Advertisements

Tag Archive: Centre for Health Protection


Earth Watch  Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9 Virus Origin Diagram expanded

"This

This diagram depicts the origins of the H7N9 virus from China and shows how the virus’s genes came from other influenza viruses in birds.

…..

Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

 

…..

RSOE EDIS

Biological Hazard in China on Monday, 14 April, 2014 at 02:59 (02:59 AM) UTC.

Description
The Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is   investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85. The patient, with underlying medical conditions, traveled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical. Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today. This is the 10th imported human H7N9 avian flu case to date. Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH. Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far. These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing. The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who traveled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.
Biohazard name: H7N9 – Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

 

…..

Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 9) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 82.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, lives in Liwan, Guangzhou with her family. She has presented with cough with blood-stained sputum since April 7 but had no fever.

She came to Hong Kong with her two family members by car via Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point yesterday (April 8). Upon arrival, she was directly transferred to the Accident and Emergency Department of North District Hospital by ambulance and was admitted for further management under isolation on the same day. Her current condition is stable.

Her sputum specimen was tested positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch tonight.

The patient has been transferred to Princess Margaret Hospital for isolation and treatment.

Her exposure history to poultry is under investigation.

The CHP’s investigations and contact tracing are ongoing. The patient’s family members in Hong Kong, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and immigration officer at Lok Ma Chau Spur Line Control Point are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the ninth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm today, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:18

NNNN

 

…..

Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Email this article news.gov.hk
Imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) under CHP investigation
*********************************************************     The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) is today (April 13) investigating an imported human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) affecting a woman aged 85.The patient, with underlying medical conditions, travelled to Dongguan from April 4 to 5 with her husband and younger brother. They lived at their relatives’ home where their relatives have reared chickens. The patient also visited a wet market near their home there and helped in slaughtering chickens at home on April 4. She returned to Hong Kong on April 5, and developed fever, cough with blood-stained sputum and shortness of breath since April 11. She was sent to the Accident and Emergency Department of Tseung Kwan O Hospital (TKOH) by ambulance today and was subsequently admitted. She is currently managed under isolation and her condition is critical.

Her respiratory specimen was positive for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus upon preliminary laboratory testing by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Services Branch today.

Initial investigation revealed that the patient had visited her husband at Haven of Hope Hospital (HHH) on April 10 who was admitted due to other illness. Her husband has remained asymptomatic so far and is currently under observation at HHH.

Apart from her husband, seven other family members of the patient are also considered as close contacts. One of them had sore throat since April 12 and his condition is stable. The other close contacts have remained asymptomatic so far.  These close contacts will be admitted to hospital for observation and their respiratory specimens will be taken for preliminary laboratory testing.

The CHP’s investigations and tracing of other contacts are ongoing. The patient’s brother who travelled to Dongguan with the patient, relevant healthcare workers, ambulance staff and patients who had stayed in the same cubicle with the patient’s husband at HHH are being traced for exposure assessment and medical surveillance.

The CHP will liaise with the relevant Mainland health authority to follow up on the patient’s contacts during her stay in the Mainland.

“The Serious Response Level under the Government’s Preparedness Plan for Influenza Pandemic remains activated and the CHP’s follow-up actions are in full swing,” a spokesman for the CHP remarked.

This is the tenth confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong. The CHP will notify the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health and Family Planning Commission as well as health and quarantine authorities of Guangdong and Macau.

Locally, enhanced surveillance of suspected cases in public and private hospitals is underway. The CHP will continue to maintain liaison with the WHO, the Mainland and overseas health authorities to monitor the latest developments. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

“In view of human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) confirmed locally and in the Mainland, further cases are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. Those planning to travel outside Hong Kong should maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene at all times,” the spokesman urged.

“All boundary control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures. Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travellers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices have also been arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation,” the spokesman added.

Regarding health education for travellers, display of posters in departure and arrival halls, in-flight public announcements, environmental health inspection and provision of regular updates to the travel industry via meetings and correspondence are proceeding.

The spokesman advised travellers, especially those returning from avian influenza-affected areas and provinces with fever or respiratory symptoms, to immediately wear masks, seek medical attention and reveal their travel history to doctors. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to patients who might have had contact with poultry, birds or their droppings in affected areas and provinces.

“We have enhanced publicity and health education to reinforce health advice on the prevention of avian influenza,” the spokesman said.

As of 4pm on April 11, the CHP’s hotline (2125 1111) for public enquiries has received 217 calls since the first confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H7N9) in Hong Kong.

Members of the public should remain vigilant and take heed of the preventive advice against avian influenza below:

* Do not visit live poultry markets and farms. Avoid contact with poultry, birds and their droppings. If contact has been made, thoroughly wash hands with soap;
* Avoid entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered and contact with surfaces which might be contaminated by droppings of poultry or other animals;
* Poultry and eggs should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
* Wash hands frequently with soap, especially before touching the mouth, nose or eyes, handling food or eating; after going to the toilet or touching public installations or equipment (including escalator handrails, elevator control panels and door knobs); or when hands are dirtied by respiratory secretions after coughing or sneezing;
* Cover the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing, hold the spit with a tissue and put it into a covered dustbin;
* Avoid crowded places and contact with fever patients; and
* Wear masks when respiratory symptoms develop or when taking care of fever patients.

The public may visit the CHP’s avian influenza page (www.chp.gov.hk/en/view_content/24244.html) and website (www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/global_statistics_avian_influenza_e.pdf) for more information on avian influenza-affected areas and provinces.

Ends/Sunday, April 13, 2014
Issued at HKT 22:39

NNNN

 

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

H7N9

Johns Hopkins Medicine

…..

Biological Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong Damage level Details

…..

Situation Update No. 12Posted:2013-12-03, 04:31:30 [UTC]

Ref.no.:BH-20131203-41836-CHN

Situation Update No. 12On 2014-01-15 at 04:14:21 [UTC]

Event: Biological Hazard

Location: Hong Kong Hong Kong Special Administrative Region China
Number of Dead: 2 person(s)

Number of Injured: 0 person(s)

Number of Evacuated: 0 person(s)

Number of Infected: 4 person(s)

Situation: Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang. The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details. “Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.” To date, there were 152 confirmed human cases of avian influenza A H7N9 in China, including 53 cases in Zhejiang. Thirty-four cases occurred in
Shanghai, 29 in Jiangsu, 10 in Guangdong, six in Jiangxi, five in Fujian, four in Anhui, four in Henan, two in Beijing, two in Hunan, two in Shandong and one in Hebei. The DH in Hong Kong said it is taking precautions to ensure cases do not occur locally. “All boarder control points have implemented disease prevention and control measures,” the DH spokesperson said. “Thermal imaging systems are in place for body temperature checks of inbound travelers. Random temperature checks by handheld devices will also be arranged. Suspected cases will be immediately referred to public hospitals for follow-up investigation.”

…..

Hong Kong confirms case of avian flu in China

H7N9 Virus

H7N9 Virus

Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection verified a human case of avian influenza A H7N9 on Thursday with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission in a woman in Zhejiang.

The 51-year-old patient’s case of avian flu was confirmed on Wednesday. She is receiving medical treatment in a Hangzhou hospital and was in serious condition as of Thursday. The CHP said it would follow up with Chinese health authorities to gain additional details.

“Locally, enhanced disease surveillance, port health measures and health education against avian influenza are ongoing,” a spokesperson with Hong Kong’s Department of Health said. “We will remain vigilant and maintain liaison with the World Health Organization and relevant health authorities. Local surveillance activities will be modified upon the WHO’s recommendations.

Read More Here

…..

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

Hong Kong confirms second human H7N9 bird flu case in a week

AFP Hong Kong confirms second human H7N9 bird flu case in a week

…..

Biological Hazard China Province of Hunan, Yongzhou Damage level Details

…..

Biological Hazard in China on Friday, 03 January, 2014 at 03:45 (03:45 AM) UTC.

Description
For the second time in less than a week, there is a report of a human case of H9N2 avian influenza. The China National Health and Family Planning Commission reported today a human case of avian influenza A(H9N2) affecting a boy aged 7 in Hunan, according to Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) press release. According to the information available, The child with a history of contact with poultry, lived in Yongzhou, Hunan. He presented with fever and runny nose since November 19, 2013. He sought medical consultation from a hospital in Yongzhou the next day and recovered after treatment. This case was confirmed yesterday (January 1). This is the second confirmed human case of avian influenza A(H9N2) reported this week. On Monday, Hong Kong health officials reported a human case of avian influenza A (H9N2) in a 86-year-old Hong Kong resident living in Shenzhen.
Biohazard name: H9N2 (new strain)
Biohazard level: 3/4 Hight
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that can cause severe to fatal disease in humans, but for which vaccines or other treatments exist, such as anthrax, West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, SARS virus, variola virus (smallpox), tuberculosis, typhus, Rift Valley fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yellow fever, and malaria. Among parasites Plasmodium falciparum, which causes Malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes trypanosomiasis, also come under this level.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

…..

Yahoo!7 News

Hong Kong confirms second human H7N9 bird flu case in a week

AFP

Hong Kong confirms second human H7N9 bird flu case in a week
AFP Hong Kong confirms second human H7N9 bird flu case in a week

Hong Kong (AFP) – Hong Kong health authorities on Friday confirmed a new human case of the deadly H7N9 bird flu, the second case to come to light in less than five days.

An 80-year-old man has been infected and is hospitalised in the southern Chinese city, Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection controller Leung Ting-hung told reporters at a press conference.

“Tonight we have confirmed the second human case of avian flu influenza A H7N9 we believe this is an imported case,” Leung said, adding that the patient has been living in the neighbouring mainland China city of Shenzhen.

The man, a Hong Kong resident, was admitted to the city’s Tuen Mun hospital on Tuesday due to underlying medical conditions, but developed a fever on Friday.

He is currently in a stable condition and is being treated in an isolation ward.

Officials are still investigating whether or not the patient had come into contact with poultry on the mainland.

“We are still investigating if the patient had exposure to poultry, but he definitely did not in Hong Kong,” Leung said.

 

Read More Here

…..

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Earth Watch Report  –  Biological Hazards

Image Source

図:鳥インフルエンザ(H5N1)のヒトへの主な感染経路

Image Source

Today Biological Hazard China Province of Guizhou, [The area was not defined.] Damage level Details

Biological Hazard in China on Sunday, 10 February, 2013 at 18:17 (06:17 PM) UTC.

Description
The mainland authorities say two people have been infected with the H5N1 bird flu virus in Guizhou. Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection said it was notified of the cases by the Ministry of Health. The two patients, a 21-year-old woman and a 31-year man are said to be in critical condition. They did not report any obvious contact with poultry before developing symptoms. The Centre for Health Protection says it’s heightening its vigilance and will continue to maintain stringent port health measures.
Biohazard name: H5N1 (highly pathogenic avian influenza – human infection)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

Earth Watch Report  –  Epidemic Hazards

Today Epidemic Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong [Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan] Damage level
Details

Epidemic Hazard in China on Thursday, 10 January, 2013 at 04:01 (04:01 AM) UTC.

Description
A nine-year-old girl has died in hospital after being struck by a mystery illness, the Centre for Health Protection said last night. The girl had a good health record, had not traveled outside Hong Kong and tests for flu and enterovirus had shown to be negative, the center said. She was initially diagnosed with myocarditis, an acute inflammation of the heart muscle. On Saturday the girl, who lived in Eastern District and studied locally, complained of epigastric pain, fever and vomiting. A spokesman for the center said she was admitted to the pediatric ward of the Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital on Monday. “Her condition rapidly deteriorated after admission and she passed away on the same day,” he said.

The spokesman confirmed respiratory and rectal specimens tested by the Public Health Laboratory Services Branch had shown to be negative for influenza and enterovirus. Further tests were being conducted. Neither the family nor classmates of the girl have shown any symptoms. The case has been referred to the coroner’s office. Tse Hung-hing, president of the Hong Kong Medical Association, who is also a pediatrician, said: “Such rapid deterioration is very unusual for an infection. “The clinical course of myocarditis was really fast.” The infection may be some rare virus but flu or enterovirus is usually responsible for children developing myocarditis, Tse said.

“The first thing to consider in any child with fever is infection,” he added. “After excluding infection, one could consider immune diseases such as Kawasaki disease, which involves inflammation of the blood vessels and myocarditis.” Pediatric specialist Wilson Fung Yee-leung said the case appears to be a rare one. “It is possible that the girl had a weak immune system and died within a short time,” said Fung, adding that the girl may have suffered serious gastroenteritis. The girl reportedly attended a prayer session at a church in North Point with her family on Saturday. However this could not be confirmed by center staff.

Biohazard name: Unidentified illness (fatal)
Biohazard level: 3/4 Hight
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that can cause severe to fatal disease in humans, but for which vaccines or other treatments exist, such as anthrax, West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, SARS virus, variola virus (smallpox), tuberculosis, typhus, Rift Valley fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yellow fever, and malaria. Among parasites Plasmodium falciparum, which causes Malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes trypanosomiasis, also come under this level.
Symptoms: acute inflammation, epigastric pain, fever and vomiting
Status: confirmed

 

Earth Watch Report   –  Epidemic Hazards

 

….

28.11.2012 Epidemic Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong [ New Territories North Animal Management Centre (NTNAMC), Sheung Shui] Damage level
Details

….

Details of Situation Update

Epidemic Hazard in China on Tuesday, 27 November, 2012 at 04:54 (04:54 AM) UTC.

Back

Updated: Wednesday, 28 November, 2012 at 04:10 UTC
Description
The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health today [27 Nov 2012] provided an update on its joint investigation with the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) into an outbreak of psittacosis respiratory disease involving 5 AFCD male staff working in the New Territories North Animal Management Centre (NTNAMC) in Sheung Shui. A CHP spokesman said that the respiratory specimens from 3 patients (a 55-year-old patient at Queen Mary Hospital, a 62-year-old patient in Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital and a 27-year-old patient who has been discharged from Yan Chai Hospital) tested positive for Chlamydophila psittaci by polymerase chain reaction as confirmed by the CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Centre, suggesting that they were suffering from psittacosis infection. So far, a total of 5 AFCD staff working in the NTNAMC have developed respiratory symptoms (mostly pneumonia) requiring admission to hospitals. One has recovered and the other 4 are currently in hospitals in Hong Kong (3) and Australia (one). The CHP has successfully contacted 59 AFCD staff working in the NTNAMC and 8 of them are found to currently have upper respiratory symptoms. Arrangements will be made with the Hospital Authority for these 8 persons to undergo medical assessment and laboratory investigation to rule out psittacosis. The joint investigation is under way. The total number of laboratory confirmed cases so far in this outbreak is 3. The spokesman said that psittacosis is a disease caused by Chlamydophila psittaci. It is usually transmitted to humans by inhaling the agent from the dried droppings and secretions of infected birds. Pet birds such as parrots, cockatiels, parakeets, macaws and poultry (turkeys and ducks) are most frequently involved. Person-to-person transmissions are rare. Common symptoms include fever, headache, rash, muscle pain, chills and dry cough. Pneumonia may occur in serious cases. Encephalitis, myocarditis and thrombophlebitis are occasional complications. The incubation period ranges from one to 4 weeks. Psittacosis can be effectively treated with antibiotics.

….

Earth Watch Report  –   Epidemic Hazards

 

….

Today Epidemic Hazard China Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong [ New Territories North Animal Management Centre (NTNAMC), Sheung Shui] Damage level
Details

….

Epidemic Hazard in China on Tuesday, 27 November, 2012 at 04:54 (04:54 AM) UTC.

Description
The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health is today (November 26) conducting a joint investigation with the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) into a suspected outbreak of respiratory disease involving five AFCD staff working in the New Territories North Animal Management Centre (NTNAMC) in Sheung Shui. They were all males aged between 27 and 64 with onset of symptoms from November 6 to November 24. The first case affected a 64-year-old man who presented with upper respiratory symptoms since November 6. He was admitted to a hospital in Australia since November 12. The second case is a 55-year-old man. He developed chills, cough and sore throat since November 8 and fever, shortness of breath, headache and myalgia since November 19. He was admitted to Queen Mary Hospital (QMH) on November 22. His chest X-ray showed bilateral upper zone patchiness and the clinical diagnosis was pneumonia. He is now receiving care in the Intensive Care Unit of QMH in stable condition.

Respiratory and urine specimens taken from the 55-year-old patient at QMH tested by the hospital yielded negative results for influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Legionnaires’ Disease, while test results for psittacosis and leptospirosis are pending. CHP’s Public Health Laboratory Centre performed tests on the patient’s respiratory specimens and it was negative for Novel Coronavirus associated with Severe Respiratory Disease. The third case affected a 62-year-old man who developed bilateral red eyes on November 12, and was admitted to Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital on November 17 because of cough with blood-stained sputum, malaise, chills, rigors and sore throat. His condition was stable. The diagnosis was pneumonia. Preliminary laboratory testing for influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, RSV and adenovirus was negative. The fourth case is a 27-year-old man. He developed fever, headache and malaise on November 14 and was admitted to Yan Chai Hospital on November 18. The diagnosis was pneumonia. He recovered after treatment and was discharged home on November 22 and his condition was stable. The fifth case affected a 62-year old man who presented with cough, chills and rigor since November 24 and was admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital for further management on November 26. His condition is stable. The home contacts of the patients are asymptomatic.

CHP staff conducted a site visit to NTNAMC today and provided health advice to the staff. According to the information provided by AFCD, there is a batch of 16 seized parrots being kept in NTNAMC since October 20. Subsequently, three died and 10 were euthanised as precautionary measures. The health condition of the three surviving birds is being closely monitored. The possibility of psittacosis outbreak among these staff is being actively investigated. The investigation is underway.

Biohazard name: SARS
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: suspected

….

 

….