Inside LSD Full Length Documentary

Uploaded on Oct 19, 2011

Lysergic acid diethylamide, abbreviated LSD or LSD-25, also known as lysergide and colloquially as acid, is a semisynthetic psychedelic drug of the ergoline family, well known for its psychological effects which can include altered thinking processes, closed and open eye visuals, synaesthesia, an altered sense of time and spiritual experiences, as well as for its key role in 1960s counterculture. It is used mainly as an entheogen, recreational drug, and as an agent in psychedelic therapy. LSD is non-addictive, is not known to cause brain damage, and has extremely low toxicity relative to dose, although in rare cases adverse psychiatric reactions such as anxiety or delusions are possible.[3]

LSD was first synthesized by Albert Hofmann in 1938 from ergotamine, a chemical derived by Arthur Stoll from ergot, a grain fungus that typically grows on rye. The short form “LSD” comes from its early code name LSD-25, which is an abbreviation for the German “Lysergsäure-diethylamid” followed by a sequential number.[4][5] LSD is sensitive to oxygen, ultraviolet light, and chlorine, especially in solution, though its potency may last for years if it is stored away from light and moisture at low temperature. In pure form it is a colorless, odorless, and mildly bitter solid.[6] LSD is typically delivered orally, usually on a substrate such as absorbent blotter paper, a sugar cube, or gelatin. In its liquid form, it can also be administered by intramuscular or intravenous injection. LSD is very potent, with 20–30 µg (micrograms) being the threshold dose.[7]

Introduced by Sandoz Laboratories, with trade-name Delysid, as a drug with various psychiatric uses in 1947, LSD quickly became a therapeutic agent that appeared to show great promise.[8] In the 1950s the CIA thought it might be applicable to mind control and chemical warfare; the agency’s MKULTRA research program propagated the drug among young servicemen and students. The subsequent recreational use of the drug by youth culture in the Western world during the 1960s led to a political firestorm that resulted in its prohibition.[9] Currently, a number of organizations—including the Beckley Foundation, MAPS, Heffter Research Institute and the Albert Hofmann Foundation—exist to fund, encourage and coordinate research into the medicinal and spiritual uses of LSD and related psychedelics.[10]

BBC Horizon: Psychedelic Science – (DMT, LSD, Ibogaine)

Uploaded on May 7, 2011

A documentary about the psychedelic drugs: DMT, LSD and the newly rediscovered Ibogaine.

Skyline productions

CIA LSD Experiment – Schizophrenic Model Psychosis Induced by LSD-25 – Art Drawing (1955)

Published on Jul 10, 2012

Artists and scientists have been interested in the effect of LSD on drawing and painting since it first became available for legal use and general consumption. Dr. Oscar Janiger was one of the pioneers in the field studying the relationship between LSD and creativity. What fascinated Janiger was that “paintings, under the influence of LSD, had some of the attributes of what looked like the work done by schizophrenics”. Janiger maintained that trained artists could “maintain a certain balance, riding the edge” of the LSD induced psychosis, “ride his creative Pegasus”. Janiger coined the term ‘”dry schizophrenia,” where a person was able to control the surroundings and yet be “crazy” at the same time’.

Many artists and their surviving relatives have kept LSD artwork from this period. One patient of Dr. Janiger, bipolar and alcoholic artist Frank Murdoch, was given a controlled, experimental dose of LSD for several months as an attempt to cure his late stage alcoholism. Janiger had Murdoch paint still-lives both on and off LSD, including a Kachina doll (that he reportedly had 70 other patients also paint). Murdoch also continued to paint as an artist while on LSD, including most of his underwater paintings.

In the Netherlands, Dr. Stanislav Grof practiced “LSD Psychotherapy” in the 1980s, which included having his patients paint on LSD. Some of his artist patients painted numerous paintings while on LSD.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LSD_art

LSD was first synthesized on November 16, 1938 by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann at the Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, Switzerland as part of a large research program searching for medically useful ergot alkaloid derivatives. LSD’s psychedelic properties were discovered 5 years later when Hofmann himself accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of the chemical. The first intentional ingestion of LSD occurred on April 19, 1943, when Hofmann ingested 250 µg of LSD. He said, this would be a threshold dose based on the dosages of other ergot alkaloids. Hofmann found the effects to be much stronger than he anticipated. Sandoz Laboratories introduced LSD as a psychiatric drug in 1947.

Beginning in the 1950s the US Central Intelligence Agency began a research program code named Project MKULTRA. Experiments included administering LSD to CIA employees, military personnel, doctors, other government agents, prostitutes, mentally ill patients, and members of the general public in order to study their reactions, usually without the subject’s knowledge. The project was revealed in the US congressional Rockefeller Commission report in 1975.

In 1963 the Sandoz patents expired on LSD. Also in 1963, the US Food and Drug Administration classified LSD as an Investigational New Drug, which meant new restrictions on medical and scientific use. Several figures, including Aldous Huxley, Timothy Leary, and Al Hubbard, began to advocate the consumption of LSD. LSD became central to the counterculture of the 1960s. On October 24, 1968, possession of LSD was made illegal in the United States. The last FDA approved study of LSD in patients ended in 1980, while a study in healthy volunteers was made in the late 1980s. Legally approved and regulated psychiatric use of LSD continued in Switzerland until 1993. Today, medical research is resuming around the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysergic_acid_diethylamide

MKULTRA Compendium: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1441499733/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=…

‘CIA – LSD experiment’ sends French village mad.

Uploaded on Mar 11, 2010

* Residents suddenly go psychotic
* Local baker cops the blame
* Turns out CIA may have spiked bread

A US writer has uncovered evidence suggesting the CIA spiked a French village’s food with the hallucinogenic drug LSD

Journalist H P Albarelli Jr came across CIA documents while investigating the suspicious suicide of a biochemist who fell from a 13th floor window two years after a mystery illness that caused an entire French village to go temporarily mad 50 years ago.

Hundreds of residents in picturesque Pont-Saint-Esprit were suddenly struck down with mass insanity and hallucinations on August 16, 1951.

At least five people in the southern French village died and dozens were locked up in asylums after witnessing terrifying hallucinations of dragons and fire.

In the horror scenes an 11-year-old tried to strangle his grandmother. Another man shouted: “I am a plane”, before jumping out of a second-floor window, breaking his legs.

For decades the bizarre “Cursed Bread” incident was blamed on a local baker whose baguettes had been poisoned with either a psychedelic mould or mercury.

But new evidence points the finger at the CIA who are accused of spiking bread with LSD in a mind control experiment.

The incident – which took place at the height of the Cold War – was investigated by a Swiss pharmaceutical company Sandoz. The company has been revealed as the same organisation that secretly supplied the CIA with LSD.

One note transcribes a conversation between a CIA agent and a Sandoz official who mentions the “secret of Pont-Saint-Esprit” and explains that it was not “at all” caused by mould but by diethylamide – the D in LSD.

The French Government has officially denied any involvement in the case. According to US reports, French intelligence chief have demanded the CIA explain itself. The CIA is yet to come forward.

Cat on LSD

Uploaded on Apr 22, 2007

Government experiments on cats using drugs.

For those of you too stupid to figure it out: I did not create this video. Our government did.

To make it even clearer: this cat was long dead by the time I was even born.

Government Mind Control: MKULTRA & LSD | Brainwash Update

Published on Dec 20, 2012

Abby Martin takes a look at the US government’s morbid history of mind-control, MKULTRA, and the testing of deadly chemicals on US citizens.

1960’s Chidlren on LSD

Uploaded on Sep 26, 2006

This is not a joke. This is merely to show that the drug lsd was administered to children, like lab rats. kinda scary.

The Net: The Unabomber, LSD and the Internet [HQ FULL]

Published on Mar 16, 2012

Full version of Lutz Dammbecks 2003 documentary.
Highest quality on YouTube.

The Net explores the complex back-story of Ted Kaczynski, the infamous Unabomber. An inquiry into the rationale of this notable figure situates him within a late 20th Century web of technology – a system that he grew to oppose. Incorporating a subversive approach to the history of the Internet, the documentary combines speculative travelogue and investigative journalism to trace contrasting counter cultural responses to the cybernetic revolution.

For those who resist these intrusive systems of technological control, the Unabomber has come to symbolize an ultimate figure of refusal. For those that embrace it, as did the early champions of media art like Marshall McLuhan, Nam June Paik, and Stewart Brand, the promises of worldwide networking and instantaneous communication outweighed the perils.

Working through themes of utopianism, anarchism, terrorism, and providing insights on the CIA, LSD, Project MK-ULTRA, Timothy Leary, Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, Dammbeck provides a fascinating view of the wider picture of the most famous neo-luddite.

– shortened and altered summary originally from Amazon.com