Tag Archive: Cat


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Eastern Daily Press

08:00 12 November 2015

Brian, who has three ears, is believed to be between four and ten years old.

Brian, who has three ears, is believed to be between four and ten years old.

We’ve all heard about cats having nine lives but have you heard the one about the cat with three ears?

Staff at a Norfolk rescue centre were equally perplexed when one intrepid feline arrived sporting an extra ear.

As Feline Care Cat Rescue in East Harling continue to care for the moggie, it is hoped its owner will now step forward. Brian, as he has been affectionately called, arrived at the centre on Monday after being caught in one of the centre’s traps after setting off security alarms at a nearby business.

Manager of the centre, Molly Farrar, said: “We expected it to be one of our own cats who’d been causing problems so this handsome, mature gentleman was quite a surprise to us.

“We’ve cared for plenty of cats with one eye, three legs or six toes and several cats with no tail left, but this is our first three-eared cat.

The centre is hoping that Brian has not been dumped but has simply got lost.

Miss Farrar, 38, said: “He’s obviously very distinctive with his extra little ear so someone must be missing him or recognise him.

“He’s in a bit of a tatty and skinny state. He’s been in the wars a bit and has a fractured canine tooth and ear mites so he obviously needs looking after.

 

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Biological Hazard USA State of Wyoming, [Laramie County] Damage level Details

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Biological Hazard in USA on Thursday, 29 October, 2015 at 04:14 (04:14 AM) UTC.

Description
A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic plague in rural western Laramie County. Over a dozen individuals who came into contact with the cat are currently being assessed by the Wyoming Department of Health to determine if they need to receive antibiotics. Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly if not treated promptly with antibiotics. The pneumonic form of plague can be easily transmitted from a coughing cat or other animal to a human. Humans can then breathe in the bacteria and develop pneumonic plague as well. Although health officials believe this is thought to be an isolated case, plague has been present in the area before with animal cases in 2005 and 2008 and is believed to be endemic in Wyoming wildlife.
Biohazard name: Plague (pneumonic, cat )
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Status: confirmed

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Local News 8

Pneumonic plague found in Laramie County cat

POSTED: 10:24 AM MDT Oct 29, 2015 
cat logo

GNU image/MGN Online

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) – A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic plague in rural western Laramie County.

Over a dozen individuals who came into contact with the cat are currently being assessed by the Wyoming Department of Health to determine if they need to receive antibiotics.

 

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 Cheyenne, Wyoming | News, Weather, Sports | CBS5 NewsChannel

Animal plague found in Laramie County

LARAMIE COUNTY – A housecat has been diagnosed with pneumonic (the lung form) of plague in rural western Laramie County.

Plague, known as the Black Death during medieval times, is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly if not treated promptly with antibiotics. The pneumonic form of plague can be easily transmitted from a coughing cat or other animal to a human. Humans can then breathe in the bacteria and develop pneumonic plague as well.

On October 26, the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) notified Cheyenne-Laramie County Health Department (CLCHD) of a plague positive housecat submitted to the Wyoming State Veterinary Lab on October 21.

 

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Cat delivers bag of weed to his owner

Published time: May 22, 2014 13:14
Edited time: May 23, 2014 13:25

AFP Photo / Luis Robayo

AFP Photo / Luis Robayo

A cat in New Zealand has behaved in a very un-feline manner, bringing his owner a bag of marijuana and leaving it at the door. Police are now praising the furry friend for possibly helping them secure a drug bust as they dust the bag for prints.

Local police say they are very impressed with the deed.

”You hear of cats bringing dead birds and rats home, but certainly in my career I’ve never seen anything like this before,” Sergeant Reece Munro told the local Otago Daily Times. “I guess you never know who’s keeping you honest these days, do you?”

 

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Cats Vs Dogs – Supercut Compilation 2013!

FRlKK FRlKK

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Meet Possum and his friend Chipmunk. Possum is blind and Chipmunk is his "seeing eye" companion.

February 23, 2014

The special feline combination adds up to 18 lives, and Possum and his friend Chipmunk are apt to enjoy years and years of cat play, curiosity, and a special bond according to the Peggy Adams Rescue League in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Possum is a blind kitten, and Chipmunk is Possum’s “seeing eye” cat who also serves as his companion’s mentor; teaching Possum all those cool things cats learn as they pass through the excitement of “kittenhood.”

Where one would expect a kitten to be confused, disoriented, and alone, Chipmunk and Possum are inseparable, playful, and absolutely adorable.

Many thanks to their foster mom, Susan Vanison-Oddo, the dynamic duo are ready to be adopted, but they must be placed together.

Amy Webb Perdue, of West Palm Beach, shared her personal experience with blind cats stating:

“Our older cat lost his sight and the younger has stepped up to help. Before this they barely tolerated one another. Wish humans could be as compassionate!”

Interested in adopting this amazing pair of fantastic felines? Click here for more information.

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Posted: 02/12/2014 3:22 pm EST

 

Meet Hammie, a 1-year-old bulldog who lives in Lincoln, Neb. He’s here to tell you that he loves kittens, and there’s nothin’ you can do about it.

standingnexttoeachother

Last October, Hammie’s owner, Michelle Parden, took in a pregnant stray cat named Mommy. Parden, 34, had seen Mommy on Facebook after her friend, Gayla Hausman, posted a picture of the orange cat online. Hausman is the director at Voice for Companion Animals, a nonprofit that provides resources like pet food for low income individuals, Parden told The Huffington Post.

Parden happily took Mommy in, and on Halloween, the cat gave birth to six kittens — Pumpkin, Goblin, Frankenstein, Batman, Zombie and Elvira. Because Mommy was so skinny and had eye and respiratory infections, some of the births had complications. But Parden told HuffPost all six kittens and Mommy are now healthy.

kittens

 

bulldog4

Parden has since found adoptive families for all of the kittens and Mommy. Hammie misses his old friends, but the cats’ owners keep in touch with Parden.

h/t Reddit Aww

 

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Book Buddies at ARL Berks County

The Animal Rescue League (ARL) of Berks County, Pennsylvania have implemented the “Book Buddies” program, a novel way to bring together shelter cats wanting companionship and school-age children wanting to improve their reading skills.

Children in grades 1-8 who are able to read at any level may come into the shelter to read to the cats in our adoption room. Similar programs at other shelters across the country have seen the benefits the program has to offer. The program will help children improve their reading skills while also helping the shelter animals. Cats find the rhythmic sound of a voice very comforting and soothing

The Berks County ARL accepts donations through their site. They are also on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest.

Book Buddies at ARL Berks County

Book Buddies at ARL Berks County

Book Buddies

Book Buddies at ARL Berks County

images via The Animal Rescue League (ARL) of Berks County

via reddit, Daily of the Day

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Animal Lovers Need Not Apply

Posted: 11/20/2013 4:52 pm

Director, No Kill Advocacy Center

2013-11-20-TheStoryofaLittleCat_Layout1_0001.jpg
Shelters are supposed to rescue animals from cruelty and neglect. They are supposed to be a sanctuary for lost dogs and stray cats. They are supposed to be a refuge, a safe haven for animals whose people can no longer keep them or no longer want them. Unfortunately, for too many animals, they are not.

Meet a little cat who was stuck inside a wall of a U.S. animal shelter, a cat who was stuck near the employee break room, where every employee could hear his cries while they sat and drank coffee, and ate lunch and socialized. They later told a newspaper reporter that they “pleaded” with shelter supervisors to do something about the cat. But neither they nor those supervisors did what compassion dictates. Not a single one of them took action. And because of that, the cat paid the ultimate price. This is how a local newspaper, the Dallas Observer, described it:

Before it starved to death last May, the cat could be heard by shelter workers, crying and clawing, trying to escape the confines of the break room wall behind which it had become trapped at Dallas Animal Services. Cats do especially badly in animal shelters, naturally preferring dark, quiet repose to loud, boisterous interaction. This cat, terrified, had jumped away from staffers who were trying to clean cages, going straight for a loose ceiling tile and bolting into darkness.
But somewhere in its search for safety, the cat fell between shelter walls and landed between the walls of the employee break room and the ladies’ restroom. It couldn’t move. It could only yowl and scratch. For more than a week.

Imagine it. Really try to imagine it. A shelter filled with employees whose job it is to care for animals. Imagine a cat calling out in panic and fear, stuck in a wall, where the employees are eating and talking and not a single one rescues the cat. Sure, one of them calls a cruelty investigator and he comes and determines that the cat is indeed stuck in the wall. But he doesn’t rescue the cat either. Others ask managers, each other, “Will someone rescue the cat?” But no one does. And they keep right on eating their lunches; they keep right on talking and doing those things that people do in break rooms. And meanwhile, the cats’ cries are getting more desperate, then weaker and then they finally stop. A short time later, the smell comes: the smell of a decomposing body.

And only then do they complain in earnest. How can we eat lunch in here, how can we socialize with that smell? And because it now affects them, they do something about it. They cut open a hole in the wall to remove the dead body, while every single one of us wants to scream: Why didn’t any of them tear open the wall when the cat was still alive? Don’t think for a second that this story is unique. There are many more. Moreover, these incidents are not just tragic in and of themselves, but they are set against the backdrop of the killing of roughly four million animals in shelters across the country every year.

Taken as a whole, these facts reveal a distinct pattern, an unpleasant but undeniable truth: willful abuse, careless neglect and even sadistic pleasure in causing animals to suffer and die are the status quo at many of our nation’s shelters. The question, of course, is why? How is it that agencies filled with people who are supposed to protect animals from harm and rescue them when they are in trouble, people who are paid to care for animals in need, are often abusive?

 

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Dallas taxpayers have every right to be pissed about the goings on at the city’s animal shelter.

By Andrea Grimes Thursday, Jan 20 2011

Before it starved to death last May, the cat could be heard by shelter workers, crying and clawing, trying to escape the confines of the break room wall behind which it had become trapped at Dallas Animal Services. Cats do especially badly in animal shelters, naturally preferring dark, quite repose to loud, boisterous interaction. This cat, terrified, had jumped away from staffers who were trying to clean cages, going straight for a loose ceiling tile and bolting into darkness.

But somewhere in its search for safety, the cat fell between shelter walls and landed between the walls of the employee break room and the ladies’ restroom. It couldn’t move. It could only yowl and scratch. For more than a week.

On May 3, according to court records, at least two shelter workers, after hearing the animal’s cries, notified animal cruelty investigator Domanick Munoz about the cat’s attempts to free itself. He e-mailed his bosses, including Tyrone McGill, a shelter manager. He explained that a cat was trapped in the wall, and where. Shelter workers could hear it clearly. And they had to get it out. Fast.

Lieutenant Scott Walton, interim division manager at Dallas Animal Services, has
demonstrated his “compassion” charge to shelter workers by fostering shelter
 kittens at home. He believes “responsible pet ownership,” including strict adherence to spay and neuter laws, will be the best
long-term solution for the shelter.

Mark Graham
Lieutenant Scott Walton, interim division manager at Dallas Animal Services, has demonstrated his “compassion” charge to shelter workers by fostering shelter kittens at home. He believes “responsible pet ownership,” including strict adherence to spay and neuter laws, will be the best long-term solution for the shelter.
The 2010 Humane Society audit of DAS found that cat keepers were "overwhelmed" by minimum daily responsibilities. Here, veterinary assistant Ameha Gebremichael checks on a kitten after an exam.

Mark Graham
The 2010 Humane Society audit of DAS found that cat keepers were “overwhelmed” by minimum daily responsibilities. Here, veterinary assistant Ameha Gebremichael checks on a kitten after an exam.

Details


Behind the Scenes at Dallas Animal Services

But the cat’s cries continued throughout the next day. Another worker, Kimberly Killebrew, told McGill about the trapped cat. McGill told her he’d “handle it,” according to an affidavit in the case. But the crying wore on. McGill just kept telling employees he’d take care of it.

Munoz was torn. He loved animals, and his job as a cruelty investigator allowed him to be on the front lines, saving them from horrible situations. But he also loved his family and couldn’t risk his job by going over his bosses’ heads and cutting the cat out of the wall. That just wasn’t the way things were done at Animal Services.

“If he had kicked that wall in, he’d have been fired,” says Arlington animal rights attorney Don Feare, whom Munoz retained. “[Munoz] had three small children to feed. He just had to deal with it.”

As the days went on, and the cat continued to claw at the wall, the shelter workers wondered when their supervisors were going to take action. According to the affidavit, the workers reported pleading with McGill: Couldn’t he do something?

Court records claim that McGill lifted a few ceiling tiles up, but did nothing more to save the cat. Calls were made to McGill’s supervisor, Kent Robertson, the shelter division manager and a former SPCA director who had been lauded by animal rights activists in the city for his dedication. But he was out of town, dealing with a family emergency.

More days elapsed and the cat stopped crying. That’s when the stink began. Not the stink made by shelter workers furious with supervisors, but the literal stink from the cat’s decomposing body. It was so bad that workers couldn’t eat their lunches in the break room.

On May 18—more than two weeks after the cat’s cries were first heard, McGill cut a square hole in the wall—about a foot across, in precisely the location Munoz had identified. After the day shift ended, McGill and a few other workers pulled the cat’s decomposed body out of the wall.

Animal deaths are nothing unusual at the shelter, which receives $6.6 million annually from the city’s general fund. Up to 26,000 dogs, eight or nine thousand cats and several hundred exotic animals, livestock and wildlife come through DAS each year. The smallest percentage of those—for example, 1,510 cats and 5,308 dogs for the last fiscal year—will be adopted, rescued or returned to their owners. The vast majority will be euthanized.

But imagine: animal services workers terrified of getting fired for attempting to save an animal’s life. Yet at Dallas Animal Services, that’s how things worked, say animal rights activists like Jonnie England and shelter employees such as Domanick Munoz, for whom the culture of intimidation at DAS became so bad he had to hire a lawyer after he blew the whistle on McGill. Even Humane Society of the United States auditors found that toeing the party line and maintaining the favor of supervisors often has taken precedence over animal care and safety.

According to a HSUS report released in November, DAS has been suffering from a “morale crisis.” Auditors reported that “staff repeatedly expressed alienation from managers and supervisors who used retaliatory disciplinary actions.” This, they surmised, was “reflective of ineffective leadership in the management ranks.”

Clock in, obey orders, keep your head down. Don’t question the bosses. Clock out. If a cat dies in the wall? Hope the press doesn’t get wind of it. And in the end, of course, it’s the animals who suffer most.

The past year has been disastrous for DAS: Once-lauded animal shelter division manager Kent Robertson resigned and shelter manager Tyrone McGill was indicted on felony animal cruelty charges, though his attorney, Anthony Lyons, adamantly denies his client did anything wrong. Two other employees were put on paid leave pending internal investigations into mistreatment of animals, and a cop—a cop!—was brought in to manage the department in anticipation of a damning audit by the Humane Society that was strikingly similar to the one it issued a decade earlier. Over the last 10 years, seemingly endless shake-ups in upper management and a new state-of-the-art animal shelter costing taxpayers millions can’t seem to set DAS straight.

 

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Read further: A Liveblog During The Animal Shelter Commission Meeting

Paid Leave for Being Indicted on Animal Cruelty Charges

Maybe With Their Powers Combined, Dallas Animal Services Can Be Compassionate

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Aarthi

Bengal • Baby • Female • Medium

Angels Among Us Pet Rescue, Inc. Alpharetta, GA

Aarthi is a 9 week old kitten up to date on vaccinations and will be spayed prior to adoption. Aarthi wants you to know that while she is the smallest in the litter, big things sometimes come in tiny packages. Aarthi love adventure and a baby gate is no problem for her at all – she can go right over one. This little girl has the most beautiful tabby swirls and is wonderful with other cats and really enjoys dogs! No fear of canines here.

 

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Our local animal shelter was having a special adoption fee of $10 for older cats who have been at the shelter for a year or longer. I’ve always liked tuxedo cats and her cage had said she was very friendly. She tolerates our one cat Lucifur who is not exactly the friendliest and gets along with our latest rescue cat Cleo. The only cat I’ve ever known to love having their belly rubbed. As you can see in the picture, all I have to do is say “Can I rub yer belly?” and she rolls right over!

Tracie K.
Valparaiso, IN

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