere with an energy equal to nearly 4 kilotons of TNT and might have sprayed the Sierra Nevada mountains with meteorites.  Visit http://spaceweather.com for more information.

AURORA WATCH:

At the time this alert is being written on April  23rd, a minor geomagnetic storm is underway. The storm is likely due to Earth’s passage through the wake of a CME that swept past our planet earlier in the day.  Sign up for aurora alerts at http://spaceweathertext.com (text) or http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

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Articles of Interest

Japan chemical plant blast kills one

TOKYO: A blast at a chemical plant in western Japan killed one worker and injured at least fifteen others on Sunday, police said.

The accident occurred at a factory operated by comprehensive chemical manufacturer Mitsui Chemicals in Yamaguchi prefecture, some 700 kilometres (434 miles) southwest of Tokyo, an official at Yamaguchi prefectural police said. The deceased was a 22-year-old male employee, police said, with Jiji Press identifying him as Shota Sunakawa.

Nine other company employees and workers for subcontract companies were severely or slightly injured, while at least four residents in the neighbourhood were slightly injured, police said. “The fire is not extinguished yet as the fire department is cooling the plant while waiting for combustible materials to burn out,” he told.

“It may take more than a few days for us to find out the cause of the accident, but we are investigating it as a case of professional negligence resulting in death and injury,” he said. The plant had been manufacturing materials to make adhesives, he said. afp

 

 

Mayan Culture Holds Secrets for Today (Part I)

Russian researcher looks for answers to earth’s future

By Uliana Kim
Epoch Times Staff

Thousands of people gathered at the Kukulkan Pyramid, in Chichen Itza, Yucatan

Thousands of people gathered at the Kukulkan Pyramid, in Chichen Itza, Yucatan, southeastern Mexico, during the spring equinox celebration 2006. The steps of the pyramid throw the shadow of a snake onto the side wall of the staircases. (Elizabeth Ruiz/AFP/Getty Images)

Kiril Novoselsky, professor of economics and a consultant for several museums, recently conducted a field trip to the Yucatan Peninsula and Cozumel Island, Mexico. On his way through Mayan football fields, pyramids, and prophecies, he came across Russian influence from the past century.

Near the famous Chichen Itza Pyramid, he discovered Pre-Columbian fields that were created for ball games.

“I was very surprised by the fact that the Mayans were obsessed with football,” said Novoselsky, who is also a member of the Russian Geographical Society. “Football was a sacred game. The captain of the winning team was sacrificed to gods, and it was a big honor.”

If I hadn’t read anything about the topic before, I would think that these things aren’t from the current human civilization.

—Kiril Novoselsky

The golden age of classic Mayan civilization ended in the late 9th century. Cities became empty and silent. Lianas and roots of trees penetrated stone walls of temples and pyramids, destroying them.

Archeologists classify several periods of Mayan civilization: pre-classic (2000 to 300 B.C.), classic (300 B.C. to A.D. 900), and post-classic (900 to 1530).

During these last centuries, highly populated and economically developed cities disappeared in jungles. The Mayan city Tikal, mentioned on a stela in 869, was the last historical mention of a Mayan city.

Invasions of other tribes as well as wars are considered possible reasons for the Mayan civilization’s decline. The true reason, however, still remains a mystery to scientists.

Read Full Article Here

 

 

Mayan Culture Holds Secrets for Today (Part II)

Russian researcher looks for answers to earth’s future

By Uliana Kim
Epoch Times Staff

The coastal archaeological site Tulum, located on the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, on the Caribbean Sea, is one of the best-preserved Pre-Columbian Mayan sites. (CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP/Getty Images)

Another interesting complex is Fort Tulum, on the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. During the time of the Mayan civilization’s decline, several tribes moved to the coast and built Fort Tulum to protect inhabitants from attacks of fellow tribes.

“All those grey stones were once colored in bright colors. Different colors symbolized different nature powers: heaven, earth, moon, sun, fire, and so on,” Novoselsky said.

In my opinion, all these prophecies are a chance to think about our behavior, the meaning of life, about how to improve yourself and other people’s life, and how to live in harmony.

—Kiril Novoselsky

Mayan Prophecies

Mayan life is described in a sacred book called “Popol Vuh.” Novoselsky said it could be compared to the Bible, “but all information is in allegoric form.” “There are some interpretations, but I think they are all far from the truth,” he said.

All commentaries were either destroyed or written with the hieroglyphic script, which is difficult to read. “Most secrets are still hidden. One of the most popular interpretations is the prophecy about the end of the days in 2012,” Novoselsky said.

As to whether he believes in this prophecy, Novoselsky said, “As a scientist, I investigated this question.”

He mentioned the well-known esoteric researcher Drunvalo Melchisedek, who had discussed this question with Guatemalan priests and found out that the predicted transformation would be a process that would happen gradually—not in two days, but during 200 years.

“In their opinion, the year 2012 is a milestone of the old epoch and the beginning of something new, maybe the beginning of a new culture. And they emphasized that this would happen slowly and gradually without cataclysms and earthquakes,” Novoselsky said. “People living in the center of the Mayan civilization haven’t any panic about this prophecy.”

He added, “In my opinion, all these prophecies are a chance to think about our behavior, the meaning of life, about how to improve yourself and other people’s life, and how to live in harmony.”

Hundreds of people gathered at the Kukulkan Pyramid, in Chichen Itza, Yucatan, southeastern Mexico, during the spring equinox celebration 2005. The steps of the pyramid throw the shadow of a snake onto the side wall of the staircases. (LUIS BARRERA/AFP/Getty Images)

Read Full Article Here

 

 

Evidence for a geologic trigger of the Cambrian explosion

by Staff Writers
Madison WI (SPX) Apr 24, 2012


The results of this Cambrian explosion are well documented in the fossil record, but its cause – why and when it happened, and perhaps why nothing similar has happened since – has been a mystery.

The oceans teemed with life 600 million years ago, but the simple, soft-bodied creatures would have been hardly recognizable as the ancestors of nearly all animals on Earth today.

Then something happened. Over several tens of millions of years – a relative blink of an eye in geologic terms – a burst of evolution led to a flurry of diversification and increasing complexity, including the expansion of multicellular organisms and the appearance of the first shells and skeletons.

The results of this Cambrian explosion are well documented in the fossil record, but its cause – why and when it happened, and perhaps why nothing similar has happened since – has been a mystery.

New research shows that the answer may lie in a second geological curiosity – a dramatic boundary, known as the Great Unconformity, between ancient igneous and metamorphic rocks and younger sediments.

“The Great Unconformity is a very prominent geomorphic surface and there’s nothing else like it in the entire rock record,” says Shanan Peters, a geoscience professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who led the new work. Occurring worldwide, the Great Unconformity juxtaposes old rocks, formed billions of years ago deep within the Earth’s crust, with relatively young Cambrian sedimentary rock formed from deposits left by shallow ancient seas that covered the continents just a half billion years ago.

Named in 1869 by explorer and geologist John Wesley Powell during the first documented trip through the Grand Canyon, the Great Unconformity has posed a longstanding puzzle and has been viewed – by Charles Darwin, among others – as a huge gap in the rock record and in our understanding of the Earth’s history.

But Peters says the gap itself – the missing time in the geologic record – may hold the key to understanding what happened.

In the April 19 issue of the journal Nature, he and colleague Robert Gaines of Pomona College report that the same geological forces that formed the Great Unconformity may have also provided the impetus for the burst of biodiversity during the early Cambrian.

“The magnitude of the unconformity is without rival in the rock record,” Gaines says. “When we pieced that together, we realized that its formation must have had profound implications for ocean chemistry at the time when complex life was just proliferating.”

“We’re proposing a triggering mechanism for the Cambrian explosion,” says Peters. “Our hypothesis is that biomineralization evolved as a biogeochemical response to an increased influx of continental weathering products during the last stages in the formation of the Great Unconformity.”

Peters and Gaines looked at data from more than 20,000 rock samples from across North America and found multiple clues, such as unusual mineral deposits with distinct geochemistry, that point to a link between the physical, chemical, and biological effects.

During the early Cambrian, shallow seas repeatedly advanced and retreated across the North American continent, gradually eroding away surface rock to uncover fresh basement rock from within the crust. Exposed to the surface environment for the first time, those crustal rocks reacted with air and water in a chemical weathering process that released ions such as calcium, iron, potassium, and silica into the oceans, changing the seawater chemistry.

The basement rocks were later covered with sedimentary deposits from those Cambrian seas, creating the boundary now recognized as the Great Unconformity.

Evidence of changes in the seawater chemistry is captured in the rock record by high rates of carbonate mineral formation early in the Cambrian, as well as the occurrence of extensive beds of glauconite, a potassium-, silica-, and iron-rich mineral that is much rarer today.

The influx of ions to the oceans also likely posed a challenge to the organisms living there. “Your body has to keep a balance of these ions in order to function properly,” Peters explains. “If you have too much of one you have to get rid of it, and one way to get rid of it is to make a mineral.”

The fossil record shows that the three major biominerals – calcium phosphate, now found in bones and teeth; calcium carbonate, in invertebrate shells; and silicon dioxide, in radiolarians – appeared more or less simultaneously around this time and in a diverse array of distantly related organisms.

The time lag between the first appearance of animals and their subsequent acquisition of biominerals in the Cambrian is notable, Peters says. “It’s likely biomineralization didn’t evolve for something, it evolved in response to something – in this case, changing seawater chemistry during the formation of the Great Unconformity. Then once that happened, evolution took it in another direction.” Today those biominerals play essential roles as varied as protection (shells and spines), stability (bones), and predation (teeth and claws).

Together, the results suggest that the formation of the Great Unconformity may have triggered the Cambrian explosion.

“This feature explains a lot of lingering questions in different arenas, including the odd occurrences of many types of sedimentary rocks and a very remarkable style of fossil preservation. And we can’t help but think this was very influential for early developing life at the time,” Gaines says.

Far from being a lack of information, as Darwin thought, the gaps in the rock record may actually record the mechanism as to why the Cambrian explosion occurred in the first place, Peters says.

“The French composer Claude Debussy said, ‘Music is the space between the notes.’ I think that is the case here,” he says. “The gaps can have more information, in some ways, about the processes driving Earth system change, than the rocks do. It’s both together that give the whole picture.”

Related Links
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com

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[In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit, for research and/or educational purposes. This constitutes ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material.]

Earthquake

 

Magnitude 4.6 earthquake, Cyprus Region

UTC Date / Time Mar 13 10:44 AM

Depth 10 km GEO: Longitude 31.260 GEO: Latitude 35.210

Source
GEOFON

 

Magnitude 4.5 earthquake, CYPRUS REGION

UTC Date / Time Mar 13 10:44 AM

Depth 16 km GEO: Longitude 31.540 GEO: Latitude 35.610

Source
EMSC

 

Magnitude 4.9 earthquake, Vanuatu

UTC Date / Time Mar 13 19:43 PM

Depth 188 km GEO: Longitude 166.959 GEO: Latitude -13.127

Source
USGS

 

Storms


In the Indian Ocean –
Tropical cyclone 17s (Lua) was located approximately 285 nm north of Learmonth, Australia.

Australia – The cyclone threat to Darwin is easing, with a tropical low heading further south than forecast and failing to gain strength as expected.

 

Volcanic Activity

 

ItalyThe volcanic caldera on the picturesque tourist island of Santorini is showing signs of unrest. But researchers detecting the caldera’s movement say it doesn’t necessarily mean an eruption is imminent. The Greek island was the site of one of the most massive volcanic eruptions in history 3,600 years ago. That eruption, which created tsunamis 40 feet (12 meters) tall, may have spawned the legend of the lost city of Atlantis. The volcano last erupted in 1950, on a much smaller scale.
Global positioning system (GPS) sensors placed on the caldera have detected renewed movement after decades of peace. The earth around the caldera (a depression at the top of a volcano) is deforming, or expanding outward. GPS instruments on the northern part of Santorini have moved between 1.9 and 3.5 inches (5 to 9 centimeters) since January 2011. “What we’re seeing now is the first significant deformation and the first deformation that has any significant earthquake activity associated with it.” In the same time period, the magma chamber under Santorini has swollen by almost 500 million cubic feet (14 million cubic meters).
It’s unlikely that the deforming caldera portends an eruption. Excavations of extinct volcanoes suggest that 90 percent of the time, below-ground magma movements don’t end in eruption. A similar caldera system, the Long Valley Caldera in California, started deforming in 1980. It then quieted again until 1989, repeating the cycle in 1997 and 2002, with nary an eruption. If a Santorini eruption did occur, it would be nothing like the Minoan eruption of 1650 B.C. That eruption was a once-in-100,000-year event, and the expansion of the magma chamber happening now is only 1 percent of what would have gone on prior to the ancient blast. Geophysicists are keeping an eye on the caldera, however. An eruption could generate local tsunamis within the Santorini archipelago, damaging ports and disrupting ship traffic. Even if the volcano doesn’t erupt, the shifting caldera could increase earthquake risk, and the island cliffs are vulnerable. “We don’t need an eruption to have earthquake-induced landslides.” There’s no telling how long the deformation will continue, but it could stretch years or decades, perhaps cycling between activity and peace. “It is one of very few of these really large caldera volcanoes. So any information we gather from ongoing activity adds significantly to our database of how these systems evolve.”

 

Radiation

 

Fukushima’s Dangerous Myths

The myth that Fukushima radiation levels were too low to harm humans persists, a year after the meltdown. A March 2, 2012 New York Times article quoted Vanderbilt University professor John Boice: “there’s no opportunity for conducting epidemiological studies that have any chance for success – the doses are just too low.” Wolfgang Weiss of the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation also recently said doses observed in screening of Japanese people “are very low.”

http://www.sott.net/articles/show/242804-Fukushima-s-Dangerous-Myths

 

Severe Rainfall – Drought

Mexico withers under worst drought in 71 years
Country’s extreme conditions could cause widespread hunger for years to come

San Luis de la Paz, Mexico — Odon Leon has grown vegetables in San Luis de la Paz for 50 years, planting tomatoes, peppers, and onions. He says the arid community is fortunate to have wells they can use to water crops, but the water is getting scarcer amid Mexico’s worst drought in 71 years. This year, Mr. Leon could only irrigate half of what he usually does, meaning his water-dependent onions suffered: The harvest was a fifth of what it usually is, the lowest ever.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46685130/ns/world_news/#.T2AzPbQycdQ

Louisiana: 15 inches of rain in five hours

States of emergency were in force Tuesday in four Louisiana parishes after torrential rain left homes and roads under several feet of water. Hundreds fled their homes and dozens of motorists had to be rescued.

Flooding closed the major highway through St. Landry Parish, and many roads across the four parishes remained closed on Tuesday.

http://www.sott.net/articles/show/242856-Louisiana-15-inches-of-rain-in-five-hours

 

Misc

 

2MIN News Mar13: Weather, Quakes, Geomagnetic Update