MSN

More snow is ahead for residents of northern New England a day after a fast-moving storm dumped about a foot on many communities, but rain and warmer temperatures could present problems in other states.

A worker is reflected in a building facade as he clears snow from the sidewalk in Boston, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014. It was expected to drop 3 to 5 inches of snow on Boston, with 6 to 10 inches forecast for parts of Northern New England, before moving out late Tuesday and early Wednesday. (AP Photo | Michael Dwyer)

A worker is reflected in a building facade as he clears snow from the sidewalk in Boston, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014. It was expected to drop 3 to 5 inches of snow on Boston, with 6 to 10 inches forecast for parts of Northern New England, before moving out late Tuesday and early Wednesday. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — More snow is ahead for residents of northern New England a day after a fast-moving storm brought about a foot to many communities, but rain and warmer temperatures could present new problems for other states.

A rain and snow mixture is possible Wednesday along the northern New England coast, but inland communities could see between 1 and 4 inches of snow, said Eric Schwibs, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

That’s far less than the 12 inches of snow reported Tuesday night in New Boston, N.H., or the nearly 10 inches that fell in Kennebunk, Maine. There were no immediate reports of any major traffic messes caused by the weather.

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Elsewhere in the country, as warmer temperatures bring rain and melt snow, concerns are being raised about the potential for flooding and collapsing roofs.

In Chicago, the weather service says people who live along rivers and in flood prone areas should prepare for possible flooding as the mounds of snow in yards and along streets melt.

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NBC News

Flooding Woes are on Tap for Snow-Buried Midwest

Winter’s woes aren’t just about severe storms and bitter cold — there’s still freezing rain and melting snow to grapple with.

Nasty thunderstorms will target the Ohio Valley on Thursday and could bring an inch-and-a-half of rain and create extreme flooding conditions in parts of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Ohio, according to forecasts. A flood watch has been issued across Illinois.

“The great melt has started,” National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Hirsch told NBC News.

Aside from the rain, warmer temperatures are moving in, which will speed the melt. Chicago, for instance, could hit a high of 50 degrees Thursday, forecasts say. The Windy City endured a 52-day stretch of below-freezing temperatures this winter, keeping the the accumulated snow firmly in place.

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