Tag Archive: cannabis


Cat delivers bag of weed to his owner

Published time: May 22, 2014 13:14
Edited time: May 23, 2014 13:25

AFP Photo / Luis Robayo

AFP Photo / Luis Robayo

A cat in New Zealand has behaved in a very un-feline manner, bringing his owner a bag of marijuana and leaving it at the door. Police are now praising the furry friend for possibly helping them secure a drug bust as they dust the bag for prints.

Local police say they are very impressed with the deed.

”You hear of cats bringing dead birds and rats home, but certainly in my career I’ve never seen anything like this before,” Sergeant Reece Munro told the local Otago Daily Times. “I guess you never know who’s keeping you honest these days, do you?”

 

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ReasonTV ReasonTV

 

Published on Feb 26, 2014

While Washington State is still adjusting to many changes since legalizing recreational marijuana—from growing space size to the number of licenses to give out—one of the biggest changes may be Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) employees going to work in the private sector. Reason TV sat down with Patrick Moen, a former supervisory special agent with the DEA, who now works as compliance director and senior counsel at Privateer Holdings, a private equity firm that invests in cannabis.

“The more law enforcement officers acknowledge that prohibition [of marijuana] is wrong, the better off society is going to be,” said Moen. At the DEA he specialized in wiretaps and worked on cases varying from busting heroin and methamphetamine rings to rooting out pot and painkiller dealers. “Taking that first step is often the most difficult one, it just so happened that I was the one to take it.”

Moen says that he got a lot of support from friends and former colleagues, the latter of which privately asked him for jobs. He says people may be surprised to know that an overwhelming majority of agents he interacted with didn’t feel marijuana should be a priority for the DEA.

“Well, my own personal point of view is that drugs like methamphetamine and heroin have legitimate, observable, harmful effects to the user and people around the user and you definitely cannot say the same thing about cannabis,” says Moen.

Reason TV presented Moen with numbers from the Department of Justice’s 2013 National Drug Threat Assessment indicating an increase in the availability of methamphetamine and heroin in the U.S.

“There are some cases of mine in particular that I am very proud of that I can look back at and say that I had a measurable effect on this community for some period of time before it bounced back,” says Moen. “I don’t think anyone was under the illusion that we were going to stop it, that we were going to win the war on drugs.”

Moen is aware of the criticism of the DEA and the war on drugs in general.

“I think there is a certain subset of the population that views DEA agents as jackbooted thugs, that have an agenda to oppress them…. But it’s just another job, and there are guys there that are competent, and there are guys there that are less so, but they are all trying to do the job the best that they can.”

Privateer Holdings is looking to invest in businesses that surround the legal marijuana industry like the cannabis review site, Leafly.com, which also helps users find different strains and locations of cannabis around them. Leafly claims to have a website and app that generate more than more than 2.3 million visits a month.

The private cannabis industry isn’t without worries though. CEO at Privateer Holdings, Brenden Kennedy, told Bloomberg TV on January 28, that banking in the marijuana industry was nearly impossible because banks were concerned with the taboo nature of the product. “We have been kicked out of two banks, two large banks, very unceremoniously,” said Kennedy, who also said at least one employee at Privateer Holdings had experienced trouble with his personal bank account.

“The biggest risk we see is from the federal government. Bureaucrats and politicians are always the last ones to accept change,” said Kennedy.

Approximately 10:07.

Produced and edited by Paul Detrick. Shot by Alex Manning. Music is “A Freak” by Moby.

Visit http://reason.com/reasontv for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason TV’s YouTube Channel to receive automatic updates when new material goes live.

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Did the Government Give Industrial Hemp a Pass to Clean Up Radiation in the States?

Christina Sarich

NationofChange / News Analysis

Published: Friday 14 February 2014

Hemp has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, but the most interesting fact about hemp is that it “eats” radiation.

Article image

Activists have been shouting they want an end to GMO foods for more than a decade now, and Cannabis Sattiva L. supporters have been at it for even longer, so why has the US government finally given farmers the right to legally grow industrial hemp, the non-hallucinatory, sister plant of medical marijuana?

It is safe to say that industrialized hemp should have been legalized years ago. With THC levels so low, you would have to smoke more of it than Snoop Dogg to get ‘high’ – and that’s a lot of Cannabis, it is ridiculous that it was classified as a drug at all. It has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, like cotton, for example. Here’s the most interesting fact though – hemp plants ‘eat’ radiation.

When the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant Reactor 4 accident caused severe radioactive contamination in 1986, families within a 30-kilometer area of the site had to be evacuated. Radioactive contamination was later found at 100 kilometers from the accident site, and Fukushima radiation levels are still to be determined, with the Japanese government planning on dumping their overflowing radiated water tanks into the Pacific as we speak.

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Pot in Washington (AP Images)

(HealthDay News) — The legalization of marijuana is an idea that is gaining momentum in the United States, but there may be a dark side to pot becoming more commonplace, a new study suggests.

Fatal crashes involving marijuana use tripled during the previous decade, fueling some of the overall increase in drugged-driving traffic deaths, researchers from Columbia University‘s Mailman School of Public Health report.

“Currently, one of nine drivers involved in fatal crashes would test positive for marijuana,” said co-author Dr. Guohua Li, director of the Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia. “If this trend continues, in five or six years non-alcohol drugs will overtake alcohol to become the most common substance involved in deaths related to impaired driving.”

The research team drew its conclusions from crash statistics from six states that routinely perform toxicology tests on drivers involved in fatal car wrecks — California, Hawaii, Illinois, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and West Virginia. The statistics included more than 23,500 drivers who died within one hour of a crash between 1999 and 2010.

Alcohol contributed to about the same percentage of traffic fatalities throughout the decade, about 40 percent, Li said.

But drugs played an increasingly prevalent role in fatal crashes, the researchers found. Drugged driving accounted for more than 28 percent of traffic deaths in 2010, up from more than 16 percent in 1999.

Marijuana proved to be the main drug involved in the increase, contributing to 12 percent of 2010 crashes compared with 4 percent in 1999.

The study authors also noted that the combined use of alcohol and marijuana dramatically increases a driver’s risk of death.

“If a driver is under the influence of alcohol, their risk of a fatal crash is 13 times higher than the risk of the driver who is not under the influence of alcohol,” Li said. “But if the driver is under the influence of both alcohol and marijuana, their risk increases to 24 times that of a sober person.”

The researchers found that the increase in marijuana use occurred across all age groups and in both sexes. Their findings were published online Jan. 29 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Impaired Driving: Get the Facts

Every day, almost 30 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes that involve an alcohol-impaired driver. This amounts to one death every 48 minutes.1  The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes totals more than $51 billion.2

Thankfully, there are effective measures that can help prevent injuries and deaths from alcohol-impaired driving.

How big is the problem?

  • In 2010, 10,228 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes, accounting for nearly one-third (31%) of all traffic-related deaths in the United States.1
  • Of the 1,210 traffic deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years in 2010, 211 (17%) involved an alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • Of the 211 child passengers ages 14 and younger who died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes in 2010, over half (131) were riding in the vehicle with the alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • In 2010, over 1.4 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.3 That’s one percent of the 112 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. adults each year.4
  • Drugs other than alcohol (e.g., marijuana and cocaine) are involved in about 18% of motor vehicle driver deaths. These other drugs are often used in combination with alcohol.5

CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving: A Threat to Everyone

US adults drank too much and got behind the wheel about 112 million times in 2010. Alcohol-impaired drivers* are involved in about 1 in 3 crash deaths, resulting in over 10,000 deaths in 2010.

*These drivers had blood alcohol concentrations of at least 0.08%. This is the illegal blood alcohol concentration level for adult drivers in the United States.

Learn more

Who is most at risk?

  • Young people:
    • At all levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC), the risk of being involved in a crash is greater for young people than for older people.6
    • Among drivers with BAC levels of 0.08 % or higher involved in fatal crashes in 2010,  more than one out of every 3 were between 21 and 24 years of age (34%). The next two largest groups were ages 25 to 34 (30%) and 35 to 44 (25%).1
  • Motorcyclists:
    • Among motorcyclists killed in fatal crashes in 2010, 28% had BACs of 0.08% or greater. 1
    • Nearly half of the alcohol-impaired motorcyclists killed each year are age 40 or older, and motorcyclists ages 40-44 have the highest percentage of deaths with BACs of 0.08% or greater (44%).7
  • Drivers with prior driving while impaired (DWI) convictions:
    • Drivers with a BAC of 0.08% or higher involved in fatal crashes were four times more likely to have a prior conviction for DWI than were drivers with no alcohol in their system? (8% and 2%, respectively).1

A Closer Look

  • Sobriety checkpoints: traffic stops where law enforcement officers assess drivers’ level of alcohol impairment. These checkpoints consistently reduce alcohol-related crashes, typically by 9%.
  • Ignition interlocks: devices that are installed in the vehicles of people who have been convicted of driving while impaired. They prevent operation of the vehicle by anyone with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above a specified safe level (usually 0.02% – 0.04%). When installed, interlocks are associated with about a 70% reduction in arrest rates for impaired driving.

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The Washington Times

 

Photo by: Ted S. Warren

This photo taken Oct. 16, 2013 shows marijuana clone plants that are used to grow medical marijuana displayed under a light, at The Joint, a medical marijuana cooperative in Seattle. It took nearly 15 years after voters approved it for medical marijuana to become available in the District of Columbia, but the next major change to the district’s pot laws is on the fast track. The D.C. Council is poised to approve a bill to decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot, and Democratic Mayor Vincent Gray supports it. He could sign the bill into law as early as January. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

WASHINGTON — It took nearly 15 years after voters approved medical marijuana for it to become available in the District of Columbia, but the next major change to pot laws in the nation’s capital is on the fast track.

The D.C. Council is poised to approve a bill that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot, and Democratic Mayor Vincent Gray announced last month that he supports it. He could sign the bill into law as early as January.


SEE ALSO: D.C. mayor, AG support bill decriminalizing marijuana


Some activists want the city to go further by legalizing, taxing and regulating marijuana as Colorado and Washington state do, and they’re considering a ballot initiative if the council doesn’t take that step.

It’s a big change from a year ago, when there was no medical marijuana in the capital and elected officials weren’t talking about relaxing recreational pot laws. Now, there are three tightly regulated marijuana dispensaries in the city, although there aren’t many patients yet.

City leaders have long been cautious about pot, in part because Congress has the final say on what’s legal in the district. But with 17 states having some form of decriminalization and the Justice Department taking a hands-off approach to legalization in Colorado and Washington state, city leaders think Congress won’t be interested in fighting that battle.

“What the states do would not matter if there were serious interest in the subject” on Capitol Hill, said Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat who represents the district in Congress. “I don’t think there’s a serious interest in the subject.”

The new sense of urgency has been fueled in part by two studies released this year that found large racial disparities in marijuana arrests in the city. Blacks were eight times more likely to be arrested than whites in the district in 2010, the American Civil Liberties Union found, and 91 percent of those arrested that year were black. About half of the city’s 632,000 residents are African-American.

“We have hundreds of young black men, black boys, being locked up, for simple possession of a couple bags of marijuana,” said Democratic Councilmember Marion Barry, one of the bill’s sponsors. “We don’t want to be proud of the wrong kind of thing here. We need to stop that kind of injustice from happening.”

Democrat Paul Zukerberg, a defense attorney who represents people charged with marijuana offenses and who campaigned for the council this spring on liberalization of marijuana laws, said he’s pleased members have embraced the issue.

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Reefer madness grips bureaucrats

 

Rady Ananda
Activist Post

To hell with populist will, bureaucrats in Colorado and Washington are dragging their feet or outright banning the sale of recreational cannabis in select cities.

Following the passage of permitted recreational marijuana use in both states last year, a flurry of local ordinances hit the books banning sales inside city limits, or putting a moratorium on allowing it. Over 100 Colorado cities have done this – nine of the most populous ten in the state.

In Washington, regulators are considering dismantling their medical marijuana regulations to enable taxing patients under the new recreational use tax scheme being devised. That’s not at all what voters intended, but accountants won’t ignore the revenue that can be generated from dying people using a plant that’s been around tens of millions of years longer than hominids.

Not only has marijuana been shown to cut tumor growth in cancer patients, improve mood in depressives, reduce nausea and provide safe pain relief, it’s also believed to reduce cocaine cravings in addicts and acts as a neuroprotectant with therapeutic value in treating Alzheimer’s and psychosis.

The British biotech firm GW Pharmaceuticals provides US cannabis patients with Sativex, and recently gained FDA approval to provide researchers with a cannabis concoction aimed at stopping seizures in epileptic children. The new formula, GWP42006 (to be marketed as Epidiolex), excludes all THC, the psychoactive cannabinoid favored by recreational users.
Sanjay Gupta’s CNN documentary, Weed, highlighted the story of 6-year-old Charlotte Fiji, who suffered 300 seizures a week. Finally, her mother administered a liquid form of marijuana high in CBD and low in THC. The effects were immediate and dramatic. Charlotte didn’t suffer a seizure that night and now only suffers a few a week.

Three different Investigational New Drug studies have been approved using GW’s blend, but all must pass muster with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which has a history of blocking FDA-approved cannabis studies.

 

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Seattle’s largest medical pot dispensary opens

by JOHN LANGELER / KING 5 News

 

Instead of a state-run liquor store, a building in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood now holds “the Whole Foods of weed,” according to the man who owns the business inside.

Green Ambrosia opened last Saturday and is the city’s biggest medical marijuana dispensary.

The opening comes as Washington’s Liquor Control Board and lawmakers decide how to regulate recreational marijuana sales in the wake of Initative 502, which legalized the use and possession of small amounts of pot.

“This could be the face of what I-502 enabled pot looks like,” explained Green Ambrosia owner Dante Jones.

Jones’ business has operated since 2011, but only recently opened a storefront.  Inside, behind a bamboo wall, is one large glass table loaded with jars of marijuana.  There are restrictions on how much medical marijuana a business can have on sale.

 

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Medical Marijuana: Federal Law Still Rules Over I-502

Posted: Feb 21, 2013 10:40 PM CST Updated: Feb 22, 2013 12:52 AM CST

by Dylan Wohlenhaus, KHQ Local News Reporter – email

SPOKANE, Wash. – Spokane resident Jerry Laberdee was in Federal court Wednesday to face charges of selling and using marijuana for charges filed before the passing of Initiative 502.

Laberdee is a medical marijuana patient and dispensary owner.  His store, “Medical Herb Providers,” was raided in 2011 when federal agents seized more than 30 pot plants, thousands in cash, and several ounces of ready-to-smoke weed.

Jerry Labredee and his business partner Dennis Whited were charged with distribution and manufacture.  Laberdee and Whited were facing up to 20-years in prison.

 

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Bills would stop medical pot arrests, erase marijuana convictions

By GENE JOHNSON, Associated Press Published: Feb 21, 2013 at 2:51 PM PST Last Updated: Feb 21, 2013 at 4:54 PM PST
Bills would stop medical pot arrests, erase marijuana convictions

SEATTLE (AP) – Two marijuana-related bills advanced Thursday in Olympia, with legislative committees giving their OK to one measure that would block police from arresting medical marijuana patients and another that would let people have misdemeanor pot convictions erased.

The House Public Safety Committee voted 6-5 to recommend the bill on pot convictions be passed, and the Senate Health Care Committee approved the arrest-protection bill. The votes beat a deadline Friday for bills dealing with policy matters to be passed out of committee.

Democratic Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon of Burien told the House committee Wednesday that after Initiative 502 passed, allowing adults over 21 to have up to an ounce of marijuana under state law, he started thinking about the thousands of people who have criminal records for activity that is now legal – criminal records that can keep people from getting jobs, housing or loans.

Typically, people must wait three years after completing their sentence before asking to have a misdemeanor conviction vacated. The bill would eliminate that waiting period and remove other restrictions on having pot misdemeanors wiped clean.

The bill drew some objections at a hearing Thursday. The head of the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, Tom McBride, noted that the bill would allow people to have their convictions erased even if they had more marijuana than I-502 allows. Misdemeanor pot possession has historically been defined as up to 40 grams, but the new law only lets people have up to an ounce, or 28 grams.

 

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  • Angel Dobbs, 38, and niece Ashley Dobbs, 24, were pulled over on State Highway 161 near Irving, Texas
  • Trooper searched car for marijuana before requesting invasive cavity search
  • Older woman claims search by trooper Kellie Helleson irritated an anal cyst she was suffering causing ‘severe pain and discomfort’
  • Also suing the Texas Department of Public Safety for failing to act on previous complaints about ‘violating’ searches

By Daily Mail Reporter

 

Two Texas women are suing after state troopers subjected them to a humiliating and invasive ‘roadside body cavity search’ that was caught on video.

Female trooper Kellie Helleson is seen in the footage aggressively searching the private parts of Angel Dobbs, 38, and her niece, Ashley Dobbs, 24, in front of passing cars.

The women, who claim the trooper used the same rubber glove for both of them, were initially stopped by Helleson’s colleague David Farrell on State Highway 161 near Irving after he saw one of them throw a cigarette butt out the window.

Invasive: The women, pictured right, is suing after female trooper Kellie Helleson, left, aggressively searched her private parts Invasive: Female trooper Kellie Helleson, left, aggressively searched their private parts

Farrell can be heard in the disturbing video questioning the pair about marijuana though he failed to find any evidence of the drug in the vehicle.

However, he requested the women be searches after allegedly claiming they were ‘acting weird.’

The lawsuit states he then tried to ‘morph this situation into a DWI investigation,’ according to the Dallas Morning News.

Angel Dobbs passed a roadside sobriety test and the women were given warnings for littering.

 

 

 

 

GMO Hemp

Barbara H. Peterson

Farm Wars

Let’s get this straight. There is cannabis, and there is CANNABIS. One has relatively no THC levels, and the other does. It’s like two dogs – one a Chihuahua, the other a Great Dane. Same species, different breeds. The one with higher levels of THC is normally referred to as marijuana. That is the one that gets you high if heated. The other one, without high THC levels, is hemp. Smoke a pound of it and you’ll only get a headache… maybe. Yet, these are both illegal according to the U.S. government. Why? That’s a very good question.

Federal Hypocrisy in Action

One of the arguments against cannabis legalization in the U.S. is that “getting high” via THC is evidently unacceptable. Go drink a fifth of whiskey or down some barbiturates courtesy of your local licensed Big Pharma drug pusher instead. But don’t do both together, or you might die. In fact, you could die from either one, but that’s evidently irrelevant, as long as it is approved by our corporate government. In other words, don’t use your own drugs, use ours. Yeah, that’s safer. Take for example, Intermezzo, just in case you have that occasional sleepless night.

 Intermezzo

http://www.myintermezzo.com/portal/f?p=800:SAFETY:0::NO:::

“…the FDA is fully aware that the drugs it certifies as safe have been killing Americans at the rate of 100,000 per year.” (Jon Rappoport)

Here’s a novel idea – Before selling pain killers or sleeping pills, why not force Big Pharma to take the “high” out of them? Why not hold Big Pharma meds to the same standards? After all, that is the objectionable part to marijuana, isn’t it? Or so we’ve been told.

The only thing that anyone can complain about regarding the weed is that you are liable to get a little goofy if you take it. No side effects. None. Use enough and you go to sleep. Period. No depression, no vomiting or death by asphyxiation.

But that’s different, you say?

Why?

Well, what about the “gateway” theory that smoking marijuana will lead to stronger drugs?

The real gateway is the medicine cabinet in our own homes. Just count the prescriptions in there, then try and tell your child that drugs are bad. Yes, you can get high smoking marijuana, big deal. You can also get high doing any number of dangerous things, smoking marijuana NOT being one of them. Industrial hemp, however, will not get anyone high!

liarLies, Lies, and more Lies

Since the U.S. government does not differentiate between high THC content marijuana and its low content relation, industrial hemp, both are banned. Not because the government somehow missed the class on the difference between the two, that’s just plain silly.

So, why the ban?

It only makes sense if you understand that our government doesn’t care one lick about our health, or the health of the planet. The people in our government just want to keep their corporate donors flush in profits, power, and control. So, what to do? Simple. Conduct a war on the one plant that could quite possibly, if it was legal, put those donors out of business. At least for the time being…

So, here’s the spin – Have the government declare that cannabis, all cannabis, has no medicinal value and is illegal to grow, or even possess if it is the wrong breed. In fact, as recently as 2011, “the federal government ruled that it has no accepted medical use and should remain classified as a highly dangerous drug like heroin.

Really???? Well, that says it all, eh? But wait! There is a government study from 1999 that says just the opposite!

And here is a patent for medical marijuana assigned to the US government:

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=6630507.PN.&OS=PN/6630507&RS=PN/6630507

Another patent:

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8337908.PN.&OS=PN/8337908&RS=PN/8337908

Hmmmm…  Methinks the lies are starting to unravel before our very eyes.

 

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