Tag Archive: Beagle


Tears of joy as April Helland and her family are reunited with Maizy after nearly 6 years.March 21, 2014

Maizy was a young beagle when she followed the children of her family into the woods of Knoxville five-and-a-half-years ago, but she got lost that day – so very long ago for a dog. Somehow miracles do happen when luck and technology joined together to help Maizy and her long lost family find each on Tuesday reported wbir.com.

The beagle stray was rescued by the Young Williams Animal Center in Knoxville, and as a routine practice, all pets are scanned for microchips. Not only did Maizy have a microchip, her information was current; in turn her owners Chad and April Helland were called with the good news.

The Helland family had been distraught years before when Maizy lost her way. The friendly beagle who loved to cuddle was part of the family. Four-year-old Parker cried for his four-legged friend. Posters were displayed everywhere, but Maizy never came home.

Eventually the family adopted another beagle named Cooper, but no one ever forgot their first dog.

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Local 8 Now WVLT | Knoxville, East Tennessee | News, Weather, Sports

 

Dog missing for six years reunited with her family

 

 

 

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) — The last time the Helland family saw their dog, their youngest son was four years old.

 

Now he’s ten and the dog they never thought they’d see again is back home.

 

“The day before we had taken a trip to Nashville. So the last thing that was on our minds was gee, I wonder if our dog that went missing six years ago is gonna come back,” says son Tyler Yonce.

 

But finally it started to sink in that a family member was back.

 

“My husband told me and I just broke down immediately. I thought I would never see her again,” says April Helland.

 

“It was a whole range of emotions — shocked. I couldn’t believe it,” says her husband, Chad Helland.

 

Monday, the family got a call from Young-Williams Animal Shelter telling them that someone found their beagle Maisy, the family pet that went missing back in 2008.

 

“I spent many hours out in the woods. I took old t-shirts and put them out in the woods so I could leave my scent out there for her,” Chad says.

 

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While animal-free experimentation alternatives do exist and are being increasingly advocated for, testing on animals is still prevalent. According to the Humane Society of the United States, more than 25 million vertebrate animals, from dogs and cats to rats and mice, are used in research, testing, and education in the U.S. every year.

Of these 25 million or so, 200,000 of them are rabbits, as the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has reported in filings.

Most rabbits are used in toxicity testing, such as the painful Draize eye and skin irritancy tests during which a rabbit is “locked into full-body restraints to prevent them from touching eye or skin sores,” the American Anti-Vivisection Society (AAVS) reports.

Rabbits are also known to be used to test pyrogenicity, the ability of a product to induce a fever, and for development or embryotoxcity tests, which aim to determine “the danger that a product will harm a pregnant female of developing fetus,” AAVS explains.

Despite all their service to testing facilities, rabbits rarely receive any kindness in laboratories. AAVS states that the lab environment is “particularly noxious to rabbits, causing great stress, weakening their immune systems, and making them more prone to illness.”

What’s more, these rabbits seldom leave their cages, except for testing procedures, and are often never provided with enrichment or any sort of comfort.

Beagle Freedom Project, a rescue, foster, and adoption program with the nonprofit Animal Rescue, Media and Education (ARME) based in Los Angeles, Calif., has taken in and cared for a number of lab rabbits over the years through retirement agreements with laboratories.

Kevin Chase, Beagle Freedom Project’s director of operations, tells OGP that they have even sent letters to every U.S. cosmetics and household product company that still uses animals for testing, asking that they surrender their research animals after terminating their studies to allow them to be put up for adoption.

Two Rescued Rabbits Finally Step Outside After Life in a Lab Cage (PHOTOS)Beagle Freedom Project

It was this type of agreement that allowed Beagle Freedom Project to rescue rabbits, Bun and Honey. They are just two of eight rabbits who the project has saved over the last 18 months.

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Beagles are used heavily in research procedures and are the dog breed most often used in animal testing due to their size and passivity. According to U.K. government statistics, of the 8,018 dogs used for testing in the country, more 97 percent, or 7,799, were beagles.

A report last year said that more than 70,000 beagles in the United States are used for testing purposes. Los Angeles journalist Lu Parker by way of the Huffington Post found the dogs are sometimes used in surgical experiments, while its common for the dog’s vocal chords to be removed.

The creator of the White House petition seeks to end what they described as “cruel and a violation of animal rights.”

As of December 21, the petition had 5,985 signatures; it closes on January 3, 2013.