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Tag Archive: Bahrain


Published time: March 01, 2014 02:14

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police during clashes taking place during a protest over the death of detainee Jaffar Mohammed Jaffar at a hospital, ahead of his funeral in the village of Daih, west of Manama, February 27, 2014. (Reuters)

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police during clashes taking place during a protest over the death of detainee Jaffar Mohammed Jaffar at a hospital, ahead of his funeral in the village of Daih, west of Manama, February 27, 2014. (Reuters)

A funeral in a Bahraini village of a man who died in police custody has ended with police using teargas and stun grenades to disperse the crowd that engaged them with stones and petrol bombs, according to the authorities.

The Shiite village of Daih was holding a funeral for a 23-year-old Mohammed Jaafar who died in custody, after being accused of smuggling weapons. His death is the second in 2014 of a person held on security-related charges. The main opposition al-Wefaq group said that the young man was denied medical treatment in custody, while one activist said he had been tortured, Reuters reports. The accusations have been denied by the authorities.

Following the funeral, scuffles with police erupted. The people started throwing rocks, metal rods and reportedly petrol bombs at the police who used tear gas and stun grenades to disperse the crowd. No casualties have so far been reported.

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VOA

Tens of thousands of Bahraini pro-democracy protesters wave signs and national flags during a march along a divided four-lane highway near Barbar, Bahrain, west of the capital of Manama, Feb. 15, 2014.

Tens of thousands of Bahraini pro-democracy protesters wave signs and national flags during a march along a divided four-lane highway near Barbar, Bahrain, west of the capital of Manama, Feb. 15, 2014.

Reuters

The rally organized by the kingdom’s main opposition al-Wefaq movement was one of the biggest staged since 2011.

Vast crowds of men, women and children took to the streets of the small Gulf Arab nation calling for democracy, political reform and the release of political prisoners, witnesses said.

“We will not stop until we achieve our demands,” protesters shouted. “Shi’ites and Sunnis, we all love this country.”

Police could not be seen at the rally on Budaiya Highway, which links Bahrain’s southern Budaiya region with the capital Manama, witnesses said. No clashes were reported.

The Interior Ministry said a policeman had died after being wounded by a “terrorist” blast on Friday. Three other policemenwere wounded the same day, while 26 people had been arrested.

“Some villages saw rioting, vandalism and the targeting of policemen,” the ministry said, referring to Friday’s unrest.

Bahrain, with Saudi help, crushed the demonstrations that began on Feb. 14, 2011 inspired by Arab uprisings elsewhere, but has yet to resolve the conflict between majority Shi’ites and the Sunni-led monarchy they accuse of oppressing them.

The ruling family has launched a third round of dialogue with its opponents, but no political agreement is in sight.

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SFGate

Bahrainis protest, wounded police officer dies

Updated 11:41 am, Saturday, February 15, 2014

Police officers carry the body of fellow policeman Abdul Wahid Al Balouchi, who was killed in a bombing on Friday, during his funeral procession in Riffa, Bahrain, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Thousands of Bahraini protesters clashed with security forces on Saturday, sending tear gas into a major shopping mall and bringing the capital's streets to a standstill on the same day that authorities said a police officer died of injuries sustained from an earlier bombing. Photo: Uncredited, AP / AP
Police officers carry the body of fellow policeman Abdul Wahid Al Balouchi, who was killed in a bombing on Friday, during his funeral procession in Riffa, Bahrain, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Thousands of Bahraini protesters clashed with security forces on Saturday, sending tear gas into a major shopping mall and bringing the capital’s streets to a standstill on the same day that authorities said a police officer died of injuries sustained from an earlier bombing. Photo: Uncredited, AP

MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — Bahraini anti-government activists clashed with security forces as thousands of demonstrators took to the streets on Saturday, sending tear gas into a major shopping mall and bringing the capital’s streets to a standstill on the same day that authorities said a police officer died of injuries sustained from an earlier bombing.

The Interior Ministry said that the officer was one of two injured in what it called a “terrorist blast” on Friday in the village of Dair, near the country’s main airport. It did not identify the officer. In a second statement, the ministry characterized recent attacks against security forces as “urban guerrilla warfare.”

Chaos in the small Gulf-island nation highlights deeper regional sectarian tensions that continue to roil Bahrain three years after the country’s majority Shiites began an Arab Spring-inspired uprising to demand greater political rights from the Sunni-led monarchy.

Neighboring Sunni-ruled Gulf countries with smaller Shiite populations, led by Saudi Arabia, sent troops to Bahrain in an effort to stem the uprising in 2011. More than 65 people have died in the unrest, but rights groups and others put the death toll higher.

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Hmmmm,  I  wonder  how  much  incentive…….umm,  I  mean  aid  goes  to  Bahrain?

A Wikileaks has provided via  leaked  cables the amounts spent on U.S. military aid to Bahrain. The U. S provided $3.9 million in 2008. $8 million in 2009, then $19 million in 2010. The request is for $19.45 million this year. Although relatively small in  comparison to  other military  aid  price tags one  must  keep in mind that Bahrain is a small country with a population of about 500,000.

And  yet the money  continues  to  flow  , in spite  of the  human  rights  abuses  and  the  Bahraini  government’s oppression  of it’s  people.   But then Saudi Arabia  approves of  what is happening in  Bahrain as  they are  complicit  in their crimes.  The   facts  that  George  W Bush’s Kissing   buddy  and   Barack Obama’s superior, having  bowed  down to  the Saudi King in deference.   The  Saudi King is  very  much a  part  of  what is  happening in the  Middle East and  The  US is  complicit.

                       Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz (file photo)

So then  why Egypt?

It  wouldn’t  have  anything to  do with the  fact that having the  Muslim Brotherhood  in  control in  Egypt  was a  beneficial  thing  to TPTB  ,  would it?

I  would bet  it  does.

Let’s not  allow  ourselves  to  be hoodwinked  by  some  show  of solidarity  with the  suffering  of the  people  of  Egypt.  This   administration  has   shown on more than one  occasion that their  agenda is  devoid  of  what  is  right  and  just  and all to do with  garnering  power and  money at  any  cost.

A protester receives treatment at the Al-Fateh mosque in Cairo on August 16. A protester receives treatment at the Al-Fateh mosque in Cairo on August 16.

Methinks,  they  should  remember who they  are, where they are  from  and  what this  Nation  once  stood  for.  Rather  than  march on following  the  coattails of  the  pied piper in  chief  and  do what is morally  just.

Perhaps it is  time  they were  reminded?

~Desert Rose ~

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CNN

U.S. officials differ on status of military aid to Egypt

By Jessica Yellin, CNN Chief White House Correspondent
August 20, 2013 — Updated 1550 GMT (2350 HKT)

A soldier sets up barbed wire in anticipation of protesters outside the constitutional court in Cairo on Sunday, August 18. The protesters never showed up. Over the past week, about 900 people -- security forces as well as citizens -- have been killed. Deaths occurred when the military used force to clear supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsy from two sit-in sites in Cairo on Wednesday, and violence raged after Morsy supporters staged demonstrations Friday. <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/04/middleeast/gallery/egypt-after-coup/index.html' target='_blank'>Look back at Egypt's unrest.</a> A soldier sets up barbed wire in anticipation of protesters outside the constitutional court in Cairo on Sunday, August 18. The protesters never showed up. Over the past week, about 900 people — security forces as well as citizens — have been killed. Deaths occurred when the military used force to clear supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsy from two sit-in sites in Cairo on Wednesday, and violence raged after Morsy supporters staged demonstrations Friday. Look back at Egypt’s unrest.

Washington (CNN) — The Obama administration is withholding some military aid to Egypt as it reviews how it wants to proceed, a U.S. official told CNN, but a Pentagon spokesman said he knew of no action to stop aid to Egypt.

The U.S. official said Monday the move is being described as a “reprogramming” of some funds to Egypt, but in effect, Washington is temporarily holding up some military aid to that country as it prepares for the possibility that future aid could be cut.

However, Pentagon spokesman George Little said Tuesday that no decisions had been made regarding military aid to Egypt.

“I’m not aware of any de facto suspension. I don’t know where that came from,” Little said, adding that “all aspects (of the aid) are under review.”

But beyond the delay in shipping four F-16s, which had already been announced, Little said he knows of no other actions taken to stop aid to Egypt.

Wreckage and debris litter the area around the Al-Fateh mosque in Cairo, where hundreds of Islamist protesters had barricaded themselves on Saturday, August 17. Thousands defied an emergency order by taking to the streets the day before to mark a "Friday of anger" in support of ousted President Mohamed Morsy. Wreckage and debris litter the area around the Al-Fateh mosque in Cairo, where hundreds of Islamist protesters had barricaded themselves on Saturday, August 17. Thousands defied an emergency order by taking to the streets the day before to mark a “Friday of anger” in support of ousted President Mohamed Morsy.

A spokesman for Sen. Patrick Leahy, David Carle, confirmed to CNN Monday that his office has been told the aid has been halted. Leahy, a Vermont Democrat, is chairman of the Appropriations State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee.

“As we noted yesterday, the State Department and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee was told that the transfer of military aid was stopped, that this is current practice, not necessarily official policy, and there is no indication of how long it will last,” an aide to Leahy reiterated in a statement Tuesday.

The United States gives about $1.23 billion in military aid to Egypt.

But the U.S. official emphasized no decision has been made to permanently halt the aid. These steps ultimately allow the administration to move forward on either scenario: pressing ahead with the aid or cutting it off.

Aid is not a continuous flow of funds, but a series of periodic bursts: a delivery of fighter jets; a military exercise. Both of those recent aid items for Egypt have already been halted.

Egyptians security forces escort a supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood out of the Al-Fateh mosque and through an angry crowd in Ramses Square on August 17. Egyptians security forces escort a supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood out of the Al-Fateh mosque and through an angry crowd in Ramses Square on August 17.

The official said the latest moves to “reprogram” aid mean the United States has taken steps to get the remaining aid in U.S. accounts in line with legal requirements so the administration is positioned to cut off the aid, if it decides to do so, or continue it.

The official says once the review is complete, administration officials will go to Congress to decide how to move forward.

Reporter Josh Rogin with the Daily Beast first reported the United States has quietly suspended the aid.

A wounded boy is treated in the Taamin Sehi field hospital during clashes on August 16. A wounded boy is treated in the Taamin Sehi field hospital during clashes on August 16.

What it means

The move provides the administration with a quick “on/off” switch.

Under the law, if the United States were to designate the situation in Egypt a “coup,” the United States couldn’t restore aid until a democratic government is established. A coup determination would not be temporary.

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PressTVGlobalNews PressTVGlobalNews

Published on May 7, 2013

Press TV has conducted an interview with Jeff Steinberg, senior editor with the Executive Intelligence Review in Washington, about the issue of the US and a group of 41 other nations’ military drills off Bahrain in the Persian Gulf focusing on the protection of global shipping.

PressTVGlobalNews PressTVGlobalNews

Published on Apr 28, 2013

Press TV has conducted an interview with international lawyer, Franklin Lamb, about the situation in Bahrain.

 

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Bahraini police arrest 22 protesters

Bahraini police disperse protesters holding an anti-regime demonstration in the village of Diraz, April 27, 2013.

Bahraini police disperse protesters holding an anti-regime demonstration in the village of Diraz, April 27, 2013.
Sun Apr 28, 2013 8:43AM

The Bahraini uprising began in mid-February 2011, when the people started holding massive demonstrations against the Al Khalifa regime, which promptly launched a brutal crackdown on the peaceful protests and called in Saudi-led Arab forces from neighboring states to help quash the revolt.

Bahrain has arrested more than 22 people since February for participation in demonstrations against the Al Khalifa regime, police say.

The police made the announcement in a statement issued on Saturday. The statement added that search was still under way for more protesters.

Bahrain’s main opposition group, al-Wefaq, said on Saturday that 14 people had been detained during police raids on April 25 and 26.

Meanwhile, people held an anti-regime demonstration in the village of Diraz, west of the capital, Manama, on Saturday. The protesters shouted slogans against the Al Khalifa regime.

In recent weeks, anti-regime protests have increased in Bahrain as Manama hosted the controversial Formula One Grand Prix auto race.

On April 25, Bahrainis staged demonstrations to protest the detention of female activists who were arrested in connection to rallies against the Formula One event.

The Bahraini uprising began in mid-February 2011, when the people started holding massive demonstrations against the Al Khalifa regime, which promptly launched a brutal crackdown on the peaceful protests and called in Saudi-led Arab forces from neighboring states to help quash the revolt.

Dozens of people have been killed in the crackdown, and the security forces have arrested hundreds including doctors and nurses.

The UN Special Rapporteur on torture said on April 24 that he was deeply disappointed over a move by Manama to practically cancel his planned visit to Bahrain.

“This was a unilateral decision by the authorities. Unfortunately, it is not the first time the government has tried to avoid responsibility for the postponement of my visit, which was originally supposed to take place over a year ago,” Juan Mendez stated.

Amnesty International also condemned the move, saying the Manama regime was clearly “not serious” about implementing human rights reforms.

DB/HSN

Saudi sends more tanks, arms to Bahrain

Saudi Arabian troops heading towards Bahrain to crush anti-regime protesters (file photo)

Saudi Arabian troops heading towards Bahrain to crush anti-regime protesters (file photo)
Sun Apr 21, 2013 9:34PM GMT
Press TV



Bahrani activists said on Sunday that the tanks were sent by heavy military transport vehicles, which crossed the main bridge that links the two neighboring countries.

Meanwhile, Saudi-backed Bahraini security forces clashed with pro-democracy protesters, who held demonstrations on Sunday across the country against the Grand Prix race.

The violence erupted when police attacked protesters blocking roads in Manama. The protesters also burnt tires on roads in villages outside Manama, according to witnesses.

Protests have increased in Bahrain as the Manama regime prepares to host the controversial sporting event.

Bahrain’s public security chief, Major General Tariq Hassan said in a statement, “Police are out in force to beef up security measures at the Bahrain International Circuit.”

On Saturday, police fired tear gas at anti-regime demonstrators calling for the cancelation of the sporting event over the regime’s crackdown on peaceful protests.

Similar demonstrations were held on Friday, when tens of thousands of Bahrainis rallied along the Budaiya highway west of Manama to demand the cancelation of the race.

The Bahraini revolution began on February 14, 2011, when the people, inspired by the popular revolutions that toppled the dictators of Tunisia and Egypt, started holding massive demonstrations.

On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded the country, upon Manama’s request, to help the Bahraini regime quash the uprising.

The protesters initially said they wanted political reform and a constitutional monarchy. However, following the regime’s brutal crackdown on the popular protests, the Bahraini people began demanding that the ruling Al Khalifa family step down.

Scores of people have been killed and hundreds of others arrested in the crackdown, but the protesters are undaunted and have refused to back down on their demands.

GJH/HN

Why didn’t CNN’s international arm air its own documentary on Bahrain’s Arab Spring repression?

A former CNN correspondent defies threats from her former employer to speak out about self-censorship at the network

A Bahraini protester

A Bahraini protester in Manama. Photograph: Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty Images

In late March 2011, as the Arab Spring was spreading, CNN sent a four-person crew to Bahrain to produce a one-hour documentary on the use of internet technologies and social media by democracy activists in the region. Featuring on-air investigative correspondent Amber Lyon, the CNN team had a very eventful eight-day stay in that small, US-backed kingdom.

By the time the CNN crew arrived, many of the sources who had agreed to speak to them were either in hiding or had disappeared. Regime opponents whom they interviewed suffered recriminations, as did ordinary citizens who worked with them as fixers. Leading human rights activist Nabeel Rajab was charged with crimes shortly after speaking to the CNN team. A doctor who gave the crew a tour of his village and arranged meetings with government opponents, Saeed Ayyad, had his house burned to the ground shortly after. Their local fixer was fired ten days after working with them.

The CNN crew itself was violently detained by regime agents in front of Rajab’s house. As they described it after returning to the US, “20 heavily-armed men”, whose faces were “covered with black ski masks”, “jumped from military vehicles”, and then “pointed machine guns at” the journalists, forcing them to the ground. The regime’s security forces seized their cameras and deleted their photos and video footage, and then detained and interrogated them for the next six hours.

Lyon’s experience both shocked and emboldened her. The morning after her detention, newspapers in Bahrain prominently featured articles about the incident containing what she said were “outright fabrications” from the government. “It made clear just how willing the regime is to lie,” she told me in a phone interview last week.

But she also resolved to expose just how abusive and thuggish the regime had become in attempting to snuff out the burgeoning democracy movement, along with any negative coverage of the government.

“I realized there was a correlation between the amount of media attention activists receive and the regime’s ability to harm them, so I felt an obligation to show the world what our sources, who risked their lives to talk to us, were facing.”

CNN’s total cost for the documentary, ultimately titled “iRevolution: Online Warriors of the Arab Spring”, was in excess of $100,000, an unusually high amount for a one-hour program of this type. The portion Lyon and her team produced on Bahrain ended up as a 13-minute segment in the documentary. That segment, which as of now is available on YouTube, is a hard-hitting and unflinching piece of reporting that depicts the regime in a very negative light.

Amber Lyon, former CNN report

Amber Lyon on CNN, commenting on the March 2011 repression in Bahrain

Read Full Article Here

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Amber Lyon’s iRevolution documentaries Egypt, Bahrain, Tunisia, …

Dictators Sponsor CNN | Interview with Amber Lyon

Published on Oct 3, 2012

Abby Interviews former CNN Investigative Journalist, Amber Lyon, about CNN’s corrupt media empire, calling into question a media establishment where censorship can be bought.

Former CNN Reporter (Amber Lyon) threatened & silenced by CNN reveals CNN Lies & War Propaganda

Published on Oct 9, 2012

‘Real Arab Spring in Bahrain which West ignores’

Published on Aug 16, 2012

Bahraini Human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been sentenced to three years in jail for “participation in an illegal assembly” and “calling for a march without prior notification.” – READ MORE http://on.rt.com/y95tqy

Patrick Henningsen, who’s a geopolitical analyst, believes human rights chaos in Bahrain is beneficial for Western states.

Bahrain uprising anniversary: Worst clashes in months

Published on Feb 14, 2013

http://www.euronews.com/ Two years after their Arab Spring uprising against Bahrain’s ruling family, protesters have been back on the streets in what they said was a day of civil disobedience.

Security forces fired warning shots to try to disperse a crowd of youths gathered in a village near the capital Manama.

They killed a teenager and several others were injured during the most violent clashes in months.

Thousands of people were arrested during the first uprising in early 2011. Dozens of political prisoners are still in jail.

Of those originally detained, seven prisoners have been interviewed by Amnesty International at Bahrain’s Jaw prison.

All of them say they’ve been jailed on false charges or under laws that repress basic rights. Many were allegedly tortured in the first weeks of their arrests.

Human rights groups also claim security forces used excessive force two years ago.

Bahrain Shouting in the dark البحرين تصرخ في الظلام

Uploaded on Aug 4, 2011

Bahrain: An island kingdom in the Arabian Gulf where the Shia Muslim majority are ruled by a family from the Sunni minority. Where people fighting for democratic rights broke the barriers of fear, only to find themselves alone and crushed.

This is their story and Al Jazeera is their witness – the only TV journalists who remained to follow their journey of hope to the carnage that followed.

This is the Arab revolution that was abandoned by the Arabs, forsaken by the West and forgotten by the world.

Shouting in the dark can be seen from Thursday, August 4, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

Arabic Translated:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyARJP…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaTKDM…
AlJazeeraEnglish

Teenage protester shot dead amid clashes on Bahrain uprising anniversary (PHOTOS)

Published: 14 February, 2013, 13:36
Edited: 14 February, 2013, 19:37

Shiite Bahraini protestors clash with security forces following a rally to mark the second anniversary of an uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom of Bahrain, on February 14, 2013 in the village of Sanabis, West of the capital Manama (AFP Photo / Mohammed Al - Shaikh)

Shiite Bahraini protestors clash with security forces following a rally to mark the second anniversary of an uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom of Bahrain, on February 14, 2013 in the village of Sanabis, West of the capital Manama (AFP Photo / Mohammed Al – Shaikh)

A teenage protester was killed in a Shiite village near the Bahraini capital Manama on Thursday, as demonstrators clashed with police during a rally marking the second anniversary of the country’s Shia uprising.

­According to the website of main Bahraini opposition group Wefaq, 16-year-old Ali Ahmed Ibrahim al-Jazeeri died in the village of Diya from what it alleged were internationally banned exploding bullets. The country’s interior ministry confirmed the death on its Twitter account, but did not release the identity of the deceased, AFP reported.

Protests started early in the morning in a few Shiite villages, as demonstrators marked the second anniversary of the beginning of the popular uprising in the country. According to the International Federation for Human Rights, at least 80 people have died in the violence over the past two years.

The latest rally also turned violent, with security forces firing shotguns and tear gas to disperse the protesters. Demonstrators retaliated by throwing petrol bombs at officers, witnesses said.

Shiite Bahraini protestors clash with security forces following a rally to mark the second anniversary of an uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom of Bahrain, on February 14, 2013 in the village of Sanabis, West of the capital Manama (AFP Photo / Mohammed Al – Shaikh)
Shiite Bahraini protestors clash with security forces following a rally to mark the second anniversary of an uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom of Bahrain, on February 14, 2013 in the village of Sanabis, West of the capital Manama (AFP Photo / Mohammed Al – Shaikh)

Two police officers were reportedly hurt when their vehicles crashed in Budaiya, after anti-government protesters poured motor oil on the road. Hundreds of people participating in the rally also built roadblocks.

Nationwide protests are set to take place across Bahrain on Thursday and Friday following calls by opposition activists.

On Wednesday, Bahraini police fired tear gas and stun grenades in a crackdown on hundreds of protesters in the capital Manama. Demonstrators attempted to march to Pearl Square, which was occupied two years ago when the protest against the country’s ruling Sunni monarchy first began.

Peace in Bahrain can only be reached “through a dialogue, and the regime has to realize that,” Bahraini activist Dominic Kavakeb told RT.

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‘No change in Bahrain as Al Khalifa rules’

Published on Feb 8, 2013

A Bahraini opposition leader says that the developments in the past two years in the Persian Gulf island of Bahrain have proved that the ruling Al Khalifa regime cannot be trusted to bring about real changes.

The comments come as Bahraini protesters have held fresh protest rallies marking the second anniversary of their pro-democracy uprising against the ruling regime. Anti-regime demonstrators on Thursday held a massive march in the capital, Manama, while similar rallies were held in several other parts of the country. According to Physicians for Human Rights, many doctors and nurses have been detained, tortured, or have disappeared because they have “evidence of atrocities committed by the authorities, security forces, and riot police” in the crackdown on anti-government protesters.

Press TV has talked with Saeed Shahabi, Bahraini opposition leader from London to further discuss the issue at hand.

Bahrain protesters mark Arab Spring 2nd anniversary

ublished on Feb 14, 2013

http://www.euronews.com/ Security forces in Bahrain shot dead a teenage boy on Thursday as protesters marked the second anniversary of the failed Arab Spring uprising.

The shooting happened in a small village near the capital Manama after a radical underground group called for a general strike and a day of civil disobedience.

Earlier in the week, riot police were deployed to disperse demonstrators and clashes broke out when tea gas was fired.

The main opposition continues to demand the freeing of dozens of political prisoners, who were detained two years ago.

Seven of them were interviewed by Amnesty International at Bahrain’s Jaw prison last month. All of them say they’ve been jailed on false charges or under laws that repress basic rights.

The human rights group also released a video from Maryam Abu Deeb, the daughter of one prisoner, Mahdi Abe Deeb, who is the president of the Bahrain Teachers Association.

“My dad has been prisoned now for two years, sentenced to five years for exercising his right to freedom of expression,” she recounted.

Dozens of people were killed during February and March 2011 when the original uprising took hold.

Human rights groups claim security forces used excessive force as they attempted to quash the protests. Many prisoners were allegedly tortured in the first weeks of their arrests.

RT.com
Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:55 CST

Bahraini princess Nora Bint Ebrahim al-Khalifa

A Bahraini princess is in court for the torture of three pro-democracy activists in detention. The princess’s case is the latest in a string of cases of torture and violence has seen the light in a report issued by Bahraini opposition.

Princess Nora Bint Ebrahim al-Khalifa who serves in Bahrain’s Drugs Control Unit, allegedly collaborated with another officer to torture three activists held in detention following a pro-democracy rally against the island kingdom’s monarchy.

The princess categorically denies the charges of torture set against her.

Two of the princess’s alleged victims were Doctors Ghassan Daif and Bassem Daif, who went to help the hundreds wounded when police opened fire with teargas and birdshot during protests in 2011. They were taken into custody in March of that year when it is thought that al-Khalifa tortured them.

Ayat al-Qurmazi

The third victim, 21-year-old Ayat al-Qurmazi, was arrested for public reading of inflammatory poetry criticizing the royal family. She claims her blindfold slipped while she was being tortured and she caught a glimpse of al-Khalifa.

As Muslim women have never before been known to take part in interrogations and tortures, Nora Al-Khalifa stands out as the grossest character in the human rights activists’ report, RT’s Nadezhda Kevorkova said.

Princess Nora’s case is the latest in a series of torture scandals highlighted in a report by the Bahrain Forum for Human Rights.

A 55-pages report titled ‘Citizens in the Grip of Torture’ is based on the nine interviews with named and anonymous witnesses. It was published both in English and Arabic.

The report states that two of the Bahraini King’s sons Nasser Bin Hammad Al-Khalifa and Khalid Bin Hammad Al-Khalifa, as well as two other members of the royal family, Khalifa Bin Ahmed Al-Khalifa and Nora Bint Ebrahim Al-Khalifa, directly took part in torturing the activists.

© Photos from Report: Citizens in the Grip of Torturers
Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa (L), Khalid bin Hamad Al Khalifa (M), Khalifa bin Ahmed Al Khalifa (R).

Torture stories include rare details that Muslims usually prefer to shun for ethical reasons, Bahraini opposition activists told Kevorkova.

After getting numerous letters from torture victims who mentioned the four members of the royal family among the arresters and torturers, the report’s authors decided it was vital to get an investigation going, RT’s Kevorkova said.

Included in the report are short CVs of those four members of the Bahrain’s royal family accused of human rights violations.

Nasser Bin Hamad, the fourth son of the King Hamad, is a colonel and commander of Bahrain’s royal guard. Bin Hamad, his 23-year-old brother, has also held a number of senior positions despite his young age and is married to Saudi Arabian King’s daughter.

The other two Al-Khalifas directly responsible for cases of torture and violence as stated in the report are Colonel Khalifa Bin Ahmed, a high-ranking police officer dismissed from his post in September 2011, and Lieutenant Nora Bint Ebrahim Al-Khalifa of Bahrain’s Drug Enforcement Administration.

Tortured for reading verses

Poet Ayat Al-Qurmozy was arrested in March 2011 after reciting a poem against the Bahraini regime during a peaceful demonstration in Pearl Roundabout. She was detained by masked men dressed in civilian clothing. On her release, al-Qurmozy told of tortures used on her by both men and women. One of the women involved was identified as Nora al-Khalifa.

The report states that Nora spat on al-Qurmozy and into her mouth, slapped her in the face repeatedly, administered electric shocks and shouted anti-Shia slurs.

On the eighth day of her arrest, al-Qurmozy was brought blindfolded into a room full of men, documents the report. They shouted abuse at her and demanded she tell them by whom she was given the verses and how much she was paid for reading them.

“I was surprised by a woman grabbing me and slapping me hard in the face… When she was screaming, cursing and slapping me hard on my face, the blindfold came down off my eyes and I saw her face a bit but they rushed to lift it,” al-Qurmozy later said, as cited in the report.

 

Read Full Article Here

 

TEHRAN, Dec. 25 (MNA) – Bahraini Foreign Minister has recently insulted Iranian people with a discourse governing the Al Khalifa regime officials far from diplomatic norms and conventions.Separation of Bahrain in 1971 brings the question to the fore that what international legal bases allowed British colonial power to separate Bahrain from motherland Iran.

According to official map registered by UN headquarters, Bahrain was an integral part of mainland Iran. At that time unfortunately, Iran’s weak and failed monarch distanced from the public and accepted Bahrain’s independence and separation to save his crown, making a large scar on hearts of Iranians forever.

At that time in 1970, British government arranged the scene in order to separate Bahrain, then 14th province of Iran. The colonialist Britain, disturbed by the spread of Shiism in southern coasts of the Persian Gulf, devised the great conspiracy of separation of Bahrain from its motherland, Iran. Then, the British government installed Bedouins and desert-dwellers from Al Khalifa tribe on Bahrain as governors, with the aid from Saudi influence.

A 15-per cent minority, later to form Al Khalifa regime, immigrated Bahrain to change its demographic features, and to bring about gradual decrease in Bahrain’s original settlers.

The original settlers were not allowed to properly give their voices to the referendum held illegally by the British government.

The majority of those participants in the referendum received money from the Britain and came from Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh.

U Thant, then the UN Secretary General, voiced his objection to the British excessive intervention in Bahrain internal affairs, but he was intimidated by UK and US.