Tag Archive: climate change


 

The World Meteorological Organisation revealed in Statement on the Status of the Global Climate, that during the August to September 2012 melting season, the Arctic’s sea ice cover was just 3.4 million square kilometres (1.32 million square miles). That is equal to 18% less than record low set in 2007. Last year was the ninth warmest year since recorded history and the 27th consecutive year that the global land and ocean temperatures were above the 1961–1990 average. The 2012 global land and ocean surface temperature during January–December 2012 is estimated to be 0.45°C (±0.11°C) above the 1961–1990 average of 14.0°C. The years 2001–2012...
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The World Meteorological Organisation revealed in Statement on the Status of the Global Climate, that during the August to September 2012 melting season, the Arctic’s sea ice cover was just 3.4 million square kilometres (1.32 million square miles). That is equal to 18% less than record low set in 2007. Last year was the ninth warmest year since recorded history and the 27th consecutive year that the global land and ocean temperatures were above the 1961–1990 average.

The 2012 global land and ocean surface temperature during January–December 2012 is estimated to be 0.45°C (±0.11°C) above the 1961–1990 average of 14.0°C. The years 2001–2012 were all among the top 13 warmest years on record. Last year’s warming came despite a cooling La Nina at the beginning of the year.

Above-average temperatures were observed across most of the globe’s land surface areas, most notably North America, southern Europe, western Russia, parts of northern Africa and southern South America while cooler than average conditions were observed across Alaska, parts of northern and eastern Australia, and central Asia.

Global land and ocean surface temperature anomalies with respect to the 1961-1990 base period (Source: WMO)

Precipitation also varied, with drier-than-average conditions across much of the central United States, northern Mexico, northeastern Brazil, central Russia, and south-central Australia. Northern Europe, western Africa, north-central Argentina, western Alaska, and most of northern China were meanwhile wetter than average.

Annual precipitation anomalies for global land areas for 2012; gridded 1.0-degree rain gauge-based analysis as percentages of average focusing on the 1951–2000 base period (Source: Global Precipitation Climatology Centre, Deutscher Wetterdienst, Germany)

According to data from the Global Snow Laboratory, snow cover extent in North America during the 2011/2012 winter was below average. The previous two winters (2009/2010 and 2010/2011) had the largest and third largest snow cover extent, respectively, since records began in 1966.

On the other side, the Eurasian continent snow cover extent during the winter was above average, resulting in the fourth largest snow cover extent on record. Overall, the northern hemisphere snow cover extent was above average – 590000 km2 above the average of 45.2 million km2.

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Antarctic sea ice cover is increasing under the effects of climate change

Antarctic sea ice drift caused by changing winds are responsible for observed increases in Antarctic sea ice cover in the past two decades according to new study by British Antarctic Survey and NASA. While Arctic experienced dramatic record ice loss due the climate change, Antarctic sea ice cover has increased due the climate change. Antarctic  ice cover expands to an area roughly twice the size of Europe during the winter season.  By the end of winter the ice covers an area of 19 million square kilometres, more than doubling the size of the continent. More than five million daily ice-motion measurements by four U.S....
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Antarctic sea ice drift caused by changing winds are responsible for observed increases in Antarctic sea ice cover in the past two decades according to new study by British Antarctic Survey and NASA. While Arctic experienced dramatic record ice loss due the climate change, Antarctic sea ice cover has increased due the climate change. Antarctic  ice cover expands to an area roughly twice the size of Europe during the winter season.  By the end of winter the ice covers an area of 19 million square kilometres, more than doubling the size of the continent.

Monthly sea ice extent for October 2012 – Blue Marble view (Image courtesy of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado, Boulder and NASA Earth Observatory)

More than five million daily ice-motion measurements by four U.S. Defense Meteorological satellites, over a period of 19 years, were mapped by JPL and used in research. Scientists Paul Holland of the Natural Environment Research Council’s British Antarctic Survey and Ron Kwok of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, analysed data which show long-term changes in sea ice drift around Antarctica for the first time. Before that, researchers used computer models of Antarctic winds.

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Carlos Duarte: “We are facing the first clear evidence of a dangerous climate change”

“We are facing the first clear evidence of a dangerous climate change. However, some of the researchers and some of the Media are plunged into a semantic debate about whether the Arctic Sea-Ice has reached a tipping point or not. This all is distracting the attention on the need to develop indicators that warn about the proximity of abrupt changes in the future, as well as on the policymaking to prevent them”, prof. Carlos Duarte, Director of the Oceans Institute at The University of Western Australia and Research Professor with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced...
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“We are facing the first clear evidence of a dangerous climate change. However, some of the researchers and some of the Media are plunged into a semantic debate about whether the Arctic Sea-Ice has reached a tipping point or not. This all is distracting the attention on the need to develop indicators that warn about the proximity of abrupt changes in the future, as well as on the policymaking to prevent them”, prof. Carlos Duarte, Director of the Oceans Institute at The University of Western Australia and Research Professor with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Studies (IMEDEA) in Mallorca, Spain.

Tipping points are defined as critical points within a system, of which future condition may be qualitatively affected by small perturbations. On the other hand, tipping elements are defined as those components of the Earth system that may show tipping signs.

According to the experts, the Arctic shows the largest concentration of potential tipping elements in Earth’s Climate System: Arctic Sea-Ice; Greenland Ice-Sheet; North Atlantic deep water formation regions; boreal forests; plankton communities; permafrost; and marine methane hydrates among others.

Duarte maintains: “Due to all of this, the Arctic region is particularly prone to show abrupt changes and transfer them to the Global Earth System. It is necessary to find rapid alarm signs, which warn us about the proximity of tipping points, for the development and deployment of adaptive strategies. This all would help to adopt more preventive policies”.

In an article, published in the latest number of ‘AMBIO’, Duarte and other CSIC researchers detail the tipping elements present in the Arctic. They also provide evidence to prove that many of these tipping elements have already entered into a dynamic of change that may become abrupt in most of the cases. According to the study, it is possible to observe numerous tipping elements that would impact on the Global Climate System if they were perturbed.

CSIC scientist explains: “In this work, we provide evidence showing that many of these tipping elements have already started up. We also identify which are the climate change thresholds that may accelerate the global climate change. The very human reaction to climate change in the Arctic (dominated by the increase of activities such as transportation, shipping, and resource exploitation) may contribute to accelerate the changes already happening”. CSIC website

Arctic – 2011 in review

Map of the Arctic (Source: The Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection)

According to US National Snow and Ice Data Center, Arctic sea ice extent for December 2011 was the third lowest in the satellite record. The five lowest December extents in the satellite record have occurred in the past six years. Including the year 2011, the linear rate of decline ice December ice extent over the satellite record is -3.5% per decade. The Arctic gained 2.37 million square kilometers (915,000 square miles) of ice during the month. The average ice gain for December was 1.86 million square kilometers (718,000 square miles). On December 31, Arctic sea ice extent was 13.25 million square kilometers (5.12 million square miles), 561,000 square kilometers (217,000 square miles) more than the ice extent on December 31, 2010, the lowest extent on December 31 in the satellite record.

Arctic sea ice extent remained unusually low through December, especially in the Barents and Kara seas.  In sharp contrast to the past two winters, the winter of 2011 has so far seen a generally positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation, a weather pattern that helps to explain low snow cover extent and warmer than average conditions over much of the United States and Eastern Europe.  In Antarctica, where summer is beginning, sea ice extent is presently above average.

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Ian Mauro

Published on Feb 22, 2013

Environmental leader, eco-feminist, philosopher, and quantum physicist, Vandana Shiva’s expertise seems to have no limits. She has become a globally respected activist for grassroots and alternative globalization movements, biodiversity, bioethics, intellectual property rights, and sustainable living. Some of her books include Staying Alive (1988), The Violence of the Green Revolution (1992), Monocultures of the Mind (1993), Biopiracy (1997), Water Wars (2002), Earth Democracy (2005), and Soil Not Oil (2008). Shiva’s scholarship and activism has been recognized internationally and she has won numerous awards, including the Right Livelihood Award, considered the Alternative Nobel Prize.

Ian Mauro is a Canada Research Chair in “human dimensions of environmental change” at Mount Allison University, in Sackville, New Brunswick. He is both a researcher and filmmaker, with a PhD in environmental science, and his work focuses on hunter, farmer and fisher knowledge regarding environmental change, specifically issues related to food security and climate change. He first interviewed Dr. Shiva in 2002, as part of his doctoral research on farmer knowledge and biotechnology in the Canadian prairies, which in part resulted in the documentary film Seeds of Change (http://www.seedsofchangefilm.org/). He subsequently went on to make various films, including Qapirangajuq: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (http://www.isuma.tv/lo/en/inuit-knowl…), with acclaimed Inuk filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk, as well as the Climate Change in Atlantic Canada project (http://www.climatechangeatlantic.com).

The conversation between Drs. Mauro and Shiva took place on February 26th, 2012 at Mount Allison University, with a full audience of 300+ people. This was Shiva’s only New Brunswick event, on a larger Maritime tour, and she went beyond the surface issues facing our world today and explored, through conversation, the solutions and deep changes required for humans to find a more balanced relationship with the earth and each other.

For more information about Dr. Vandana Shiva, visit the Navdanya website: http://www.navdanya.org/

February 28, 2013
Image Caption: Among the prominent salinity features visible in this view are the large area of highly saline water across the North Atlantic. This area, the saltiest anywhere in the open ocean, is analogous to deserts on land, where little rainfall and much evaporation occur. Red colors represent areas of high salinity, while blue shades represent areas of low salinity. Credit: NASA/GSFC/JPL-Caltech

WATCH VIDEOS: [Aquarius Measuring Salty Seas 1] – [Aquarius Measuring Salty Seas 2]

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online

The salinity level of the world’s rivers, lakes and oceans has been a growing topic in response to global climate change. As NASA’s Aquarius instrument has shown previously, seasonal salinity has been on the rise in oceans all around the world. This year, the picture is no less striking, with deep shades of oranges and reds, at least in the image above, filling a large swath of the Atlantic Ocean both to the north and to the south of the equator.

Launched on June 10, 2011 aboard the Argentine spacecraft SAC-D, Aquarius was specifically developed to study the salt content of the oceans’ surface waters. Variations in ocean salinity, one of the main drivers of ocean circulation, are closely associated with the cycling of freshwater around the world. The data collected from these measurements provide scientists with valuable information on how global climate change is affecting rainfall patterns around the globe.

“With a bit more than a year of data, we are seeing some surprising patterns, especially in the tropics,” said Aquarius’ principal investigator Gary Lagerloef, of Earth & Space Research in Seattle, Washington. “We see features evolve rapidly over time.”

Aquarius was designed to cover the Earth from an orbit that takes it over all the world’s ice-free oceans, taking a complete measurement of salinity levels every seven days. The detector on the instrument measures the top 1 inch of ocean water in 240-mile-wide swaths as it sweeps across the world overhead.

NASA has now received its first full year worth of data from Aquarius showing the varying salinity patterns around the globe.

By studying the data, the research team has revealed some key findings. The Arabian Sea, which sits against the Middle East, is much saltier than the Bay of Bengal, which is diluted by intense monsoons and freshwater discharges from the Ganges River, as well as others.

The Amazon, which releases large amounts of freshwater into the southern Atlantic, will either send a plume of freshwater toward Africa or bend up toward the Caribbean, depending on the seasonal currents. Freshwater also builds up against Panama’s coast, carried down from the central Pacific.

 

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Earth Watch Report  –  Extreme Weather

 

CLIMATE SCIENCE

Dry spell projected for southwest US

by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP)

Southwestern areas of the United States, reeling from its worst drought in 50 years, may have 10 percent less surface water within a decade due to global warming, a study said Sunday.

While rainfall is forecast to increase over northern California in winter and the Colorado River feeding area, warmer temperatures will outstrip these gains by speeding up evaporation, leaving the soil and rivers drier, a research paper said.

Texas will likely be dealt a double blow with declining rainfall and an increase in evaporation, said the paper based on weather simulations and published in Nature Climate Change.

Overall for the area, “annual mean runoff in 2021-2040 is projected to be 10 percent less than in the second half of the 20th century,” co-author Richard Seager of Columbia University told AFP.

This “is a very significant decline given the stress on Colorado River-based water resources” for agriculture and household use, he added.

Runoff is rainfall not absorbed by the soil, running overland or in rivers.

According to the paper, California obtains most of its water from snow on the Sierra Nevada mountain range, while the Colorado River is fed from tributaries created by melting winter snowfall and summer rainfall.

The river provides water to seven US states and Mexico.

Texas, for its part, uses water from rivers and groundwater within its own borders, said the paper.

Average annual runoff for the region overall should drop by about 10 percent, and about 25 percent in spring for the Colorado tributary headwaters.

“Drying intensifies as the century advances,” added the paper.

“These projected declines in surface-water availability for the coming two decades are probably of sufficient amplitude to place additional stress on regional water resources.”

 

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Related Links
Climate Science News – Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation

ICE WORLD

Top Officials Meet at ONR as Arctic Changes Quicken

by David Smalley, Office of Naval Research
Arlington, VA (SPX)


File image.

The Navy’s chief of naval research, Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, met this week with leaders from U.S. and Canadian government agencies to address research efforts in the Arctic, in response to dramatic and accelerating changes in summer sea ice coverage.

“Our Sailors and Marines need to have a full understanding of the dynamic Arctic environment, which will be critical to protecting and maintaining our national, economic and security interests,” said Klunder.

“Our research will allow us to know what’s happening, to predict what is likely to come for the region, and give leadership the information it needs to formulate the best policies and plans for future Arctic operations.”

The Arctic Summit, held Dec. 11 at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) headquarters in Arlington, enabled senior leaders from ONR, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Defense Research and Development Canada, the Departments of Energy and Interior, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation, the Navy Task Force Climate Change and more to share important scientific ideas on the region.

One of the goals of the summit was to assess the different Arctic research efforts-and potentially form new research partnerships.

“Vital and varied Arctic research is taking place across a number of agencies,” Klunder said. “We are identifying areas of common scientific interest-and ideally come up with a comprehensive mutual understanding of everyone’s current and planned efforts.”

In the wake of last week’s widely reported release of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card-co-edited by ONR program officer and Arctic science expert Dr. Martin Jeffries-new concerns have arisen over record-low levels of sea ice and snow in the Arctic.

“We are surely on the verge of seeing a new Arctic,” said Jeffries. “And, since the Arctic is not isolated from the global environmental system-indeed it is an integral and vital part of that system-we can expect to see Arctic change have global environmental and socio-economic consequences.”

While yesterday’s summit was not a policy meeting, experts agree that changes in the Arctic could raise substantial future strategy questions.

The U.S. Navy Arctic Roadmap, authored by the Navy’s Task Force Climate Change, notes that: “Because the Arctic is primarily a maritime environment, the Navy must consider the changing Arctic in developing future policy, strategy, force structure and investment.”

Changing Arctic conditions are opening the region to more human enterprise that could impact naval operations, including:

+ Oil, mineral and other natural resource extraction
+ Shipping
+ Commercial fishing + Tourism
+ Scientific research

If, as Klunder hopes, new research partnerships develop from meetings like the one held this week at ONR, it could result in a powerful planning tool for military and civilian officials alike.

“We know that the key to a successful path forward for all parties and nations concerned depends on the ability to plan ahead,” said Klunder. “And for that, we are utilizing top-flight research from leading scientists around the globe.

“We’ll keep working together to fully understand this changing Arctic.”

 

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Related Links
Office of Naval Research
Beyond the Ice Age

Natural Resources Defense Council

By Andrew Wetzler

Now that the world’s delegates have returned home from climate negotiations in Doha, many ministries are turning their attention to other international environmental agreements—and the consequences of climate change that echo in their implementation. One of those agreements is CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. For the second time in three years, the U.S., now supported by the Russian Federation, has proposed ending the international trade in polar bear fur and parts. This trade, fueled by soaring prices and fed solely by Canada, contributes to the killing of 500 to 600 polar bears every year, provides cover for poaching in Russia and has resulted in an unsustainable hunt for many polar bear populations.

Isn’t the biggest danger to polar bears climate change? Of course it is. In fact, it is because of climate change that we need to give polar bears the best possible chance they have to survive climate change through the end of this century, by which time humanity will hopefully been able to stabilize the atmosphere.

That’s why the U.S. proposal is so important. While climate change is threatening polar bears across the Arctic, we need to adopt policies to keep their populations as robust and healthy as possible. The most obvious way to do this is to address the second biggest threat to polar bears: the fur trade.  That means stopping other sources of mortality (like unsustainable hunting) that can drive polar bear populations down.

The fate of the U.S. proposal largely lies in the hands of the European Union. As a block that controls dozens of votes at the rapidly approaching CITES meeting, Europe can swing what animals get protected—and those that are left behind. Our sources tell us that Europe’s position remains in flux with many European countries sitting on the fence.

Will Europe stand up and help the U.S. and Russia end international trafficking in their parts? The next few weeks will decide that question and, with it, the fate of hundreds of polar bears.

Many countries are still upset that the U.S. Congress never ratified the Kyoto Protocols, resentment that Canada is trying to exploit as it defends its polar bear hunt. But that sad fact shouldn’t be used to distract us from what we can do for polar bears today and other animals endangered by climate change. Nor should it distract us from a few other facts: in the last year the U.S. has moved aggressively to regulate the biggest source of global warming, carbon dioxide, through domestic law. Between those regulations and a shift to lower-carbon fuels, the U.S. has substantially reduced it emissions of climate change gasses. In 2011, U.S. emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide were 8.7 percent below 2005 levels. By contrast, since 2005 Canada has walked away from the Kyoto Protocol and invested heavily in polluting tar sands oil fields.

Polar bears need our help. Will Europe be there for them?

Visit EcoWatch’s BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

Earth Watch Report –  Climate  Change

 

CLIMATE SCIENCE

Drought in the Horn of Africa delays migrating birds


by Staff Writers
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX)


This is a photo of a thrush nightingale. Credit: Mikkel W. Kristensen and University of Copenhagen.

 

Details of the migration route was revealed by data collected from small back-packs fitted on birds showing that the delay resulted from an extended stay in the Horn of Africa.

The extensive 2011 drought in the Horn of Africa had significant consequences for European songbirds such as thrush nightingale and red-backed shrike. These birds visit northern Europe every spring to mate and take advantage of ample summer food resources.

However, their spring migrating route from southern Africa to northern latitudes passes directly through the Horn of Africa, where the birds stop to feed and refuel for the next stage of their migration.

Our research was able to couple the birds’ delayed arrival in Europe with that stopover in the Horn of Africa. Here they stayed about a week longer in 2011 than in the years before and after 2011. Because of the drought, the birds would have needed longer to feed and gain energy for their onward travel, causing delayed arrival and breeding in Europe.

This supports our theory that migrating animals in general are dependent on a series of areas to reach their destination, says Associate Professor Anders Tottrup from the Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate at the University of Copenhagen.

Data loggers as a backpack
The late spring arrival of European songbirds such as thrush nightingale and red-backed shrike perplexed researchers and bird watchers in 2011.

This mystery was even greater considering these songbirds’ tendency to arrive progressively earlier over the last 50 years as climate change has made its impact.

By placing small data loggers on the backs of several birds in the autumn before their migration to Africa, and retrieving them in the spring when the birds returned to Europe, the scientists were able to trace the migration route and stopover sites.

These data revealed a delay in the particular stopover in the Horn of Africa. Additionally, it was noted that other migrating birds not passing through the Horn of Africa arrived in Europe at the expected time.

We have reconstructed 26 migration routes based on data from the small “data backpacks” weighing just 1 gram. This new technology provides us with a detailed picture of the birds’ migration and stopovers.

It is brand-new territory to be able to track animals this small over such great distances, says Associate Professor Kasper Thorup from the Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate at the University of Copenhagen.

Delayed breeding
The birds’ late arrival in 2011 also meant a similarly late breeding year.

There are no signs of implications on the birds’ breeding success and thereby the size of the population. But it is possible that we haven’t yet seen the full effect of the delayed year, concludes Anders Tottrup.

The research was carried out in collaboration with Lund University in Sweden.

 

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Related Links
University of Copenhagen
Climate Science News – Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation

Published on Sep 12, 2012 by

http://www.ArtificialClouds.com:

WEATHER MODIFICATION CAUSES CLIMATE MODIFICATION.
Thousands of planned weather modification events occur every year in the U.S. and worldwide.

This documentary should make you think twice before dismissing persistent tracks in the sky from condensation trails, or “chemtrails.”

Skywatcher is a 25-minute science presentation discussing weather modification and the REAL cause of climate change, which is anthropogenic CLOUD cover– much more than greenhouse gases like CO2– and the spraying of “cloud seeding” chemicals (especially silver iodide) for precipitation enhancement.

This video shows exactly HOW we make clouds with aircraft, why the jet contrails persist now (when they used to disappear much more quickly), and why we’re finding high levels of metals in our water and soil, including aluminum and strontium. …you sure you want the truth?

[See http://www.ArtificialClouds.com for current documentation.]

Earth Watch Report  –  Seas/Oceans

 

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WATER WORLD

‘Time running out’ for Kiribati as seas rise: president

by Staff Writers
Wellington (AFP)

The low-lying Pacific nation of Kiribati is running out of time on climate change as seas rise, and is drafting plans including mass relocation of its people while the world procrastinates on the issue, the country’s leader says.

President Anote Tong said areas of Kiribati — consisting of more than 30 coral atolls, most only a few metres (feet) above sea level — had already been swamped by the rising ocean.

“We’ve had communities that have had to relocate because their previous village is submerged, it’s no longer there,” he told AFP in a telephone interview from the capital Tarawa.

“We had a very high tide at the beginning of this month and communities were washed out. It’s becoming more frequent, time is running out.”

Kiribati is among a number of island states — including Tuvalu, Tokelau and the Maldives — the UN Human Rights Commission is concerned could become “stateless” due to climate change.

With erosion gnawing at the coast and crops dying as sea water infiltrates fresh water sources, Tong said plans to relocate people from Kiribati to Fiji and East Timor had been put forward.

He was pessimistic UN climate talks underway in Doha would offer a solution, saying they assumed global warming would occur in the future, allowing countries to stall over emissions targets.

“That’s not relevant to us,” he said. “The reality is that we’re already facing problems.

“Are the negotiations addressing this? I don’t believe so. They’re regarded as a game by many of the negotiators, they’re not focusing on what’s already happening in the most vulnerable countries.

“We (in Kiribati) are not talking about economic growth, we’re not talking about standards of living — we’re talking about our very survival.”

— “Some of our people will have to be relocated” —

Rather than wait for global action, Tong said Kiribati was examining options for the climate-threatened nation, including relocating parts of its 103,000-strong population.

 

Read Full Article Here

World’s rivers running on empty: StudyCredit: Mike Russell, http://bit.ly/WqPg9e

(Phys.org)—Four of the world’s great rivers, including the Murray Darling, are all suffering from drastically reduced flows as a direct result of water extraction, according to new ANU research.
The multi-author study – led by ANU researchers Professor Quentin Grafton, Dr Jamie Pittock, Professor Tom Kompas and Dr Daniel Connell of the Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University – examined the threats from water extractions and climate change on four of the world’s iconic river systems; the US Colorado River, the South African Orange River, the Chinese Yellow River and the Murray. The researchers found that in all four basins, over a long period of time, outflows have greatly reduced as a direct result of increased water extractions, and that urgent changes in governance of water are needed to ensure the systems remain healthy and viable. “While climate change will aggravate changes in flows in river systems, current high levels of water extractions remain the principal contributor to reduced flows and degradation of these rivers,” said Dr Pittock. “Changes in governance, including sharing the variability between the environment and consumptive users, are urgently required if the health of these rivers is to be maintained,” added Dr Connell. The researchers said that the key to securing the future of the world’s rivers lies in plans to share water use between users and the environment, and water markets to manage allocations. They added that, although the management of the Murray Darling Basin was favourable when compared to other places in the world, there was much more that could be done to ensure a healthy future for the system. “Many sound frameworks are being established in water management throughout the world, but in many cases their implementation needs to be greatly improved,” said Professor Kompas. “Stronger action is needed to ensure that in dry times, the rivers get a fair share of the available water,” said Dr Pittock. The work was conducted with researchers from the University of Queensland, the University of Canberra and international collaborators from universities in the USA, China, and South Africa. The paper, “Global insights into water resources, climate change and governance,” is published today in Nature Climate Change.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-world-rivers-paper.html#jCp